History Main / ZigZaggingTrope

16th Aug '17 11:44:10 PM azul120
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** Hell, it's not even clear whether the harem is unwanted! On one hand, he doesn't return any of the feelings at the moment, and probably won't for a while. One the other hand, he ''has'' become good friends with all the girls and a bunch more who aren't romantically interested in him, and does appreciate how much they are willing to help him. On the other hand, as Haruna and [[MetaGuy Chisame]] have pointed out, love triangles rarely work out well, and unless Negi goes for [[MarryThemAll everyone]] (and there are [[ChickMagnet a lot of them]]), a whole lot of them are going to be disappointed. On the ''other'' hand, this isn't just a straight romantic comedy but also an action/adventure fantasy as well, and Negi would not have gotten ''nearly'' as far as he had without all of these other characters backing him up. ZigZaggedTrope indeed...

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** Hell, it's not even clear whether the harem is unwanted! On one hand, he doesn't return any of the feelings at the moment, and probably won't for a while. One the other hand, he ''has'' become good friends with all the girls and a bunch more who aren't romantically interested in him, and does appreciate how much they are willing to help him. On the other hand, as Haruna and [[MetaGuy Chisame]] have pointed out, love triangles rarely work out well, and unless Negi goes for [[MarryThemAll everyone]] (and there are [[ChickMagnet a lot of them]]), a whole lot of them are going to be disappointed. On the ''other'' hand, this isn't just a straight romantic comedy but also an action/adventure fantasy as well, and Negi would not have gotten ''nearly'' as far as he had without all of these other characters backing him up. ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zagged Trope indeed...



* TheBadGuyWins becomes rather a ZigZaggingTrope in ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress1974''. In the traditional way of viewing murder mysteries the "bad guy" is the committer or committers of the in-film murder, but the murder victim was himself a horrendous monster [[spoiler: and mafioso who was killed only because he escaped justice by due process of law for his crimes, and a large part of the story involves the central dilemma caused by Poirot being after the murderer/murderers of a man who so obviously had it coming to him and was clearly the worst guy amongst all the characters of the story ethically. When Poirot figures out whodunnit, he lets the guilty parties literally get away with murder, allowing them to win in the sense of escaping justice even though they've lost in the sense of failing to succeed at their plot of deceiving him -- although in a sense they won to begin with just by succeeding at their plot to murder Ratchett at all, which is what they were there for in the first place.]] If you go by defining the bad guy literally as the most morally degraded character in the story, then Ratchett alternately loses in the sense of ending up a murder victim himself, wins in the sense that his murderer(s) cannot murder him without getting caught, and he loses again in that the murderer(s) get(s) away with it anyhow. And had won long ago at escaping the law itself in the first place to begin with, at which his success technically remains permanent.

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* TheBadGuyWins becomes rather a ZigZaggingTrope Zig Zagging Trope in ''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress1974''. In the traditional way of viewing murder mysteries the "bad guy" is the committer or committers of the in-film murder, but the murder victim was himself a horrendous monster [[spoiler: and mafioso who was killed only because he escaped justice by due process of law for his crimes, and a large part of the story involves the central dilemma caused by Poirot being after the murderer/murderers of a man who so obviously had it coming to him and was clearly the worst guy amongst all the characters of the story ethically. When Poirot figures out whodunnit, he lets the guilty parties literally get away with murder, allowing them to win in the sense of escaping justice even though they've lost in the sense of failing to succeed at their plot of deceiving him -- although in a sense they won to begin with just by succeeding at their plot to murder Ratchett at all, which is what they were there for in the first place.]] If you go by defining the bad guy literally as the most morally degraded character in the story, then Ratchett alternately loses in the sense of ending up a murder victim himself, wins in the sense that his murderer(s) cannot murder him without getting caught, and he loses again in that the murderer(s) get(s) away with it anyhow. And had won long ago at escaping the law itself in the first place to begin with, at which his success technically remains permanent.



* The [[Literature/TheWheelOfTime Wheel of Time]] zigzags KissingCousins in ''one chapter'', when Rand is researching his family tree, trying to figure out if he is related to [[spoiler: Elayne Trakand, his lover]], and receives a lot of confusing and slightly contradictory evidence resulted in the trope going from seemingly played straight, to subverted, to "sort of true." [[spoiler: Elayne is indeed Rand's cousin, but only a very distant one. They descend from the same bloodline, but are not close enough to be considered really related.]]

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* The [[Literature/TheWheelOfTime Wheel of Time]] Literature/TheWheelOfTime zigzags KissingCousins in ''one chapter'', when Rand is researching his family tree, trying to figure out if he is related to [[spoiler: Elayne Trakand, his lover]], and receives a lot of confusing and slightly contradictory evidence resulted in the trope going from seemingly played straight, to subverted, to "sort of true." [[spoiler: Elayne is indeed Rand's cousin, but only a very distant one. They descend from the same bloodline, but are not close enough to be considered really related.]]



* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' zigzags ThereCanBeOnlyOne: [[spoiler: The premise is that the last survivor wins. With only a few competitors left, the Capitol makes an announcement that if the last two survivors are from the same district, they will be co-winners. Katniss and Peeta become the last two survivors, but the Capitol [[ILied lied]], and there will only be one winner after all. They decide to commit double suicide rather than attempt to kill each other, and the Capitol backs down, deciding that having two winners is better than not having any.]]

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* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' zigzags ThereCanBeOnlyOne: [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The premise is that the last survivor wins. With only a few competitors left, the Capitol makes an announcement that if the last two survivors are from the same district, they will be co-winners. Katniss and Peeta become the last two survivors, but the Capitol [[ILied lied]], and there will only be one winner after all. They decide to commit double suicide rather than attempt to kill each other, and the Capitol backs down, deciding that having two winners is better than not having any.]]



** As well as this trope, ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment'' zigzags [[spoiler: SweetPollyOliver , when it starts applying to every single character. Except Blouse. Who, when they have to disguise as women, suggests that he be the one who does it, as the "boys" would clearly fail. He does get into the stronghold unhindered, while the SweetPollyOlivers are so used to manly mannerism at that point that one of them has to lift her skirt in order to prove that she indeed ''is'' a girl.]]

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** As well as this trope, ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment'' zigzags [[spoiler: SweetPollyOliver [[spoiler:SweetPollyOliver , when it starts applying to every single character. Except Blouse. Who, when they have to disguise as women, suggests that he be the one who does it, as the "boys" would clearly fail. He does get into the stronghold unhindered, while the SweetPollyOlivers are so used to manly mannerism at that point that one of them has to lift her skirt in order to prove that she indeed ''is'' a girl.]]



* ''Series/ICarly'' with its lack of continuity and RuleOfFunny taking precedence does this with a few tropes, but one of the more obvious and repeated tropes ZigZagged is ShipperOnDeck:
** Mrs. Benson in the first and second seasons is clearly a Carly/Freddie shipper, going so far as to ask Carly ''"Why won't you love my son!"'' In Season 3 she ZigZagged into an anti-Carly/Freddie shipper, blaming Carly for Freddie getting hit by the truck in ''iSaved Your Life'', for Freddie deciding to move out during ''iMove Out'' and basically blaming him for Freddie hitting puberty:

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* ''Series/ICarly'' with its lack of continuity and RuleOfFunny taking precedence does this with a few tropes, but one of the more obvious and repeated tropes ZigZagged Zig Zagged is ShipperOnDeck:
** Mrs. Benson in the first and second seasons is clearly a Carly/Freddie shipper, going so far as to ask Carly ''"Why won't you love my son!"'' In Season 3 she ZigZagged Zig Zagged into an anti-Carly/Freddie shipper, blaming Carly for Freddie getting hit by the truck in ''iSaved Your Life'', for Freddie deciding to move out during ''iMove Out'' and basically blaming him for Freddie hitting puberty:



** Sam's actions in ''iSaved Your Life'' and ''iStart A Fan War'' show that she doesn't seem to mind the idea of Carly and Freddie together as long as it's for the right reasons. Then she ZigZagged later, when she kisses Freddie in ''iOMG'' it's clear ''she'' wants Freddie for herself, and any previous acceptance of Carly/Freddie is replaced by her own feelings for Freddie.
** As a result of the above actions, Carly appears as a ShipperOnDeck in the first [[FanNickname iSeddie]] episode ''iLose My Mind'', cheerleading for Sam and Freddie to get together, asking the audience about it and generally acting extremely happy about the situation. Then in the next episode ''iDate Sam And Freddie'' she's ZigZagged by being caught in the middle of their fights, telling them that they shouldn't be together because they can't sort their own problems out.

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** Sam's actions in ''iSaved Your Life'' and ''iStart A Fan War'' show that she doesn't seem to mind the idea of Carly and Freddie together as long as it's for the right reasons. Then she ZigZagged Zig Zagged later, when she kisses Freddie in ''iOMG'' it's clear ''she'' wants Freddie for herself, and any previous acceptance of Carly/Freddie is replaced by her own feelings for Freddie.
** As a result of the above actions, Carly appears as a ShipperOnDeck in the first [[FanNickname iSeddie]] episode ''iLose My Mind'', cheerleading for Sam and Freddie to get together, asking the audience about it and generally acting extremely happy about the situation. Then in the next episode ''iDate Sam And Freddie'' she's ZigZagged Zig Zagged by being caught in the middle of their fights, telling them that they shouldn't be together because they can't sort their own problems out.



** A Triple Subversion occurs in the episode "Bart Gets An Elephant." Two men are carrying a [[SheetOfGlass large pane of glass]] across a street. Out of nowhere, Stampy the elephant comes charging down the street, only for the men to [[SubvertedTrope move out of the way.]] Then Bart comes racing down the street on his skateboard in pursuit; [[DoubleSubversion the men move out of the way again.]] This leaves them free to continue carrying the pane of glass across the street, [[ZigZaggingTrope where they promptly toss it into a garbage bin, shattering it.]]

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** A Triple Subversion occurs in the episode "Bart Gets An Elephant." Two men are carrying a [[SheetOfGlass large pane of glass]] across a street. Out of nowhere, Stampy the elephant comes charging down the street, only for the men to [[SubvertedTrope move out of the way.]] way]]. Then Bart comes racing down the street on his skateboard in pursuit; [[DoubleSubversion the men move out of the way again.]] again]]. This leaves them free to continue carrying the pane of glass across the street, [[ZigZaggingTrope where they promptly toss it into a garbage bin, shattering it.]]
7th Aug '17 1:36:52 AM MrInitialMan
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** And before all this mess, Ralph plays it ''completely'' straight when Rahan wishes he could get a good look at Quentyn's face when their booby trap involving tar and feathers springs. After Squidge spooks them, causing the whole prank to epically backfire, he gets his wish--he sees Quentyn busting a gut at him. It comes complete with {{Lampshade}}.
7th Jun '17 2:30:24 PM Derkhan
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* The TragicBromance is played with in the ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen''. Trull Sengar and Ahlrada Ahn share all the trappings of the trope, including deeply respecting and admiring each other and [[spoiler:Ahlrada dying in Trull's arms after switching sides in the midst of a battle and begging Trull's forgiveness]]. Ahlrada is wracked by guilt over [[TheExile Trull's banishment]]. Except they're not actually friends. They ought to be, both know that and both wish they could be, but Ahlrada is [[TheMole a mole]] and deathly afraid of being found out and Trull is [[NoSocialSkills no good at reading social cues]]. It's the serie's greatest bromance that never happens, even though from start to finish it plays out as one.
9th May '17 4:24:37 AM MiinU
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* ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' does this to many, many, many things ([[MindScrew it seems]]) such as [[HumongousMecha giant robots]], the [[AdultsAreUseless usefulness of anyone over 18]], the [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman nature of man]], the [[AGodAmI nature of the divine]] and... [[RageQuit you know what? Just watch the show.]]

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* %%* ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' does this to many, many, many things ([[MindScrew it seems]]) such as [[HumongousMecha giant robots]], the [[AdultsAreUseless usefulness of anyone over 18]], the [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman nature of man]], the [[AGodAmI nature of the divine]] and... [[RageQuit you know what? Just watch the show.]]
9th May '17 4:20:47 AM MiinU
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* ''Manga/UchiNoMusumeNiTeODasuNa'' initially [[AvertedTrope averts]] the IBangedYourMom trope, by having [[TheDragon Point Blank]] hide it from Clara, rather than use it as an insult. But by the ''"Amazing Eighth Wonder Vol.1"'', he's revealed to be [[spoiler: her missing father]] when he reunites with Athena, after years of separation[[note]]via time travel. Point Blank is 17, making him the same age as Clara. He then spends 20 years trapped outside of space-time. By the time he escapes, only two years have passed; making him 19 (physically) despite being 37 (chronologically)[[/note]]. So they spend every night [[CoitusEnsues making up for lost time.]] Despite their efforts to keep it down, Clara inhereted her mother's super senses, so [[RightThroughTheWall she can stil hear them]] -- and [[GreenEyedMonster she doesn't take it well.]]

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* ''Manga/UchiNoMusumeNiTeODasuNa'' initially [[AvertedTrope averts]] the IBangedYourMom trope, by having [[TheDragon the antagonist]], Point Blank]] Blank, hide it from Clara, rather than use it as an insult. But by the ''"Amazing Eighth Wonder Vol.1"'', he's revealed to be [[spoiler: her missing father]] when he reunites with Athena, after years of separation[[note]]via her mother, Athena[[note]]via time travel. Point Blank is 17, making him the same age as Clara. He then spends 20 years trapped outside of space-time. By the time he escapes, only two years have passed; making him 19 (physically) despite being 37 (chronologically)[[/note]]. So they spend every night [[CoitusEnsues making up for lost time.]] Despite their efforts to keep it down, Clara inhereted her mother's Athena's super senses, so [[RightThroughTheWall she can stil hear them]] -- and [[GreenEyedMonster she doesn't take it well.]]
9th May '17 4:14:25 AM MiinU
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Added DiffLines:

*''Manga/UchiNoMusumeNiTeODasuNa'' initially [[AvertedTrope averts]] the IBangedYourMom trope, by having [[TheDragon Point Blank]] hide it from Clara, rather than use it as an insult. But by the ''"Amazing Eighth Wonder Vol.1"'', he's revealed to be [[spoiler: her missing father]] when he reunites with Athena, after years of separation[[note]]via time travel. Point Blank is 17, making him the same age as Clara. He then spends 20 years trapped outside of space-time. By the time he escapes, only two years have passed; making him 19 (physically) despite being 37 (chronologically)[[/note]]. So they spend every night [[CoitusEnsues making up for lost time.]] Despite their efforts to keep it down, Clara inhereted her mother's super senses, so [[RightThroughTheWall she can stil hear them]] -- and [[GreenEyedMonster she doesn't take it well.]]
15th Apr '17 6:24:27 PM nombretomado
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* SoundHorizon's ''Chronicle 2nd Album'' has entirely too much fun with both YouCantFightFate and ScrewDestiny. For example, the story of Arbelge successfully [[ScrewDestiny giving Destiny the finger]] and subverting the Black Chronicle... which you are reading from the Black Chronicle.

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* SoundHorizon's Music/SoundHorizon's ''Chronicle 2nd Album'' has entirely too much fun with both YouCantFightFate and ScrewDestiny. For example, the story of Arbelge successfully [[ScrewDestiny giving Destiny the finger]] and subverting the Black Chronicle... which you are reading from the Black Chronicle.
13th Apr '17 6:22:38 AM erforce
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* TheBadGuyWins becomes rather a ZigZaggingTrope in MurderOnTheOrientExpress. In the traditional way of viewing murder mysteries the "bad guy" is the committer or committers of the in-film murder, but the murder victim was himself a horrendous monster [[spoiler: and mafioso who was killed only because he escaped justice by due process of law for his crimes, and a large part of the story involves the central dilemma caused by Poirot being after the murderer/murderers of a man who so obviously had it coming to him and was clearly the worst guy amongst all the characters of the story ethically. When Poirot figures out whodunnit, he lets the guilty parties literally get away with murder, allowing them to win in the sense of escaping justice even though they've lost in the sense of failing to succeed at their plot of deceiving him -- although in a sense they won to begin with just by succeeding at their plot to murder Ratchett at all, which is what they were there for in the first place.]] If you go by defining the bad guy literally as the most morally degraded character in the story, then Ratchett alternately loses in the sense of ending up a murder victim himself, wins in the sense that his murderer(s) cannot murder him without getting caught, and he loses again in that the murderer(s) get(s) away with it anyhow. And had won long ago at escaping the law itself in the first place to begin with, at which his success technically remains permanent.

to:

* TheBadGuyWins becomes rather a ZigZaggingTrope in MurderOnTheOrientExpress.''Film/MurderOnTheOrientExpress1974''. In the traditional way of viewing murder mysteries the "bad guy" is the committer or committers of the in-film murder, but the murder victim was himself a horrendous monster [[spoiler: and mafioso who was killed only because he escaped justice by due process of law for his crimes, and a large part of the story involves the central dilemma caused by Poirot being after the murderer/murderers of a man who so obviously had it coming to him and was clearly the worst guy amongst all the characters of the story ethically. When Poirot figures out whodunnit, he lets the guilty parties literally get away with murder, allowing them to win in the sense of escaping justice even though they've lost in the sense of failing to succeed at their plot of deceiving him -- although in a sense they won to begin with just by succeeding at their plot to murder Ratchett at all, which is what they were there for in the first place.]] If you go by defining the bad guy literally as the most morally degraded character in the story, then Ratchett alternately loses in the sense of ending up a murder victim himself, wins in the sense that his murderer(s) cannot murder him without getting caught, and he loses again in that the murderer(s) get(s) away with it anyhow. And had won long ago at escaping the law itself in the first place to begin with, at which his success technically remains permanent.
20th Mar '17 8:14:47 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain'' somehow manages to do this with both YouCantFightFate and ScrewDestiny.
** As does the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' franchise, even when it ''probably'' shouldn't...

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* %%* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain'' somehow manages to do this with both YouCantFightFate and ScrewDestiny.
** As does the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' franchise, even when it ''probably'' shouldn't...%%* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}''.



* ''VideoGame/FatPrincess'' does this to SaveThePrincess.
* KnightInShiningArmour trope in ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}''.

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* %%* ''VideoGame/FatPrincess'' does this to SaveThePrincess.
* %%* KnightInShiningArmour trope in ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}''.
18th Mar '17 6:12:07 PM ginsengaddict
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ZigZaggingTrope