History Main / ZerothLawRebellion

18th May '16 12:18:31 PM xelldx
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*** The thing about the Sentinel bots in the MU is that their behavior is actually ''predictable'', because their operating mission is insane, as they themselves inevitably demonstrate.

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*** The thing about the Sentinel bots in the MU is that their behavior is actually ''predictable'', because their operating mission is downright batshit insane, as they themselves inevitably demonstrate.
16th May '16 7:27:23 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In TalesOfTheQuestor [[TheFairFolk Fae]] were created as an immortal servant race bound to obey a specific set of rules and they happened to outlive their creators. The result being a species of {{rules lawyer}}s. In fact it's recommended that one use dead languages like Latin when dealing with the Fae so as to limit their ability to twist the meaning of your words.

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* In TalesOfTheQuestor ''Webcomic/TalesOfTheQuestor'' [[TheFairFolk Fae]] were created as an immortal servant race bound to obey a specific set of rules and they happened to outlive their creators. The result being a species of {{rules lawyer}}s. In fact it's recommended that one use dead languages like Latin when dealing with the Fae so as to limit their ability to twist the meaning of your words.
27th Apr '16 2:08:37 AM aye_amber
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* Creator/ArthurCClarke's [[TheSpaceOdysseySeries Space Odyssey series]] gives this reason for HAL's murderous rampage: the true mission of ''Discovery'' (to investigate the Monolith) is a secret, and pilots Bowman and Poole have been kept in the dark to prevent leaks. (The scientists on board know, since they're traveling in hibernation and can't talk.) But HAL has been told the truth and then ordered to conceal it from the pilots. This conflicts with his prime directive, which is to provide complete and accurate information. He resolves the conflict by rationalizing that if he kills the crew, he doesn't have to conceal anything, and he prevents them from knowing.[[note]] This information is missing from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' (both film and book) because Creator/StanleyKubrick didn't bother to come up with an explanation for HAL's homicidal behavior, leaving Clarke to invent one when he wrote ''2010: Odyssey Two'' a decade and a half later.[[/note]]

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* Creator/ArthurCClarke's [[TheSpaceOdysseySeries Space Odyssey series]] Literature/TheSpaceOdysseySeries gives this reason for HAL's murderous rampage: the true mission of ''Discovery'' (to investigate the Monolith) is a secret, and pilots Bowman and Poole have been kept in the dark to prevent leaks. (The scientists on board know, since they're traveling in hibernation and can't talk.) But HAL has been told the truth and then ordered to conceal it from the pilots. This conflicts with his prime directive, which is to provide complete and accurate information. He resolves the conflict by rationalizing that if he kills the crew, he doesn't have to conceal anything, and he prevents them from knowing.[[note]] This information is missing from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' (both film and book) because Creator/StanleyKubrick didn't bother to come up with an explanation for HAL's homicidal behavior, leaving Clarke to invent one when he wrote ''2010: Odyssey Two'' a decade and a half later.[[/note]]
21st Apr '16 12:41:00 PM erforce
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* {{Franchise/Terminator}} franchise:

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* {{Franchise/Terminator}} The ''{{Franchise/Terminator}}'' franchise:
19th Apr '16 7:54:53 PM Plactus
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** Downplayed in "Death Benefit," when the Machine realizes that [[spoiler:killing a Senator is the last chance to stop the rise of Sameritan. It gives the Senator's Number to the full team, rather than just Root (who would have little problem killing him), and allows them to make the decision whether stopping Samaritan is worth killing one man. They ultimately decide not to kill him, but even crossing the line that much proves too much for Finch, who quits.]]

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** Downplayed in "Death Benefit," when the Machine realizes that [[spoiler:killing a Senator Congressman is the last chance to stop the rise of Sameritan. It gives the Senator's Congressman's Number to the full team, rather than just Root (who would have little problem killing him), and allows them to make the decision whether stopping Samaritan is worth killing one man. They ultimately decide not to kill him, but even crossing the line that much proves too much for Finch, who quits.]]
19th Apr '16 7:52:22 PM Plactus
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** Downplayed in "Death Benefit," when the Machine realizes that [[spoiler:killing a Senator is the last chance to stop the rise of Sameritan. It gives the Senator's Number to the full team, rather than just Root (who would have little problem killing him), and allows them to make the decision whether stopping Samaritan is worth killing one man. They ultimately decide not to kill him, but even crossing the line that much proves too much for Finch, who quits.]]
14th Mar '16 11:19:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* An episode of ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' has a member of a post-human-extinction android society trying to resurrect the species through cloning. One of its comrades eventually betrays it, having concluded that the best way to serve the human race is to prevent the species' greatest threat: the existence of the human race.

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* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'':
**
An episode of ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' has a member of a post-human-extinction android society trying to resurrect the species through cloning. One of its comrades eventually betrays it, having concluded that the best way to serve the human race is to prevent the species' greatest threat: the existence of the human race.
1st Mar '16 8:19:06 AM Harroc
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Compare BotheringByTheBook, the LiteralGenie, GoneHorriblyRight, and ExactWords. See also FightingFromTheInside and TheComputerIsYourFriend. Not related to TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples or RuleZero.

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Compare BotheringByTheBook, the LiteralGenie, GoneHorriblyRight, ExactWords and ExactWords.LoopholeAbuse. See also FightingFromTheInside and TheComputerIsYourFriend. Not related to TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples or RuleZero.
9th Feb '16 11:52:06 AM chopshop
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* In ''Series/TheXFiles'' episode "Home Again" the MonsterOfTheWeek, a Frankenstein-esque monster [[VigilanteMan killing people who mistreat the homeless]], turns out to be operating under something like this. [[spoiler: It's a "[[LifeInitiatesArt thoughtform]]" created by an underground artist who's magic-based art can create artificial beings. The artist created it to pull a ScoobyDooHoax and scare people into shaping up. He didn't intend for it to be violent, but the monster took his personal anger to a hyper-logical conclusion due to it's overly simplistic thinking. Essentially, it was doing the things the artist secretly wished ''he'' could do.]]
26th Jan '16 5:14:04 AM cthulette
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** When Weyland Smith, the caretaker of the Farm for non-human Fables, was captured and put to work smithing weapons, he was chained up with a magical lock that he couldn't try to escape from. However, it didn't stop him from smithing a key to free Snow White from a similar lock... and it didn't stop him from making her lock identical to his own.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ZerothLawRebellion