History Main / YuriGenre

22nd Jun '17 1:33:03 AM abscake
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* ''Manga/MyLesbianExperienceWithLoneliness'''s autobiographical protagonist gains insight into her mental illness, resolving much of her issues through discovering her sexual identity.



* The manga ''Manga/{{Claudine}}'', written by Manga/OniisamaE's author Creator/RiyokoIkeda, is often wrongly classified as Yuri. However, this is a mistake. The main character, Claudine de Montesse, is {{Transsexual}}. He is female-bodied but identifies as a man, and searches for female love interests. He is referred as a man such by other characters. His UnluckyChildhoodFriend Rosemarie, for example, describes him as "a true man, given a woman's body". Therefore, it'd be technically incorrect to classify ''this'' particular manga as yuri. Although homosexuality and transsexuality are both LGBTQ issues, they are different and, whilst they ''can'' overlap, it's not always the case.

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* The manga ''Manga/{{Claudine}}'', written by Manga/OniisamaE's author Creator/RiyokoIkeda, is often wrongly classified as Yuri. However, this is a mistake. The main character, Claudine de Montesse, is {{Transsexual}}. He is female-bodied but identifies as a man, and {{Transsexual}} man who searches for female love interests. He is referred as a man such by other characters. His UnluckyChildhoodFriend Rosemarie, for example, describes him as "a true man, given a woman's body". Therefore, it'd be technically incorrect to classify ''this'' particular manga as yuri. Although homosexuality and transsexuality are both LGBTQ issues, they are different and, whilst they ''can'' overlap, it's not always the case.
30th Apr '17 2:08:20 AM Koveras
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Manga/AliceQuartet''
31st Mar '17 5:42:10 PM gwennie-chan
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The most common tropes you find in yuri, especially older yuri, are SempaiKouhai, TomboyAndGirlyGirl, and TeacherStudentRomance. All three of these tropes can be cast in a particular light to make them appear to mirror or emulate heterosexual couples (see Analysis/YuriGenre).

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The most common tropes you find in yuri, especially older yuri, are SempaiKouhai, TomboyAndGirlyGirl, and TeacherStudentRomance. All three of these tropes can be cast in a particular light to make them appear to mirror or emulate heterosexual couples (see Analysis/YuriGenre).
the [[Analysis/YuriGenre Analysis page]]).
31st Mar '17 5:41:22 PM gwennie-chan
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The most common tropes you find in yuri, especially older yuri, are SempaiKoukai, TomboyAndGirlyGirl, and TeacherStudentRomance. All three of these tropes can be cast in a particular light to make them appear to mirror or emulate heterosexual couples (see Analysis/YuriGenre).

to:

The most common tropes you find in yuri, especially older yuri, are SempaiKoukai, SempaiKouhai, TomboyAndGirlyGirl, and TeacherStudentRomance. All three of these tropes can be cast in a particular light to make them appear to mirror or emulate heterosexual couples (see Analysis/YuriGenre).
31st Mar '17 5:39:49 PM gwennie-chan
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Due to Japanese [[{{Homophobia}} cultural predisposition against homosexuality]], a large, disproportionate amount of yuri works, especially older ones, tend to end in [[DownerEnding sadness]], [[BuryYourGays tragedy]], [[HideYourLesbians obscurity]], or [[BaitAndSwitchLesbians audience-attracting sham]]. This is slowly changing and more fictional couples are allowed to have happy, committed, and {{canon}} endings as time goes on.

In yuri, you'll most likely find relationships which play on TomboyAndGirlyGirl or SempaiKouhai dynamics. The first usually emulates a heterosexual couple, while the latter emphasizes the difference in maturity between the girls. TeacherStudentRomance is also found, but less commonly than the other two.

Note that entry is for the genre. Couple-specific examples should only be listed below if they're the focus of the series. For yuri-style couples (and unrequited crushes) in other genres, see TokenYuriGirls. Note also that RomanticTwoGirlFriendship (that is, when the yuri relationship doesn't last and the girls involved end up with boys) is a completely different trope. Also see: SlashFic, EveryoneIsGay, and SchoolgirlLesbians.

The [[DistaffCounterpart Spear Counterpart]] of this genre are {{Yaoi}} (the explicit version of BL) or Shounen-ai/Shonen-ai (the PG-13 version) both targeted towards women, and the BaraGenre, which is targeted towards gay men.

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Due to Japanese [[{{Homophobia}} [[{{UsefulNotes/Homophobia}} cultural predisposition against homosexuality]], a large, disproportionate amount of yuri works, especially older ones, tend to end in [[DownerEnding sadness]], [[BuryYourGays tragedy]], [[HideYourLesbians obscurity]], or [[BaitAndSwitchLesbians audience-attracting sham]]. This is slowly changing and more fictional couples are allowed to have happy, committed, and {{canon}} endings as time goes on.

In When a yuri work was made has a large impact of exactly what tropes it uses. Older yuri of the [[TheEighties 80s]], [[TheNineties 90s]], and early [[TurnOfTheMillennium 2000s]] tend to be more rigid in their adherence to standard tropes. Recent yuri works tend to break the traditional mold much more often as the genre expands and gains more mainstream acceptance.

The most common tropes you find in
yuri, you'll most likely find relationships which play on TomboyAndGirlyGirl especially older yuri, are SempaiKoukai, TomboyAndGirlyGirl, and TeacherStudentRomance. All three of these tropes can be cast in a particular light to make them appear to mirror or SempaiKouhai dynamics. The first usually emulates a emulate heterosexual couple, while the latter emphasizes the difference in maturity between the girls. TeacherStudentRomance is also found, but less commonly than the other two.

Note that
couples (see Analysis/YuriGenre).

This
entry is for the genre.genre specifically. Works should be listed only if they are released as, [[WordOfGod described]] as, and/or feature yuri. Couple-specific examples should only be listed below if they're the focus of the series. For yuri-style sapphic couples (and unrequited crushes) and crushes in other genres, see TokenYuriGirls. Note also that RomanticTwoGirlFriendship (that is, when the yuri relationship doesn't last and the girls involved end up with boys) is a completely different trope. Also see: See also: SlashFic, EveryoneIsGay, and SchoolgirlLesbians.

SchoolgirlLesbians. Compare and contrast RomanticTwoGirlFriendship. The [[DistaffCounterpart Spear Counterpart]] DistaffCounterpart[=s=] of this genre ''Yuri'' are {{Yaoi}} (the explicit version of BL) or Shounen-ai/Shonen-ai (the PG-13 version) both targeted towards women, ''{{Yaoi}}'', ''Shounen-Ai'', and the BaraGenre, {{Bara|Genre}}, which is targeted towards gay men.feature male-male romance and sexuality.
31st Mar '17 5:17:35 PM gwennie-chan
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* "Background" or "Subtext" yuri is a cross-demographic type of yuri that has been gaining a foothold in Japan. These works portray female protagonists (often {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being specifically ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such works are classified as yuri in addition to whatever their primary genre is.

A disproportionate amount of yuri stories have, in the past, [[BuryYourGays ended tragically]] or [[HideYourLesbians inconclusively]], but this is changing as more fictional couples are allowed to have happy, committed, and {{canon}} endings.

to:

* "Background" or "Subtext" "{{Subtext}}" yuri is a cross-demographic type of yuri that has been gaining a foothold in Japan. These works portray female protagonists (often {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being specifically ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such works are classified as yuri in addition to whatever their primary genre is.

A Due to Japanese [[{{Homophobia}} cultural predisposition against homosexuality]], a large, disproportionate amount of yuri stories have, works, especially older ones, tend to end in the past, [[DownerEnding sadness]], [[BuryYourGays ended tragically]] or tragedy]], [[HideYourLesbians inconclusively]], but this obscurity]], or [[BaitAndSwitchLesbians audience-attracting sham]]. This is slowly changing as and more fictional couples are allowed to have happy, committed, and {{canon}} endings.
endings as time goes on.
31st Mar '17 5:04:11 PM gwennie-chan
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* Yuri aimed at men, "{{seinen}} yuri", tends to emphasize sweetness, femininity, girlishness, [[TheIngenue innocence, purity]], and {{Moe}} generally. It usually has a very romanticized view of what it's like to be a teenage girl. This is in contrast to the standard GirlOnGirlIsHot scenarios (lustful women making out with each other for the viewer's delectation, often mixed with heterosexual content in {{fanservice}}-driven shows) which are usually not considered yuri. Men's yuri typically fetishizes femininity and youthfulness and rarely focuses on long-standing relationships or adult characters, much less LGBTQ culture and social issues.

Most recently, a cross-demographic type of yuri known as "background" or "subtext" yuri has been gaining a foothold in Japan. These works portray female protagonists (often {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being specifically ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such works are classified as yuri in addition to whatever their primary genre is.

to:

* Yuri aimed at men, "{{seinen}} yuri", men ("{{seinen}} yuri") tends to emphasize (or [[UpToEleven overemphasize]]) sweetness, femininity, girlishness, [[TheIngenue innocence, [[TropesOfInnocence innocence]], [[IncorruptiblePurePureness purity]], and {{Moe}} {{moe}} generally. It usually has This type often shows a very romanticized or idyllic view of what it's like to be a teenage girl. female adolescence or childhood. This is in contrast to [[GirlOnGirlIsHot fetishized]] and {{fanservice}} portrays of sapphic romance or sexuality. This type of yuri rarely mentioned or includes long-term relationships, LGBTQ culture, or any other realistic aspects of being a sapphic woman.
* Yuri aimed at boys ("{{shonen}} yuri") tends to only exist as a secondary or tertiary genre under
the standard main focus/es (see "background/subtext" yuri below). Often portrayals of sapphic romance is subsumed under sapphic sexuality in these works, often working the fetishized GirlOnGirlIsHot scenarios (lustful women making out with each other for the viewer's delectation, often mixed with heterosexual content trope hard. For this reason, most sapphic interactions in {{fanservice}}-driven shows) which are usually ''shonen''-aimed works tends to not considered yuri. Men's be "yuri". Not to say that it does not exist, but that one should take care before labeling anything sapphic that occurs in a ''shonen'' work as "yuri".
* "Background" or "Subtext"
yuri typically fetishizes femininity and youthfulness and rarely focuses on long-standing relationships or adult characters, much less LGBTQ culture and social issues.

Most recently,
is a cross-demographic type of yuri known as "background" or "subtext" yuri that has been gaining a foothold in Japan. These works portray female protagonists (often {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being specifically ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such works are classified as yuri in addition to whatever their primary genre is.
31st Mar '17 4:46:50 PM gwennie-chan
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* Yuri aimed at adult women, "{{josei}} yuri", is usually less stereotyped and fairly realistic, like most fiction aimed at adults. Yuri for lesbians is the most likely to be realistic, and to deal with LGBTQ culture and social issues, but is a very small portion of all yuri produced. As previously noted, some readers use a separate term for "yuri by/for lesbians" to distinguish it from the more common types.

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* Yuri aimed at adult women, "{{josei}} yuri", women ("{{josei}} yuri") is usually less stereotyped and fairly realistic, like most fiction aimed at adults. Yuri Many works in the demographic are targetted at actual sapphic women, which is why this type is often called "yuri for lesbians lesbians". Generally, this type is the most likely to be realistic, realistic regarding sapphic identity, culture, experience, and to deal with LGBTQ culture and social issues, politics, but is a very small portion of all yuri produced. As produced.[[note]]As previously noted, some readers use a separate term for "yuri by/for lesbians" to distinguish it from the more common types.[[/note]]






31st Mar '17 4:41:50 PM gwennie-chan
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, as well as and the , for a bit more context.
31st Mar '17 4:41:29 PM gwennie-chan
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%% Page image's source is "Sono Hanabira Ni Kuchizuke wo", a work that was cut for violating the site's content policy.

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%% Page image's source is "Sono Hanabira Ni Kuchizuke wo", a work that was cut for violating the site's nsfw content policy.



Yuri, the Japanese word for "lily", refers to a {{genre}} in Japanese media based on [[QueerRomance sapphic romance]] that is, romance between girls that like (but not always only like) girls. Yuri works often focus either on romantic or sexual feelings, but increasingly have both. Western fans will sometimes use the term ''"shoujo-ai"'' to refer to romance-specific, less-explicit works, while using ''"yuri"'' to refer to more sexually explicit work. However, in Japan, ''"shoujo-ai"'' often refers to [[{{Lolicon}} girl-focused pedophilia]], and yuri is also known as "Girls' Love" ([[GratuitousEnglish in English]]), or GL, a term created in common with the more popular [[DisaffCounterpart male version]], "[[YaoiGenre Boys' Love]]" or BL.

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Yuri, the Japanese word for "lily", refers to a {{genre}} in Japanese media JapaneseMedia based on [[QueerRomance sapphic romance]] that is, romance between girls that like (but not always only like) girls. Yuri works often focus either on romantic or sexual feelings, but increasingly have both. Western fans will sometimes use the term ''"shoujo-ai"'' to refer to romance-specific, less-explicit works, while using ''"yuri"'' to refer to more sexually explicit work. However, in Japan, ''"shoujo-ai"'' often refers to [[{{Lolicon}} girl-focused pedophilia]], and yuri is also known as "Girls' Love" ([[GratuitousEnglish in English]]), or GL, a term created in common with the more popular [[DisaffCounterpart [[DistaffCounterpart male version]], "[[YaoiGenre Boys' Love]]" or BL.



See this [[http://okazu.yuricon.com/2008/03/02/okazu-glossary-of-terms/ short glossary of yuri terms]], as well as Matt Thorn's [[http://www.matt-thorn.com/shoujo_manga/jaws/index.php "What Japanese Girls Do With Manga, and Why"]] essay and the Wikipedia's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_(genre) "Yuri Genre"]] page, for a bit more context.

There are a few different types of yuri, depending in part on the target audience:

* Yuri for men, "{{seinen}} yuri", tends to emphasize sweetness, femininity, girlishness, [[TheIngenue innocence, purity]], and {{Moe}} generally. It usually has a very romanticized view of what it's like to be a teenage girl. This is in contrast to the standard GirlOnGirlIsHot scenarios (lustful women making out with each other for the viewer's delectation, often mixed with heterosexual content in {{fanservice}}-driven shows) which are usually not considered yuri. Men's yuri typically fetishizes femininity and youthfulness and rarely focuses on long-standing relationships or adult characters, much less LGBTQ culture and social issues.
* Yuri for girls, "{{shoujo}} yuri", may also be hyperfeminine and "pure" but may feature some degree of gender-bending or cross-dressing, with the {{bifauxnen}} in a more traditionally male role. In either case, it's usually focused on fantasies of female solidarity, idealized femininity and gender transgression, not with lesbian identity, culture or actual life in Japan. [[http://www.japanesestudies.org.uk/articles/2010/Nagaike.html Here's]] an academic essay that discusses the history and looks at some modern stories (warning: one of the images near the end is {{NSFW}}).
* Yuri for adult women, "{{josei}} yuri", is usually less stereotyped and fairly realistic, like most fiction aimed at adults. Yuri for lesbians is the most likely to be realistic, and to deal with LGBTQ culture and social issues, but is a very small portion of all yuri produced. As previously noted, some readers use a separate term for "yuri by/for lesbians" to distinguish it from the more common types.
* "Background yuri" is a new type of yuri gaining a foothold in Japan. These mangas portray female protagonists (usually {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such mangas are classified as yuri in addition to whatever genres they primarily belong to.

to:

See this [[http://okazu.yuricon.com/2008/03/02/okazu-glossary-of-terms/ short glossary of yuri terms]], , as well as Matt Thorn's [[http://www.matt-thorn.com/shoujo_manga/jaws/index.php "What Japanese Girls Do With Manga, and Why"]] essay as and the Wikipedia's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_(genre) "Yuri Genre"]] page, , for a bit more context.

There are In {{UsefulNotes/Japan}}, yuri stories and portrayal depend a few different types of yuri, depending in part lot on the target audience:

audience demographic:

* Yuri aimed at girls ("{{shoujo}} yuri") is commonly hyperfeminine and "pure" but may feature some degree of gender-bending or cross-dressing, with the {{bifauxnen}} in a more traditionally male role. In either case, it's usually focused on fantasies of female solidarity, idealized femininity and gender transgression, not with lesbian identity, culture or actual life in Japan.
* Yuri aimed at adult women, "{{josei}} yuri", is usually less stereotyped and fairly realistic, like most fiction aimed at adults.
Yuri for lesbians is the most likely to be realistic, and to deal with LGBTQ culture and social issues, but is a very small portion of all yuri produced. As previously noted, some readers use a separate term for "yuri by/for lesbians" to distinguish it from the more common types.
* Yuri aimed at
men, "{{seinen}} yuri", tends to emphasize sweetness, femininity, girlishness, [[TheIngenue innocence, purity]], and {{Moe}} generally. It usually has a very romanticized view of what it's like to be a teenage girl. This is in contrast to the standard GirlOnGirlIsHot scenarios (lustful women making out with each other for the viewer's delectation, often mixed with heterosexual content in {{fanservice}}-driven shows) which are usually not considered yuri. Men's yuri typically fetishizes femininity and youthfulness and rarely focuses on long-standing relationships or adult characters, much less LGBTQ culture and social issues.
* Yuri for girls, "{{shoujo}} yuri", may also be hyperfeminine and "pure" but may feature some degree of gender-bending or cross-dressing, with the {{bifauxnen}} in
issues.

Most recently,
a more traditionally male role. In either case, it's usually focused on fantasies of female solidarity, idealized femininity and gender transgression, not with lesbian identity, culture or actual life in Japan. [[http://www.japanesestudies.org.uk/articles/2010/Nagaike.html Here's]] an academic essay that discusses the history and looks at some modern stories (warning: one of the images near the end is {{NSFW}}).
* Yuri for adult women, "{{josei}} yuri", is usually less stereotyped and fairly realistic, like most fiction aimed at adults. Yuri for lesbians is the most likely to be realistic, and to deal with LGBTQ culture and social issues, but is a very small portion of all yuri produced. As previously noted, some readers use a separate term for "yuri by/for lesbians" to distinguish it from the more common types.
* "Background yuri" is a new
cross-demographic type of yuri known as "background" or "subtext" yuri has been gaining a foothold in Japan. These mangas works portray female protagonists (usually (often {{Action Girl}}s) in lasting lesbian relationships, without actually being specifically ''about'' these relationships. Though this element has the same status that a RomanceArc in non-romantic fiction does, such mangas works are classified as yuri in addition to whatever genres they primarily belong to.
their primary genre is.



See also our guide on how to SoYouWantTo/WriteAYuriManga.

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See also our !!Links and Resources
* Our
guide on how to SoYouWantTo/WriteAYuriManga.SoYouWantTo/WriteAYuriManga.
* [[http://okazu.yuricon.com/2008/03/02/okazu-glossary-of-terms/ A short glossary of yuri terms]].
* Matt Thorn's [[http://www.matt-thorn.com/shoujo_manga/jaws/index.php "What Japanese Girls Do With Manga, and Why" essay]].
* [[TheOtherWiki Wikipedia's]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_(genre) "Yuri Genre" page]].
* An academic essay that discusses the history and looks at some modern stories can be found [[http://www.japanesestudies.org.uk/articles/2010/Nagaike.html here]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.YuriGenre