History Main / YouRequireMoreVespeneGas

5th Jan '16 7:41:32 PM RAMChYLD
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** ''Everything'' is a resource if you think about it. Wool, Mineral, Eggs, Milk, Crops, Fruits, Fish, Mushroom... You can use the edible resources to create food which can be used to raise the affection and respect of the townspeople, or to replenish your energy (also a resource- which you replenish by eating said food, or bathing in the hot springs in some games). The non-edible resources you need to build or expand your farm. Or you can sell off your resource for another resource- money- which is also used to build or expand your farm. Harvest Moon is [[IncrediblyLamePun very resource intensive]].
2nd Oct '15 5:02:23 AM SuperFeatherYoshi
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* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'': The ''Tiberium'' series uses Tiberium ([[CaptainObvious duh]]) as a Gold-type resources. ''Generals'' uses good ol' dollars. The ''Red Alert'' series used "ore" as its Gold. Another variant, gems, functioned exactly like ore, only it was worth more money. Both series have Power as, well, Power (though the spiritual predecessor ''Dune II'' is the TropeNamer for that resource). ''Tiberian Twilight'' changes their Gold into a Lumber-type, where they pay for upgrades instead.
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* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'': The ''Tiberium'' ''Tiberian'' series uses Tiberium ([[CaptainObvious duh]]) as a Gold-type resources. ''Generals'' uses good ol' dollars. The ''Red Alert'' series used "ore" as its Gold. Another variant, gems, functioned exactly like ore, only it was worth more money. Both series have Power as, well, Power (though the spiritual predecessor ''Dune II'' is the TropeNamer for that resource). ''Tiberian Twilight'' changes their Gold into a Lumber-type, where they pay for upgrades instead.
9th Jul '15 12:03:03 AM Chabal2
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** ''Warcraft 3'' also has another minor tertiary resource - corpses. The most obvious way to get them is to kill ground units or creatures, but the Undead can also produce them at Graveyards or in Meat Wagons, and carry them around in Meat Wagons. They're primarily used by the Undead for raising Skeletons and Carrion Beetles, healing Ghouls and Abominations, and for the Death Knight's AnimateDead ability. They're also used by the Night Elf Warden's Avatar of Vengeance, the Human Paladin's Resurrection ability (only friendly corpses), and the Tauren Spirit Walker's Ancestral Spirit ability (only Tauren corpses).
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** ''Warcraft 3'' also has another minor tertiary resource - corpses. The most obvious way to get them is to kill ground units or creatures, but the Undead can also produce them at Graveyards or in Meat Wagons, and carry them around in Meat Wagons. They're primarily used by the Undead for raising Skeletons and Carrion Beetles, healing Ghouls and Abominations, and for the Death Knight's AnimateDead ability. They're also used by the Night Elf Warden's Avatar of Vengeance, the Human Paladin's Resurrection ability (only friendly corpses), and the Tauren Spirit Walker's Ancestral Spirit ability (only friendly Tauren corpses).

** ''Warcraft 3'' also has another minor tertiary resource - corpses. The most obvious way to get them is to kill ground units or creatures, * ''VideoGame/StarcraftII'' kept the same formula but changed a few details: Vespene geysers are no longer infinite (depleted geysers gave a quarter of the Undead normal output), Zerg can also produce them at Graveyards or in Meat Wagons, boost their larva production from three to seven via micromanagement, and carry them around in Meat Wagons. They're primarily used by the Undead for raising Skeletons and Carrion Beetles, healing Ghouls and Abominations, and for the Death Knight's AnimateDead ability. They're also used by the Night Elf Warden's Avatar of Vengeance, the Human Paladin's Resurrection ability (only friendly corpses), and the Tauren Spirit Walker's Ancestral Spirit ability (only Tauren corpses).campaign-only automatic Vespene gathering.

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----* ''VideoGame/GemCraft'' has a grand total of one ressource: Mana serves not only to buy towers, traps, walls and gems, it's also used as your health bar by autocasting a banishing spell on monsters who get too close. If a monster gets close and you're out of mana, it's GameOver. * ''{{VideoGame/Pharaoh}}'' has an extremely complicated resource system, as resources are consumed by population (food, finished goods) or industry (raw materials) or traded (all of the above). There are only four instances of getting the YouRequireMoreVespeneGas message though: obelisks and sun temples, which require vast amounts of granite and sandstone, and libraries, which need papyrus, and a city requesting goods and refusing to accept one unit less. ----
1st Jul '15 5:14:55 AM Degraine
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*** Interestingly, this makes ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' and TotalAnnihilation the most realist RTS's in the sense of logistics, as commanders are actually being sent completely alone with small built-in mass generator and energy generator, and has to exploit the local mass and energy of the planet to make do with an army. As opposed to somehow be sent to battle right next door to the capital of TheEmpire without even a stick and cloth to raise tent.
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*** Interestingly, this makes ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' and TotalAnnihilation some of the most realist RTS's [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration plausible]] [=RTSes=] in the sense of logistics, as commanders are actually being sent completely alone through teleportation gates with small built-in but fully self-sufficient mass generator and energy generator, generators built into their command units, and has they have to exploit the local mass and energy of the planet to make do with an army. build their armies. As opposed to somehow be being sent to battle right next door to the capital of TheEmpire without even a stick and cloth to raise a tent.

** To make this worse, recources present on the map are determined [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything through a process of simulated geology]]. While you can pick a starting area with favourable mineral analysis, you can't really predict what you're going to end up short on. And many resources and commodities (particularly food and clothing) can end up rotting or being otherwise contaminated before you get a chance to use them for their intended purpose. This is somewhat (but not entirely) [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything offset by the fact that there are multiple resources that can be used for most jobs]].
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** To make this worse, recources resources present on the map are determined [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything through a process of simulated geology]]. While you can pick a starting area with favourable mineral analysis, you can't really predict what you're going to end up short on. And many resources and commodities (particularly food and clothing) can end up rotting or being otherwise contaminated before you get a chance to use them for their intended purpose. This is somewhat (but not entirely) [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything offset by the fact that there are multiple resources that can be used for most jobs]].

* The multi-player RealTimeStrategy / SimulationGame hybrid ''VideoGame/{{Allegiance}}'' has one resource, Helium-3, which is equivalent to ''"gold."'' Building stations, conducting research, and purchasing certain advanced ships requires He-3, which is harvested by [[AsteroidMiners [=AI=] mining ships]] from special asteroids. Arguably, the game also has a second resource, equivalent to ''"lumber"'' -- the asteroids themselves. Every new base needs to be built on an asteroid, which is consumed in the process. Some advanced bases require specific kinds of asteroid, which will get increasingly hard to find and secure as the battle goes on.
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* The multi-player RealTimeStrategy / SimulationGame hybrid ''VideoGame/{{Allegiance}}'' has one resource, Helium-3, which is equivalent to ''"gold."'' Gold. Building stations, conducting research, and purchasing certain advanced ships requires He-3, which is harvested by [[AsteroidMiners [=AI=] mining ships]] from special asteroids. Arguably, the game also has a second resource, equivalent to ''"lumber"'' Lumber-type resource -- the asteroids themselves. Every new base needs to be built on an asteroid, which is consumed in the process. Some advanced bases require specific kinds of asteroid, which will get increasingly hard to find and secure as the battle goes on.
24th Jun '15 2:11:49 PM TompaDompa
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** ''Galactic Battlegrounds'' doesn't just use the ''Age of Empires'' engine - gameplay-wise, it '''is''' ''Age of Empires''; graphics are different and missions are obviously different as well, but the gameplay is essentially the same, with the only difference being that the StarWars game has more ranged weapons and flying units for obvious reasons. Because of all this, resources in the game work almost exactly as those in ''Age of Empires''.
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** ''Galactic Battlegrounds'' doesn't just use the ''Age of Empires'' engine - gameplay-wise, it '''is''' ''Age of Empires''; graphics are different and missions are obviously different as well, but the gameplay is essentially the same, with the only difference being that the StarWars Franchise/StarWars game has more ranged weapons and flying units for obvious reasons. Because of all this, resources in the game work almost exactly as those in ''Age of Empires''.
1st Jun '15 5:11:21 PM chicagomel
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* In ''War Dragons'', you need Food every time one of your dragons is ready to be trained to another level. Expanding territory also requires Food as an offering to the dragons to convince them to expand their territory. This means you have to keep upgrading your Sheep Farms and collaborating with your team to keep enough. Lumber is required for upgrading buildings and comes from your Lumber Mills. The trouble is keeping enough on hand to build and train without becoming a sitting target for other players and teams to raid, as your storage only protects so much.
11th May '15 12:37:02 PM SeptimusHeap
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** ''TotalAnnihilationKingdoms'' was criticised for having only one resource (mana) and thus doing away with the interesting energy/metal tradeoff system from the original TA. ** It is worth noting, that all of those games avoid MostAnnoyingSound. Lack of resources will cause heavy stalling and possibly disable attacks, but new units can still be queued, building blueprints can be placed and so on. In both ''TotalAnnihilation'' and ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' energy can be transformed into metal/mass in case all metal spots are occupied and it's still not enough. Unfortunately "metal (mass) makers" are costly on energy and they don't turn themselves off when energy is low, thus turning off defenses/rest of economy. In Total Annihilation's Open Source remake - ''{{Spring}}'' - the "metal maker" economy (energy -> metal exchange) has been balanced to prevent its domination over standard economy later in game. How it is done differs - most mods make metal makers fragile, volatile and inefficient. One of the mods removes them altogether and instead allows standard metal extractors to "overclock" themselves with spare energy. Unlike in Total Annihilation, in Spring metal makers are handled by AI, which means they don't need to be manually turned off in case of power shortage (fusion power plant got blasted for example). * ''WorldInConflict'' just uses Requisition. It also doesn't have a resource gathering component; you have a certain points limit, and the cost of units is refunded slowly to it after they've been destroyed.
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** ''TotalAnnihilationKingdoms'' ''VideoGame/TotalAnnihilationKingdoms'' was criticised for having only one resource (mana) and thus doing away with the interesting energy/metal tradeoff system from the original TA. ** It is worth noting, that all of those games avoid MostAnnoyingSound. Lack of resources will cause heavy stalling and possibly disable attacks, but new units can still be queued, building blueprints can be placed and so on. In both ''TotalAnnihilation'' ''VideoGame/TotalAnnihilation'' and ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander'' energy can be transformed into metal/mass in case all metal spots are occupied and it's still not enough. Unfortunately "metal (mass) makers" are costly on energy and they don't turn themselves off when energy is low, thus turning off defenses/rest of economy. In Total Annihilation's Open Source remake - ''{{Spring}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Spring}}'' - the "metal maker" economy (energy -> metal exchange) has been balanced to prevent its domination over standard economy later in game. How it is done differs - most mods make metal makers fragile, volatile and inefficient. One of the mods removes them altogether and instead allows standard metal extractors to "overclock" themselves with spare energy. Unlike in Total Annihilation, in Spring metal makers are handled by AI, which means they don't need to be manually turned off in case of power shortage (fusion power plant got blasted for example). * ''WorldInConflict'' ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'' just uses Requisition. It also doesn't have a resource gathering component; you have a certain points limit, and the cost of units is refunded slowly to it after they've been destroyed.
5th May '15 8:41:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ''ParaWorld'' has food, wood, and stone, but also a unique fourth resource called skulls. Skulls are used in some upgrades and in the promotion of units to higher levels, and are gained by killing other units.
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* ''ParaWorld'' ''VideoGame/ParaWorld'' has food, wood, and stone, but also a unique fourth resource called skulls. Skulls are used in some upgrades and in the promotion of units to higher levels, and are gained by killing other units.
14th Apr '15 10:25:59 AM nombretomado
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}: DawnOfWar'' 1 & 2 have requisition, a Gold-type resource which is generated by command centers, and further gained by capturing strategic locations, and power, which is gained by building power plants. Unlike most examples, power works mostly like a Lumber-type resource (it's used to pay for stuff, along with requisition. More power plants increase power input, but there is no power output other than the cost of units and upgrades). Strategic Points gave a steady stream of Requisition, which could be enhanced by Tech Tree upgrades and by building and upgrading listening posts on the point itself. Over time however, a Point would decay, and give much less Requisition. A decayed point captured by the enemy would return to it's original levels.
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}: DawnOfWar'' VideoGame/DawnOfWar'' 1 & 2 have requisition, a Gold-type resource which is generated by command centers, and further gained by capturing strategic locations, and power, which is gained by building power plants. Unlike most examples, power works mostly like a Lumber-type resource (it's used to pay for stuff, along with requisition. More power plants increase power input, but there is no power output other than the cost of units and upgrades). Strategic Points gave a steady stream of Requisition, which could be enhanced by Tech Tree upgrades and by building and upgrading listening posts on the point itself. Over time however, a Point would decay, and give much less Requisition. A decayed point captured by the enemy would return to it's original levels.

** In ''DawnOfWar 2'', power is a Lumber-Type resource. Some lower tier units only require requisition.
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** In ''DawnOfWar ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'', power is a Lumber-Type resource. Some lower tier units only require requisition.
13th Feb '15 3:49:01 AM jormis29
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* The ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' series just has a standard currency, e.g. florins in ''Medieval''. This is used to purchase all units and buildings in the game. There's also a number of ways to acquire more money, such as through merchant trade (including "acquiring" other merchants' business), generation of money by farming, mining, and trade, sacking enemy towns, or ransoming captured enemy troops. There's no population limit, but you are limited with how many troops you can order per settlement per turn, and certain settlements only have a certain number of troops of each type that can be ordered, and must replenish from the local "pool" of troops available - representative of the fact that if you recruited a few hundred knights from a particular region, you'll have to wait for either more nobles to come of age to join the military or for more peasants or middle-class citizens to be levied/recruited for combat. ** Interestingly, the very first game in the series, ''Shogun: Total War'', has "koku" as a standard currency. In RealLife, koku was never a currency but a unit of measure, sometimes defined as the amount of rice to feed a single person for a year (about 330 pounds). While wealth of a region was often measured in "koku", it normally didn't equate to gold.
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* The ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' series just has a standard currency, e.g. florins in ''Medieval''.''[[VideoGame/MedievalTotalWar Medieval]]''. This is used to purchase all units and buildings in the game. There's also a number of ways to acquire more money, such as through merchant trade (including "acquiring" other merchants' business), generation of money by farming, mining, and trade, sacking enemy towns, or ransoming captured enemy troops. There's no population limit, but you are limited with how many troops you can order per settlement per turn, and certain settlements only have a certain number of troops of each type that can be ordered, and must replenish from the local "pool" of troops available - representative of the fact that if you recruited a few hundred knights from a particular region, you'll have to wait for either more nobles to come of age to join the military or for more peasants or middle-class citizens to be levied/recruited for combat. ** Interestingly, the very first game in the series, ''Shogun: Total War'', ''VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar'', has "koku" as a standard currency. In RealLife, koku was never a currency but a unit of measure, sometimes defined as the amount of rice to feed a single person for a year (about 330 pounds). While wealth of a region was often measured in "koku", it normally didn't equate to gold.
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