History Main / YouMeanXmas

22nd Apr '17 2:44:23 PM Generality
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** The name is a combination of New Year's Eve being "Hogmanay" in Scotland and "Watch Night" in traditionalist Christian communities (and possibly also "hogwash"); it is also on the Discworld (at least around the Circle Sea) the culmination of the pig-slaughtering season.
** It has other equivalents, too; for instance, the Soul Cake Days are a mix of Halloween ("trickle-treating" is mentioned by a small girl in ''Reaper Man'') and Easter (there's a "Soul Cake Duck" who lays chocolate eggs).

to:

** The name is a combination of New Year's Eve being "Hogmanay" in Scotland and "Watch Night" in traditionalist Christian communities (and possibly also a pun on "hogwash"); it is also on the Discworld (at least around the Circle Sea) the culmination of the pig-slaughtering season.
** It has other equivalents, too; for instance, the Soul Cake Days are a mix of Halloween ("trickle-treating" is mentioned by a small girl in ''Reaper Man'') Man'', and "soul cakes" used to be given on All Souls Day in real life) and Easter (there's a "Soul Cake Duck" who lays chocolate eggs).
20th Apr '17 11:53:09 AM Karxrida
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--> '''Callie:''' [...]Don't you want to go visit Father Squidmas? I'm voting for the North Pole!
-->'''Marie:''' You know Father Squidmas is just Gramps, right?
-->'''Callie:''' Hmph, you can believe what you want. It's your fault if you get a lump of coral for Squidmas!

to:

--> '''Callie:''' -->'''Callie:''' [...]Don't you want to go visit Father Squidmas? I'm voting for the North Pole!
-->'''Marie:'''
Pole!\\
'''Marie:'''
You know Father Squidmas is just Gramps, right?
-->'''Callie:'''
right?\\
'''Callie:'''
Hmph, you can believe what you want. It's your fault if you get a lump of coral for Squidmas!


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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'': The Spring Festival is an Easter counterpart, featuring painted eggs and characters dressed up like bunnies.
8th Apr '17 4:33:05 PM nombretomado
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* RhettAndLink, who are Christians, played around with this trope on a collection of fake outtakes from a fake commercial. Rhett also mentioned in one podcast that he celebrates the Harvest Season as opposed to Halloween.

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* RhettAndLink, WebVideo/RhettAndLink, who are Christians, played around with this trope on a collection of fake outtakes from a fake commercial. Rhett also mentioned in one podcast that he celebrates the Harvest Season as opposed to Halloween.
28th Mar '17 8:52:51 AM BeerBaron
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* In ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' game series, the Saturnalia festival is a holiday that happens right on the 25th of December, and is even explicitly described as a 'time of gift giving'.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Bloodmoon]]'' even includes a Santa Claus figure named Uncle Sweetshare, though he has no connections to Saturnalia. The game's files include an unused version of Sweetshare named Grandfather Frost, who was even more Santa-like. Supposedly he was replaced for being ''too much'' like Santa.
** Only instead of presents, he gives you drugs.
** Bonus points for this holiday being named the same as the Roman festival that took place at the time Christmas is currently celebrated. Supposedly, many of the traditions currently observed over Christmas originated from this feast.

to:

* In ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' game series, ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
** Tamriel has
the Saturnalia "New Life" festival is a holiday that happens right on the 25th of December, Evening Star (December), and is even explicitly described as a 'time of gift giving'.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Bloodmoon]]'' even includes Morrowind]]'''s ''Bloodmoon'' expansion has a side quest with a Santa Claus Claus-type figure named Uncle Sweetshare, though Sweetshare. (Only instead of presents, he has no connections to Saturnalia. gives you drugs.) The game's files include an unused version of Sweetshare named Grandfather Frost, who was even more Santa-like. Supposedly (Supposedly he was replaced for being ''too much'' like Santa.
** Only instead of presents, he gives you drugs.
** Bonus points for this holiday being named the same as the Roman festival that took place at the time Christmas is currently celebrated. Supposedly, many of the traditions currently observed over Christmas originated from this feast.
Santa.)
10th Mar '17 3:37:02 PM portaljumper339
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* Related to the above, most of the southern United States sees Christmas the same way that the Southern Hemisphere does due to it not getting cold enough to snow down there except in particularly high-altitude areas or during a freak cold-snap that coincides with both an incoming low-pressure system ''and'' the holiday itself. This has led to certain sights such as Florida flamingo lawn ornaments decorated with Santa hats and lights, snowmen made from sand on the beach and decorated with seashells, and the ever-present Surfer Santa or Santa in beach attire chilling on a lounge chair with a delightful beverage.
6th Mar '17 1:22:05 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' is rather infamous for its "Life Day."
* In the ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' episode "The Strike" George Costanza, in a miserly effort to avoid giving Christmas gifts at the office, celebrates Festivus. A holiday previously created by George's father, Festivus was a response to the over-commercialization of Christmas.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' sometimes gives suspiciously similar holidays to alien cultures to make up for the general lack of human holidays.
** ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' had an episode involving the suspiciously Christmas-like Talaxian holiday of Prixin.
** And there was a Bajoran "Gratitude Festival" in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' -- they stopped short of eating turkey, although there is a reference in one episode to a UsefulNotes/ThanksgivingDay dinner Sisko served, which did include turkey and stuffing.
* ''Series/TheOC'' featured resident DeadpanSnarker Seth Cohen inventing "Chrismukkah" to cope with having a Jewish father and a Christian mother.
* The second season of ''Series/LazyTown'' had a winter episode with no holiday at all, but featured a relyricked version of a song from the Icelandic forerunner's Christmas album as the episode's song.
* ''Main/XenaWarriorPrincess'' has "A Solstice Carol". This episode features orphans about to be evicted on Solstice eve, a solstice tree, a toy maker named Senticles who disguises himself with a red suit and a white beard and falls down a chimney, a king who hates the Solstice and has banned it, Xena and Gabrielle sneaking into his bedchamber to pretend to be the Fates and ghosts of past, present, future and convincing him to mend his evil ways. To top it all off, Gabrielle gives her donkey to a married couple with a child who look suspiciously like a few religious figures that will remain nameless, while a bright star hangs in the sky above. Seriously. Of course, fans of the show will tell you that this trope was just made for this show.
** Funnily enough, if you take out "Senticles" and the ''Christmas Carol'' shout-outs, it's actually a pretty damned good representation of Solstice festivals of the time... in NORTHERN Europe, anyway, if not Greece.
* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' features a thinly veiled Nativity story in the episode "A Star to Guide Them". Aeolus and two others have visions of a star guiding them to some sort of "important event", they have gold and frankincense and myrrh as presents, Herc ''explicitly'' calls him a "wise man," and at the end you see the three entering a manger with a bunch of animals sitting around and some very familiar looking folks. About the only thing they didn't do was have the happy couple introduce themselves as Mary and Joseph before fading out.
* In ''Series/{{Quark}}'', Christmas has become "Holiday Number 11." The last episode focused on ObstructiveBureaucrat Palindrome giving TheCaptain Quark a murderous computer as a Number 11 gift.
* ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'' has a ChristmasEpisode where the characters fuss over Christmas Eve dinner, and the Matthews family has a large, beautiful Christmas tree. However, no one ever actually says the word "Christmas".
* ''{{Series/Dinosaurs}}'' has its own uncannily parallel holiday from 60 million years in the past: Refrigerator Day.

to:

* ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' is rather infamous for its "Life Day."
* In the ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' episode "The Strike" George Costanza, in a miserly effort to avoid giving Christmas gifts at the office, celebrates Festivus. A holiday previously created by George's father, Festivus was a response to the over-commercialization of Christmas.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' sometimes gives suspiciously similar holidays to alien cultures to make up for the general lack of human holidays.
** ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' had an episode involving the suspiciously Christmas-like Talaxian holiday of Prixin.
** And there was a Bajoran "Gratitude Festival" in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' -- they stopped short of eating turkey, although there is a reference in one episode to a UsefulNotes/ThanksgivingDay dinner Sisko served, which did include turkey and stuffing.
* ''Series/TheOC'' featured resident DeadpanSnarker Seth Cohen inventing "Chrismukkah" to cope with having a Jewish father and a Christian mother.
* The second season of ''Series/LazyTown'' had a winter episode with no holiday at all, but featured a relyricked version of a song from the Icelandic forerunner's Christmas album as the episode's song.
* ''Main/XenaWarriorPrincess'' has "A Solstice Carol". This episode features orphans about to be evicted on Solstice eve, a solstice tree, a toy maker named Senticles who disguises himself with a red suit and a white beard and falls down a chimney, a king who hates the Solstice and has banned it, Xena and Gabrielle sneaking into his bedchamber to pretend to be the Fates and ghosts of past, present, future and convincing him to mend his evil ways. To top it all off, Gabrielle gives her donkey to a married couple with a child who look suspiciously like a few religious figures that will remain nameless, while a bright star hangs in the sky above. Seriously. Of course, fans of the show will tell you that
''Series/AdventuresInWonderland'' plays this trope was just made for this show.
** Funnily enough, if you take out "Senticles" and the ''Christmas Carol'' shout-outs, it's actually a pretty damned good representation of Solstice festivals of the time... in NORTHERN Europe, anyway, if not Greece.
* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' features a thinly veiled Nativity story in the episode "A Star to Guide Them". Aeolus and two others have visions of a star guiding them to some sort of "important event", they have gold and frankincense and myrrh as presents, Herc ''explicitly'' calls him a "wise man," and at the end you see the three entering a manger
straight with a bunch of animals sitting around the Thanksgiving-esque "Thanks-A-Lot Day," but averts it with Christmas, Halloween and some very familiar looking folks. About the only thing they didn't do was have the happy couple introduce themselves as Mary and Joseph before fading out.
* In ''Series/{{Quark}}'', Christmas has become "Holiday Number 11." The last episode focused on ObstructiveBureaucrat Palindrome giving TheCaptain Quark a murderous computer as a Number 11 gift.
* ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'' has a ChristmasEpisode where the characters fuss over Christmas Eve dinner, and the Matthews family has a large, beautiful Christmas tree. However, no one ever actually says the word "Christmas".
* ''{{Series/Dinosaurs}}'' has its own uncannily parallel holiday from 60 million years
Valentine's Day, which are all celebrated in the past: Refrigerator Day.Wonderland, albeit in unusual ways.



* ''TheBigComfyCouch'' has an episode called "Comfy and Joy" wherein the whole cast gets together, exchanges wishes and gifts, and stays up until sunrise, on what is repeatedly referred to as The Longest Night of the year.



* A sketch on ''Series/TheKidsInTheHall'' featured a society in the future that had OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions and instead had a holiday called Bellini Day, celebrating [[RunningGag recurring character]] Bellini, who always wore only a bath-towel and never hurried or wore a watch.
* ''Series/TimAndEricAwesomeShowGreatJob'' held a "Chrimbus Special." Apparently the Winterman (an old bald guy wearing naught but a vest) will leave presents in your Chrimbus bush, but only if you've eaten a pound of hair during the year. More subtly, the holiday was consistently referred to as "the season of getting/receiving."
* The concept was parodied in ''Series/MaidMarianAndHerMerryMen'' where the Sheriff of Nottingham and his henchmen, Gary and Grayhame, invent a public holiday called "Bloopy" in order to get out of trouble with King John, and every single cynical thing ever said about Christmas applies to Bloopy as well.



* ''TheBigComfyCouch'' has an episode called "Comfy and Joy" wherein the whole cast gets together, exchanges wishes and gifts, and stays up until sunrise, on what is repeatedly referred to as The Longest Night of the year.
* ''Series/AdventuresInWonderland'' plays this trope straight with the Thanksgiving-esque "Thanks-A-Lot Day," but averts it with Christmas, Halloween and Valentine's Day, which are all celebrated in Wonderland, albeit in unusual ways.

to:

* ''TheBigComfyCouch'' ''{{Series/Dinosaurs}}'' has its own uncannily parallel holiday from 60 million years in the past: Refrigerator Day.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': As shown in the page quote, this is {{discussed|Trope}} in [[Recap/DoctorWho2010CSAChristmasCarol "A Christmas Carol"]], where [[TheScrooge Kazran Sardick]] mentions in narration that the first settlers of his planet called Christmas "The Crystal Feast". It's averted in the rest of the episode, however, as Christmas is actually called "Christmas".
* ''Series/GirlMeetsWorld'' has a ChristmasEpisode where the characters fuss over Christmas Eve dinner, and the Matthews family has a large, beautiful Christmas tree. However, no one ever actually says the word "Christmas".
* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' features a thinly veiled Nativity story in the episode "A Star to Guide Them". Aeolus and two others have visions of a star guiding them to some sort of "important event", they have gold and frankincense and myrrh as presents, Herc ''explicitly'' calls him a "wise man," and at the end you see the three entering a manger with a bunch of animals sitting around and some very familiar looking folks. About the only thing they didn't do was have the happy couple introduce themselves as Mary and Joseph before fading out.
* A sketch on ''Series/TheKidsInTheHall'' featured a society in the future that had OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions and instead had a holiday called Bellini Day, celebrating [[RunningGag recurring character]] Bellini, who always wore only a bath-towel and never hurried or wore a watch.
* The second season of ''Series/LazyTown'' had a winter episode with no holiday at all, but featured a relyricked version of a song from the Icelandic forerunner's Christmas album as the episode's song.
* The concept was parodied in ''Series/MaidMarianAndHerMerryMen'' where the Sheriff of Nottingham and his henchmen, Gary and Grayhame, invent a public holiday called "Bloopy" in order to get out of trouble with King John, and every single cynical thing ever said about Christmas applies to Bloopy as well.
* ''Series/TheOC'' featured resident DeadpanSnarker Seth Cohen inventing "Chrismukkah" to cope with having a Jewish father and a Christian mother.
* In ''Series/{{Quark}}'', Christmas has become "Holiday Number 11." The last episode focused on ObstructiveBureaucrat Palindrome giving TheCaptain Quark a murderous computer as a Number 11 gift.
* In the ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' episode "The Strike" George Costanza, in a miserly effort to avoid giving Christmas gifts at the office, celebrates Festivus. A holiday previously created by George's father, Festivus was a response to the over-commercialization of Christmas.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' sometimes gives suspiciously similar holidays to alien cultures to make up for the general lack of human holidays.
** ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' had
an episode called "Comfy involving the suspiciously Christmas-like Talaxian holiday of Prixin.
** And there was a Bajoran "Gratitude Festival" in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' -- they stopped short of eating turkey, although there is a reference in one episode to a UsefulNotes/ThanksgivingDay dinner Sisko served, which did include turkey
and Joy" wherein stuffing.
* ''Film/TheStarWarsHolidaySpecial'' is rather infamous for its "Life Day."
* ''Series/TimAndEricAwesomeShowGreatJob'' held a "Chrimbus Special." Apparently
the whole cast gets together, exchanges wishes and gifts, and stays up until sunrise, on what is repeatedly Winterman (an old bald guy wearing naught but a vest) will leave presents in your Chrimbus bush, but only if you've eaten a pound of hair during the year. More subtly, the holiday was consistently referred to as The Longest Night "the season of getting/receiving."
* ''Main/XenaWarriorPrincess'' has "A Solstice Carol". This episode features orphans about to be evicted on Solstice eve, a solstice tree, a toy maker named Senticles who disguises himself with a red suit and a white beard and falls down a chimney, a king who hates the Solstice and has banned it, Xena and Gabrielle sneaking into his bedchamber to pretend to be the Fates and ghosts of past, present, future and convincing him to mend his evil ways. To top it all off, Gabrielle gives her donkey to a married couple with a child who look suspiciously like a few religious figures that will remain nameless, while a bright star hangs in the sky above. Seriously. Of course, fans
of the year.
* ''Series/AdventuresInWonderland'' plays
show will tell you that this trope straight with was just made for this show.
** Funnily enough, if you take out "Senticles" and
the Thanksgiving-esque "Thanks-A-Lot Day," but averts it with Christmas, Halloween and Valentine's Day, which are all celebrated ''Christmas Carol'' shout-outs, it's actually a pretty damned good representation of Solstice festivals of the time... in Wonderland, albeit in unusual ways.NORTHERN Europe, anyway, if not Greece.
24th Feb '17 3:56:45 PM JMQwilleran
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* ''WesternAnimation/CreativeGalaxy'' has the story "Heart Day," which is promoted as a Valentine's Day special, but the holiday is called "Heart Day" within the story, as indicated by the title. Eye-rolling may commence because even though the characters are all aliens, the show also has a ChristmasEpisode, with Christmas actually called "Christmas."
8th Feb '17 5:28:23 AM DaibhidC
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* Another example is Erastide, winter solstice festival and the most important holiday in ''Literature/TheBelgariad''. It includes a [[strike:Christmas pageant]] Erastide play, with masked family members reenacting the roles of the Seven Gods.

to:

* Another example is Erastide, winter solstice festival and the most important holiday in ''Literature/TheBelgariad''. It includes a [[strike:Christmas pageant]] Erastide play, with masked family members reenacting the roles of the Seven Gods. According to ''Belgarath the Sorcerer'' it's mainly celebrated in Senderia - since they don't have a single patron god like the other kingdoms - and while it's supposed to be the day the Seven Gods created the world, it's actually an arbitrary date.
22nd Jan '17 11:16:40 PM OldBlindTrope
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** Christmas was always a very religious holiday in Russia, and New Year's was popular as a chance to celebrate Christmas again without all the candles and dourness. The Soviet Union was militantly anti-religious until Stalin got religion in 1942 (because the Russians just wouldn't fight without at least token acknowledgement of the Faith), and even after that it was hard for the religious to rise very far in the Soviet state. The USSR moved the Christmas festivities over to New Year's, complete with [[TheMoralSubstitute a secular Santa Claus]]. Even today, with Putin trying to help the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church]] rebuild popular belief, New Year's is the winter festival season and Christmas is far from universal.

to:

** Christmas was always a very religious holiday in Russia, and New Year's was popular as a chance to celebrate Christmas again without all the candles and dourness. The Soviet Union was militantly anti-religious until Stalin got religion in 1942 (because the Russians just wouldn't fight without at least token acknowledgement of the Faith), 1942, and even after that it was hard for the religious to rise very far in the Soviet state. The USSR moved the Christmas festivities over to New Year's, complete with [[TheMoralSubstitute a secular Santa Claus]]. Even today, with Putin trying to help the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church]] rebuild popular belief, New Year's is the winter festival season and Christmas is far from universal.
22nd Jan '17 11:15:45 PM OldBlindTrope
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* In Russia, Christmas is only a religious holiday, rarely specially celebrated. But there is an equivalent to Western Christmas, the New Year. It's the New Year that is celebrated with decorated trees, presents and fireworks.
** It mostly has to do with the fact that Christmas, a religious holiday, was banned in the militantly atheist days of early Soviet Russia. Soon, however, the social, strictly secular aspects of celebration were reallowed, but, the religious holiday still being heavily discouraged, they kind of latched on the ClosestThingWeGot the New Year, which even before was largely seen as a chance to celebrate the Christmas second time without all that religious dourness.
** It should be also noted that the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church]] still follows the [[AlternativeCalendar Julian Calendar]] which means that [[UsefulNotes/RussianHolidays the Christmas Day]] actually falls on January 7 of the Gregorian Calendar.
** It is a similar case in Turkey which is Muslim, but has a Westernised culture. Christmas is not observed but all the usual Christmas paraphenelia (gifts, Santa, trees) are linked to New Year celebrations.
* In the USA, Hanukkah has become the ersatz Christmas for Jews. It's not a particularly holy or important day[[note]] it is basically a celebration of military victory, the religious equivalent of V-J Day[[/note]], but because it happens to fall around Christmas, it receives extra attention from many Jewish families who are feeling left out of the holiday season. Some families have even added trees to the celebration, calling them "Hanukkah Bushes," but this is itself a DeadHorseTrope among Jews. Christmas Day spent seeing a movie and eating Chinese food is [[PekingDuckChristmas its own trope]].
* ChristmasInJapan is actually very popular, even though most Japanese aren't Christians. However, Japanese Christmas isn't anything close to Western Christmas. It's more like Valentine's Day with elves, Santa Claus hats and [[ChristmasCake cake]]. New Year's has closer emotional associations, being a very family-and-home oriented holiday, and most TV channels will ring in the new year with beautiful solemn images of shrines tolling bells in remote, snow-covered locations.

to:

* In Russia, New Year's instead of Christmas is only a religious holiday, rarely specially celebrated. But there is an equivalent to Western Christmas, the New Year. It's the New Year that is celebrated with decorated trees, presents and fireworks.
in Russia.
** It mostly has to do with the fact that Christmas, a religious holiday, Christmas was banned in the militantly atheist days of early Soviet Russia. Soon, however, the social, strictly secular aspects of celebration were reallowed, but, the always a very religious holiday still being heavily discouraged, they kind of latched on the ClosestThingWeGot the in Russia, and New Year, which even before Year's was largely seen popular as a chance to celebrate Christmas again without all the candles and dourness. The Soviet Union was militantly anti-religious until Stalin got religion in 1942 (because the Russians just wouldn't fight without at least token acknowledgement of the Faith), and even after that it was hard for the religious to rise very far in the Soviet state. The USSR moved the Christmas second time without all that religious dourness.
festivities over to New Year's, complete with [[TheMoralSubstitute a secular Santa Claus]]. Even today, with Putin trying to help the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church]] rebuild popular belief, New Year's is the winter festival season and Christmas is far from universal.
** It should be New Year's is also noted that earlier than Christmas. The USSR switched to the Gregorian calendar in the 1920s, but the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Russian Orthodox Church]] still follows the [[AlternativeCalendar Julian Calendar]] which means that Calendar]], so [[UsefulNotes/RussianHolidays the Christmas Day]] actually falls on January 7 of the Gregorian Calendar.
** It is
January 7th.
* Turkey,
a similar case in Turkey which is Muslim, but has highly Westernized Muslim country, also celebrates a Westernised culture. Christmas is not observed but all the usual Christmas paraphenelia (gifts, Santa, trees) are linked to Christmas-like New Year celebrations.
Year's -- with gifts, trees, and even a Santa Claus counterpart.
* In the USA, Hanukkah has become is a minor holiday in the ersatz Christmas for Jews. It's not a particularly holy or important day[[note]] it is basically Jewish religious calendar -- a celebration of a military victory, victory against the Seleucids, a sort of religious equivalent of V-J Day[[/note]], Day -- but because it it's a minor holiday that just happens to fall around close to Christmas, it receives extra attention from many Jewish families who are feeling left out of and it's come to be a huge cultural event in the holiday season. US. Some families have even added add trees to the celebration, calling them "Hanukkah Bushes," but this is itself a DeadHorseTrope among Jews. Jews -- perhaps particularly because the Christmas tree is a pagan European custom (specifically a pagan German one), not specifically Christian and definitely not Jewish.
**
Christmas Day spent seeing a movie and eating Chinese food is [[PekingDuckChristmas its own trope]].
* ChristmasInJapan is actually very popular, even though most Most Japanese aren't Christians. However, Christians, [[ChristmasInJapan but that does nothing to stop them]]. Japanese Christmas isn't anything close to Western Christmas. It's more is a romantic holiday, like St. Valentine's Day with elves, Santa Claus hats hats, and [[ChristmasCake cake]]. It's New Year's that has closer emotional Christmas-like associations, being a very family-and-home oriented holiday, family-, home-, and religion-oriented holiday; most TV channels will ring in the new year with beautiful solemn majestic images of shrines tolling their bells in remote, snow-covered locations.



* Slightly aside of the trope, it's also worth noting that for the entire Southern Hemisphere, Christmas is a ''summer'' holiday, and yet the influence of European and American winter traditions often remains. It's not unusual for an Australian Christmas (for example) to involve roast turkeys and fake snowmen during a 40 degree Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) day.

to:

* Slightly aside of the trope, it's also worth noting that for For the entire Southern Hemisphere, Christmas is a ''summer'' holiday, and yet but it's still celebrated with the influence of European and American winter traditions often remains.full Victorian paraphernalia. It's not unusual for an Australian Christmas (for example) to involve roast turkeys and fake snowmen during a 40 degree Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) day.
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