History Main / YouHaveToBelieveMe

18th Feb '17 12:55:13 PM AthenaBlue
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** Played with in [[Recap/DoctrWhoS27E1Rose "Rose"]], when Rose meets with a conspiracy theorist who has information about the Doctor (whom she has kept mysteriously bumping into). Initially, he starts off presenting his theories about why the Doctor keeps popping up in different parts of history in a calm and reasonable fashion, and presents a relatively plausible theory that she'd be likely to believe-they're all different men who are related and sharing a code name. Then, as he gets a bit carried away with having an audience, he starts getting a bit more worked up and intense, until he's convinced that Rose believes him fully and so blurts out his ''real'' theory (which is the truth)-that they're same man, and the Doctor is an alien traveling through time. Unfortunately for him, he hadn't quite won Rose over before this, who leaves believing that he's a nutcase.

to:

** Played with in [[Recap/DoctrWhoS27E1Rose [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E1Rose "Rose"]], when Rose meets with a conspiracy theorist who has information about the Doctor (whom she has kept mysteriously bumping into). Initially, he starts off presenting his theories about why the Doctor keeps popping up in different parts of history in a calm and reasonable fashion, and presents a relatively plausible theory that she'd be likely to believe-they're all different men who are related and sharing a code name. Then, as he gets a bit carried away with having an audience, he starts getting a bit more worked up and intense, until he's convinced that Rose believes him fully and so blurts out his ''real'' theory (which is the truth)-that they're same man, and the Doctor is an alien traveling through time. Unfortunately for him, he hadn't quite won Rose over before this, who leaves believing that he's a nutcase.
18th Feb '17 12:53:53 PM AthenaBlue
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* An episode of Season 2 of ''Series/AmazingStories'' is actually titled "You Gotta Believe Me". It involves a man who has a horrific dream of a plane crashing into his house in the middle of the night. As he walks among the wreckage, he sees ghosts of some of the passengers and the ghost of the pilot talking about having to attempt take off too early due to something being on the runway. He wakes up and, while still in pajamas and robe, heads to the airport. While there, he sees the things that were part of the wreckage in his dream (including a girl's Teddy Ruxpin toy) and some of the ghosts. Convinced his dream was a prophecy, he keeps trying to convince the passengers, crew, security and so on that the plane's going to crash and gets more and more frustrated by people not taking him seriously. In the climax, he's on the tarmac and sees a single-engine plane with a drunk pilot taxiing onto the runway, heading into the path of the airliner. He rams the plane with a forklift, saving the passengers. Security grabs him and he says: "They were going to crash! You gotta believe me!" At which point, they finally do.
* In the ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' episode "Blind Spot", Laurel's insistence that the only reason she's been arrested for possession of illegal prescription medicine is because Brother Blood knows she's onto him and wants her out of the way sounds increasingly paranoid and crazy. It doesn't help that she has to acknowledge that, actually, she ''has'' been illegally self-medicating.



* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'' episode "The Special One", a father asks the board of education if they provide tutors as part of the enrichment program. When he's told that they don't, he reveals that a man posing as a tutor has been visiting his son. And then he reveals that the man isn't human, is from outer space ([[FunctionalGenreSavvy which he couldn't possibly know]]), disappears and materializes, and then starts talking about climate control machines.
* Mulder of ''Series/TheXFiles'' has a bad habit of this; when trying to enlist outside aid in dealing with a case (local police, FBI higher-ups, etc.) he makes sure to tell them ''exactly'' what he thinks is going on, no matter how insane, as opposed to sticking to the parts they're likely to believe.
** This becomes almost something of a RunningGag, since no matter how crazy the theory and how much Scully cites scientific research that he's wrong, Mulder is always right.
** It's suggested TheMenInBlack are pretty smart about this, deliberately acting as strangely as possible and using agents who look like famous people (or perhaps even making an agent, say, [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} the host of a game show]]), so that anyone who tries to tell other people about them won't be believed.
--->[[Creator/JesseVentura "I don't see why anyone would find anything odd about our appearance."]]
** In the episode "Synchrony", an elderly man (who's actually from the future) approaches two guys and starts a rant about how one of them will die in a traffic accident while crossing the street that evening, and how '''this must not happen'''. Of course, they don't believe him. If he'd calmly started a conversation with them and held them up for just a few minutes, he'd have easily succeeded.
* Played with in the first episode of the 2005 series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', when Rose meets with a conspiracy theorist who has information about the Doctor (whom she has kept mysteriously bumping into). Initially, he starts off presenting his theories about why the Doctor keeps popping up in different parts of history in a calm and reasonable fashion, and presents a relatively plausible theory that she'd be likely to believe-they're all different men who are related and sharing a code name. Then, as he gets a bit carried away with having an audience, he starts getting a bit more worked up and intense, until he's convinced that Rose believes him fully and so blurts out his ''real'' theory (which is the truth)-that they're same man, and the Doctor is an alien traveling through time. Unfortunately for him, he hadn't quite won Rose over before this, who leaves believing that he's a nutcase.

to:

* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'' episode "The Special One", ''Series/BurnNotice'': "Burn [Notice] After Reading" has a guy going to Michael claiming that a woman at his workplace is an alien bent on world conquest. While the client ''is'' obviously delusional, [[spoiler:the woman was actually selling the names of spies, so he was right about there being a conspiracy, it just wasn't the one he thought.]]
** This is also happens to their opponent one week. When Michael finds out about a well connected
father asks the board of education if who was beating up his wife and kids, [[CloseToHome he decides to do something about it]]. The problem is that his brother is a gangster and therefore they provide tutors as part of the enrichment program. have to drive a wedge between them. [[spoiler: When he's told that they don't, he reveals that a man posing as a tutor has been visiting his son. And then he reveals find that the man isn't human, is from outer space ([[FunctionalGenreSavvy which he couldn't possibly know]]), disappears father was doing side deals, they convince him that those deals have caused someone to want to kill him and materializes, that he must leave town. Unfortunately, this is when his gangster brother shows up and begins to question him. They then starts talking about climate control machines.
* Mulder
pass of ''Series/TheXFiles'' has a bad habit of this; the abusive father as crazy when Michael, Sam and Fiona all appear randomly on the street and the father begins claiming to his brother that he saw the three of them killed. ]]
* ''Series/{{Community}}'':
** The phrase is spoken by Britta when she is
trying to enlist outside aid unsuccessfully convince Tory and Abed that their friend Lukka is actually a genocidal war criminal.
** Invoked by the Greendale Air Conditioning Repair Initiation. It's supposed to be secret, and so they kidnap people
in dealing with the middle of the night, there's an astronaut in the corner making paninis, to ensure that any story would sound insane.
--> '''Dean of Air Conditioning Repair:''' We don't want you to tell anyone about this, and if you do, we don't want them to believe you. Isn't that right, Black Hitler?
* ''Series/TheDailyShow'': PlayedForLaughs by Rob Riggle's character, whose often somewhat valid points which are completely overshadowed by his borderline psychotic personality.
* Used
a case (local police, FBI higher-ups, etc.) he makes sure bit creatively in the ''Series/DeadtimeStories'' episode "Invasion of the Appleheads": A girl calls police to tell them ''exactly'' what he thinks is going on, no matter how insane, as opposed to sticking to the parts they're likely to believe.
** This becomes almost something of a RunningGag, since no matter how crazy the theory and how much Scully cites scientific research
that he's wrong, Mulder is always right.
** It's suggested TheMenInBlack are pretty smart about this, deliberately acting as strangely as possible and using agents who look like famous people (or perhaps even making an agent, say, [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} the host of a game show]]), so that anyone who tries to tell other people about them won't be believed.
--->[[Creator/JesseVentura "I don't see why anyone would find anything odd about our appearance."]]
** In the episode "Synchrony", an elderly man (who's actually from the future) approaches two guys and starts a rant about how one of them will die in a traffic accident while crossing the street that evening, and how '''this must not happen'''. Of course, they
her parents have been turned into "appleheads", immobile doll-like figures. The police don't believe him. If he'd calmly started her, and threaten to come to her house if she doesn't stop "prank calling" them. Realizing that she can get the police to her house anyway, she then calls back and intentionally makes up a conversation with fantastical story to anger them and held them up for just a few minutes, he'd have easily succeeded.
* Played with in
into indeed coming to her house. [[spoiler:They show up, but are turned into "appleheads" by the first episode of the 2005 series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', when Rose meets with a conspiracy theorist who has information about the Doctor (whom she has kept mysteriously bumping into). Initially, he starts off presenting his theories about why the Doctor keeps popping up in different parts of history in a calm and reasonable fashion, and presents a relatively plausible theory that she'd be likely to believe-they're all different men who are related and sharing a code name. Then, as he gets a bit carried away with having an audience, he starts getting a bit more worked up and intense, until he's convinced that Rose believes him fully and so blurts out his ''real'' theory (which is the truth)-that they're same man, and the Doctor is an alien traveling through time. Unfortunately for him, he hadn't quite won Rose over before this, who leaves believing that he's a nutcase.time they get there.]]
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':



** One of the AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho audio plays, ''Minuet in Hell'', has the Eighth Doctor lose some of his memory after crashing the TARDIS and winds up in a mental hospital. He tries to tell people his name and what happened, and tells the Brigadier when he shows up that he (the Doctor) recognizes him, but no one believes him, because, well, he's in a mental hospital (the Brig doesn't recognize him because he hadn't seen that incarnation before).
** Averted in "The Eleventh Hour": The Doctor breaks into a house, and keeps shouting about Prisoner Zero. He is knocked out cold, cut to a hospital. Despite our expectations, he isn't there.

to:

** One of Played with in [[Recap/DoctrWhoS27E1Rose "Rose"]], when Rose meets with a conspiracy theorist who has information about the AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho audio plays, ''Minuet in Hell'', has the Eighth Doctor lose some of (whom she has kept mysteriously bumping into). Initially, he starts off presenting his memory after crashing theories about why the TARDIS and winds Doctor keeps popping up in different parts of history in a mental hospital. He tries to tell people his name calm and what happened, reasonable fashion, and tells the Brigadier when he shows up presents a relatively plausible theory that she'd be likely to believe-they're all different men who are related and sharing a code name. Then, as he (the Doctor) recognizes him, but no one believes him, because, well, gets a bit carried away with having an audience, he starts getting a bit more worked up and intense, until he's in a mental hospital (the Brig doesn't recognize convinced that Rose believes him because fully and so blurts out his ''real'' theory (which is the truth)-that they're same man, and the Doctor is an alien traveling through time. Unfortunately for him, he hadn't seen quite won Rose over before this, who leaves believing that incarnation before).
he's a nutcase.
** Averted in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour "The Eleventh Hour": Hour"]]: The Doctor breaks into a house, and keeps shouting about Prisoner Zero. He is knocked out cold, cut to a hospital. Despite our expectations, he isn't there.



** The Doctor's pleas to the alliance at the end of ''The Pandorica Opens''.
* This is Tru's default state in ''Series/TruCalling''. When subtler methods of informing people of their own impending death fail or are sabotaged, she always falls back on this line. Not only does it ''never'' help, it was likely similar antics from Tru's mother (who had Tru's powers) that got Davis' wife killed, so Tru should really know better.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** Subverted in one episode, where after relating a prophetic dream he's had to General Hammond, Dr. Jackson is surprised when Hammond asks what he can do to help. When asked why he believes Jackson, Hammond gets smart, alluding to all of the ''other'' crazy things he's seen and heard while in command of the SGC.
** Also played straight in several episodes. In the three episode arc that ends the first season [[spoiler: no one believes that Daniel Jackson had gone to an alternate reality despite the fact that he had evidence in the form of a staff weapon blast on his shoulder and had disappeared for several hours with no other explanation.]] Later, and more (though not entirely) excusably, [[spoiler: he has a hard time convincing people to take his theory about Teal'c's sickness seriously after he apparently develops and then recovers from schizophrenia.]] The latter is also a massive case of HollywoodPsych.
-->'''Daniel''': "''Why does everyone think I'm crazy!?'' ''[{{Beat}}]'' Probably because I'm acting like it, aren't I?"
** The same thing later happened to Jonas Quinn. When he starts seeing bugs that no one else can see, Hammond immediately orders a lockdown and a full sweep of the base. Granted, Jonas was the only one to touch the strange alien device, but he was ''also'' the only one who'd spent his entire life around a specific type of radiation that's known to cause ''schizophrenia'', [[JustifiedTrope so, well...]]

to:

** The Doctor's pleas to At the alliance at the end climax of ''The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens "The Pandorica Opens''.
* This
Opens"]], the Doctor desperately attempts to persuade the [[LegionOfDoom Alliance]] [[spoiler:not to lock him in the Pandorica as he is Tru's default state the only one who can stop the TARDIS from exploding. He's rather frantic, but they don't listen to him because the Alliance is made up of all of his enemies and thus not inclined to do so.]]
** One of the ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' audio plays, "Minuet
in ''Series/TruCalling''. When subtler methods Hell", has the Eighth Doctor lose some of informing his memory after crashing the TARDIS and winds up in a mental hospital. He tries to tell people of their own impending death fail or are sabotaged, she always falls back on this line. Not only does it ''never'' help, it was likely similar antics from Tru's mother (who had Tru's powers) his name and what happened, and tells the Brigadier when he shows up that got Davis' wife killed, so Tru should really know better.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** Subverted in one episode, where after relating a prophetic dream he's had to General Hammond, Dr. Jackson is surprised when Hammond asks what
he can do to help. When asked why he believes Jackson, Hammond gets smart, alluding to all of the ''other'' crazy things he's seen and heard while in command of the SGC.
** Also played straight in several episodes. In the three episode arc that ends the first season [[spoiler:
(the Doctor) recognizes him, but no one believes him, because, well, he's in a mental hospital (the Brig doesn't recognize him because he hadn't seen that Daniel Jackson had gone incarnation before).
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'': Refreshingly averted with Molly going out of her way
to an alternate reality despite avoid telling everybody, because she knows it's insane sounding, and gaining all the fact that he had evidence she can to corroborate her story.
** Played straight
in season 2 since the form of a staff weapon blast on his shoulder government covered up what happened in season 1 and had disappeared for several hours with no other explanation.]] Later, and more (though not entirely) excusably, Molly suffered a nervous breakdown due to [[spoiler: he has John's death and Ethan's seizure by the government]]. She is committed to a hard time convincing "rest home" and her efforts to convince people to take his theory about Teal'c's sickness seriously after he apparently develops and that she is sane quickly devolve into this trope. It is then recovers from schizophrenia.]] The latter is also a massive case of HollywoodPsych.
-->'''Daniel''': "''Why
subverted when Molly decides that it does everyone not matter if people think I'm crazy!?'' ''[{{Beat}}]'' Probably because I'm acting like it, aren't I?"
**
she is insane as long as they also think that she possesses useful information they need in the current crisis.
* ''{{Series/Firefly}}'':
The same thing later parents of Simon and River Tam have some excuse for not believing their son when he claims their daughter, supposedly safe at a government school, is being tortured and tries to hire criminals to kidnap her. As it happens, Simon is absolutely right, but it isn't exactly the most believable of stories. A deleted scene implies that they didn't completely ''dis''believe him either, but were also afraid to go poking around in Alliance business.
* ''Series/GetSmart'': Events in "The Little Black Book" force Maxwell to tell an old friend of his that he is actually a spy instead of being in the greeting card business. He isn't convinced until Max drags him to CONTROL headquarters (by way of the telephone booth) and has him talk to the president on the cow horn phone.
* Played for laughs in an episode of ''Series/TheGoodies'' called ''Invasion Of The Moon Creatures'' -- the audience has followed everything that
happened to Jonas Quinn. When he starts seeing bugs and knows that no it's true, but of course, it sounds insane summing it up. Context: Tim and Bill have been brainwashed by moon rabbits, and Graeme pleads for help with the authorities.
-->'''Graeme:''' ''(in close-up)'' Anyway, I sent that rabbit up to the moon...uh, that was Flopsy. But he didn't come back, so I sent Tim and Bill up to the moon to see what had happened, and when they got up there, they found all these...carrots. And then hundreds of rabbits attacked them and overpowered them...''(zoom out to reveal two uniformed men are grabbing him)'' ...and they've just gone into the space-burrow and they've met Big Bunny. ''(gets fastened with sign reading 'LOONY -- handle with care')'' No, honestly, it's the truth, it is the truth, and Big Bunny's teaching them to say [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes 'Nyeeeeh, what's up doc']]! ''(gets stuffed into a crate reading 'TO THE FUNNY FARM -- this side up')''
* In the ''Series/{{Grimm}}'' episode "Woman in Black", Nick is desperate is convince his {{Muggle}} girlfriend Juliet that Wesen are real so that she will accept that it is possible that
one else is trying to kill her by magic and go to the hospital. So he takes her to his aunt's [[RoomFullOfCrazy Trailer Full of Crazy]], shows her all the medieval weaponry, the books of Grimm lore (in languages she doesn't understand and full of gruesome illustrations) and the collection of Nazi propaganda films and earnestly explains that several people they know are monsters that only he can see, Hammond immediately orders a lockdown pausing every few sentences to beg her to believe him. For obvious reasons, she thinks he's delusional, and he can't get her to the hospital until after she collapses.
** The next season he gets to try this again as
a full sweep case of Magical Amnesia has wiped Juliet's memory of the base. Granted, Jonas was event. This time he is much calmer, and makes sure that he can back up his claims by actually having some friendly Wesen transform into their GameFace in front of her.
* Played with in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}''; when Will realizes he's being framed for
the only copycat murders, he explains it to Jack in the calmest, most reasonable manner possible. Unfortunately, [[ClearMyName it doesn't help]].
* Played absolutely straight in season 1 of ''{{Series/Homeland}}'' when Carrie goes to Brody's house and, in the most wild-eyed, rambling manner possible, tries to convince his wife and daughter that he's a terrorist. She even says the trope name aloud word-for-word at
one to touch the strange alien device, but he was ''also'' the only one who'd spent his entire life around a specific type of radiation that's known to cause ''schizophrenia'', point. [[JustifiedTrope so, well...]]Justified]] in that Carrie is mentally ill with bipolar disorder and is currently in the throes of a manic phase.



* An episode of Season 2 of ''Series/AmazingStories'' is actually titled "You Gotta Believe Me". It involves a man who has a horrific dream of a plane crashing into his house in the middle of the night. As he walks among the wreckage, he sees ghosts of some of the passengers and the ghost of the pilot talking about having to attempt take off too early due to something being on the runway. He wakes up and, while still in pajamas and robe, heads to the airport. While there, he sees the things that were part of the wreckage in his dream (including a girl's Teddy Ruxpin toy) and some of the ghosts. Convinced his dream was a prophecy, he keeps trying to convince the passengers, crew, security and so on that the plane's going to crash and gets more and more frustrated by people not taking him seriously. In the climax, he's on the tarmac and sees a single-engine plane with a drunk pilot taxiing onto the runway, heading into the path of the airliner. He rams the plane with a forklift, saving the passengers. Security grabs him and he says: "They were going to crash! You gotta believe me!" At which point, they finally do.
* Happens so, so, ''so'' many times in ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''. The two protagonists ''always'' jump straight to "We're from the future," never bothering to come up with some more plausible explanation for how they know what they do, no matter how many times it doesn't work. Though it is nicely subverted in one episode where Doug confesses everything while being affected by a truth serum, which just causes his captors to think he's been conditioned to resist the serum and consider this proof that he's a professional spy.
* Oddly enough, it happened constantly on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Someone would claim to see some kind of anomaly in their quarters, have been abducted, been contacted telepathically, or whatever. Yet, the crew would always look at the person as if they were insane, [[ArbitrarySkepticism even though that kind of stuff happened every single week.]]
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', on the other hand, played this straight to start with, then tended to avert it once [[GrowingTheBeard the beard filled in]] and [[CharacterDevelopment the main characters learned to trust each other]], generally responding to outlandish claims with a sensor sweep or system diagnostic - which, naturally, rarely turns up anything at first - before suggesting a sleeping pill and a nice lie down. (It still does go straight occasionally, but there's always a valid reason given for why.)
** A good example of this is "Realm of Fear", in which minor character Barclay, who has a well-deserved reputation as a twitchy, paranoid hypochondriac, spontaneously develops a fear of the transporters, insisting that he's been bitten by something living '''inside''' the beam. Picard gives him a long, hard look... then tells Data and Geordi to tear the transporter apart looking for the problem, because he knows that Barclay is fully aware of his reputation, and wouldn't risk the humiliation of reporting to him directly unless he were ''absolutely positive''.
** Another episode, "The Wounded," features a starship captain who is convinced the Cardassians are rearming in preparation to break the peace treaty with the Federation. He's right, but unfortunately, instead of amassing evidence and going to his superiors, he proceeds to just start blowing Cardassian ships away left and right and then rants like a lunatic about how "they're all the same" and "I can smell their deceit" when Picard calls him out on it.
** The final episode [[PlayingWithATrope plays with]] every aspect of the trope, with Picard traveling through 3 time periods. The present crew believe him outright. The future crew has doubts, since future!Picard is suffering from a brain disorder known to cause delusions, but he calls in some favors and they go along [[TrueCompanions out of a sort of familial duty]]. And in the past, having "just" arrived on the ''Enterprise'', he simply opts to not tell them at all and just starts barking out orders.
* A similar event happens in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Before And After". [[WeAreAsMayflies Dying of old age as a nine-year old grandmother]], Kes starts jumping back through her own timeline. At first she has difficulty convincing people as they (as with Picard) think it's dementia, but becomes more convincing as she gets younger and gathers more information...until she jumps back to her childhood on the Ocampan homeworld, where she's unable to convince her father she's not playing some kind of kid's game.
** In "Death Wish" the all-powerful and all-annoying being called Q transports a spotlight operator from the Woodstock festival and Sir Issac Newton to Voyager. Captain Janeway tries to explain to them what is happening.
-->'''Janeway:''' Consider for a moment that it might be possible to travel forward in time, say to the twenty fourth century, onto a starship seventy five thousand light years from Earth.
-->''(Blank looks.)''
-->'''Janeway:''' You're having a very strange dream...
* Dr. Bashir plays this trope straight in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Inquisition" while trying to convince the bridge officers that he's not a traitor. [[spoiler:Then it's revealed that the officers are in fact holograms programmed to vilify him. The fact that his TrueCompanions won't consider his side of the story is one of the things that tips Bashir off.]]

to:

* An episode of Season 2 of ''Series/AmazingStories'' is actually titled "You Gotta Believe Me". It involves a man who has a horrific dream of a plane crashing into his house in the middle of the night. As he walks among the wreckage, he sees ghosts of some of the passengers and the ghost of the pilot talking about having to attempt take off too early due to something being on the runway. He wakes up and, while still in pajamas and robe, heads Often happens to the airport. While there, he sees marks on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' as they try in vain to get the things authorities to believe that they were part set up by an elite team of con artists.
** In "The Very Big Bird Job," corrupt executive Romer calmly explains to
the wreckage in his dream (including a girl's Teddy Ruxpin toy) FBI that he wasn't fleeing the country to avoid insider trading charges and some of causing a deadly crash. Rather, he believed he was flying the ghosts. Convinced his dream was a prophecy, he keeps trying Spruce Goose to convince save it from Iranians out to steal 70-year old stealth technology invented by Howard Hughes. Their expressions say it all.
* This is
the passengers, crew, security title character's usual tactic in ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}''. He never has any proof, because obviously AWizardDidIt, and so on it never works. You'd think he'd learn after a few tries. Or alternatively, you'd think the other characters would learn that the plane's going to crash and gets more and more frustrated by people not taking him seriously. In the climax, no matter how insane Merlin's initial claims may seem (or however badly he goes about explaining it), he's on the tarmac and sees a single-engine plane with a drunk pilot taxiing onto the runway, heading into the path of the airliner. He rams the plane with a forklift, saving the passengers. Security grabs him and he says: "They were going to crash! You gotta believe me!" At which point, they finally do.
* Happens so, so, ''so'' many times in ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''. The two protagonists
always -- ''always'' jump straight -- proven to "We're from be right by the future," never bothering to come up with some more plausible explanation for how they know what they do, no matter how many times it doesn't work. Though it end of the episode.
** Although this
is nicely finally subverted in one episode where Doug confesses everything while by ''The Dark Tower'', when Merlin is trying to get the Knights to follow him. Arthur, being affected by a truth serum, which just causes his captors usual ignorant self, starts to think he's been conditioned to resist ignore him, but the serum and consider this proof Knights point out that he's a professional spy.
* Oddly enough,
it happened constantly on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Someone would claim to see some kind of anomaly in their quarters, have been abducted, been contacted telepathically, or whatever. Yet, the crew would always look at the person can't hurt as if they were insane, [[ArbitrarySkepticism even though that kind of stuff happened every single week.]]
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', on the other hand, played this straight to start with, then tended to avert it once [[GrowingTheBeard the beard filled in]]
they're already lost, and [[CharacterDevelopment the main characters learned ask Arthur to trust each other]], generally responding to outlandish claims with a sensor sweep or system diagnostic - which, naturally, rarely turns up anything at first - before suggesting a sleeping pill and a nice lie down. (It still does go straight occasionally, but there's always a valid reason given for why.)
** A good example of this is "Realm of Fear", in which minor character Barclay, who has a well-deserved reputation as a twitchy, paranoid hypochondriac, spontaneously develops a fear of the transporters, insisting that he's been bitten by something living '''inside''' the beam. Picard gives
give him a long, hard look... then tells Data and Geordi to tear the transporter apart looking for the problem, because he knows chance.
* ''{{Series/Misfits}}'': Nathan yells dramatically at his mother
that Barclay her boyfriend is fully aware of a "psycho, rough-trade, [[PunctuatedForEmphasis gay, rapist werewolf!]]" Granted, his reputation, and mother probably wouldn't risk the humiliation of reporting to have believed him directly unless he were ''absolutely positive''.
** Another episode, "The Wounded," features a starship captain who is convinced the Cardassians are rearming in preparation to break the peace treaty with the Federation. He's right, but unfortunately, instead of amassing evidence and going to his superiors, he proceeds to
even if he'd just start blowing Cardassian ships away left calmly explained the situation (especially considering that Nathan is pretty much a compulsive liar, and right and then rants had leapt to a rather silly conclusion based on what he'd seen anyway) but by the time he realized that babbling like a lunatic about how "they're all the same" and "I can smell their deceit" when Picard calls crazy person probably wasn’t doing him out on it.
** The final episode [[PlayingWithATrope plays with]] every aspect of the trope, with Picard traveling through 3 time periods. The present crew believe him outright. The future crew has doubts, since future!Picard is suffering from a brain disorder known to cause delusions, but he calls in some favors and they go along [[TrueCompanions out of a sort of familial duty]]. And in the past, having "just" arrived on the ''Enterprise'', he simply opts to not tell them at all and just starts barking out orders.
* A similar event happens in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Before And After". [[WeAreAsMayflies Dying of old age as a nine-year old grandmother]], Kes starts jumping back through her own timeline. At first she has difficulty convincing people as they (as with Picard) think it's dementia, but becomes more convincing as she gets younger and gathers more information...until she jumps back to her childhood on the Ocampan homeworld, where she's unable to convince her father she's not playing some kind of kid's game.
** In "Death Wish" the all-powerful and all-annoying being called Q transports a spotlight operator from the Woodstock festival and Sir Issac Newton to Voyager. Captain Janeway tries to explain to them what is happening.
-->'''Janeway:''' Consider for a moment that it might be possible to travel forward in time, say to the twenty fourth century, onto a starship seventy five thousand light years from Earth.
-->''(Blank looks.)''
-->'''Janeway:''' You're having a very strange dream...
* Dr. Bashir plays this trope straight in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Inquisition" while trying to convince the bridge officers that he's not a traitor. [[spoiler:Then it's revealed that the officers are in fact holograms programmed to vilify him. The fact that his TrueCompanions won't consider his side of the story is one of the things that tips Bashir off.]]
any favors, she'd already totally dismissed him.



* ''Series/TheDailyShow'': PlayedForLaughs by Rob Riggle's character, whose often somewhat valid points which are completely overshadowed by his borderline psychotic personality.
* Often happens to the marks on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' as they try in vain to get the authorities to believe that they were set up by an elite team of con artists.
** In "The Very Big Bird Job," corrupt executive Romer calmly explains to the FBI that he wasn't fleeing the country to avoid insider trading charges and causing a deadly crash. Rather, he believed he was flying the Spruce Goose to save it from Iranians out to steal 70-year old stealth technology invented by Howard Hughes. Their expressions say it all.

to:

* ''Series/TheDailyShow'': PlayedForLaughs by Rob Riggle's character, whose often somewhat valid points which are completely overshadowed by his borderline psychotic personality.
* Often happens
''Series/NoTomorrow'': Xavier's method of trying to alert a famous astronomer that an asteroid is (he believes) on a heading with Earth is loudly accosting her in public and behaving like a maniac. Not surprisingly he's been arrested multiple times and the marks on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' as they try astronomer's taken out a restraining order against him. Even when she's convinced to listen by Evie though and he talks calmly, she still thinks he's nuts.
* Mentioned by name
in vain to get ''Series/OnceUponATime'' during the authorities [[Disney/{{Frozen}} Arendelle arc]] in Season 4; Ingrid locks up Anna and tries to convince Elsa that Anna was plotting against her. Elsa confronts Anna in the dungeon and accuses her of treason, and then demands the guards leave her alone with her sister. Anna tells Elsa she would never even think of betraying her, pleading, "You have to believe me." Once she hears the guards close the door behind them, Elsa drops her angry mask and unlocks Anna's cell, assuring her, "Of course I believe you."
* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'' episode "The Special One", a father asks the board of education if they provide tutors as part of the enrichment program. When he's told
that they were set up by an elite team of con artists.
** In "The Very Big Bird Job," corrupt executive Romer calmly explains to the FBI
don't, he reveals that a man posing as a tutor has been visiting his son. And then he wasn't fleeing reveals that the country to avoid insider trading charges and causing a deadly crash. Rather, he believed he was flying the Spruce Goose to save it man isn't human, is from Iranians out outer space ([[FunctionalGenreSavvy which he couldn't possibly know]]), disappears and materializes, and then starts talking about climate control machines.
* Subverted in ''{{Series/PeepShow}}'': When Mark's girlfriend Sophie receives a phone call from a mentally ill woman that Mark has been unfaithful, Mark's pleas
to steal 70-year old stealth technology invented by Howard Hughes. Their expressions say convince her that she has been institutionalized are initially met with disbelief. However, Mark, rather surprisingly, gives a calm and rational statement: "No Soph, look at me; honestly, she's in hospital. I can you give you her reference number.". This actually convinces Sophie, although it all. is unfortunately hinted that she may have already had her revenge.
* In an episode of ''Series/PowerRangersJungleFury'', an archaeologist discovers some artifacts that are potential weapons for the villains. Instead of visiting her as a Ranger and just explaining the situation, the Red Ranger shows up in civvies and tells her that people he can't talk about want the artifacts for reasons he also can't talk about, and can he have the artifacts for safekeeping? Not surprisingly, she says no.



* ''Series/BurnNotice'': "Burn [Notice] After Reading" has a guy going to Michael claiming that a woman at his workplace is an alien bent on world conquest. While the client ''is'' obviously delusional, [[spoiler:the woman was actually selling the names of spies, so he was right about there being a conspiracy, it just wasn't the one he thought.]]
** This is also happens to their opponent one week. When Michael finds out about a well connected father who was beating up his wife and kids, [[CloseToHome he decides to do something about it]]. The problem is that his brother is a gangster and therefore they have to drive a wedge between them. [[spoiler: When they find that the father was doing side deals, they convince him that those deals have caused someone to want to kill him and that he must leave town. Unfortunately, this is when his gangster brother shows up and begins to question him. They then pass of the abusive father as crazy when Michael, Sam and Fiona all appear randomly on the street and the father begins claiming to his brother that he saw the three of them killed. ]]
* ''Series/GetSmart'': Events in "The Little Black Book" force Maxwell to tell an old friend of his that he is actually a spy instead of being in the greeting card business. He isn't convinced until Max drags him to CONTROL headquarters (by way of the telephone booth) and has him talk to the president on the cow horn phone.
* ''{{Series/Firefly}}'': The parents of Simon and River Tam have some excuse for not believing their son when he claims their daughter, supposedly safe at a government school, is being tortured and tries to hire criminals to kidnap her. As it happens, Simon is absolutely right, but it isn't exactly the most believable of stories. A deleted scene implies that they didn't completely ''dis''believe him either, but were also afraid to go poking around in Alliance business.
* ''{{Series/Misfits}}'': Nathan yells dramatically at his mother that her boyfriend is a "psycho, rough-trade, [[PunctuatedForEmphasis gay, rapist werewolf!]]" Granted, his mother probably wouldn't have believed him even if he'd just calmly explained the situation (especially considering that Nathan is pretty much a compulsive liar, and had leapt to a rather silly conclusion based on what he'd seen anyway) but by the time he realized that babbling like a crazy person probably wasn’t doing him any favors, she'd already totally dismissed him.
* This is the title character's usual tactic in ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}''. He never has any proof, because obviously AWizardDidIt, and so it never works. You'd think he'd learn after a few tries. Or alternatively, you'd think the other characters would learn that no matter how insane Merlin's initial claims may seem (or however badly he goes about explaining it), he's always -- ''always'' -- proven to be right by the end of the episode.
** Although this is finally subverted by ''The Dark Tower'', when Merlin is trying to get the Knights to follow him. Arthur, being his usual ignorant self, starts to ignore him, but the Knights point out that it can't hurt as they're already lost, and ask Arthur to give him a chance.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** Subverted in one episode, where after relating a prophetic dream he's had to General Hammond, Dr. Jackson is surprised when Hammond asks what he can do to help. When asked why he believes Jackson, Hammond gets smart, alluding to all of the ''other'' crazy things he's seen and heard while in command of the SGC.
** Also played straight in several episodes. In the three episode arc that ends the first season [[spoiler: no one believes that Daniel Jackson had gone to an alternate reality despite the fact that he had evidence in the form of a staff weapon blast on his shoulder and had disappeared for several hours with no other explanation.]] Later, and more (though not entirely) excusably, [[spoiler: he has a hard time convincing people to take his theory about Teal'c's sickness seriously after he apparently develops and then recovers from schizophrenia.]] The latter is also a massive case of HollywoodPsych.
-->'''Daniel''': "''Why does everyone think I'm crazy!?'' ''[{{Beat}}]'' Probably because I'm acting like it, aren't I?"
** The same thing later happened to Jonas Quinn. When he starts seeing bugs that no one else can see, Hammond immediately orders a lockdown and a full sweep of the base. Granted, Jonas was the only one to touch the strange alien device, but he was ''also'' the only one who'd spent his entire life around a specific type of radiation that's known to cause ''schizophrenia'', [[JustifiedTrope so, well...]]
* Oddly enough, it happened constantly on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Someone would claim to see some kind of anomaly in their quarters, have been abducted, been contacted telepathically, or whatever. Yet, the crew would always look at the person as if they were insane, [[ArbitrarySkepticism even though that kind of stuff happened every single week.]]
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', on the other hand, played this straight to start with, then tended to avert it once [[GrowingTheBeard the beard filled in]] and [[CharacterDevelopment the main characters learned to trust each other]], generally responding to outlandish claims with a sensor sweep or system diagnostic - which, naturally, rarely turns up anything at first - before suggesting a sleeping pill and a nice lie down. (It still does go straight occasionally, but there's always a valid reason given for why.)
** A good example of this is "Realm of Fear", in which minor character Barclay, who has a well-deserved reputation as a twitchy, paranoid hypochondriac, spontaneously develops a fear of the transporters, insisting that he's been bitten by something living '''inside''' the beam. Picard gives him a long, hard look... then tells Data and Geordi to tear the transporter apart looking for the problem, because he knows that Barclay is fully aware of his reputation, and wouldn't risk the humiliation of reporting to him directly unless he were ''absolutely positive''.
** Another episode, "The Wounded," features a starship captain who is convinced the Cardassians are rearming in preparation to break the peace treaty with the Federation. He's right, but unfortunately, instead of amassing evidence and going to his superiors, he proceeds to just start blowing Cardassian ships away left and right and then rants like a lunatic about how "they're all the same" and "I can smell their deceit" when Picard calls him out on it.
** The final episode [[PlayingWithATrope plays with]] every aspect of the trope, with Picard traveling through 3 time periods. The present crew believe him outright. The future crew has doubts, since future!Picard is suffering from a brain disorder known to cause delusions, but he calls in some favors and they go along [[TrueCompanions out of a sort of familial duty]]. And in the past, having "just" arrived on the ''Enterprise'', he simply opts to not tell them at all and just starts barking out orders.
* A similar event happens in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Before And After". [[WeAreAsMayflies Dying of old age as a nine-year old grandmother]], Kes starts jumping back through her own timeline. At first she has difficulty convincing people as they (as with Picard) think it's dementia, but becomes more convincing as she gets younger and gathers more information...until she jumps back to her childhood on the Ocampan homeworld, where she's unable to convince her father she's not playing some kind of kid's game.
** In "Death Wish" the all-powerful and all-annoying being called Q transports a spotlight operator from the Woodstock festival and Sir Issac Newton to Voyager. Captain Janeway tries to explain to them what is happening.
-->'''Janeway:''' Consider for a moment that it might be possible to travel forward in time, say to the twenty fourth century, onto a starship seventy five thousand light years from Earth.
-->''(Blank looks.)''
-->'''Janeway:''' You're having a very strange dream...
* Dr. Bashir plays this trope straight in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Inquisition" while trying to convince the bridge officers that he's not a traitor. [[spoiler:Then it's revealed that the officers are in fact holograms programmed to vilify him. The fact that his TrueCompanions won't consider his side of the story is one of the things that tips Bashir off.]]
* In the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS02E20WhatIsAndWhatShouldNeverBe "What Is And What Should Never Be" (S02, Ep20)]], Dean has to convince the Sam of the Wishverse that he needs to hunt the djinn, but Sam thinks he had a psychotic break. Subverted earlier in the episode when Sam catches Dean stealing a silver knife; as he's a loser in this particular reality, Dean simply says that he owes money to a loan shark.
* Happens so, so, ''so'' many times in ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''. The two protagonists ''always'' jump straight to "We're from the future," never bothering to come up with some more plausible explanation for how they know what they do, no matter how many times it doesn't work. Though it is nicely subverted in one episode where Doug confesses everything while being affected by a truth serum, which just causes his captors to think he's been conditioned to resist the serum and consider this proof that he's a professional spy.
* This is Tru's default state in ''Series/TruCalling''. When subtler methods of informing people of their own impending death fail or are sabotaged, she always falls back on this line. Not only does it ''never'' help, it was likely similar antics from Tru's mother (who had Tru's powers) that got Davis' wife killed, so Tru should really know better.
* The main character in the famous ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode ''Nightmare at 20,000 Feet'' spends most of the episode gradually slipping into a major anxiety attack after seeing a gremlin on the wing of the plane he's riding on, which vanishes whenever anyone else looks at it, and trying to convince everyone that he isn't going insane. Their concern is admittedly justified, because until recently he'd been a patient in an asylum after suffering a nervous breakdown on a plane, and because he's played by [[Creator/WilliamShatner William Shatner's]] ''completely'' [[LargeHam hamming it up]].
--> '''Bob:''' (wild-eyed and drenched in sweat) ''Do I...'' look... ''insane!?''



* Played for laughs in an episode of ''Series/TheGoodies'' called ''Invasion Of The Moon Creatures'' -- the audience has followed everything that happened and knows that it's true, but of course, it sounds insane summing it up. Context: Tim and Bill have been brainwashed by moon rabbits, and Graeme pleads for help with the authorities.
-->'''Graeme:''' ''(in close-up)'' Anyway, I sent that rabbit up to the moon...uh, that was Flopsy. But he didn't come back, so I sent Tim and Bill up to the moon to see what had happened, and when they got up there, they found all these...carrots. And then hundreds of rabbits attacked them and overpowered them...''(zoom out to reveal two uniformed men are grabbing him)'' ...and they've just gone into the space-burrow and they've met Big Bunny. ''(gets fastened with sign reading 'LOONY -- handle with care')'' No, honestly, it's the truth, it is the truth, and Big Bunny's teaching them to say [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes 'Nyeeeeh, what's up doc']]! ''(gets stuffed into a crate reading 'TO THE FUNNY FARM -- this side up')''
* ''Series/{{Community}}'':
** The phrase is spoken by Britta when she is trying to unsuccessfully convince Tory and Abed that their friend Lukka is actually a genocidal war criminal.
** Invoked by the Greendale Air Conditioning Repair Initiation. It's supposed to be secret, and so they kidnap people in the middle of the night, there's an astronaut in the corner making paninis, to ensure that any story would sound insane.
--> '''Dean of Air Conditioning Repair:''' We don't want you to tell anyone about this, and if you do, we don't want them to believe you. Isn't that right, Black Hitler?
* In the ''Series/{{Grimm}}'' episode "Woman in Black", Nick is desperate is convince his {{Muggle}} girlfriend Juliet that Wesen are real so that she will accept that it is possible that one is trying to kill her by magic and go to the hospital. So he takes her to his aunt's [[RoomFullOfCrazy Trailer Full of Crazy]], shows her all the medieval weaponry, the books of Grimm lore (in languages she doesn't understand and full of gruesome illustrations) and the collection of Nazi propaganda films and earnestly explains that several people they know are monsters that only he can see, pausing every few sentences to beg her to believe him. For obvious reasons, she thinks he's delusional, and he can't get her to the hospital until after she collapses.
** The next season he gets to try this again as a case of Magical Amnesia has wiped Juliet's memory of the event. This time he is much calmer, and makes sure that he can back up his claims by actually having some friendly Wesen transform into their GameFace in front of her.
* In the ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' episode "Blind Spot", Laurel's insistence that the only reason she's been arrested for possession of illegal prescription medicine is because Brother Blood knows she's onto him and wants her out of the way sounds increasingly paranoid and crazy. It doesn't help that she has to acknowledge that, actually, she ''has'' been illegally self-medicating.
* In the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS02E20WhatIsAndWhatShouldNeverBe "What Is And What Should Never Be" (S02, Ep20)]], Dean has to convince the Sam of the Wishverse that he needs to hunt the djinn, but Sam thinks he had a psychotic break. Subverted earlier in the episode when Sam catches Dean stealing a silver knife; as he's a loser in this particular reality, Dean simply says that he owes money to a loan shark.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'': Refreshingly averted with Molly going out of her way to avoid telling everybody, because she knows it's insane sounding, and gaining all the evidence she can to corroborate her story.
** Played straight in season 2 since the government covered up what happened in season 1 and Molly suffered a nervous breakdown due to [[spoiler: John's death and Ethan's seizure by the government]]. She is committed to a "rest home" and her efforts to convince people that she is sane quickly devolve into this trope. It is then subverted when Molly decides that it does not matter if people think she is insane as long as they also think that she possesses useful information they need in the current crisis.
* Used a bit creatively in the ''Series/DeadtimeStories'' episode "Invasion of the Appleheads": A girl calls police to tell them that her parents have been turned into "appleheads", immobile doll-like figures. The police don't believe her, and threaten to come to her house if she doesn't stop "prank calling" them. Realizing that she can get the police to her house anyway, she then calls back and intentionally makes up a fantastical story to anger them into indeed coming to her house. [[spoiler:They show up, but are turned into "appleheads" by the time they get there.]]
* In an episode of ''Series/PowerRangersJungleFury'', an archaeologist discovers some artifacts that are potential weapons for the villains. Instead of visiting her as a Ranger and just explaining the situation, the Red Ranger shows up in civvies and tells her that people he can't talk about want the artifacts for reasons he also can't talk about, and can he have the artifacts for safekeeping? Not surprisingly, she says no.
* Subverted in ''{{Series/PeepShow}}'': When Mark's girlfriend Sophie receives a phone call from a mentally ill woman that Mark has been unfaithful, Mark's pleas to convince her that she has been institutionalized are initially met with disbelief. However, Mark, rather surprisingly, gives a calm and rational statement: "No Soph, look at me; honestly, she's in hospital. I can you give you her reference number.". This actually convinces Sophie, although it is unfortunately hinted that she may have already had her revenge.
* Played absolutely straight in season 1 of ''{{Series/Homeland}}'' when Carrie goes to Brody's house and, in the most wild-eyed, rambling manner possible, tries to convince his wife and daughter that he's a terrorist. She even says the trope name aloud word-for-word at one point. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that Carrie is mentally ill with bipolar disorder and is currently in the throes of a manic phase.
* Mentioned by name in ''Series/OnceUponATime'' during the [[Disney/{{Frozen}} Arendelle arc]] in Season 4; Ingrid locks up Anna and tries to convince Elsa that Anna was plotting against her. Elsa confronts Anna in the dungeon and accuses her of treason, and then demands the guards leave her alone with her sister. Anna tells Elsa she would never even think of betraying her, pleading, "You have to believe me." Once she hears the guards close the door behind them, Elsa drops her angry mask and unlocks Anna's cell, assuring her, "Of course I believe you."
* Played with in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}''; when Will realizes he's being framed for the copycat murders, he explains it to Jack in the calmest, most reasonable manner possible. Unfortunately, [[ClearMyName it doesn't help]].
* The main character in the famous ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode ''Nightmare at 20,000 Feet'' spends most of the episode gradually slipping into a major anxiety attack after seeing a gremlin on the wing of the plane he's riding on, which vanishes whenever anyone else looks at it, and trying to convince everyone that he isn't going insane. Their concern is admittedly justified, because until recently he'd been a patient in an asylum after suffering a nervous breakdown on a plane, and because he's played by [[Creator/WilliamShatner William Shatner's]] ''completely'' [[LargeHam hamming it up]].
--> '''Bob:''' (wild-eyed and drenched in sweat) ''Do I...'' look... ''insane!?''
* ''Series/NoTomorrow'': Xavier's method of trying to alert a famous astronomer that an asteroid is (he believes) on a heading with Earth is loudly accosting her in public and behaving like a maniac. Not surprisingly he's been arrested multiple times and the astronomer's taken out a restraining order against him. Even when she's convinced to listen by Evie though and he talks calmly, she still thinks he's nuts.

to:

* Played for laughs in an episode Mulder of ''Series/TheGoodies'' called ''Invasion Of The Moon Creatures'' -- the audience ''Series/TheXFiles'' has followed everything that happened and knows that it's true, but a bad habit of course, it sounds insane summing it up. Context: Tim and Bill have been brainwashed by moon rabbits, and Graeme pleads for help with the authorities.
-->'''Graeme:''' ''(in close-up)'' Anyway, I sent that rabbit up to the moon...uh, that was Flopsy. But he didn't come back, so I sent Tim and Bill up to the moon to see what had happened, and
this; when they got up there, they found all these...carrots. And then hundreds of rabbits attacked them and overpowered them...''(zoom out to reveal two uniformed men are grabbing him)'' ...and they've just gone into the space-burrow and they've met Big Bunny. ''(gets fastened with sign reading 'LOONY -- handle with care')'' No, honestly, it's the truth, it is the truth, and Big Bunny's teaching them to say [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes 'Nyeeeeh, what's up doc']]! ''(gets stuffed into a crate reading 'TO THE FUNNY FARM -- this side up')''
* ''Series/{{Community}}'':
** The phrase is spoken by Britta when she is
trying to unsuccessfully convince Tory and Abed that their friend Lukka is actually a genocidal war criminal.
** Invoked by the Greendale Air Conditioning Repair Initiation. It's supposed to be secret, and so they kidnap people
enlist outside aid in the middle of the night, there's an astronaut in the corner making paninis, to ensure that any story would sound insane.
--> '''Dean of Air Conditioning Repair:''' We don't want you to tell anyone about this, and if you do, we don't want them to believe you. Isn't that right, Black Hitler?
* In the ''Series/{{Grimm}}'' episode "Woman in Black", Nick is desperate is convince his {{Muggle}} girlfriend Juliet that Wesen are real so that she will accept that it is possible that one is trying to kill her by magic and go to the hospital. So he takes her to his aunt's [[RoomFullOfCrazy Trailer Full of Crazy]], shows her all the medieval weaponry, the books of Grimm lore (in languages she doesn't understand and full of gruesome illustrations) and the collection of Nazi propaganda films and earnestly explains that several people they know are monsters that only he can see, pausing every few sentences to beg her to believe him. For obvious reasons, she thinks he's delusional, and he can't get her to the hospital until after she collapses.
** The next season he gets to try this again as
dealing with a case of Magical Amnesia has wiped Juliet's memory of the event. This time (local police, FBI higher-ups, etc.) he is much calmer, and makes sure that he can back up his claims by actually having some friendly Wesen transform into their GameFace in front of her.
* In the ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' episode "Blind Spot", Laurel's insistence that the only reason she's been arrested for possession of illegal prescription medicine is because Brother Blood knows she's onto him and wants her out of the way sounds increasingly paranoid and crazy. It doesn't help that she has to acknowledge that, actually, she ''has'' been illegally self-medicating.
* In the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS02E20WhatIsAndWhatShouldNeverBe "What Is And What Should Never Be" (S02, Ep20)]], Dean has to convince the Sam of the Wishverse that he needs to hunt the djinn, but Sam thinks he had a psychotic break. Subverted earlier in the episode when Sam catches Dean stealing a silver knife; as he's a loser in this particular reality, Dean simply says that he owes money to a loan shark.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'': Refreshingly averted with Molly going out of her way to avoid telling everybody, because she knows it's insane sounding, and gaining all the evidence she can to corroborate her story.
** Played straight in season 2 since the government covered up what happened in season 1 and Molly suffered a nervous breakdown due to [[spoiler: John's death and Ethan's seizure by the government]]. She is committed to a "rest home" and her efforts to convince people that she is sane quickly devolve into this trope. It is then subverted when Molly decides that it does not matter if people think she is insane as long as they also think that she possesses useful information they need in the current crisis.
* Used a bit creatively in the ''Series/DeadtimeStories'' episode "Invasion of the Appleheads": A girl calls police
to tell them ''exactly'' what he thinks is going on, no matter how insane, as opposed to sticking to the parts they're likely to believe.
** This becomes almost something of a RunningGag, since no matter how crazy the theory and how much Scully cites scientific research
that her parents have been turned into "appleheads", immobile doll-like figures. The police he's wrong, Mulder is always right.
** It's suggested TheMenInBlack are pretty smart about this, deliberately acting as strangely as possible and using agents who look like famous people (or perhaps even making an agent, say, [[Series/{{Jeopardy}} the host of a game show]]), so that anyone who tries to tell other people about them won't be believed.
--->[[Creator/JesseVentura "I don't see why anyone would find anything odd about our appearance."]]
** In the episode "Synchrony", an elderly man (who's actually from the future) approaches two guys and starts a rant about how one of them will die in a traffic accident while crossing the street that evening, and how '''this must not happen'''. Of course, they
don't believe her, and threaten to come to her house if she doesn't stop "prank calling" them. Realizing that she can get the police to her house anyway, she then calls back and intentionally makes up a fantastical story to anger them into indeed coming to her house. [[spoiler:They show up, but are turned into "appleheads" by the time they get there.]]
* In an episode of ''Series/PowerRangersJungleFury'', an archaeologist discovers some artifacts that are potential weapons for the villains. Instead of visiting her as a Ranger and just explaining the situation, the Red Ranger shows up in civvies and tells her that people he can't talk about want the artifacts for reasons he also can't talk about, and can he have the artifacts for safekeeping? Not surprisingly, she says no.
* Subverted in ''{{Series/PeepShow}}'': When Mark's girlfriend Sophie receives a phone call from a mentally ill woman that Mark has been unfaithful, Mark's pleas to convince her that she has been institutionalized are initially met with disbelief. However, Mark, rather surprisingly, gives a calm and rational statement: "No Soph, look at me; honestly, she's in hospital. I can you give you her reference number.". This actually convinces Sophie, although it is unfortunately hinted that she may have already had her revenge.
* Played absolutely straight in season 1 of ''{{Series/Homeland}}'' when Carrie goes to Brody's house and, in the most wild-eyed, rambling manner possible, tries to convince his wife and daughter that he's a terrorist. She even says the trope name aloud word-for-word at one point. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that Carrie is mentally ill with bipolar disorder and is currently in the throes of a manic phase.
* Mentioned by name in ''Series/OnceUponATime'' during the [[Disney/{{Frozen}} Arendelle arc]] in Season 4; Ingrid locks up Anna and tries to convince Elsa that Anna was plotting against her. Elsa confronts Anna in the dungeon and accuses her of treason, and then demands the guards leave her alone with her sister. Anna tells Elsa she would never even think of betraying her, pleading, "You have to believe me." Once she hears the guards close the door behind them, Elsa drops her angry mask and unlocks Anna's cell, assuring her, "Of course I believe you."
* Played with in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}''; when Will realizes he's being framed for the copycat murders, he explains it to Jack in the calmest, most reasonable manner possible. Unfortunately, [[ClearMyName it doesn't help]].
* The main character in the famous ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode ''Nightmare at 20,000 Feet'' spends most of the episode gradually slipping into a major anxiety attack after seeing a gremlin on the wing of the plane he's riding on, which vanishes whenever anyone else looks at it, and trying to convince everyone that he isn't going insane. Their concern is admittedly justified, because until recently
him. If he'd been calmly started a patient in an asylum after suffering a nervous breakdown on a plane, and because he's played by [[Creator/WilliamShatner William Shatner's]] ''completely'' [[LargeHam hamming it up]].
--> '''Bob:''' (wild-eyed and drenched in sweat) ''Do I...'' look... ''insane!?''
* ''Series/NoTomorrow'': Xavier's method of trying to alert a famous astronomer that an asteroid is (he believes) on a heading
conversation with Earth is loudly accosting her in public them and behaving like held them up for just a maniac. Not surprisingly he's been arrested multiple times and the astronomer's taken out a restraining order against him. Even when she's convinced to listen by Evie though and he talks calmly, she still thinks he's nuts.few minutes, he'd have easily succeeded.



* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', the Thanes are faced with some pretty outlandish stories from their population and might easily fall for this trope, although they have the good sense to [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure ask you to go look into that mysterious cavern]] just to be certain. Surely enough, no matter how crazy the story was it all turns out to be true.
** In the DLC ''Dragonborn'' you can come across I barely clothed madman shouting about how a book inserted his secrets. No matter how calmly you talk to him he'll attempt to attack you. He's right of course, because AllMythsAreTrue, but what makes it maddeningly is that you can know it's true by accessing one of these books before you've ever met him yet you still treat him like a complete nutcase.
* {{Averted}} / {{Defied}} in ''VideoGame/{{Gothic}} II''. When the [[NoNameGiven Nameless Hero]] has to gain Paladins' support against the dragons in Valley of Mines, he simply tells their commander, "The question is not if you should believe me, but whether you can afford to ''not'' believe me if I'm telling truth." It works pretty well -- the Hero is sent to the Valley for confirmation.
* ''{{In The 1st Degree}}'': James Tobin goes into this a few times. What really makes him look bad is how early on, he changes most of his story, saying that he was so scared and that he did not think anyone would believe him. He even admits to shooting himself in the leg because he wanted to make the situation he was in look like like it was self-defense.
* In ''Franchise/MassEffect'', the Council is generally considered TooDumbToLive for ignoring your warnings about the Reapers. But then again, Commander Shepard probably could've come up with some much better arguments.
* Twisted and reversed in [[MetalGearSolid2 Metal Gear Solid 2]]. At the game's climax, Raiden is contacted by Rose (secretly the Patriots' AI in her form) who claims, as the subtitles spell, "You have to beLIEve me!"
* Subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}''. After trying out the local rumor (looking at a blank TV screen on a rainy night will reveal your soulmate), [[HelloInsertNameHere the protagonist]], Yosuke, and Chie are all talking to each other about their experience the previous night. The main character, unlike the other two, was a bit more hands-on, and managed to fit his head into his TV, which he then calmly and casually explains to them. Thinking it to be dream or a bad joke, Yosuke and Chie take him to the electronics aisle of the local department store, sarcastically suggesting that he could climb right in through one of the flatscreen televisions. When they suggest for him to prove what he said that he did, he promptly sticks his hand into the TV, and then, when curiosity overtakes him, ''[[HandInTheHole his whole upper torso]]'', at which point Chie and Yosuke [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJz3NTw6RkI begin freaking out]].
** Unfortunately played straight if he tries to tell his uncle about it later. Despite the TV in the room.



* In the [[TombRaider2013 Tomb Raider Reboot]], one of the supporting cast doesn't believe in Lara's crazy theory that a Japanese demigoddess is controlling the weather on the island. Even though they witnessed storms that have literally formed in ten seconds to take down a massive, E.M.P.-shielded aircraft in one strike. And then an entire cruiser. IN HALF. Eventually, Lara realizes that she doesn't need the acting captain to believe her - just trust her, and her judgment in "going to the center of the island and killing whoever is sniping off people who try to leave the island with super-powerful technology". Since the acting captain has trusted her since the beginning, she agrees.
* ''VirtuesLastReward'': When [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Dio]] and [[ChildrenAreInnocent Quark's]] vote turns out to be "Betray" early in the game, if their opponent is [[GrumpyOldMan Tenmyouji]], Dio attempts to persuade Tenmyouji that Quark pushed the button, while Quark responds by screaming that Dio pushed the button and begging for Tenmyouji to believe him. (This trope turns out better than usual, though: Tenmyouji scolds Quark for losing his temper, but ultimately does believe Quark because he' raised Quark and could be deaf and blind and would ''still'' know if Quark was lying to him.)
* In the second episode of the ''VideoGame/TheWalkingDead'' the player can get one of these. [[spoiler: When everybody is about to chow down to some nice human meat you have four choices, one of which is [[Film/SoylentGreen IT'S PEOPLE]], to which the reply is "yes Lee, we're all people in here."]]



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}''. After trying out the local rumor (looking at a blank TV screen on a rainy night will reveal your soulmate), [[HelloInsertNameHere the protagonist]], Yosuke, and Chie are all talking to each other about their experience the previous night. The main character, unlike the other two, was a bit more hands-on, and managed to fit his head into his TV, which he then calmly and casually explains to them. Thinking it to be dream or a bad joke, Yosuke and Chie take him to the electronics aisle of the local department store, sarcastically suggesting that he could climb right in through one of the flatscreen televisions. When they suggest for him to prove what he said that he did, he promptly sticks his hand into the TV, and then, when curiosity overtakes him, ''[[HandInTheHole his whole upper torso]]'', at which point Chie and Yosuke [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJz3NTw6RkI begin freaking out]].
** Unfortunately played straight if he tries to tell his uncle about it later. Despite the TV in the room.
* In ''Franchise/MassEffect'', the Council is generally considered TooDumbToLive for ignoring your warnings about the Reapers. But then again, Commander Shepard probably could've come up with some much better arguments.



* ''{{In The 1st Degree}}'': James Tobin goes into this a few times. What really makes him look bad is how early on, he changes most of his story, saying that he was so scared and that he did not think anyone would believe him. He even admits to shooting himself in the leg because he wanted to make the situation he was in look like like it was self-defense.
* {{Averted}} / {{Defied}} in ''VideoGame/{{Gothic}} II''. When the [[NoNameGiven Nameless Hero]] has to gain Paladins' support against the dragons in Valley of Mines, he simply tells their commander, "The question is not if you should believe me, but whether you can afford to ''not'' believe me if I'm telling truth." It works pretty well -- the Hero is sent to the Valley for confirmation.
* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', the Thanes are faced with some pretty outlandish stories from their population and might easily fall for this trope, although they have the good sense to [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure ask you to go look into that mysterious cavern]] just to be certain. Surely enough, no matter how crazy the story was it all turns out to be true.
** In the DLC ''Dragonborn'' you can come across I barely clothed madman shouting about how a book inserted his secrets. No matter how calmly you talk to him he'll attempt to attack you. He's right of course, because AllMythsAreTrue, but what makes it maddeningly is that you can know it's true by accessing one of these books before you've ever met him yet you still treat him like a complete nutcase.
* In the second episode of the ''VideoGame/TheWalkingDead'' the player can get one of these. [[spoiler: When everybody is about to chow down to some nice human meat you have four choices, one of which is [[Film/SoylentGreen IT'S PEOPLE]], to which the reply is "yes Lee, we're all people in here."]]
* In the [[TombRaider2013 Tomb Raider Reboot]], one of the supporting cast doesn't believe in Lara's crazy theory that a Japanese demigoddess is controlling the weather on the island. Even though they witnessed storms that have literally formed in ten seconds to take down a massive, E.M.P.-shielded aircraft in one strike. And then an entire cruiser. IN HALF. Eventually, Lara realizes that she doesn't need the acting captain to believe her - just trust her, and her judgment in "going to the center of the island and killing whoever is sniping off people who try to leave the island with super-powerful technology". Since the acting captain has trusted her since the beginning, she agrees.
* Twisted and reversed in [[MetalGearSolid2 Metal Gear Solid 2]]. At the game's climax, Raiden is contacted by Rose (secretly the Patriots' AI in her form) who claims, as the subtitles spell, "You have to beLIEve me!"
* ''VirtuesLastReward'': When [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Dio]] and [[ChildrenAreInnocent Quark's]] vote turns out to be "Betray" early in the game, if their opponent is [[GrumpyOldMan Tenmyouji]], Dio attempts to persuade Tenmyouji that Quark pushed the button, while Quark responds by screaming that Dio pushed the button and begging for Tenmyouji to believe him. (This trope turns out better than usual, though: Tenmyouji scolds Quark for losing his temper, but ultimately does believe Quark because he' raised Quark and could be deaf and blind and would ''still'' know if Quark was lying to him.)



* Averted and Lampshaded in ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'' when Agatha [[http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20070516 tries to convince Von Mekkhan]] that she is the Hetrodyne heir. Von Mekkhan has seen stranger things than talking cats, and while he has seen a lot of pretenders come by, he is willing to give Agatha the opportunity to make her case.



* Averted and Lampshaded in ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'' when Agatha [[http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20070516 tries to convince Von Mekkhan]] that she is the Hetrodyne heir. Von Mekkhan has seen stranger things than talking cats, and while he has seen a lot of pretenders come by, he is willing to give Agatha the opportunity to make her case.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''
** In the commentary for "Homer's Enemy" (featuring the line "This whole plant is insane! Insane, I tell you!") the writers note that if you're trying to convince people you're not crazy, it's not a good idea to end any sentences with "I tell you." Or worse, "I tells you."
** Lampshaded in one [[HalloweenEpisode "Treehouse of Horror" story]] where Kang and Kodos abduct Homer and spray him with booze before releasing him so that his warnings will be dismissed as drunken ravings.
--> '''Homer:''' Why won't anyone believe my crazy story?
* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/StarchaserTheLegendOfOrin'', when Orin is trying to convince the others of the existence of the outside world and gets interrupted by [[BigBad Zygon]].
--> '''Orin:''' He's only telling you what he ''wants'' you to believe!
--> '''Zygon:''' ''(entering the chamber behind Orin)'' Because I want you to believe the ''truth''!



* Jet from ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' does this when he tries to convince the people of Ba Sing Se that Zuko and Iroh are Firebenders.
** {{Lampshaded}} by the Earth King when the Gaang says this regarding his TreacherousAdvisor.
-->'''Earth King''': You invade my palace, lay waste to all my guards, break down my fancy door, and you expect me to ''trust'' you!?
-->'''Toph''': ...He has a good point.
* Early in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', XANA targets the local nuclear plant and the group ultimately decides to send Yumi to tell the adults what's going on. They don't believe her. In fact, pretty much ''any'' time the kids try to tell the adults about XANA's actions, they're dismissed outright. This also happens with their peers a lot.
* In ''WesternAnimation/DangerMouse On The Orient Express'', Penfold has a difficult time getting Greenback's agents and even DM to believe that the important document to be transported to London got eaten by a fish, which did eat it when Penfold was submerged in a Venice canal. Later in the episode, the fish, with said document in its mouth, is served to Greenback for lunch on the train ("So...the half-witted hamster was telling the truth!")
* In an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/DuckTales}}'', Ma Beagle's latest scheme involves pretending to be married to Scrooge [=McDuck=]. Scrooge's attempts to deny being her husband fall under this trope, especially when she demands a "divorce" (meaning that she would get half his fortune), and he blurts out that he'd rather "stay married," which of course the judge interprets as meaning they already *are* married...
* Likewise, EvilTeacher [[ButtMonkey Mr. Crocker]] from ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', [[NoIndoorVoice although he tends to not be quite so lucid]] [[CloudCuckooLander when stating his case]].
-->"'''''[[VerbalTic FAIRY GODPARENTS!!!]]'''''"



* In an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/DuckTales}}'', Ma Beagle's latest scheme involves pretending to be married to Scrooge [=McDuck=]. Scrooge's attempts to deny being her husband fall under this trope, especially when she demands a "divorce" (meaning that she would get half his fortune), and he blurts out that he'd rather "stay married," which of course the judge interprets as meaning they already *are* married...



* ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'': This is the entire reason why nobody ever listens to Dib, not even his sister who ''knows'' that [[TheCuckooLanderWasRight he's correct about Zim being an alien invader.]] [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption Not that it really matters.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', Supergirl has vivid recurring nightmares about killing people. She goes to Green Arrow who is naturally skeptical. Then [[ConspiracyTheorist The Question]] overhears her and is so certain that it's part of a deep government plot that even Supergirl becomes skeptical. He is eventually [[TheCuckoolanderWasRight proven right.]]
* The protagonist in WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes' ''OneFroggyEvening'' follows this trope to a T when he utterly fails to convince anyone (talent agent, theater full of patrons, a policeman) that he is in possession of a singing frog.



* Likewise, EvilTeacher [[ButtMonkey Mr. Crocker]] from ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', [[NoIndoorVoice although he tends to not be quite so lucid]] [[CloudCuckooLander when stating his case]].
-->"'''''[[VerbalTic FAIRY GODPARENTS!!!]]'''''"
* The protagonist in WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes' ''OneFroggyEvening'' follows this trope to a T when he utterly fails to convince anyone (talent agent, theater full of patrons, a policeman) that he is in possession of a singing frog.
* ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'': This is the entire reason why nobody ever listens to Dib, not even his sister who ''knows'' that [[TheCuckooLanderWasRight he's correct about Zim being an alien invader.]] [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption Not that it really matters.]]

to:

* Likewise, EvilTeacher [[ButtMonkey Mr. Crocker]] from ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', [[NoIndoorVoice although he tends to not be quite so lucid]] [[CloudCuckooLander when stating his case]].
-->"'''''[[VerbalTic FAIRY GODPARENTS!!!]]'''''"
* The protagonist in WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes' ''OneFroggyEvening'' follows this trope to a T when he utterly fails
''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''
** In the commentary for "Homer's Enemy" (featuring the line "This whole plant is insane! Insane, I tell you!") the writers note that if you're trying
to convince people you're not crazy, it's not a good idea to end any sentences with "I tell you." Or worse, "I tells you."
** Lampshaded in one [[HalloweenEpisode "Treehouse of Horror" story]] where Kang and Kodos abduct Homer and spray him with booze before releasing him so that his warnings will be dismissed as drunken ravings.
--> '''Homer:''' Why won't
anyone (talent agent, theater full of patrons, a policeman) that he is in possession of a singing frog.
* ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'': This is the entire reason why nobody ever listens to Dib, not even his sister who ''knows'' that [[TheCuckooLanderWasRight he's correct about Zim being an alien invader.]] [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption Not that it really matters.]]
believe my crazy story?



* In ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'', Supergirl has vivid recurring nightmares about killing people. She goes to Green Arrow who is naturally skeptical. Then [[ConspiracyTheorist The Question]] overhears her and is so certain that it's part of a deep government plot that even Supergirl becomes skeptical. He is eventually [[TheCuckoolanderWasRight proven right.]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/DangerMouse On The Orient Express'', Penfold has a difficult time getting Greenback's agents and even DM to believe that the important document to be transported to London got eaten by a fish, which did eat it when Penfold was submerged in a Venice canal. Later in the episode, the fish, with said document in its mouth, is served to Greenback for lunch on the train ("So...the half-witted hamster was telling the truth!")
* Jet from ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' does this when he tries to convince the people of Ba Sing Se that Zuko and Iroh are Firebenders.
** {{Lampshaded}} by the Earth King when the Gaang says this regarding his TreacherousAdvisor.
-->'''Earth King''': You invade my palace, lay waste to all my guards, break down my fancy door, and you expect me to ''trust'' you!?
-->'''Toph''': ...He has a good point.



* Early in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', XANA targets the local nuclear plant and the group ultimately decides to send Yumi to tell the adults what's going on. They don't believe her. In fact, pretty much ''any'' time the kids try to tell the adults about XANA's actions, they're dismissed outright. This also happens with their peers a lot.

to:

* Early Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', XANA targets ''WesternAnimation/StarchaserTheLegendOfOrin'', when Orin is trying to convince the local nuclear plant others of the existence of the outside world and gets interrupted by [[BigBad Zygon]].
--> '''Orin:''' He's only telling you what he ''wants'' you to believe!
--> '''Zygon:''' ''(entering
the group ultimately decides chamber behind Orin)'' Because I want you to send Yumi believe the ''truth''!
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': {{Invoked|Trope}} by the antagonists in [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS6E4Orders "Orders"]]. [[spoiler:Fives, who has found out that all the clone troopers have mysterious chips in their brains, is drugged with a compound that increases his aggression and paranoia, so when he tries
to tell the adults what's going on. They don't believe her. In fact, pretty much ''any'' time the kids try to tell the adults others, like Anakin and Rex, about XANA's actions, they're dismissed outright. This also happens with their peers a lot.the chips, he's incapable of expressing himself coherently. It later turns out, however, that Rex ''did'' listen.]]
18th Feb '17 11:19:43 AM DarkHunter
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-->'''Daniel''': "''Why does everyone think I'm crazy!?'' *beat* Probably because I'm acting like it, aren't I?"

to:

-->'''Daniel''': "''Why does everyone think I'm crazy!?'' *beat* ''[{{Beat}}]'' Probably because I'm acting like it, aren't I?"
7th Jan '17 6:35:00 PM ObsequiousEscargot
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Added DiffLines:

** Several Abbott and Costello films involve Costello's character stumbling upon a dead body, only for the murderer to move the dead body before Costello can bring Abbott's character into the room to see the dead guy.
25th Dec '16 12:13:11 PM Morgenthaler
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* The main character in the famous ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' episode ''Nightmare at 20,000 Feet'' spends most of the episode gradually slipping into a major anxiety attack after seeing a gremlin on the wing of the plane he's riding on, which vanishes whenever anyone else looks at it, and trying to convince everyone that he isn't going insane. Their concern is admittedly justified, because until recently he'd been a patient in an asylum after suffering a nervous breakdown on a plane, and because he's played by [[Creator/WilliamShatner William Shatner's]] ''completely'' [[LargeHam hamming it up]].

to:

* The main character in the famous ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode ''Nightmare at 20,000 Feet'' spends most of the episode gradually slipping into a major anxiety attack after seeing a gremlin on the wing of the plane he's riding on, which vanishes whenever anyone else looks at it, and trying to convince everyone that he isn't going insane. Their concern is admittedly justified, because until recently he'd been a patient in an asylum after suffering a nervous breakdown on a plane, and because he's played by [[Creator/WilliamShatner William Shatner's]] ''completely'' [[LargeHam hamming it up]].
24th Dec '16 11:52:04 AM nombretomado
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* ''{{Arcanum}}'''s (in)famous X-Files quest ends this (as well as ItWasHereISwear) way: when you try to expose the conspiracy, you realize your proof was just, let's say, stolen. For added trauma, when you return to the secret facility where you found it, there's nothing, not even a brick. There are even a number of relatively obscure minor characters (along with a major one) to whom you can present your evidence, but they all either end up dead, have the files stolen from them, or are actually working for the conspiracy.

to:

* ''{{Arcanum}}'''s ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'''s (in)famous X-Files quest ends this (as well as ItWasHereISwear) way: when you try to expose the conspiracy, you realize your proof was just, let's say, stolen. For added trauma, when you return to the secret facility where you found it, there's nothing, not even a brick. There are even a number of relatively obscure minor characters (along with a major one) to whom you can present your evidence, but they all either end up dead, have the files stolen from them, or are actually working for the conspiracy.
16th Nov '16 7:09:18 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/NoTomorrow'': Xavier's method of trying to alert a famous astronomer that an asteroid is (he believes) on a heading with Earth is loudly accosting her in public and behaving like a maniac. Not surprisingly he's been arrested multiple times and the astronomer's taken out a restraining order against him. Even when she's convinced to listen by Evie though and he talks calmly, she still thinks he's nuts.
29th Oct '16 1:21:11 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''ChroniclesOfNarnia/TheSilverChair'', the adventurers come upon a knight who claims to have brief bouts of insanity due to an enchantment, during which he must be restrained. [[spoiler: It turns out to be this trope: he actually has brief bouts of sanity in the midst of what is otherwise an enchantment, but when he becomes un-enchanted, he's so desperate to escape it that he comes across as a raving lunatic.]]
* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire'', Arya overhears a pair of people discussing their massive gambit. However, with most of the discussion going completely over her head, what she does remember of it when she tells her father sounds completely nuts, even though her father is currently investigating part of said gambit. Except it's not, actually, she just ''thought'' it was and presented it to him as such, so he was perhaps right to ignore her (the discussed gambit hasn't actually impacted the plot... [[ChekhovsGun yet]]), if for the wrong reasons.

to:

* In ''ChroniclesOfNarnia/TheSilverChair'', ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', the adventurers come upon a knight who claims to have brief bouts of insanity due to an enchantment, during which he must be restrained. [[spoiler: It turns out to be this trope: he actually has brief bouts of sanity in the midst of what is otherwise an enchantment, but when he becomes un-enchanted, he's so desperate to escape it that he comes across as a raving lunatic.]]
* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire'', ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
**
Arya overhears a pair of people discussing their massive gambit. However, with most of the discussion going completely over her head, what she does remember of it when she tells her father sounds completely nuts, even though her father is currently investigating part of said gambit. Except it's not, actually, she just ''thought'' it was and presented it to him as such, so he was perhaps right to ignore her (the discussed gambit hasn't actually impacted the plot... [[ChekhovsGun yet]]), if for the wrong reasons.



* The first ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' book has no one believing that people are disappearing in the middle of the day, because the man who sees it is considered mad and they don't even see the extra footprints in the bare earth. He actually fetches his one remaining crewmember from her safe place with the idea that people are more likely to believe her, and when ''she'' [[QuicksandSucks disappears]] he hits his DespairEventHorizon.

to:

* ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'':
**
The first ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'' book has no one believing that people are disappearing in the middle of the day, because the man who sees it is considered mad and they don't even see the extra footprints in the bare earth. He actually fetches his one remaining crewmember from her safe place with the idea that people are more likely to believe her, and when ''she'' [[QuicksandSucks disappears]] he hits his DespairEventHorizon.
27th Oct '16 10:07:11 PM nombretomado
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* Duke and company in ''GIJoeRenegades''. The kind, benevolent, paragon of corporate responsibility that is Cobra Industries couldn't ''possibly'' be evil, could they? Starts to be gradually subverted as word of their heroic exploits gets out, and even Flint sees evidence that something much bigger is going on.

to:

* Duke and company in ''GIJoeRenegades''.''WesternAnimation/GIJoeRenegades''. The kind, benevolent, paragon of corporate responsibility that is Cobra Industries couldn't ''possibly'' be evil, could they? Starts to be gradually subverted as word of their heroic exploits gets out, and even Flint sees evidence that something much bigger is going on.
24th Oct '16 9:42:48 PM Fireblood
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* At first the main character of ''Film/TakeShelter'' tries to hide his fears because he knows everyone will assume he's crazy. Eventually, though, he has a full-blown outburst at a work event, resulting in the page quote.

to:

* At first the main character of ''Film/TakeShelter'' tries to hide his fears because he knows everyone will assume he's crazy. Eventually, though, he has a full-blown outburst at a work event, resulting in the page quote.event.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.YouHaveToBelieveMe