History Main / YouHaveResearchedBreathing

16th Nov '16 7:16:18 AM ChronoLegion
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* In ''Literature/CavernsAndCreatures'', Cooper forgets how to read when he is transported into the titular tabletop game, all because he happened to have rolled a very low Intelligence score and chose to be a half-orc (which gives a an additional -2 to his Intelligence score). Even after making it back to the real world, he's still a half-orc, so the game rules still apply. He can't even read the word "cat". The only exception is when he's reading character sheets, since those aren't really a part of the game world. At least, in the real world, signs for businesses and the like tend to have recognizable logos even without knowing how to read them. In the second book, he's trying to find a tavern that someone called "Horse Head". Naturally, he's looking for a drawing of a horse in lieu of being able to read the name. As it turns out, the name is actually "Whore's Head" (same pronunciation), and the drawing on the sign is that of a woman.

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* In ''Literature/CavernsAndCreatures'', Cooper forgets how to read when he is transported into the titular tabletop game, all because he happened to have rolled a very low Intelligence score and chose to be a half-orc (which gives a an additional -2 to his Intelligence score). Even after making it back to the real world, he's still a half-orc, so the game rules still apply. He can't even read the word "cat". The only exception is when he's reading character sheets, since those aren't really a part of the game world. At least, in the real world, signs for businesses and the like tend to have recognizable logos even without knowing how to read them. In the second book, he's trying to find a tavern that someone called "Horse Head". Naturally, he's looking for a drawing of a horse in lieu of being able to read the name. As it turns out, the name is actually "Whore's Head" (same pronunciation), and the drawing on the sign is that of a woman.
woman. Also, the way magic works in the game, any caster has to spend time each day re-learning his spells, all of which can be only used a limited number of times per day before he ''forgets'' them. The whole series is a jab at ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''.
16th Nov '16 7:12:47 AM ChronoLegion
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* In ''Literature/CavernsAndCreatures'', Cooper forgets how to read when he is transported into the titular tabletop game, all because he happened to have rolled a very low Intelligence score and chose to be a half-orc (which gives a an additional -2 to his Intelligence score). Even after making it back to the real world, he's still a half-orc, so the game rules still apply. He can't even read the word "cat". The only exception is when he's reading character sheets, since those aren't really a part of the game world. At least, in the real world, signs for businesses and the like tend to have recognizable logos even without knowing how to read them. In the second book, he's trying to find a tavern that someone called "Horse Head". Naturally, he's looking for a drawing of a horse in lieu of being able to read the name. As it turns out, the name is actually "Whore's Head" (same pronunciation), and the drawing on the sign is that of a woman.
16th Nov '16 7:05:14 AM ChronoLegion
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** You must also research the ability for your military forces to remember and report to you what technologies they have seen other races use in battle, and the ship types.

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** You must also research the ability for your military forces to remember and report to you what technologies they have seen other races use in battle, and the ship types. However, as soon as you research the tech, it turns out to be already full of the stuff you've seen by that point, which means they ''have'' been recording the data but just didn't feel the need to let their commanding officer's know.
16th Nov '16 6:55:22 AM ChronoLegion
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** Partially subverted in the 2013 spiritual successor 'Xenonauts': alien weapons could be picked up and used by human soldiers, but doing so severely reduced their accuracy and reflexes due to the fact that the alien weapons were designed to be ergonomic for aliens, not humans, and humans would find them unwieldy. Research into alien weapons, however, allows the development of energy weapons - first laser weapons with alien power sources, followed by a replication of plasma weapons designed for human soldiers, and finally mag weapons (i.e coilguns and railguns) to surpass alien weapons entirely.

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** Partially subverted in the 2013 spiritual successor 'Xenonauts': ''VideoGame/{{Xenonauts}}'': alien weapons could be picked up and used by human soldiers, but doing so severely reduced their accuracy and reflexes due to the fact that the alien weapons were designed to be ergonomic for aliens, not humans, and humans would find them unwieldy. Research into alien weapons, however, allows the development of energy weapons - first laser weapons with alien power sources, followed by a replication of plasma weapons designed for human soldiers, and finally mag weapons (i.e coilguns and railguns) to surpass alien weapons entirely.
16th Nov '16 5:48:27 AM AurigaNexus
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** Partially subverted in the 2013 spiritual successor 'Xenonauts': alien weapons could be picked up and used by human soldiers, but doing so severely reduced their accuracy and reflexes due to the fact that the alien weapons were designed to be ergonomic for aliens, not humans, and humans would find them unwieldy. Research into alien weapons, however, allows the development of energy weapons - first laser weapons with alien power sources, followed by a replication of plasma weapons designed for human soldiers, and finally mag weapons (i.e coilguns and railguns) to surpass alien weapons entirely.
16th Nov '16 2:27:28 AM Jdb1984
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*** Granted, your PlayerCharacter was suffering from amnesia.
7th Nov '16 5:00:36 PM TheLearnedSoldier
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** Surprisingly this is a bit of TruthinTelevision (or Games, anyway), as in reality firearms tactics took centuries to get to a point we'd consider common sense, today. For example the idea that you'd support your flimsy musket-wielding troops with pikes to fight their worst enemies, cavalry, took decades(as did the realisation that armor was basically useless against guns--nations historically tried to make armour heavier, not eschew it, until someone realised 'this isn't working at all'), and then the concept of having soldiers fight in anything other than lines when muskets became rifles and therefore much more accurate took ''almost the entire American Civil War'' to figure out, leading to the atrocious death rates in the war. And even then most nations didn't really stop doing that altogether until World War One

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** Surprisingly this is a bit of TruthinTelevision TruthInTelevision (or Games, anyway), as in reality firearms tactics took centuries to get to a point we'd consider common sense, today. For example the idea that you'd support your flimsy musket-wielding troops with pikes to fight their worst enemies, cavalry, took decades(as did the realisation that armor was basically useless against guns--nations historically tried to make armour heavier, not eschew it, until someone realised 'this isn't working at all'), and then the concept of having soldiers fight in anything other than lines when muskets became rifles and therefore much more accurate took ''almost the entire American Civil War'' to figure out, leading to the atrocious death rates in the war. And even then most nations didn't really stop doing that altogether until World War One
7th Nov '16 4:59:35 PM TheLearnedSoldier
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**Surprisingly this is a bit of TruthinTelevision (or Games, anyway), as in reality firearms tactics took centuries to get to a point we'd consider common sense, today. For example the idea that you'd support your flimsy musket-wielding troops with pikes to fight their worst enemies, cavalry, took decades(as did the realisation that armor was basically useless against guns--nations historically tried to make armour heavier, not eschew it, until someone realised 'this isn't working at all'), and then the concept of having soldiers fight in anything other than lines when muskets became rifles and therefore much more accurate took ''almost the entire American Civil War'' to figure out, leading to the atrocious death rates in the war. And even then most nations didn't really stop doing that altogether until World War One
7th Nov '16 4:44:06 PM TheLearnedSoldier
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' does shed some light on the power armor training requirements, since now each suit is a walking tank that folds around and encapsulates the player. It looks like getting it wrong would result in losing a limb. Of course, this raises more questions, seeing as almost anyone else in the game can still use it.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' does shed some light on the power armor training requirements, since now each suit is a walking tank that folds around and encapsulates the player. It looks like getting it wrong would result in losing a limb. Of course, this raises more questions, seeing as almost anyone else in the game can still use it. At least the Player has good reason to know how to use it, though; both characters are heavily implied or outright stated to be veterans of the Sino-American War in Alaska(with one theory being they actually met in said war), so they would logically know how to use the Americans' power armour, and it's not unbelievable that other variants wouldn't be more advanced. And actually encountering enemies with power armour(outside of groups like the Brotherhood who specialise in it) in the game is infrequent enough to be considered a minor boss battle in most cases and so it's not unbelievable that those rare individuals somehow learned how to use it, with the furthest belief stretch being that bandits can use it(though visually it appears they can't actually repair it properly, as most bandit suits are just metal plates haphazardly welded onto a powered exoskeleton.
30th Oct '16 11:59:25 PM Atreides
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' does shed some light on the power armor training requirements, since now each suit is a walking tank that folds around and encapsulates the player. It looks like getting it wrong would result in losing a limb. Of course, this raises more questions, seeing as almost anyone else in the game can still use it.
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