History Main / YouCantGoHomeAgain

22nd Oct '16 11:35:45 AM siberia82
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* ''Film/XMen'':

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* ''Film/XMen'':''Film/XMenFilmSeries'':
9th Oct '16 7:47:15 PM Nerrin
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* ''3:16 Carnage Amongst the Stars'' opens by touching on this trope and then inevitably hammers it in hard on any Player Characters - all [=PCs=] are outcast from the utopian society on Earth, and forced into glorified penal legions sent to "proactively defend" Earth by committing genocide on all other life in the galaxy. Any character who lasts long enough can develop a "Hatred for Home" trait that risks them eventually going back to WhereItAllBegan... to exterminate Earth in revenge for what they were forced to do.
8th Oct '16 3:50:19 PM DustSnitch
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* A minor plot point in ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' and partially a source of angst in the first parts of the story. The kids get over it fairly quickly though. [[spoiler: The reason they can't go home is because Earth is a desolate wasteland and they're the sole survivors of mankind]].

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* A minor plot point in ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' is that Sburb, a video game which can manipulate physical objects, is targeted at players who are entering adolescence and partially beginning to want to escape their homes for a source life of angst in the first parts of the story. The kids get over it fairly quickly though. their own. [[spoiler: The reason they can't go Sburb also enforces this, since playing it eventually sends players to a Pocket Universe while their home planet is because Earth is a desolate wasteland and they're destroyed by meteors created by the sole survivors of mankind]].game.]]
16th Aug '16 1:38:45 PM intastiel
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* ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' goes to great lengths to describe why a fledgling should never go back to its mortal life. Even if its old friends and family can cope with its return as a vampire; even if the vampire has enough HeroicWillpower to keep its HorrorHunger and {{Unstoppable Rage}}s in check; the dysfunctional, sadistic, and highly lethal vampiric societies ''will'' find out and take a ''very'' dim view of mortals learning about their existence.
* In ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheLost'', every newly-made Changeling quickly learns that the [[TheFairFolk Fae]] who abducted and transformed them left a [[ReplicantSnatching lifelike impostor in their place]]. Good luck convincing the family that the deformed, unhinged version of their loved one who showed up out of nowhere is actually the real person. Even if they manage, Changelings are irreversibly bound to Fate, which tends to turn them into {{Doom Magnet}}s for mortals they get too close to.
20th Jul '16 4:24:43 PM siberia82
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* After Stryker's raid on the school in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'', they stopped by Bobby Drake's house in hopes of regrouping, which in the process revealed his mutant abilities to his parents. His ''own brother'' calls the police on the group despite them coming with no ill intentions. After Pyro stupidly attacks the police in the standoff that follows, he's forced to flee with the others knowing he can never come back.

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* ''Film/XMen'':
** ''Film/X2XMenUnited'':
After Stryker's raid on the school in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'', they stopped school, Bobby, Rogue, Logan and Pyro stop by Bobby Drake's the Drake family house in hopes of regrouping, which in the process revealed his reveals Bobby's mutant abilities to his parents. His ''own brother'' calls the police on the group and reports them as a threat despite them coming with no the mutants not harbouring any ill intentions. After Pyro stupidly attacks the police officers in the standoff that follows, he's Bobby is forced to flee with the others knowing he can never come back.back.
** ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'': Invoked by a young Victor Creed after James Howlett kills his family's groundskeeper. The boys are being pursued by lawmen and search dogs.
--->'''Jimmy''': I want to go home.\\
'''Victor''': We can't.
4th Jul '16 3:01:16 AM Morgenthaler
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** By the end of ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke has lost pretty much everything. His aunt and uncle are dead, he can't go back to the farm, because he would have been killed even before the Death Star incident thanks to the droids. [[TheObiWan His mentor]] dies, and Biggs, his best friend, dies being a human shield protecting him during the Battle of Yavin. [[TraumaCongaLine This all takes place over the course of a couple days tops]]. A few expanded universe novels imply that the only thing that got Luke though was the adrenaline and the fact that he was given practically no downtime for him to think about it. Subverted in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', when he has to return to rescue Han Solo from Jabba the Hutt.

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** By the end of ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke has lost pretty much everything. His aunt and uncle are dead, he can't go back to the farm, because he would have been killed even before the Death Star incident thanks to the droids. [[TheObiWan [[MentorOccupationalHazard His mentor]] dies, mentor dies]], and Biggs, his best friend, dies being a human shield protecting him during the Battle of Yavin. [[TraumaCongaLine This all takes place over the course of a couple days tops]]. A few expanded universe novels imply that the only thing that got Luke though was the adrenaline and the fact that he was given practically no downtime for him to think about it. Subverted in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', when he has to return to rescue Han Solo from Jabba the Hutt.
8th Jun '16 8:58:43 PM erraticegomania
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* In ''Literature/{{Twig}}'', Sylvester realizes, after he deserts [[AcademyOfEvil Radham Academy]] with Jamie, that by killing the Baron Richmond and taking Jamie he's finally crossed the line and made Radham and his fellow Lambs his enemy, and that he can't go home, not alive, at least.
11th Mar '16 1:17:00 PM Wyldchyld
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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': The first three volumes are set in Beacon Academy, the boarding school that is training the titular team of students and their friends and colleagues. By the volume 3 finale, the girls are approaching the end of their first year in a four-year programme. [[spoiler:However, the villains instigate an invasion of the school by the Monsters Of Grimm, leaving the school destroyed, the teachers and students evacuated, the headmaster missing, and a magically-frozen Grimm Dragon passively attracting more Grimm to the school's ruins. The finale ends with the titular team scattered, and a cross-continental quest beginning to try and seek answers to who the villains are.]]

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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': The first three volumes are set in Beacon Academy, the boarding school that is training the titular team of students and their friends and colleagues. By the volume 3 finale, the girls are approaching the end of their first year in a four-year programme. [[spoiler:However, the villains instigate an invasion of the school by the Monsters Of of Grimm, leaving the school destroyed, the teachers and students evacuated, the headmaster missing, and a magically-frozen Grimm Dragon passively attracting more Grimm to the school's ruins. The finale ends with the titular team scattered, and a cross-continental quest beginning to try and seek answers to who the villains are.]]
11th Mar '16 1:16:29 PM Wyldchyld
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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': As of the Volume 3 finale, [[spoiler: [[ExtranormalInstitute Beacon]] has been overrun by Grimm and the frozen dragon's presence is attracting even more.]]

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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': As of The first three volumes are set in Beacon Academy, the Volume boarding school that is training the titular team of students and their friends and colleagues. By the volume 3 finale, [[spoiler: [[ExtranormalInstitute Beacon]] has been overrun the girls are approaching the end of their first year in a four-year programme. [[spoiler:However, the villains instigate an invasion of the school by the Monsters Of Grimm, leaving the school destroyed, the teachers and students evacuated, the headmaster missing, and a magically-frozen Grimm and the frozen dragon's presence is Dragon passively attracting even more.more Grimm to the school's ruins. The finale ends with the titular team scattered, and a cross-continental quest beginning to try and seek answers to who the villains are.]]
9th Mar '16 3:36:19 PM mlsmithca
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!!Examples

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!!Examples
!!Example subpages
[[index]]
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/AnimeAndManga
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/{{Literature}}
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/LiveActionTV
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/VideoGames
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/WesternAnimation
* YouCantGoHomeAgain/RealLife
[[/index]]
----



[[folder: Anime And Manga]]
* Pretty much everyone in ''Manga/SevenSeeds''. Some even try to get back home, but they don't like what they find.
* ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'':
** Guts had to flee from his original mercenary band after he killed his adoptive father in self defense and the other members sought to avenge their leader's death. Later, it was revealed that Casca joined the Band of the Hawk because if she were to go home, she would be [[spoiler: arrested and tortured for killing a noble in self defense of AttemptedRape]]. On the grander scale of things, the whole Band of the Hawk was forced to flee the Kingdom of Midland upon [[spoiler: Griffith's arrest for high treason - which was popping the cherry of the princess.]]
** Then there's Shierke, [[DoomedHometown whose forest home was burned to the ground]] by Griffith's demonic squad of apostles in order to prevent [[spoiler: a witch who would be strong enough to stop him.]]
* [[spoiler:Faye Valentine]] from ''Anime/CowboyBebop''. [[spoiler:She eventually finds the spot where her home used to be, only to discover there's nothing there now, not even ruins. She draws the layout of her house, as well as a rectangle where her bed used to be, in the dirt, and lies there alone]].
** In fact, if you're willing to extend this to psychologically or spiritually being unable to return to home, then the entire main cast could count. An underlying theme of the series seems to be that the Bebop is the only home Spike, Jet and Faye have left, hence why they default to return to it whenever they strike out on their own.
* In ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', Ed and Al burn down their house so they won't be able to give up their mission. Of course, Pinako and Winry's house is always open to them, so they're not as homeless as they'd like to think.
** Hohenheim is convinced they did it so as not to face up to the whole "brought back an abomination of nature instead of our dead mother" thing every time they walked by the study.
--> "It's no different from when a child wets the bed and then hides the sheets. You were running away...Edward."
** In the ending of the [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist 2003 anime's]] movie, ''[[TheMovie The Conqueror of Shambhala]],'' this is made even more poignant [[spoiler:as the Elrics find themselves unable to return to their own world]].
* The protagonists of ''Anime/{{Gunbuster}}'', due to [[spoiler:the time dilation effect. By the time they make it back to Earth, everyone they've ever known is long dead. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming The people of Earth still remember them and welcome them back regardless.]]]]
* Caro of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStrikers'' was exiled from her tribe when she was very young because [[PersonOfMassDestruction she was too powerful a]] [[SummonMagic summoner]]. Thankfully for her, while she can't return to her homeland ever again, Fate adopts her and gives her a new place to call home.
* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' [[spoiler:Itachi Uchiha. After killing his entire clan on orders he can never return to Konoha without dying or starting a civil war]].
** To a lesser extent, [[spoiler:Sasuke Uchiha. After learning the truth of Itachi's actions, he no longer has any concept of home; all he wants is to make everyone else suffer]].
** [[spoiler:Obito Uchiha, later known as [[BigBad Tobi]]. He's rescued from certain death by Madara, but the cave that they are in has the exits blocked off (intentionally) with a giant boulder, so Obito ''literally'' can't leave. Eventually [[StartOfDarkness something]] happens that causes Obito to completely lose any desire to return, however. ]]
* Zoro of ''Franchise/OnePiece'' sets out to sea to find Mihawk, but is unable to find his way back due to his [[NoSenseOfDirection poor sense of direction]].
** Jimbei tries to avert this when he becomes a Warlord of the Sea. One of his requirements for joining is that the World Government would allow any ex-slaves to return to Fishman Island. However, once Jimbei resigned from his position, the pardon was revoked and the remaining Sun Pirates were forced to leave.
* In ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', Ashitaka is permanently exiled from his home village to protect everyone from his curse.
* ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' - [[GenderBender Ranma]] can't go home because his father made a vow to his mother that if he failed to make their son into a real man, father and son would commit seppuku and their mother would be the one to cut off their heads -- and turning into a girl when [[BalefulPolymorph splashed with cold water]] is pretty much the opposite of being a real man. [[NoSenseOfDirection Ryoga]] can't go home because he can't find it, and it's not like his parents would be home if he did. Shampoo can't go home until she claims Ranma as her husband. It's not clear if Ukyo even ''had'' a home other than her dad's ''okonomiyaki'' cart.
* In ''Roleplay/RecordOfLodossWar'', Parn is kicked out of his village at the beginning of the story. He dons his father's armor and subsequently burns his house down and from then has to go WalkingTheEarth.
* ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': To save his father and his siblings from retaliation after he delivered a beating to criminals ruling the region where they lived, Sanosuke left them forever.
** Kenshin himself can't go home because [[spoiler:he was an orphan, and bandits murdered the girls who were attempting to take care of him.]] Kenshin's internalizing of this trope is a major motivator in the second and third arcs of the series.
* Holo of ''LightNovel/SpiceAndWolf''. Her hometown might be the only place she belongs, and it's rumored to have been destroyed centuries after she left. Even if it still exists, she knows that the passage of time has likely changed it into something completely different. She won't give up until she acknowledges it herself, though.
* ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' has young Chihiro and her ignorant parents wander into what appears to be a bankrupt theme park and explore. Long story short, she is forced to sign a contract, which turns her into Sen, a serving girl who must work in Yubaba's Bath House of the Gods for all eternity, unless she wants her TransformationTrauma'd parents to be ground up and [[ItMakesSenseInContext made into sausages]]. The whole point of the film is her learning how to be more mature and resourceful in order to reverse this fate.
** Also [[spoiler: Haku]] is unable to return home and that is the reason why they signed a contract with Yubaba. It turns out [[spoiler: their river was filled up to make room for apartments.]]
* ''TsubasaReservoirChronicle'': [[spoiler:Syaoran can't go home because he wasn't meant to exist in the first place, and he and his replacement Watanuki are stuck in similar predicaments: Syaoran will wander the worlds forever while Watanuki is stuck in the TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday forever, lest their existences destabilize time and space. At least they both have company, which includes Faye, who destroyed his world.]]
* Youko spends the first arc of ''TheTwelveKingdoms'' trying to get back to her own world. [[spoiler:Eventually, she comes to realize that she is needed far more in Kei than she is at home, and reluctantly agrees to become the Glory-King.]]
** Honestly, every ''kaikyaku'' ("People from Beyond the Sea") deals with this, since going to the "[=12K=]" world is a one-way trip[[note]]The only kaikyaku who ''aren't'' absolutely miserable in the new world are those who were meant to be there in the first place (like Youko, Enki, and King En), or those who are given the gods' blessing and become immortals (Suzu, although it takes over a century for her to cheer up). This is due mostly to the Kingdoms' language being utterly incomprehensible to outsiders, and also prejudice[[/note]]. In the animated version, Yoko's companions Sugimoto and Asano (the latter an anime-only character) both have to come to grips with this.
* This happens in [[Manga/VampirePrincessMiyu Vampire Princess Yui]], after [[spoiler:Yui's powers fully awaken ''and'' her last surviving relative, her grandmother, died.]]
* In the later installments of the ''Anime/{{Macross}}'' franchise, human civilization is spread across multiple colony ships and colonized planets, and it is implied that it is virtually impossible to travel back to Earth from most of them, at least unless you happen to be very rich and/or influential.
* Several characters deal with this in ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', with many a DoomedHometown due to invasions by Titans. Mikasa lost her childhood home when kidnappers murdered her parents, though she's immediately adopted into the Yeager family. A year later, Shiganshina is destroyed and the main trio of Eren, Mikasa, and Armin are left living as refugees. Hannes discusses this trope, longing to return to the peaceful days of the past....but [[spoiler: he's killed while protecting Eren and Mikasa]], who realize those days can never be reclaimed. Reiner and Bertolt, fellow refugees from Wall Maria, are driven by their desire to return to their lost village.....though Reiner acknowledges this trope, admitting there's nothing left to go back to. [[spoiler: Though they ''do'' head back to their true home after their [[TheMole cover]] is blown, it's fairly clear from their BecomingTheMask that Reiner was correct about the "home" of their childhood being gone]]. After three years away, Sasha finally returns home to find her village unrecognizable -- what was once an isolated hunting village deep in the forest is now a clear-out farming village that raises horses. And in a particularly heartbreaking example, [[spoiler: Connie's village is destroyed when the Beast Titan transforms the villagers into Titans]]. Barely holding back tears, he states that he no longer has a home to return to.
* All three main characters in ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''- Gin, Hana, and Miyuki- believe this. Gin because [[spoiler:he left due to being unable to support his family, believing they'd be better off without him]]; Hana because [[spoiler:she lost her temper and attacked a heckler during her singing act at her mother's bar]]; and Miyuki because [[spoiler:she believes her father will have her arrested for stabbing him in the heat of the moment during a fight.]] Ultimately, over the course of the story, [[spoiler:all three are proven wrong in the best way possible.]]
* In ''Manga/{{Cyborg 009}}'', the cyborgs are all told that it's impossible to go back to their previous lives, lest the Black Ghost organization find them. Most of the cyborgs don't have much to actually return to, but the 2001 anime still has a rather sad episode where 003 reveals to 009 that she can't go back to her brother because the Black Ghost organization had her cryogenically frozen for so long, her brother would be an old man if he was even still alive.
* In ''LightNovel/SundayWithoutGod'', after Ai's [[DoomedHometown village is destroyed]], she decides to travel the world God has abandoned in hopes of finding a way to save it.
* In Tahakata's Princess Kaguya, Kaguya finds herself languishing in her upper-class life and in a surreal dream that appears to overlap with reality, she escapes her palace and finds that her old home in the countryside had faded and her friends had migrated elsewhere. Even if the option were available, she would return to nothing back home.
* ''Manga/SchoolLive'':
** It initially seemed a bit strange that Yuki was living in the school and doesn't even think to go home until later in the first episode. But once TheReveal that they are living in a ZombieApocalypse, it makes sense that none of the girls can return home.
** The anime didn't adapt this scene however Kurumi ''did'' visit her home once. There was no sign of her family and everything was in shambles.
** Later, [[spoiler: a rescue helicopter crashes near the school, starting a fire that destroys most of the girls' supplies and survival gear (the anime scrapped the helicopter and the zombies themselves caused a fire). With the school no longer a viable shelter, the girls "graduate" and leave to find a government safe zone.]]

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[[folder: Anime And Manga]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Pretty much everyone in ''Manga/SevenSeeds''. Some even try This trope is the premise of the story of the ''ComicBook/SilverSurfer''. After sacrificing himself to get back home, but they don't like what they find.
* ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'':
** Guts had
become a slave to flee a supernatural godlike [[PlanetEater destroyer of worlds]] (to save his own homeworld, of course), the hero's memory is taken from him AND his original mercenary band homeworld gets displaced. After he (very quickly into the story) regains his memories, the rest of the plot is largely about finding his home planet again.
* Occurs to mutant alligator Leatherhead in ''Comicbook/{{Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles|Mirage}}''
after he killed his adoptive father in self defense and is inadvertently left behind on Earth by the other members sought escaping Utroms; several stories involve him unsuccessfully trying to avenge their leader's death. Later, it was revealed that Casca joined reach the Band Utrom homeworld.
* This is the premise
of the Hawk because if she were to go home, she would be [[spoiler: arrested and tortured for killing a noble in self defense ''Comicbook/{{Legion of AttemptedRape]]. On the grander scale Super-Heroes}}'' story Legion Lost. A group of things, the whole Band of the Hawk was forced to flee the Kingdom of Midland upon [[spoiler: Griffith's arrest for high treason - which was popping the cherry of the princess.]]
** Then there's Shierke, [[DoomedHometown whose forest home was burned to the ground]] by Griffith's demonic squad of apostles in order to prevent [[spoiler: a witch who would be strong enough to stop him.]]
* [[spoiler:Faye Valentine]] from ''Anime/CowboyBebop''. [[spoiler:She eventually finds the spot where her home used to be, only to discover there's nothing there now, not even ruins. She draws the layout of her house, as well as a rectangle where her bed used to be, in the dirt, and lies there alone]].
** In fact, if you're willing to extend this to psychologically or spiritually being unable to return to home, then the entire main cast could count. An underlying theme of the series seems to be that the Bebop is the only home Spike, Jet and Faye have left, hence why they default to return to it whenever they strike out on their own.
* In ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', Ed and Al burn down their house so they won't be able to give up their mission. Of course, Pinako and Winry's house is always open to them, so they're not as homeless as they'd like to think.
** Hohenheim is convinced they did it so as not to face up to the whole "brought back an abomination of nature instead of our dead mother" thing every time they walked by the study.
--> "It's no different from when a child wets the bed and then hides the sheets. You were running away...Edward."
** In the ending of the [[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist 2003 anime's]] movie, ''[[TheMovie The Conqueror of Shambhala]],'' this is made even more poignant [[spoiler:as the Elrics
Legionnaires find themselves galaxies away from Earth in a thrashed starbase.
* Creator/AlanMoore wrote a ''Time Twister'' for ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' centered around a character, Sideways Scuttleton, who can travel to alternate universes by "wiggling his back in a certain way." Unfortunately, he didn't count on his back going out in his later years, making it difficult to him to return to his own universe. The story is also possibly a subversion because when he asks someone for bus fare in a dimension that he's pretty certain is his own, the man produces the British £1 coin which upsets Scuttleton because in his dimension people use paper notes instead of coins; however, the story was written shortly after such coins were first introduced in 1983, and Scuttleton very well may have stumbled into his home dimension without fully realizing it.
* Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck combines this with StrangerInAFamiliarLand. Having spent most of his teen and adult life abroad, Scrooge has a great deal of trouble fitting in with the traditional Scottish people. He decides to begin a new life in America, this time bringing his sisters along for the ride.
* Used as the in-story reason for Comicbook/{{Static}} joining the Comicbook/TeenTitans. He was worried that his family believed him to be dead due to the months he spent in captivity, so he stayed with the Titans for a while until he could work up the nerve to return home and confront his parents.
* When ComicBook/PowerGirl finally had her back story settled during ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' it was decided that she still came from the alternate universe of Earth-2 which had been destroyed in ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths''. Under GeoffJohns run Karen struggled with being the sole survivor of an entire universe, until she was seemingly sent back to Earth-2 by the being called Gog. The residents of Earth-2 believed theirs was the only Earth that survived the first Crisis, until it was discovered that this Earth-2 was a brand new version with a copy of Power Girl already living in it. Karen was then hunted down like a criminal because her copy believed she was an impostor who had something to do with the disappearance of Superman.
* The ''ComicBook/GreenLantern''[=/=]''Film/StarTrek'' crossover "The Spectrum War" ends with some of the surviving Lanterns (John Stewart, Hal Jordan and Saint Walker) serving on the ''Enterprise'', some (Kilowog, Guy Gardner and Star Sapphire) remaining on Earth, the remaining (Sinestro, Atrocious and Larfleeze) MIA but all of them
unable to return to their own world]].
universe.
* The protagonists of ''Anime/{{Gunbuster}}'', due to [[spoiler:the time dilation effect. By the time they make it back to Earth, everyone they've ever known is long dead. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming The people of Earth still remember them and welcome them back regardless.]]]]
* Caro of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStrikers'' was exiled
As one might expect from her tribe when she was very young because [[PersonOfMassDestruction she was too powerful a]] [[SummonMagic summoner]]. Thankfully for her, while she can't return to her homeland ever again, Fate adopts her and gives her a new place to call home.
* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' [[spoiler:Itachi Uchiha. After killing his entire clan on orders he can never return to Konoha without dying or starting a civil war]].
** To a lesser extent, [[spoiler:Sasuke Uchiha. After learning the truth of Itachi's actions, he no longer has any concept of home; all he wants is to make everyone else suffer]].
** [[spoiler:Obito Uchiha, later known as [[BigBad Tobi]]. He's rescued from certain death by Madara, but the cave that they are in has the exits blocked off (intentionally) with a giant boulder, so Obito ''literally'' can't leave. Eventually [[StartOfDarkness something]] happens that causes Obito to completely lose any desire to return, however. ]]
* Zoro of ''Franchise/OnePiece'' sets out to sea to find Mihawk, but is unable to find his way back due to his [[NoSenseOfDirection poor sense of direction]].
** Jimbei tries to avert this when he becomes a Warlord of the Sea. One of his requirements for joining is that the World Government would allow any ex-slaves to return to Fishman Island. However, once Jimbei resigned from his position, the pardon was revoked and the remaining Sun Pirates were forced to leave.
* In ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', Ashitaka is permanently exiled from his home village to protect everyone from his curse.
* ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' - [[GenderBender Ranma]] can't go home because his father made a vow to his mother that if he failed to make
their son into a real man, father and son would commit seppuku and their mother would be team name, the one to cut off their heads -- and turning into a girl when [[BalefulPolymorph splashed with cold water]] is pretty much ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' are all displaced kids; the opposite of being a real man. [[NoSenseOfDirection Ryoga]] can't go home because he can't find it, and it's not like his parents would be home if he did. Shampoo can't go home until she claims Ranma as her husband. It's not clear if Ukyo even ''had'' a home other than her dad's ''okonomiyaki'' cart.
* In ''Roleplay/RecordOfLodossWar'', Parn is kicked out of his village at the beginning of the story. He dons his father's armor and subsequently burns his house down and from then has to go WalkingTheEarth.
* ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': To save his father and his siblings from retaliation after he delivered a beating to criminals ruling the region where they lived, Sanosuke left them forever.
** Kenshin himself can't go home because [[spoiler:he was an orphan, and bandits murdered the girls who were attempting to take care of him.]] Kenshin's internalizing of this trope is a major motivator in the second and third arcs of the series.
* Holo of ''LightNovel/SpiceAndWolf''. Her hometown might be the only place she belongs, and it's rumored to have been destroyed centuries after she left. Even if it still exists, she knows that the passage of time has likely changed it into something completely different. She won't give up until she acknowledges it herself, though.
* ''Anime/SpiritedAway'' has young Chihiro and her ignorant parents wander into what appears to be a bankrupt theme park and explore. Long story short, she is forced to sign a contract, which turns her into Sen, a serving girl who must work in Yubaba's Bath House of the Gods for all eternity, unless she wants her TransformationTrauma'd parents to be ground up and [[ItMakesSenseInContext made into sausages]]. The whole point of the film is her learning how to be more mature and resourceful in order to reverse this fate.
** Also [[spoiler: Haku]] is unable to return home and that is the reason why they signed a contract with Yubaba. It turns out [[spoiler: their river was filled up to make room for apartments.]]
* ''TsubasaReservoirChronicle'': [[spoiler:Syaoran can't go home because he wasn't meant to exist in the first place, and he and his replacement Watanuki are stuck in similar predicaments: Syaoran will wander the worlds forever while Watanuki is stuck in the TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday forever, lest their existences destabilize time and space. At least they both have company, which includes Faye, who destroyed his world.]]
* Youko spends the first arc of ''TheTwelveKingdoms'' trying to get back to her own world. [[spoiler:Eventually, she comes to realize that she is needed far more in Kei than she is at home, and reluctantly agrees to become the Glory-King.]]
** Honestly, every ''kaikyaku'' ("People from Beyond the Sea") deals with this, since going to the "[=12K=]" world is a one-way trip[[note]]The only kaikyaku who ''aren't'' absolutely miserable in the new world are those who were meant to be there in the first place (like Youko, Enki, and King En), or those who are given the gods' blessing and become immortals (Suzu, although it takes over a century for her to cheer up). This is due mostly to the Kingdoms' language being utterly incomprehensible to outsiders, and also prejudice[[/note]]. In the animated version, Yoko's companions Sugimoto and Asano (the latter an anime-only character) both have to come to grips with this.
* This happens in [[Manga/VampirePrincessMiyu Vampire Princess Yui]], after [[spoiler:Yui's powers fully awaken ''and'' her last surviving relative, her grandmother, died.]]
* In the later installments of the ''Anime/{{Macross}}'' franchise, human civilization is spread across multiple colony ships and colonized planets, and it is implied that it is virtually impossible to travel back to Earth from most of them, at least unless you happen to be very rich and/or influential.
* Several characters deal with this in ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', with many a DoomedHometown due to invasions by Titans. Mikasa lost her childhood home when kidnappers murdered her parents, though she's immediately adopted into the Yeager family. A year later, Shiganshina is destroyed and the main trio of Eren, Mikasa, and Armin are left living as refugees. Hannes discusses this trope, longing to return to the peaceful days of the past....but [[spoiler: he's killed while protecting Eren and Mikasa]], who realize those days can never be reclaimed. Reiner and Bertolt, fellow refugees from Wall Maria, are driven by their desire to return to their lost village.....though Reiner acknowledges this trope, admitting there's nothing left to go back to. [[spoiler: Though they ''do'' head back to their true home
original team became orphans after their [[TheMole cover]] is blown, it's fairly clear from efforts to stop their BecomingTheMask that Reiner was correct about the "home" of their childhood being gone]]. After three years away, Sasha finally returns home to find her village unrecognizable -- what was once an isolated hunting village deep in the forest is now a clear-out farming village that raises horses. And in a particularly heartbreaking example, [[spoiler: Connie's village is destroyed when the Beast Titan transforms the villagers into Titans]]. Barely holding back tears, he states that he no longer has a home to return to.
* All three main characters in ''Anime/TokyoGodfathers''- Gin, Hana, and Miyuki- believe this. Gin because [[spoiler:he left due to being unable to support his family, believing they'd be better off without him]]; Hana because [[spoiler:she lost her temper and attacked a heckler during her singing act at her mother's bar]]; and Miyuki because [[spoiler:she believes her father will have her arrested for stabbing him in the heat of the moment during a fight.]] Ultimately, over the course of the story, [[spoiler:all three are proven wrong in the best way possible.]]
* In ''Manga/{{Cyborg 009}}'', the cyborgs are all told that it's impossible to go back to their previous lives, lest the Black Ghost organization find them. Most of the cyborgs don't have much to actually return to, but the 2001 anime still has a rather sad episode where 003 reveals to 009 that she can't go back to her brother because the Black Ghost organization had her cryogenically frozen for so long, her brother would be an old man if he was even still alive.
* In ''LightNovel/SundayWithoutGod'', after Ai's [[DoomedHometown village is destroyed]], she decides to travel
supervillain parents from destroying the world God has abandoned resulted in hopes of finding a way said parents all dying, Victor became an orphan after his mother was murdered, Xavin lost their homeworld to save it.
* In Tahakata's Princess Kaguya, Kaguya finds herself languishing in her upper-class life
a war, and in a surreal dream that appears to overlap with reality, she escapes her palace and finds that her old home in the countryside had faded and her friends had migrated elsewhere. Even if the option were available, she would return to nothing back home.
* ''Manga/SchoolLive'':
** It initially seemed a bit strange that Yuki was living in the school and doesn't even think to go home until later in the first episode. But once TheReveal that they are living in a ZombieApocalypse, it makes sense that none of the girls can return home.
** The anime didn't adapt this scene however Kurumi ''did'' visit her home once. There was no sign of her family and everything was in shambles.
** Later, [[spoiler: a rescue helicopter crashes near the school, starting a fire that destroys most of the girls' supplies and survival gear (the anime scrapped the helicopter and the zombies themselves caused a fire). With the school no longer a viable shelter, the girls "graduate" and leave to find a government safe zone.]]
Klara fled from an abuser.



[[folder: Literature]]
* A theme in ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. At one point, Snicket even parodies this trope directly. "People say that you can't go home again, though they may not have been talking to you."
* This happens in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. Ax tries to get home early on, but then decides it's better to help out on Earth and wait until the Andalites arrive.
* Thomas Wolfe's novel ''You Can't Go Home Again'' is the TropeNamer, and combines elements of both this and StrangerInAFamiliarLand. George Webber, an author, literally can't go back to his small-town home because the residents think his debut book gave them a bad name and threaten to kill him over it, ''and'' the recent development boom has made the town almost unrecognizable compared to how George remembered it as a kid. Plus there's the deal with the Nazis taking all the magic out of 1930's Germany, and the whole [[EndOfAnAge Great Depression]] thing.
* The titular Ghosts of Creator/DanAbnett's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}: Literature/GauntsGhosts'' earned their nickname in part because their homeworld of Tanith was destroyed by Chaos on the day of their Founding. Later, after the novel ''Necropolis'', thousands of survivors from Vervunhive join the Tanith after their home hive-city is so badly damaged in a battle against Chaos that the whole hive is rendered uninhabitable.
* In ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', Maglor. He was the only survivor of the Noldor who was not allowed to return to the Undying Lands because of his crimes.
* Arthur Dent and Trillian in Creator/DouglasAdams's ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy''. The [[spoiler:Earth is gone for good, as are Arthur, Trillian and Ford. Even though there's a sixth book on the horizon, which means Arthur and Ford, at least, is still around in some form, I doubt the Earth's coming back.]]
** Even if Earth II was introduced, Adams' screenplay of the film version seems to indicate Arthur might not wish to return anyway.
* ''Literature/{{Neverwhere}}'' by Creator/NeilGaiman. Richard Mayhew no longer exists to his "London Above" life and most of his adventure helping Door [[{{Revenge}} avenge]] her family's deaths is because he thinks that when he does that, he'll find a way to go home. [[spoiler:He doesn't fit in anymore when he ends up home in the denouement, so he returns to London Below.]]
* In Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/{{Stardust}}'', Tristran goes back home, but returns over the Wall to stay.
** In the film version, it's made clear that he only returns to keep his word to his original LoveInterest and give her some closure. He also discovers that Yvaine would [[spoiler:turn to dust]] on our side of the Wall.
* ''Literature/TheHomewardBounders'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones makes a feature of this trope, with the titular characters traveling from world to world (unwillingly, unagingly) hoping that eventually they'll end up back home and stop. [[spoiler:The main character discovers that "you can never go back" when he finally manages to get to his world. Decades have passed; his 'home' no longer exists anywhere in the multiverse.]]
** [[spoiler:It's implied that his home was our world circa 1905, and he returns sometime after WWII and the rise of wargames.]]
* ''Literature/TheReynardCycle'': Isengrim is a Calvarian exile. Later, [[spoiler: Hirsent joins him.]]
* Throughout the latter half of Creator/RobertJordan's ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series, Rand al'Thor has the ability to open a CoolGate pretty much anywhere in the known world, and yet the closest he comes to going home is when he gives someone a lift there. He refuses to stick around, knowing that his presence would put his loved ones in danger.
* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', leaving your home of Winterfell is really not a good idea. You may end up dead, on the run from people who want you dead, held captive, or in sworn service of the Night's Watch. If you ever do make it back, DoomedHometown.
** [[spoiler: Of all the characters who consider Winterfell their home and leave over the course of the first two books, only two return (three if you count Theon). Jeyne Poole's return can hardly be considered a good thing either, as she's being married off to the sadistic Ramsay Snow. Only Ser Rodrick Cassel returns under anything close to decent circumstances, and even he is later killed.]]
* In ''Literature/TheScar'', stand-alone sequel to ''Literature/PerdidoStreetStation'', Bellis's primary objective is to get back to New Crobuzun, until her plans change when she realizes that she can't escape Armada.
* Creator/AndreNorton examples:
** In ''Literature/AndroidAtArms'', the protagonist and his Salariki friend accidentally end up in an AlternateUniverse via a CoolGate that the protagonist knew of by reputation; they had taken a chance of hiding out in its vicinity to avoid pursuit, since it rarely went into operation, and had bad luck. The protagonist knows, thanks to his studies with his late father, that nobody taken by the CoolGate has ever returned.
** In ''The Beast Master'', Earth has been destroyed in an interstellar war as of the beginning of the story; the titular character, a specialized kind of commando, chooses another planet to be sent to after the war. The military is (justifiably) worried about his state of mind, particularly since they haven't seen any of the obvious / expected reactions from him.
** In ''[[Literature/WitchWorld The Crystal Gryphon]]'', Ithkrypt (the capital of Ithdale) and Ulmsdale are both destroyed by FunctionalMagic to keep them out of the hands of invaders (though in separate incidents). The latter had no survivors other than the FishOutOfWater male protagonist, as far as he could tell; he joined up with the refugees from Ithdale (who include the female protagonist, their leader) to try to get them out of harm's way.
** In the [[Literature/TheTimeTraders Time Traders]] book ''Echoes in Time'' (co-written with Sherwood Smith), this is the fate of some human {{time travel}}ers who go back into the far past on another planet. [[spoiler:The rescue mission sent to retrieve them learns that the team survived, but were physically changed so that they could not survive returning to Earth, so they had made the best of a bad situation.]]
** In ''Here Abide Monsters'', the protagonists are swept into AnotherDimension through a CoolGate, and learn that they are TrappedInAnotherWorld, called Avalon. Such refugees from our world fall into two groups: those who accept an offer by TheFairFolk to be assimilated, and those who persist as rootless wanderers and are treated as prey by various creatures.
** In ''Wraiths Out of Time'', the protagonist changes places with her AlternateUniverse counterpart, who dies in the process. Since she has no strong anchor to take her home, she cannot go back. In addition, the titular characters - the victims of a MadScientist - are in their wraith-state due to a similar problem.
* In Creator/RobertSheckley's ''Dimension of Miracles'' the protagonist spends most of the book trying to get home.
* In ''Franchise/StarWars'', Alderaan is blown up. This is mined for much drama and angst in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]], with the various Alderaanians who were offworld at the time.
** Not to mention Luke's home, which is destroyed by Imperial Stormtroopers.
** It's actually used a lot like BondingOverDeadParents in ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear''; the Alderaanian kids, Luke, and Leia commiserate a bit. Later, talking about Alderaan is what gets the vengeful [[spoiler: wraiths of the Kivans]] to let the kids go - they are in parallel straits.
** And of course, the source of the page quote, the ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' novel, Traitor, when [[spoiler: Jacen Solo returns to his home on occupied Coruscant to find that a tree-like organism is growing out of the ruins of the dinner table]] and that there really is no solace to be found.
* Spader and Gunny from the Literature/{{Pendragon}} series ends up like this after Bobby tries to pull his Acolytes through the flume from Eelong to Zadaa, causing the Eelong flume to collapse and trap Spader and Gunny on a territory surrounded by [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom catpeople]] for months (and like four books).
* Those selected for training as Eternals in ''Literature/TheEndOfEternity'' could never return home, because home would no longer exist due to Reality Changes.
** And, at the end, the main characters can't return to either the Eternity or their respective centuries because [[spoiler:they have just erased the Eternity and changed the whole future history of humankind]].
* The short "Painwise" by Creator/JamesTiptreeJr. featured a man whose nervous system had been played with. Anything that would cause him normally to feel pain would just cause him to see coloured lights. [[spoiler:Turns out that his pain centers only kick in if he returns to Earth.]]
* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Eragon's]] house is blown up and later [[spoiler:his home village's population evacuates and joins the Varden]]. Angela the fortune-teller even predicts that [[spoiler:he will eventually leave Alagaesia altogether, never to return]].
* In ''Literature/TheForeverWar'', decades and even centuries pass on Earth while the hero spends a few years on the front, due to [[TimeDilation relativistic trips]] to and from the black holes that make FTL travel possible.
* TimeDilation plays into a short story by Nancy Etchemendy, where a woman follows the man she loves into space, then gives up her child to her mother on Earth after her husband dies. Decades have passed on Earth, and on top of all the strange fashion, technology, and slang freaking her out, she fears her mother might be dead and her presumably middle-aged son hates her. [[spoiler:To her surprise her mother is alive and her son is ''only five years younger then she is'' since he went into space too -- and they're both happy to see her.]]
* In David Eddings's ''[[Literature/TheBelgariad Belgariad]]'' Garion spends much of the first series wistfully wishing he could return to Faldor's farm where he grew up. This becomes much more evident when he discovers [[spoiler:that he is the heir to the Rivan throne, with all the responsibility and weight that carries. Oh, and he's supposed to challenge the insane god Torak in mortal combat.]] You know, run of the mill stuff. When he finally manages to visit, he knows his life is now somewhere else and makes his peace.
* The setup of Jean Shepherd's ''In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash'' is a expatriate midwesterner, now a NYC resident, going back to his home town to write an article. The book is a collection of short stories relating scenes of his youth there. It becomes clear that he doesn't belong there anymore.
* A major theme in Vilhelm Moberg's [[Literature/TheEmigrants Emigrant Suite]]. Kristina is very homesick in America and it doesn't help that she knows she can never go back home again and never see her family and friends again.
* Creator/PoulAnderson's ''The Long Way Home'' involved astronauts on a year-long voyage with a new {{FTL}} drive coming home to Earth to discover the drive ''wasn't'' faster than light after all[[labelnote:*]] Those aboard perceived the travel as being instantaneous, but it was really at exactly the speed of light[[/labelnote]] ... meaning the past year of exploring had actually taken roughly five ''thousand'' years....
* Kvothe from ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' is of the Edema Ruh, who are travelling performers similar to gypsies; their homes are their caravans. When his troupe was killed and their caravans destroyed, he found he had no home to go to.
* Ayla from ''Literature/EarthsChildren'' experiences this ''twice'' - first when her home is destroyed in an earthquake as a child, then when she's exiled from the Clan. Every other home she left voluntarily to go with Jondolar to the Zelandonii.
* Literature/SisterhoodSeries by Creator/FernMichaels: The series definitely has fun with this! The book ''Sweet Revenge'' has Isabelle Flanders stating the trope after she talks her old fiance Bobby Harcourt, and it's made clear that it's too late for them to restart the relationship they once had. At the end of the book ''Free Fall'', the Vigilantes become fugitives and a major plot point involves them waiting to be pardoned by the President. They do get pardoned by the book ''Game Over'', but they still go through a few more hurdles. By the last book ''Home Free'', the Vigilantes finally get some homes, and their lives are certainly different from what they had before.
* In one of the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' graphic novel trilogies, after [[spoiler:Graystripe is captured by Twolegs]], it takes him several moons to escape and find his way back to the forest... but that's when he realizes there ''is'' no forest - [[DoomedHometown it's been destroyed by Twolegs.]] He eventually manages to find his way to the Clans' new home.
* In Teresa Frohock's ''Literature/MiserereAnAutumnTale'', once you come through the Crimson Veil to the Woerld, you're stuck there.
* In Creator/JackCampbell's [[Literature/TheLostFleet Lost Fleet]] novel ''Invincible'', Geary. He can't go home because he slept through a century and everyone he ever knew is dead. (His planet's still there, but the LivingLegend that grew up about him means he doesn't want to.)
* In Creator/PoulAnderson's Literature/TimePatrol story "Delenda Est", Deirdre comes from an AlternateHistory that the Time Patrol will eradicate.
* In ''Literature/ChantersOfTremaris'', Calwyn runs away from her home village of Antaris and only returns when she [[spoiler:has lost her magical powers, to find that her beloved High Priestess has been replaced by her {{Jerkass}} second-in-command, Marna, who has instituted a reign of terror and is killing priestesses in an attempt at disease control, and will kill Calwyn and her friends if they are found. Not 'cause they're sick, though. Just 'cause Marna ''really, really'' hates them.]]
* ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' has Jerin Whistler leaving the farm he was raised on to go get married - in this world, husbands move into their wives' households - and as he's going thinking unhappily that this is it - if the women who pick him are kind they will take him to visit, but even then he will never call it home again.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/DreadCompanion'', the CoolGate traps them in the other world. Kosgro has been trapped for even longer.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/{{Catseye}}'', Troy is a war refugee trapped in the grim settlement where they eke out a marginal existence.
* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Homeward Bound]]'', Sam Yeager is told in so many words that he's no longer welcome on Earth and is better off joining the crew of the ''Admiral Peary'' on its way to the [[LizardFolk Race]]'s homeworld. The journey to Tau Ceti takes 30 years, although the entire crew is in [[HumanPopsicle cryo-stasis]]. Sam's son and daughter-in-law join him, though. However, a few months after their arrival to Home, the ''Commodore Perry'' joins them using the [[LightspeedLeapfrog first ever FTL drive]], having taken only 5 weeks. The crew of the ''Perry'' is under strict orders not to bring Yeager back, but they are forced to do so, averting this trope.
** In an earlier novel, Glen Johnson, a combat SpacePlane pilot decides to investigate a space station being constructed in secret by the US government. He fakes an emergency and docks with the station, only to discover that it's humanity's first nuclear-powered spaceship. Once the ''Lewis and Clark'' breaks orbit on its journey to the Asteroid Belt, Johnson is informed by the ship's commandant that he, like every member of the crew, is on the ship for good. Ditto for the crew of the second ship, the ''Christopher Columbus''.
* Creator/GertrudeStein famously wrote of her hometown of Oakland, "there is no there there," referring to this trope. After returning to America from a long stay in France, she discovered that her childhood home was unrecognizable.
* At the end of Creator/Stephen Baxter's [[Literature/{{XeeleeSequence}} Ring]], [[spoiler: not only are the protagonists stuck 5 million years after their mission started, but they're stuck in another universe.]]
* At the end of ''Literature/EndersGame'', Ender Wiggin realizes that he can't return to his family on Earth after the end of the Formic War, since the political instability on Earth--caused by years of pent-up hostility between Russia and the USA finally erupting when they no longer have an extraterrestrial threat to unite against--means that all of the major powers on Earth either want to kill him or force him into military service. He also can't bear to return to a hero's welcome on Earth, since [[spoiler: he's coping with the knowledge that he unwittingly wiped out an entire alien species]]. Instead, he accepts a post as a governor in Earth's extraterrestrial colonization program, knowing that the relativistic nature of space travel will make it impossible for him to ever see his family again.
* Averted in ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'', mostly. This happens a bit in the ''Gregor the Overlander'', but then [[spoiler:Gregor goes on this quest to find his missing dad and all that.]] Otherwise they want him to go home. And then come back for the next 4 books.
* True for the three main women in ''Literature/KingdomOfLittleWounds''. Ava lost most of her family at a young age, and more than that had to be sent away after a miscarriage. Midi doesn't know where home even is for her. And Isabel, as is the nature of political marriage, will never see France again.
* Used word for word by BillBryson in his book ''The Lost Continent'', upon finding his grandparent's old house having been completely ruined by its new owners:
-->"You can't beat the phone company, you can't make a waiter see you until he's ready to see you and you can't go home again."
** However in a follow up book, ''Notes From a Big Country'', he admits that he was later proved wrong when he moved back to America and finds many of the old joys waiting for him.
* [[DefiedTrope Defying]] this trope seems to be the modus operandi behind ''Literature/TheManWhoBroughtTheDodgersBackToBrooklyn''. Not only is Dodgers owner Bobby Hanes happy to move himself out of Los Angeles and back into his old family home in Brooklyn, but he takes the Dodgers baseball team with him, and even rebuilds Ebbets Field as it originally was -- and in the ''exact same spot'', after tearing down an apartment complex that had replaced the original ballpark. It's even explained that he'd have an easier time buying some unused land for the ballpark, but he shrugs that off, noting that Ebbets Field needs to be rebuilt in its old location.
* In ''Literature/TheDungeoneers'', Colm realizes at the end of the book that Finn was right. Once you live the life of a rogue, you see every treasure as an opportunity for more.
* In ''Literature/RangersAtRoadsend'', Chip was thrown out of the house by her parents, who hoped she would return to the temple where they wanted her to become a priest, which Chip did not want. Instead of returning to the temple, she slept on the street, was attacked by robbers. When the militia saved her, she signed up with them out of gratitude and lack of alternatives. She eventually joined the rangers in another city, and has not visited her parents of even the city ever since.
* In ''Literature/TheSorceresssOrc'', the titular sorceress and orc both cannot return home; the sorceress because people in her home village hate magic, the orc because his family didn't want him to become a mercenary and had a more prestigious career planned for him already.

to:

[[folder: Literature]]
[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* A theme in ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents''. At one point, Snicket even parodies this trope directly. "People say that you can't go home again, though they may not have been talking to you."
* This happens in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. Ax tries to get home early on, but then decides it's better to help out on Earth and wait until the Andalites arrive.
* Thomas Wolfe's novel ''You Can't Go Home Again'' is the TropeNamer, and combines elements
series of both this and StrangerInAFamiliarLand. George Webber, an author, literally can't go back to his small-town home because the residents think his debut book gave them a bad name and threaten to kill him over it, ''and'' the recent development boom has made the town almost unrecognizable compared to how George remembered it as a kid. Plus there's the deal with the Nazis {{Peanuts}} strips followed Snoopy taking all the magic out of 1930's Germany, and the whole [[EndOfAnAge Great Depression]] thing.
* The titular Ghosts of Creator/DanAbnett's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}: Literature/GauntsGhosts'' earned their nickname in part because their homeworld of Tanith was destroyed by Chaos on the day of their Founding. Later, after the novel ''Necropolis'', thousands of survivors from Vervunhive join the Tanith after their home hive-city is so badly damaged in a battle against Chaos that the whole hive is rendered uninhabitable.
* In ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', Maglor. He was the only survivor of the Noldor who was not allowed to return
Woodstock to the Undying Lands because of his crimes.
* Arthur Dent and Trillian in Creator/DouglasAdams's ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy''. The [[spoiler:Earth is gone for good, as are Arthur, Trillian and Ford. Even though there's a sixth book on the horizon, which means Arthur and Ford, at least, is still around in some form, I doubt the Earth's coming back.]]
** Even if Earth II was introduced, Adams' screenplay of the film version seems to indicate Arthur might not wish to return anyway.
* ''Literature/{{Neverwhere}}'' by Creator/NeilGaiman. Richard Mayhew no longer exists to his "London Above" life and most of his adventure helping Door [[{{Revenge}} avenge]] her family's deaths is because he thinks that when he does that, he'll find a way to go home. [[spoiler:He doesn't fit in anymore when he ends up home in the denouement, so he returns to London Below.]]
* In Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/{{Stardust}}'', Tristran goes back home, but returns over the Wall to stay.
** In the film version, it's made clear that he only returns to keep his word to his original LoveInterest and give her some closure. He also discovers that Yvaine would [[spoiler:turn to dust]] on our side of the Wall.
* ''Literature/TheHomewardBounders'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones makes a feature of this trope, with the titular characters traveling from world to world (unwillingly, unagingly) hoping that eventually they'll end up back home and stop. [[spoiler:The main character discovers that "you can never go back" when he finally manages to get to his world. Decades have passed; his 'home' no longer exists anywhere in the multiverse.]]
** [[spoiler:It's implied that his home was our world circa 1905, and he returns sometime after WWII and the rise of wargames.]]
* ''Literature/TheReynardCycle'': Isengrim is a Calvarian exile. Later, [[spoiler: Hirsent joins him.]]
* Throughout the latter half of Creator/RobertJordan's ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series, Rand al'Thor has the ability to open a CoolGate pretty much anywhere in the known world, and yet the closest he comes to going home is when he gives someone a lift there. He refuses to stick around, knowing that his presence would put his loved ones in danger.
* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', leaving your home of Winterfell is really not a good idea. You may end up dead, on the run from people who want you dead, held captive, or in sworn service of the Night's Watch. If you ever do make it back, DoomedHometown.
** [[spoiler: Of all the characters who consider Winterfell their home and leave over the course of the first two books, only two return (three if you count Theon). Jeyne Poole's return can hardly be considered a good thing either, as she's being married off to the sadistic Ramsay Snow. Only Ser Rodrick Cassel returns under anything close to decent circumstances, and even he is later killed.]]
* In ''Literature/TheScar'', stand-alone sequel to ''Literature/PerdidoStreetStation'', Bellis's primary objective is to get back to New Crobuzun, until her plans change when she realizes that she can't escape Armada.
* Creator/AndreNorton examples:
** In ''Literature/AndroidAtArms'', the protagonist and his Salariki friend accidentally end up in an AlternateUniverse via a CoolGate that the protagonist knew of by reputation; they had taken a chance of hiding out in its vicinity to avoid pursuit, since it rarely went into operation, and had bad luck. The protagonist knows, thanks to his studies with his late father, that nobody taken by the CoolGate has ever returned.
** In ''The Beast Master'', Earth has been destroyed in an interstellar war as of the beginning of the story; the titular character, a specialized kind of commando, chooses another planet to be sent to after the war. The military is (justifiably) worried about his state of mind, particularly since they haven't seen any of the obvious / expected reactions from him.
** In ''[[Literature/WitchWorld The Crystal Gryphon]]'', Ithkrypt (the capital of Ithdale) and Ulmsdale are both destroyed by FunctionalMagic to keep them out of the hands of invaders (though in separate incidents). The latter had no survivors other than the FishOutOfWater male protagonist, as far as he could tell; he joined up with the refugees from Ithdale (who include the female protagonist, their leader) to try to get them out of harm's way.
** In the [[Literature/TheTimeTraders Time Traders]] book ''Echoes in Time'' (co-written with Sherwood Smith), this is the fate of some human {{time travel}}ers who go back into the far past on another planet. [[spoiler:The rescue mission sent to retrieve them learns that the team survived, but were physically changed so that they could not survive returning to Earth, so they had made the best of a bad situation.]]
** In ''Here Abide Monsters'', the protagonists are swept into AnotherDimension through a CoolGate, and learn that they are TrappedInAnotherWorld, called Avalon. Such refugees from our world fall into two groups: those who accept an offer by TheFairFolk to be assimilated, and those who persist as rootless wanderers and are treated as prey by various creatures.
** In ''Wraiths Out of Time'', the protagonist changes places with her AlternateUniverse counterpart, who dies in the process. Since she has no strong anchor to take her home, she cannot go back. In addition, the titular characters - the victims of a MadScientist - are in their wraith-state due to a similar problem.
* In Creator/RobertSheckley's ''Dimension of Miracles'' the protagonist spends most of the book trying to get home.
* In ''Franchise/StarWars'', Alderaan is blown up. This is mined for much drama and angst in the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]], with the various Alderaanians who were offworld at the time.
** Not to mention Luke's home, which is destroyed by Imperial Stormtroopers.
** It's actually used a lot like BondingOverDeadParents in ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear''; the Alderaanian kids, Luke, and Leia commiserate a bit. Later, talking about Alderaan is what gets the vengeful [[spoiler: wraiths of the Kivans]] to let the kids go - they are in parallel straits.
** And of course, the source of the page quote, the ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' novel, Traitor, when [[spoiler: Jacen Solo returns to his home on occupied Coruscant to find that a tree-like organism is growing out of the ruins of the dinner table]] and that there really is no solace to be found.
* Spader and Gunny from the Literature/{{Pendragon}} series ends up like this after Bobby tries to pull his Acolytes through the flume from Eelong to Zadaa, causing the Eelong flume to collapse and trap Spader and Gunny on a territory surrounded by [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom catpeople]] for months (and like four books).
* Those selected for training as Eternals in ''Literature/TheEndOfEternity'' could never return home, because home would no longer exist due to Reality Changes.
** And, at the end, the main characters can't return to either the Eternity or their respective centuries because [[spoiler:they have just erased the Eternity and changed the whole future history of humankind]].
* The short "Painwise" by Creator/JamesTiptreeJr. featured a man whose nervous system had been played with. Anything that would cause him normally to feel pain would just cause him to see coloured lights. [[spoiler:Turns out that his pain centers only kick in if he returns to Earth.]]
* [[Literature/InheritanceCycle Eragon's]] house is blown up and later [[spoiler:his home village's population evacuates and joins the Varden]]. Angela the fortune-teller even predicts that [[spoiler:he will eventually leave Alagaesia altogether, never to return]].
* In ''Literature/TheForeverWar'', decades and even centuries pass on Earth while the hero spends a few years on the front, due to [[TimeDilation relativistic trips]] to and from the black holes that make FTL travel possible.
* TimeDilation plays into a short story by Nancy Etchemendy, where a woman follows the man she loves into space, then gives up her child to her mother on Earth after her husband dies. Decades have passed on Earth, and on top of all the strange fashion, technology, and slang freaking her out, she fears her mother might be dead and her presumably middle-aged son hates her. [[spoiler:To her surprise her mother is alive and her son is ''only five years younger then she is'' since he went into space too -- and they're both happy to see her.]]
* In David Eddings's ''[[Literature/TheBelgariad Belgariad]]'' Garion spends much of the first series wistfully wishing he could return to Faldor's farm
Daisy Hill Puppy Farm where he grew up. This becomes much more evident when he discovers [[spoiler:that he is the heir to the Rivan throne, with all the responsibility and weight that carries. Oh, and he's supposed to challenge the insane god Torak in mortal combat.]] You know, run of the mill stuff. When he finally manages to visit, he knows his life is now somewhere else and makes his peace.
* The setup of Jean Shepherd's ''In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash'' is a expatriate midwesterner, now a NYC resident, going back to his home town to write an article. The book is a collection of short stories relating scenes of his youth there. It becomes clear that he doesn't belong there anymore.
* A major theme in Vilhelm Moberg's [[Literature/TheEmigrants Emigrant Suite]]. Kristina is very homesick in America and it doesn't help that she knows she can never go back home again and never see her family and friends again.
* Creator/PoulAnderson's ''The Long Way Home'' involved astronauts on a year-long voyage with a new {{FTL}} drive coming home to Earth to discover the drive ''wasn't'' faster than light after all[[labelnote:*]] Those aboard perceived the travel as being instantaneous, but it
(Snoopy) was really at exactly the speed of light[[/labelnote]] ... meaning the past year of exploring had actually taken roughly five ''thousand'' years....
* Kvothe from ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' is of the Edema Ruh, who are travelling performers similar to gypsies; their homes are their caravans. When his troupe was killed and their caravans destroyed, he found he had no home to go to.
* Ayla from ''Literature/EarthsChildren'' experiences this ''twice'' - first when her home is destroyed in an earthquake as a child, then when she's exiled from the Clan. Every other home she left voluntarily to go with Jondolar to the Zelandonii.
* Literature/SisterhoodSeries by Creator/FernMichaels: The series definitely has fun with this! The book ''Sweet Revenge'' has Isabelle Flanders stating the trope after she talks her old fiance Bobby Harcourt, and it's made clear that it's too late for them to restart the relationship they once had. At the end of the book ''Free Fall'', the Vigilantes become fugitives and a major plot point involves them waiting to be pardoned by the President. They do get pardoned by the book ''Game Over'', but they still go through a few more hurdles. By the last book ''Home Free'', the Vigilantes finally get some homes, and their lives are certainly different from what they had before.
* In one of the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' graphic novel trilogies, after [[spoiler:Graystripe is captured by Twolegs]], it takes him several moons to escape and find his way back to the forest... but that's when he realizes there ''is'' no forest - [[DoomedHometown it's been destroyed by Twolegs.]] He eventually manages
born, only to find his way to the Clans' new home.
* In Teresa Frohock's ''Literature/MiserereAnAutumnTale'', once you come through the Crimson Veil to the Woerld, you're stuck there.
* In Creator/JackCampbell's [[Literature/TheLostFleet Lost Fleet]] novel ''Invincible'', Geary. He can't go home because he slept through a century and everyone he ever knew is dead. (His planet's still there, but the LivingLegend that grew up about him means he doesn't want to.)
* In Creator/PoulAnderson's Literature/TimePatrol story "Delenda Est", Deirdre comes from an AlternateHistory that the Time Patrol will eradicate.
* In ''Literature/ChantersOfTremaris'', Calwyn runs away from her home village of Antaris and only returns when she [[spoiler:has lost her magical powers, to find that her beloved High Priestess has
it had been replaced by her {{Jerkass}} second-in-command, Marna, who has instituted a reign of terror and is killing priestesses in an attempt at disease control, and will kill Calwyn and her friends if they are found. Not 'cause they're sick, though. Just 'cause Marna ''really, really'' hates them.]]
* ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'' has Jerin Whistler leaving
parking garage. This became the farm he was raised on to go get married - in this world, husbands move into their wives' households - and as he's going thinking unhappily that this is it - if the women who pick him are kind they will take him to visit, but even then he will never call it home again.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/DreadCompanion'', the CoolGate traps them in the other world. Kosgro has been trapped
basis for even longer.
* In Creator/AndreNorton's ''Literature/{{Catseye}}'', Troy is a war refugee trapped in the grim settlement where they eke out a marginal existence.
* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Homeward Bound]]'', Sam Yeager is told in so many words that he's no longer welcome on Earth and is better off joining the crew
one of the ''Admiral Peary'' on its way to the [[LizardFolk Race]]'s homeworld. The journey to Tau Ceti takes 30 years, although the entire crew is in [[HumanPopsicle cryo-stasis]]. Sam's son and daughter-in-law join him, though. However, a few months after their arrival to Home, the ''Commodore Perry'' joins them using the [[LightspeedLeapfrog first ever FTL drive]], having taken only 5 weeks. The crew of the ''Perry'' is under strict orders not to bring Yeager back, but they are forced to do so, averting this trope.
** In an earlier novel, Glen Johnson, a combat SpacePlane pilot decides to investigate a space station being constructed in secret by the US government. He fakes an emergency and docks with the station, only to discover that it's humanity's first nuclear-powered spaceship. Once the ''Lewis and Clark'' breaks orbit on its journey to the Asteroid Belt, Johnson is informed by the ship's commandant that he, like every member of the crew, is on the ship for good. Ditto for the crew of the second ship, the ''Christopher Columbus''.
* Creator/GertrudeStein famously wrote of her hometown of Oakland, "there is no there there," referring to this trope. After returning to America from a long stay in France, she discovered that her childhood home was unrecognizable.
* At the end of Creator/Stephen Baxter's [[Literature/{{XeeleeSequence}} Ring]], [[spoiler: not only are the protagonists stuck 5 million years after their mission started, but they're stuck in another universe.]]
* At the end of ''Literature/EndersGame'', Ender Wiggin realizes that he can't return to his family on Earth after the end of the Formic War, since the political instability on Earth--caused by years of pent-up hostility between Russia and the USA finally erupting when they no longer have an extraterrestrial threat to unite against--means that all of the major powers on Earth either want to kill him or force him into military service. He also can't bear to return to a hero's welcome on Earth, since [[spoiler: he's coping with the knowledge that he unwittingly wiped out an entire alien species]]. Instead, he accepts a post as a governor in Earth's extraterrestrial colonization program, knowing that the relativistic nature of space travel will make it impossible for him to ever see his family again.
* Averted in ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'', mostly. This happens a bit in the ''Gregor the Overlander'', but then [[spoiler:Gregor goes on this quest to find his missing dad and all that.]] Otherwise they want him to go home. And then come back for the next 4 books.
* True for the three main women in ''Literature/KingdomOfLittleWounds''. Ava lost most of her family at a young age, and more than that had to be sent away after a miscarriage. Midi doesn't know
Peanuts specials where home even Snoopy is for her. And Isabel, as is the nature of political marriage, will never see France again.
* Used word for word by BillBryson in his book ''The Lost Continent'', upon finding his grandparent's old house having been completely ruined by its new owners:
-->"You can't beat the phone company, you can't make a waiter see you until he's ready to see you and you can't go home again."
** However in a follow up book, ''Notes From a Big Country'', he admits that he was later proved wrong when he moved back to America and finds many of the old joys waiting for him.
* [[DefiedTrope Defying]] this trope seems to be the modus operandi behind ''Literature/TheManWhoBroughtTheDodgersBackToBrooklyn''. Not only is Dodgers owner Bobby Hanes happy to move himself out of Los Angeles and back into his old family home in Brooklyn, but he takes the Dodgers baseball team
reunited with him, and even rebuilds Ebbets Field as it originally was -- and in the ''exact same spot'', after tearing down an apartment complex that had replaced the original ballpark. It's even explained that he'd have an easier time buying some unused land for the ballpark, but he shrugs that off, noting that Ebbets Field needs to be rebuilt in its old location.
* In ''Literature/TheDungeoneers'', Colm realizes at the end of the book that Finn was right. Once you live the life of a rogue, you see every treasure as an opportunity for more.
* In ''Literature/RangersAtRoadsend'', Chip was thrown out of the house by her parents, who hoped she would return to the temple where they wanted her to become a priest, which Chip did not want. Instead of returning to the temple, she slept on the street, was attacked by robbers. When the militia saved her, she signed up with them out of gratitude and lack of alternatives. She eventually joined the rangers in another city, and has not visited her parents of even the city ever since.
* In ''Literature/TheSorceresssOrc'', the titular sorceress and orc both cannot return home; the sorceress because people in her home village hate magic, the orc because
his family didn't want him to become a mercenary and had a more prestigious career planned for him already. siblings.
--> '''Snoopy''': You stupid people! You're parking on my ''memories''!!!



[[folder: Live Action TV]]
!!General Examples:
* Creator/SidAndMartyKrofftProductions are notorious for using this trope (''Series/HRPufnstuf'', ''Series/{{Lidsville}}'', ''Series/LandOfTheLost'', ''Series/TheLostSaucer'', ''Series/FarOutSpaceNuts'').
----
!!Specific Examples:
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Parodied when Angel drags Lorne kicking and screaming to Pylea. Learns nothing, accomplishes nothing, goes back home. The end.
--> '''Lorne:''' "I had to come back here to find out I '''didn't''' have to come back here. I don't ''belong'' here, I ''hate'' it here! You know where I belong? L.A. You know why? ''Nobody'' belongs there. It's the perfect place for guys like us."
** Well, he did get closure. That's something, at least.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'':
** In the episode "No Surrender, No Retreat", Mr. Garibaldi leaves the station knowing that with what he's a bout to do, he most likely will not be able to return.
** At the end of the final season, G'Kar finds he is unable to go home to Narn and cannot stay on the station because of his [[GroupieBrigade devout followers]] and so resolves to fly off into space. He takes Lyta Alexander with him, who notes that he has to leave because everyone wants him, while she has to leave because no one wants her. [[spoiler:Her powers have grown to the point that she's considered a threat by just about everyone.]]
* ''Battlestar Galactica'' (both [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 old]] and [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 new]]):
** The writers combined this with a DoomedHometown to form the series premise. In addition, the fifth episode of the re-imagining's first season is called "You Can't Go Home Again", and involves Kara Thrace attempting to escape a barren planet to return to the Galactica, which (surprise, surprise) she does manage to do at the end, by using a crashed Cylon fighter to get off the planet.
** Oddly enough, throughout the first and second seasons of the new ''Battlestar Galactica'', numerous characters ''did'' go back home. Most notable case was Kara Thrace who literally returned to her (mostly undamaged) flat in Delphi.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Walter White is forced to go into hiding after [[spoiler:his family leaves him and the police are after him for being a drug kingpin]].
* ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'': Captain Buck Rogers really can't go back home because a) he's been gone for over 500 years and the neighborhood has [[SarcasmMode changed a little in the time since]] and b) a nuclear war effectively wiped out 90% of the world he knew.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** In the revival series, The Doctor is unable to return to his home world of Gallifrey, as in the backstory he wound up destroying it to end the Last Great Time War. As of the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor", [[spoiler: he actually ''saves'' his homeworld by sending it into a pocket universe instead -- but he has no idea where it now is. In the Series 9 finale (two years later in real-world terms) he ''finally'' gets to Gallifrey -- but the homecoming is tragic]].
** In the old series, where the Doctor couldn't reliably control the TARDIS, most of his companions couldn't go home until it randomly ended up back in their home place and time again. Most of them didn't mind so much, but there were a couple of plot arcs in which the Doctor was actively trying to get a character home, invariably without success; variations included "exactly the right place, but three centuries early" ("The Visitation"), "exactly the right time, but several light-years away" ("Four to Doomsday"), "the right place ''and'' the right time, but due to a technical fault we're all only an inch tall" ("Planet of Giants"), and "the right place and time, but the wrong ''universe''" ("Full Circle"), not to mention the ever-popular "despite the Doctor's confidence that he's succeeded at last, both the wrong place ''and'' the wrong time" ("The Reign of Terror", ''passim'').
** However, the only companion who could truly never go home again was Nyssa, whose home planet was destroyed as a result of one of the Master's schemes.
** Also in the old series, the Doctor couldn't return to Gallifrey because interfering in the histories of other planets was considered a heinous crime. When he was forced to reveal his location to them ("The War Games"), the Time Lords captured, tried and exiled him.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': John Crichton. Eventually he does make his way home, but he can't stay because he's changed too much... among other things, he's ''killed'', a ''lot''. While he's there, though, [[spoiler:an assassin tortures and kills his best friends, and wrecks his family's house]]. ''On Christmas''. Later, after he leaves, [[spoiler:he's forced to close the wormhole for good, to protect Earth from the Scarrans.]]
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': Neither River nor Simon Tam can return to their home on Osiris, because doing so would get Simon arrested and River sent back to the Academy. On a more blunt note, Malcolm Reynolds can't go back to his home on Shadow because the Alliance virtually destroyed the planet during the Unification War, rendering it uninhabitable.
* ''Series/GilligansIsland'' was a comedy example. Until "Rescue from Gilligan's Island", where the castaways become [[StrangerinAFamiliarLand strangers in a familiar land]].
* ''Series/HighlanderTheSeries'':
** Duncan [=MacLeod=] is banished from his Clan after he resurrects for the first time.
** This happens to most Immortals. Once people notice that they are not aging they will have to move away and can only really come back when most of the people who used to know them are dead. This is also required when an Immortal 'dies' in public and thus risks revealing TheMasquerade if he/she does not leave.
* ''Series/LastResort'': The whole premise was that the crew of the ''Colorado'' could never return to the United States, because they had been portrayed as traitors after refusing to nuke Pakistan. [[spoiler:Of course, the series' cancellation only halfway into its first season caused the writers to come up with an overly complicated way around this premise, so that only the Captain and those who had died during the course of the season were denied the ability to return...]]
* ''Series/LifeOnMars2006'':
** Likewise. Sam finally returns from the grey-brown-orange world of 1973 and decides that the modern world lacks colour.
** And in the spin-off, [[spoiler:Alex Drake discovers that she can't return to 2008, because she is dead]].
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'': Part of the premise. [[spoiler:SubvertedTrope in the third season finale, when they finally ''do'' get to go home, only to have Jack convinced it was a big mistake to leave]].
* ''Series/LostInSpace'': Series premise.
* ''Series/MythQuest'': Matt Bellows touches the Gorgos stone in the Cyber Museum, which causes him to get stuck in a world of myriad mythologies. He could only get out of the myth-world by touching the stone again, but he doesn't know where it is.
* ''Series/QuantumLeap'': In which not only can Sam Becket not go home, he can't even stay where he is, and must live moments from other people's lives, his leaps inevitable, finding himself in a new stranger's shoes each time.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'': The key premise. Protagonist Lister awakes from what was supposed to be eighteen months in stasis, but was actually three million years. He is the last living human on his ship. He sets off to see whether he's the last living human in the universe. HilarityEnsues; signs of what became of Earth humans does not. (Though in the books, we do have them reach Earth... and it was used as a garbage planet until an explosion sent it out of orbit. The current residents are sentient roaches who don't know a thing about those ape people there used to be.)
* ''Series/{{Revolution}}'':
** When you think about it, the world got a blackout that is still in effect 15 years later. The United States is effectively dead. Even if the power gets turned back, [[spoiler: which happens in the [[Recap/RevolutionS1E20TheDarkTower first season finale]]]], things are not going to go back to the way they were before the blackout!
** Rachel has to point this to Aaron more or less at the beginning of [[Recap/RevolutionS1E11TheStand episode 11]]. In that same episode, [[spoiler: Jason Neville]] is told to not even bother going home again by his own father.
** In [[Recap/RevolutionS1E13TheSongRemainsTheSame episode 13]], Neville tells his wife this after [[spoiler: his mission to obtain the nuke for Monroe fails]] and he realizes that thanks to Randall's influence his days in the Republic are numbered.
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}'':
** For the entire run. The writers eventually combined this with DoomedHometown in order to give the series a BigBad.
** Although one episode ended with the heroes briefly (a few minutes) ending up in a world that looked a lot like theirs, but were disappointed when Quinn sadly noted that the fence gate at his home didn't squeak, as it did in their world, so they jumped into the next vortex that appeared. But after it vanished, a local guy came out of the house with Quinn's mother and mentioned that he'd finally fixed the squeaky gate hinges.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': The entire cast in the first season. That concept was quickly destroyed.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** Teal'c's MookFaceTurn in the pilot resulted in him and his family being branded as traitors; returning overtly to Chulak as long as Apophis rules there is suicide. [[spoiler:This changes over the course of the next three seasons.]]
** An episode called "A Hundred Days" plays with this trope. A meteor shower during a mission strikes the Stargate, burying it and leaving O'Neill stuck on an alien planet, with the rest of SG-1 having made it back to Earth. O'Neill spends the following months trying to find the gate, hoping that rescue will come. As he finally gives up on the idea of traveling through the stars and going back to Earth, he begins to make a life for himself with the people still on the planet with him. That is until his 100th day there when SG-1 finds a way to make contact with the gate and dig it out. O'Neill's having to choose between his new life and his old one is something of a TearJerker.
** Martin Lloyd, the creator of ''[[ShowWithinAShow Wormhole X-treme!]]'', [[spoiler:is one of the five known survivors of a spacefaring people that was destroyed by the Goa'uld. The only reason they're alive is that they deserted their homeworld's military]].
* ''Series/StargateUniverse'': The basic premise. Apparently wanting to avoid the problems of the previous one, they've stranded the crew so far out that it would literally take decades for a current generation ship to catch up. They can make short trips home using the [[GrandTheftMe communications stones]], but such trips are temporary and don't solve the supply-line issues.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'': Garak was exiled from Cardassia [[spoiler:and is only permitted to return after the entire planet has been carpet bombed]].
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** Series premise. In the premiere, the ship winds up on the far side of the galaxy. Their journey home by the linear route (even at warp speed) would take at least 70 years, or more than most of the crew's lifetime. They use alternate technologies and wormholes to significantly reduce the time it actually does take but this was still the situation they were facing at the start of the series.
** This is especially true for Neelix, whose homeworld was destroyed, and Icheb, whose parents want only to use him as a weapon.
** One exception to this is the Doctor; he's the ship's Emergency Medical Hologram, so ''Voyager'' '''is''' his home.
** It is mentioned that even if Kes returned to the Ocampa homeworld, they would no longer accept her.
* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': [[FishOutOfTemporalWater Jack Harkness.]] Not that he'd want to go back, apparently (going by the conversation with Ianto in "To the Last Man.")
* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' has its titular character. Kara's home planet was destroyed, leaving her nowhere to return to.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
** In the episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS02E20WhatIsAndWhatShouldNeverBe "What Is And What Should Never Be" (S02, Ep20)]], Dean returns to his childhood home and his mother is still alive. However, this was just an illusion created by a djinn, and Dean's childhood home was destroyed in a fire which killed his mother and started his nomadic lifestyle.

to:

[[folder: Live Action TV]]
!!General Examples:
[[folder:Fan Works]]
* Creator/SidAndMartyKrofftProductions are notorious for using this trope (''Series/HRPufnstuf'', ''Series/{{Lidsville}}'', ''Series/LandOfTheLost'', ''Series/TheLostSaucer'', ''Series/FarOutSpaceNuts'').
----
!!Specific Examples:
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Parodied when Angel drags Lorne kicking and screaming
In ''FanFic/RorschachInEquestria'', [[ComicBook/{{Watchmen}} Rorschach]] is sent to Pylea. Learns nothing, accomplishes nothing, goes back home. The end.
--> '''Lorne:''' "I
[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Equestria]] by Dr. Manhattan, with no way back. [[spoiler: Turns out Dr. Manhattan had to come back here to find out I '''didn't''' have to come back here. I don't ''belong'' here, I ''hate'' it here! You know where I belong? L.A. You know why? ''Nobody'' belongs there. It's kill him in the perfect place for guys like us."
** Well, he did get closure. That's something, at least.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'':
** In the episode "No Surrender, No Retreat", Mr. Garibaldi leaves the station knowing
Watchmenverse in order to make that happen]].
* In ''FanFic/StarsAbove'', [[spoiler:[[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica Homura]]'s trip from her own time and universe was one-way. Even
with what he's [[TimeMaster her powers]], it took a bout to do, he most likely will not be able to return.
** At the end of the final season, G'Kar finds he is unable
significant boost from another Puella Magi to go home to Narn back six years, and cannot stay on the station because of his [[GroupieBrigade devout followers]] and so resolves there's no way to fly off into space. He takes Lyta Alexander with him, who notes that he has to leave because everyone wants him, while she has to leave because no one wants her. [[spoiler:Her powers have grown to the point that she's considered a threat by just about everyone.do it again.]]
* ''Battlestar Galactica'' (both [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 old]] and [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 new]]):
** The writers combined this with a DoomedHometown
Happens to form the series premise. In addition, the fifth episode of the re-imagining's first season is called "You Can't Go Home Again", and involves Kara Thrace attempting to escape a barren planet to return to the Galactica, which (surprise, surprise) Nanoha in ''Fanfic/GameTheoryFanFic'' [[spoiler:when she does manage to do at the end, by using a crashed Cylon fighter to get off the planet.
** Oddly enough, throughout the first and second seasons of the new ''Battlestar Galactica'', numerous characters ''did'' go back home. Most notable case was Kara Thrace who literally returned to her (mostly undamaged) flat in Delphi.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Walter White is forced to go into hiding after [[spoiler:his family leaves him and the police are after him for being a drug kingpin]].
* ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'': Captain Buck Rogers really
joins Precia, since she can't go back home because a) he's been gone for over 500 years and the neighborhood has [[SarcasmMode changed a little in the time since]] and b) a nuclear war effectively wiped out 90% of the world he knew.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** In the revival series, The Doctor is unable to
return to his home world of Gallifrey, as in the backstory he wound up destroying it to end the Last Great Time War. As of the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor", [[spoiler: he actually ''saves'' his homeworld by sending it into a pocket universe instead -- but he has no idea where it now is. In the Series 9 finale (two years later in real-world terms) he ''finally'' gets to Gallifrey -- but the homecoming is tragic]].
** In the old series, where the Doctor couldn't reliably control the TARDIS, most of his companions couldn't go home until it randomly ended up back in their home place and time again. Most of them didn't mind so much, but there were a couple of plot arcs in which the Doctor was actively trying to get a character home, invariably
without success; variations included "exactly being captured by the right place, but three centuries early" ("The Visitation"), "exactly the right time, but several light-years away" ("Four to Doomsday"), "the right place ''and'' the right time, but due to a technical fault we're all only an inch tall" ("Planet of Giants"), and "the right place and time, but the wrong ''universe''" ("Full Circle"), not to mention the ever-popular "despite the Doctor's confidence that he's succeeded at last, both the wrong place ''and'' the wrong time" ("The Reign of Terror", ''passim'').
** However, the only companion who could truly never go home again was Nyssa, whose home planet was destroyed as a result of one of the Master's schemes.
** Also in the old series, the Doctor couldn't return to Gallifrey because interfering in the histories of other planets was considered a heinous crime. When he was forced to reveal his location to them ("The War Games"), the Time Lords captured, tried and exiled him.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': John Crichton. Eventually he does make his way home, but he can't stay because he's changed too much... among other things, he's ''killed'', a ''lot''. While he's there, though, [[spoiler:an assassin tortures and kills his best friends, and wrecks his family's house]]. ''On Christmas''. Later, after he leaves, [[spoiler:he's forced to close the wormhole for good, to protect Earth from the Scarrans.
TSAB.]]
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': Neither River nor Simon Tam can return to their home on Osiris, because doing so would get Simon arrested and River sent back to In ''FanFic/SophisticationAndBetrayal'', the Academy. On a more blunt note, Malcolm Reynolds can't go back to his home on Shadow because the Alliance virtually destroyed the planet during the Unification War, rendering it uninhabitable.
* ''Series/GilligansIsland'' was a comedy example. Until "Rescue from Gilligan's Island", where the castaways become [[StrangerinAFamiliarLand strangers
protagonist ends up permanently stuck in a familiar land]].
* ''Series/HighlanderTheSeries'':
** Duncan [=MacLeod=] is banished from his Clan
Equestria after he resurrects for efforts to send him back home fail, resulting in the first time.
** This happens
spell unable to most Immortals. Once people notice that they are not aging they will be cast on him again without killing him in the process.
* People's responses to this discovery in ''FanFic/{{Pokeumans}}''
have to move away varied, but much angst and can only really come back when most of the people who used to know them are dead. This is also required when an Immortal 'dies' in public and thus risks revealing TheMasquerade if he/she does not leave.
* ''Series/LastResort'': The whole premise was that the crew of the ''Colorado'' could never return to the United States, because they had
personal drama has been portrayed as traitors after refusing to nuke Pakistan. [[spoiler:Of course, the series' cancellation only halfway into its first season caused the writers to come up with an overly complicated way around over this premise, so that only issue.
* In Raven Child's ''Fanfic/TheSmurfetteVillage'' series,
the Captain and those who had died during the course of the season were denied the ability Smurfettes lose their village to return...]]
* ''Series/LifeOnMars2006'':
** Likewise. Sam finally returns from the grey-brown-orange world of 1973 and decides that the modern world lacks colour.
** And
a volcanic eruption in the spin-off, [[spoiler:Alex Drake discovers that she can't return to 2008, because she is dead]].
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'': Part of the premise. [[spoiler:SubvertedTrope
second story, then ten surviving Smurfs in the third season finale, when they finally ''do'' get to go home, only to have Jack convinced it was a big mistake to leave]].
* ''Series/LostInSpace'': Series premise.
* ''Series/MythQuest'': Matt Bellows touches the Gorgos stone
story lose their home in the Cyber Museum, which causes him Smurf Village due to get stuck in a world SyntheticPlague.
* Fanfic/LanternPrime begins with the devastation
of myriad mythologies. He could Cybertron; Optimus is the only get out of the myth-world by touching the stone again, but he doesn't know where it is.
* ''Series/QuantumLeap'': In which not only can Sam Becket not go home, he can't even stay where he is,
survivor and must live moments from other people's lives, his leaps inevitable, finding himself he is in a new stranger's shoes each time.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'': The key premise. Protagonist Lister awakes from what was supposed to be eighteen months in stasis, but was actually three million years. He is
stasis lock until Ganthet repairs him. Even after that, Prime struggles with being the last living human on of his ship. He sets off to see whether he's kind ([[spoiler: at least initially]]). Even at the last living human in end of the universe. HilarityEnsues; signs of what became of Earth humans does not. (Though in the books, we do have them reach Earth... and it was used as a garbage planet until an explosion sent it out of orbit. The current residents are sentient roaches who don't know a thing about those ape people there used to be.)
* ''Series/{{Revolution}}'':
** When you think about it, the world got a blackout that
story Cybertron is still in effect 15 incapable of providing him any kind of home.
* In ''Fanfic/ToInfinity'', [[spoiler:it's revealed that it's over two million
years later. The United States is effectively dead. Even if the power gets turned back, [[spoiler: which happens in the [[Recap/RevolutionS1E20TheDarkTower first season finale]]]], things are not going after Cortana's rebellion- Roland had to go back to the way they were before the blackout!
** Rachel has to point this to Aaron more or less at the beginning of [[Recap/RevolutionS1E11TheStand episode 11]]. In that same episode, [[spoiler: Jason Neville]] is told to not even bother going home again by his own father.
** In [[Recap/RevolutionS1E13TheSongRemainsTheSame episode 13]], Neville tells his wife this after [[spoiler: his mission to obtain the nuke for Monroe fails]] and he realizes that thanks to Randall's influence his days in the Republic are numbered.
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}'':
** For the entire run. The writers eventually combined this with DoomedHometown
relativistic speeds in order to give the series a BigBad.
** Although one episode ended with the heroes briefly (a few minutes) ending up in a world that looked a lot like theirs, but were disappointed when Quinn sadly noted that the fence gate at his home didn't squeak, as it did in their world, so they jumped into the next vortex that appeared. But after it vanished, a local guy came out of the house with Quinn's mother and mentioned that he'd finally fixed the squeaky gate hinges.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'': The entire cast in the first season. That concept was quickly destroyed.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** Teal'c's MookFaceTurn in the pilot resulted in him and his family being branded as traitors; returning overtly to Chulak as long as Apophis rules there is suicide. [[spoiler:This changes over the course of the next three seasons.]]
** An episode called "A Hundred Days" plays with this trope. A meteor shower during a mission strikes the Stargate, burying it and leaving O'Neill stuck on an alien planet, with the rest of SG-1 having made it back to Earth. O'Neill spends the following months trying to find the gate, hoping that rescue will come. As he finally gives up on the idea of traveling through the stars and going back to Earth, he begins to make a life for himself with the people still on the planet with him. That is until his 100th day there when SG-1 finds a way to make contact with the gate and dig it out. O'Neill's having to choose between his new life and his old one is something of a TearJerker.
** Martin Lloyd, the creator of ''[[ShowWithinAShow Wormhole X-treme!]]'', [[spoiler:is one of the five known survivors of a spacefaring people that was destroyed by the Goa'uld. The only reason they're alive is that they deserted their homeworld's military]].
* ''Series/StargateUniverse'': The basic premise. Apparently wanting to avoid the problems of the previous one, they've stranded the crew so far out that it would literally take decades for a current generation ship to catch up. They can make short trips home using the [[GrandTheftMe communications stones]], but such trips are temporary and don't solve the supply-line issues.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'': Garak was exiled from Cardassia [[spoiler:and is only permitted to return after the entire planet has been carpet bombed]].
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
** Series premise. In the premiere, the ship winds up on the far side of the galaxy. Their journey home by the linear route (even at warp speed) would take at least 70 years, or more than most of the crew's lifetime. They use alternate technologies and wormholes to significantly reduce the time it actually does take but this was still the situation they were facing at the start of the series.
** This is especially true for Neelix, whose homeworld was destroyed, and Icheb, whose parents want only to use him as a weapon.
** One exception to this is the Doctor; he's the ship's Emergency Medical Hologram, so ''Voyager'' '''is''' his home.
** It is mentioned that even if Kes returned to the Ocampa homeworld, they would no longer accept her.
* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'': [[FishOutOfTemporalWater Jack Harkness.]] Not that he'd want to go back, apparently (going by the conversation with Ianto in "To the Last Man.")
* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' has its titular character. Kara's home planet was destroyed, leaving her nowhere to return to.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
** In the episode [[Recap/SupernaturalS02E20WhatIsAndWhatShouldNeverBe "What Is And What Should Never Be" (S02, Ep20)]], Dean returns to his childhood home and his mother is still alive. However, this was just an illusion created by a djinn, and Dean's childhood home was destroyed in a fire which killed his mother and started his nomadic lifestyle.
escape Cortana's sensors.]]



[[folder: Real Life]]
* In the late 1990s, numerous US Army, Air Force, and Naval bases throughout Europe and the United Kingdom closed down, often becoming the property of the home militaries of those countries in which they were located. You want depressing? Try this: the children who grew up on some of those bases would be turned away by ''armed guards'' if they tried to visit their old home-towns.
** The children that grow up in ''most'' Army, Air Force, or Naval bases will get turned away by armed guards if they try to visit their old hometowns; you need a current military ID, or an escort with current military ID, and simply being the offspring of an Enlisted individual or Officer won't get you a current military ID past the age of 21.
** Reversed in cases where the former base is annexed by the surrounding town and added to the local housing stock. Then, the trick becomes figuring out where the gates ''used to be''.
* It's not just the military brats – the "Diplobrats" (a.k.a children of diplomats) often have the same feelings. You live in so many homes, but you don't own them; the government does, or you rent. They're not your home, and going back would just emphasize that point.
* Many people find themselves displaced from their homes due to political turmoil, often losing, in the way, [[TheStateless their nationality]]. One noteworthy case was Mehran Karimi Nasseri, an Iranian national who ended up having to live in an airport terminal lounge for '''18 years''' because his refugee papers were stolen. It's said he eventually [[http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/981/has-a-guy-been-stuck-in-the-paris-airport-since-1988-for-lack-of-the-right-papers made a sort of life for himself there]] and wouldn't leave even when he could.
* At the end of the [[WorldWarII Second World War]] the borders of Poland, Germany, and Czechoslovakia were altered by the Soviets. Nearly ten million people were forcibly relocated, many leaving behind villages where their ancestors had lived for generations. Particularly heartbreaking for [=POWs=] who were released and suddenly found their homes didn't exist anymore.
** Because Poland was now Communist, virtually all of the Polish Army in Exile remained in exile for the rest of their lives.
** When the Berlin Wall was built in 1961 to complete the "Iron Curtain", those who found themselves in East Germany had to stay there. Not that it stopped some of the more determined ones.
** Some of the Soviet Union soldiers during World War II who were captured as [=POWs=] by the Germans risked a few years in prison by returning to the Soviet Union after the war. This was because failure to fight to the death against the Nazis was seen as a potential sign of cowardice (or worse). Many either stayed in Germany living in Displaced Persons camps, or migrated elsewhere.
*** The book ''Literature/OneDayInTheLifeOfIvanDenisovich'' demonstrates quite well what happened to POW's who tried to return, as the main character was sentenced to ten years in TheGulag for being a suspected "spy" for the Germans.
* This frequently happens to victims of natural disasters. These are more cases of No Home To Go Back To. Floods, fires, earthquakes, and other events can destroy whole countries. Even if you can physically return to where you house once stood, your house and neighborhood may no longer be there. This trope is especially the case when there are a lot of fatalities because not only is the physical location gone, but so are the people.
** Hurricane Katrina left tens of thousands with no homes (or jobs) to return to. The vast majority of them have managed to make new homes in Texas or further inland in Louisiana. A large number simply returned to New Orleans.
** Hurricane Sandy destroyed much of New Jersey and New York. Houses were completely washed away, or irreparably damaged. Even when people moved back in to less damaged houses, the surroundings have changed completely and is no longer truly home.
* ''The Last Days'', a film that featured interviews with concentration camp survivors from Hungary who revisit. For one of the women interviewed, it was especially painful coming back to the town where she had lived and seeing her old house. She and the other survivors had moved elsewhere, often to America, after getting out of the camps.
* It used to be a common thing in American culture – still is in certain parts of the country – where parents would kick their children (especially boys) out of the house as soon as they turned 18 or graduated HighSchool depending on when in the school year their birthday fell (by law, hitting 18 legally makes you an adult). This is due to the belief that children are supposed to face the world on their own and survive on their own. In areas where this mindset is/was prevalent, children who lived with their parents were often branded as "lazy", "freeloaders", and/or "failures"; while parents who allowed it without preconditions (exorbitant rent, etc) were openly mocked by other parents.
** While this mindset is still around, especially in parts of the South, it has become increasingly rare thanks to America's perpetually-sluggish economy and the ever-increasing cost of basic necessities (rent, utilities, food, gas/petrol). This reality has forced many twentysomething Americans to either find roommates or stay home with the family.
** This is a good example of entertainment lagging behind reality, since living with your parents past high-school/college age ''does'' make you an {{Acceptable Target|s}} for comedians and the media.
* Several of the original American colonies were settled by the losers of seventeenth-century religious and political brawls in Europe.[[note]]Virginia was the major exception to this, being originally settled by Anglicans looking to make a bit of money.[[/note]] The colonies of course hung on even if a reversal of the fortunes of war meant that they now COULD go home again.
* The Jacobites, the White Russians, and many others who have lost a civil war. White Russians had their own neighborhoods in Paris, Istanbul, Shanghai, and other cities. They would often become [[LegionOfLostSouls mercenaries]] or spies, or similar such things.
** In some cases it did mean they finally went home to a place they never knew. Baron Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim was a Finnish Noble with a Swedish name who was in the Russian military for nearly 30 years and forgot how to speak Finnish, due to lack of use.[[note]]Baron Mannerheim's native language was Swedish, just like most Finnish nobility of the time. Even after re-learning Finnish upon returning to his homeland, he was known to speak with a heavy accent, to the point that during the Finnish Civil War, he required an interpreter.[[/note]] He became Regent of Finland but found Finland strange. He lost his bid for president after helping to set up a new government. He spent most of the next 20 years semi-retired until WorldWarTwo when he was Field Marshall and was later elected president.
* The foreign volunteers of Waffen-SS after World War Two. Germany had lost the war and they would have faced trial of high treason in their native countries. Many of them found their only solace in French and Spanish Foreign Legions. It is said the majority of the French forces in Vietnam consisted of former Waffen-SS soldiers.[[note]]As a rule, and in order to prevent any particular nation from making the Foreign Legion into a Praetorian Guard, any particular national component is kept at about 25 percent of the total. Even supposing (and this was the case, of course) that the French recruiters, in the eagerness for candidates would sign up Germans enlisting as Swiss, Austrian, Scandinavian and other nationalities of related ethnic background, it is unlikely that the number of Germans in the Foreign Legion ever exceeded 35 percent. Thus, without making an allowance for losses, rotation, discharges, etc., the maximum number of Germans fighting in Indochina at any one time reached perhaps 7,000 out of 278,000. As to the ex-Nazis, the early arrivals contained a number of them, none of whom were known to be war criminals. French intelligence saw to that. Since, in view of the rugged Indochinese climate, older men without previous tropical experience constituted more a liability than an asset, the average age of the Foreign Legion enlistees was about 23. At the time of the battle of Dien Bien Phu, any legionnaire of that age group was at the worst, in his "Hitler Youth" shorts when the Third Reich collapsed.[[/note]]
** This was averted with Swedish volunteers, as shown in ''Film/{{Frostbite}}''. Almost none of the surviving volunteers where jailed. The few who were punished were simply punished for avoiding drafting.
* Ever lived in a small town or a rural area that, after you'd left it, went through a sudden round (or two or three) of development? It's freaky, especially when landmarks like entire hills just disappear.
** This is ''more'' likely to happen in a large city. Compare New York City in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, or compare Shanghai in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010. You can scale this up to entire countries during times of industrial revolution.
* This can occur during severe infestations of pest animals (IE: Rats, cockroaches, etc.). The infestations can be so severe that the families living in said home have no choice but to pack up their things and leave. The AnimalPlanet series ''Series/{{Infested}}'' is a documentary that is basically about these situations (Though, fortunately, they are often [[SubvertedTrope subverted]], but not always).
** Some infestations can become so severe that the home is essentially uninhabitable to humans.
* In 1958, a Virginia interracial couple-Richard and Mildred Loving-were arrested for leaving the state to get married in Washington D.C. and then returning to Virginia to live as a married couple. The judge sentenced them to a year in prison but suspended the sentence for 25 years on the condition that the Lovings never return to Virginia together or at the same time. Eventually, the Lovings did return home after winning a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, ''Loving v. Virginia''. The case not only overturned their convictions, but also legalized interracial marriages across the whole country.
* The village of Imber, in the middle of Salisbury Plain, was evacuated in 1943 to allow planning and training for the Normandy landings. The population were not allowed to return even after the conclusion of the war, and their families are still only allowed to return for an annual church service.
** Similarly, villages, towns and occasionally cities are wiped off the map for large structural projects or mining pits, ranging from some villages being removed in Germany to facilitate brown coal mining to moving 1.3 million people for the construction of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Gorges_Dam Three Gorges Dam and Reservoir]] in China. It means that not only does your home no longer exist, even its location has completely vanished.
*** One of the more brutal examples of this is the flooding of the Welsh town of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capel_Celyn Capel Celyn]] by the Liverpool Coporation in 1960. The town was a center for Welsh culture, and one of the last towns where the entire population could speak welsh fluently. Capel Celyn, Wales, was flooded to provide Liverpool, England, with water. The action was brought to parliament by the Liverpool City Council. Every Welsh elected official from every party in Wales voted against the plan, as well as a good handful of Scots, but the plan was pushed through largely on the strength of English votes. It led to mass protests, the rise of the modern Welsh Nationalist movement, and a spate of bombings by a Paramilitary Organization known as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mudiad_Amddiffyn_Cymru Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru]]. The issue still isn't settled, with the Liverpool City Council issuing an insulting nonapology in 2005, which mentioned all the wonderful things Liverpool has done for Wales. When it isn't, you know, destroying parts of the country.
*** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_Villages The Lost Villages]] in [[CanadaEh Canada]] can be included on that list. Most of them were abandoned, the others relocated, to allow for the building of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Building foundations and sidewalks can still sometimes be seen when the water level is low. Other than those brief glimpses, and a memorial park, the villages have disappeared beneath the water.
*** Another Canadian example was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettlement_%28Newfoundland%29 resettlement of much of coastal Newfoundland]]; the population of hundreds of tiny and isolated fishing communities were concentrated in more accessible areas. Played with because many families physically removed their houses from the foundations and literally towed them overseas to their new communities. See the song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNF3V2y5hKo Out From St Leonards]].
* The inhabitants of Pripyat and towns near the Fukushima nuclear power plant won't be able to go back to their homes for a very long time due to catastrophic nuclear meltdowns.
* Americans [[TheStateless who renounce their citizenship]] often find their ability to stay in their country of origin severely limited. For example, Creator/TerryGilliam, an American who became a British citizen, is only allowed to visit the U.S. for 29 days ''a year'', much lower than most U.K. natives are allowed to visit. On the other hand, people who do this in theory ''don't want to go home again''.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania Centralia]], PA. It was more or less condemned after a mine fire started in 1967, and the government moved everyone out, and only seven people remain. The old inhabitants and their children won't be able to come back here for a very, very long time.
* The town of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wittenoom,_Western_Australia Wittenoom]] in Western Australia was a case of this in the 1960s. The town was located around Australia's only asbestos mining site and when the dangers became apparent, the entire place was condemned and most of the residents relocated. Today, only three people remain in the town, which receives no government services, has been erased from maps and signs, and has all roads leading to it permanantly blocked off.

to:

[[folder: Real Life]]
[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' : The reason the late 1990s, numerous US Army, Air Force, and Naval bases throughout Europe and the United Kingdom closed down, often becoming the property of the home militaries of those countries in which they were located. You want depressing? Try this: the children who grew up on some of those bases would be turned away by ''armed guards'' if they tried Mousekewitz family emigrates to visit their old home-towns.
** The children that grow up in ''most'' Army, Air Force, or Naval bases will get turned away by armed guards if they try to visit their old hometowns; you need a current military ID, or an escort with current military ID, and simply being the offspring of an Enlisted individual or Officer won't get you a current military ID past the age of 21.
** Reversed in cases where the former base
America is annexed by the surrounding town and added to the local housing stock. Then, the trick becomes figuring out where the gates ''used to be''.
* It's not just the military brats – the "Diplobrats" (a.k.a children of diplomats) often have the same feelings. You live in so many homes, but you don't own them; the government does, or you rent. They're not your home, and going back would just emphasize that point.
* Many people find themselves displaced from their homes due to political turmoil, often losing, in the way, [[TheStateless their nationality]]. One noteworthy case was Mehran Karimi Nasseri, an Iranian national who ended up having to live in an airport terminal lounge for '''18 years'''
because his refugee papers were stolen. It's said he eventually [[http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/981/has-a-guy-been-stuck-in-the-paris-airport-since-1988-for-lack-of-the-right-papers made a sort of life for himself there]] and wouldn't leave even when he could.
* At
the end of the [[WorldWarII Second World War]] the borders of Poland, Germany, and Czechoslovakia were altered by the Soviets. Nearly ten million people were forcibly relocated, many leaving behind villages where Cossacks burned their ancestors had lived for generations. Particularly heartbreaking for [=POWs=] who were released and suddenly found their homes didn't exist anymore.
** Because Poland was now Communist, virtually all of the Polish Army in Exile remained in exile for the rest of their lives.
** When the Berlin Wall was built in 1961 to complete the "Iron Curtain", those who found themselves in East Germany had to stay there. Not that it stopped some of the more determined ones.
** Some of the Soviet Union soldiers during World War II who were captured as [=POWs=] by the Germans risked a few years in prison by returning to the Soviet Union after the war. This was because failure to fight to the death against the Nazis was seen as a potential sign of cowardice (or worse). Many either stayed in Germany living in Displaced Persons camps, or migrated elsewhere.
*** The book ''Literature/OneDayInTheLifeOfIvanDenisovich'' demonstrates quite well what happened to POW's who tried to return, as the main character was sentenced to ten years in TheGulag for being a suspected "spy" for the Germans.
* This frequently happens to victims of natural disasters. These are more cases of No Home To Go Back To. Floods, fires, earthquakes, and other events can destroy whole countries. Even if you can physically return to where you house once stood, your house and neighborhood may no longer be there. This trope is especially the case when there are a lot of fatalities because not only is the physical location gone, but so are the people.
** Hurricane Katrina left tens of thousands with no homes (or jobs) to return to. The vast majority of them have managed to make new homes in Texas or further inland in Louisiana. A large number simply returned to New Orleans.
** Hurricane Sandy destroyed much of New Jersey and New York. Houses were completely washed away, or irreparably damaged. Even when people moved back in to less damaged houses, the surroundings have changed completely and is no longer truly home.
* ''The Last Days'', a film that featured interviews with concentration camp survivors from Hungary who revisit. For one of the women interviewed, it was especially painful coming back to the town where she had lived and seeing her old house. She and the other survivors had moved elsewhere, often to America, after getting out of the camps.
* It used to be a common thing in American culture – still is in certain parts of the country – where parents would kick their children (especially boys) out of the house as soon as they turned 18 or graduated HighSchool depending on when in the school year their birthday fell (by law, hitting 18 legally makes you an adult). This is due to the belief that children are supposed to face the world on their own and survive on their own. In areas where this mindset is/was prevalent, children who lived with their parents were often branded as "lazy", "freeloaders", and/or "failures"; while parents who allowed it without preconditions (exorbitant rent, etc) were openly mocked by other parents.
** While this mindset is still around, especially in parts of the South, it has become increasingly rare thanks to America's perpetually-sluggish economy and the ever-increasing cost of basic necessities (rent, utilities, food, gas/petrol). This reality has forced many twentysomething Americans to either find roommates or stay home with the family.
** This is a good example of entertainment lagging behind reality, since living with your parents past high-school/college age ''does'' make you an {{Acceptable Target|s}} for comedians and the media.
* Several of the original American colonies were settled by the losers of seventeenth-century religious and political brawls in Europe.[[note]]Virginia was the major exception to this, being originally settled by Anglicans looking to make a bit of money.[[/note]] The colonies of course hung on even if a reversal of the fortunes of war meant that they now COULD go home again.
* The Jacobites, the White Russians, and many others who have lost a civil war. White Russians had their own neighborhoods in Paris, Istanbul, Shanghai, and other cities. They would often become [[LegionOfLostSouls mercenaries]] or spies, or similar such things.
** In some cases it did mean they finally went home to a place they never knew. Baron Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim was a Finnish Noble with a Swedish name who was in the Russian military for nearly 30 years and forgot how to speak Finnish, due to lack of use.[[note]]Baron Mannerheim's native language was Swedish, just like most Finnish nobility of the time. Even after re-learning Finnish upon returning to his homeland, he was known to speak with a heavy accent, to the point that during the Finnish Civil War, he required an interpreter.[[/note]] He became Regent of Finland but found Finland strange. He lost his bid for president after helping to set up a new government. He spent most of the next 20 years semi-retired until WorldWarTwo when he was Field Marshall and was later elected president.
* The foreign volunteers of Waffen-SS after World War Two. Germany had lost the war and they would have faced trial of high treason in their native countries. Many of them found their only solace in French and Spanish Foreign Legions. It is said the majority of the French forces in Vietnam consisted of former Waffen-SS soldiers.[[note]]As a rule, and in order to prevent any particular nation from making the Foreign Legion into a Praetorian Guard, any particular national component is kept at about 25 percent of the total. Even supposing (and this was the case, of course) that the French recruiters, in the eagerness for candidates would sign up Germans enlisting as Swiss, Austrian, Scandinavian and other nationalities of related ethnic background, it is unlikely that the number of Germans in the Foreign Legion ever exceeded 35 percent. Thus, without making an allowance for losses, rotation, discharges, etc., the maximum number of Germans fighting in Indochina at any one time reached perhaps 7,000 out of 278,000. As to the ex-Nazis, the early arrivals contained a number of them, none of whom were known to be war criminals. French intelligence saw to that. Since, in view of the rugged Indochinese climate, older men without previous tropical experience constituted more a liability than an asset, the average age of the Foreign Legion enlistees was about 23. At the time of the battle of Dien Bien Phu, any legionnaire of that age group was at the worst, in his "Hitler Youth" shorts when the Third Reich collapsed.[[/note]]
** This was averted with Swedish volunteers, as shown in ''Film/{{Frostbite}}''. Almost none of the surviving volunteers where jailed. The few who were punished were simply punished for avoiding drafting.
* Ever lived in a small town or a rural area that, after you'd left it, went through a sudden round (or two or three) of development? It's freaky, especially when landmarks like entire hills just disappear.
** This is ''more'' likely to happen in a large city. Compare New York City in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, or compare Shanghai in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010. You can scale this up to entire countries during times of industrial revolution.
* This can occur during severe infestations of pest animals (IE: Rats, cockroaches, etc.). The infestations can be so severe that the families living in said home have no choice but to pack up their things and leave. The AnimalPlanet series ''Series/{{Infested}}'' is a documentary that is basically about these situations (Though, fortunately, they are often [[SubvertedTrope subverted]], but not always).
** Some infestations can become so severe that the home is essentially uninhabitable to humans.
* In 1958, a Virginia interracial couple-Richard and Mildred Loving-were arrested for leaving the state to get married in Washington D.C. and then returning to Virginia to live as a married couple. The judge sentenced them to a year in prison but suspended the sentence for 25 years on the condition that the Lovings never return to Virginia together or at the same time. Eventually, the Lovings did return home after winning a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, ''Loving v. Virginia''. The case not only overturned their convictions, but also legalized interracial marriages across the whole country.
* The
village of Imber, in to the middle of Salisbury Plain, was evacuated in 1943 to allow planning and training for ground.
** Interestingly,
the Normandy landings. The population were not allowed to return even after the conclusion of the war, and their families are still only allowed to return for an annual church service.
** Similarly, villages, towns and occasionally cities are wiped off the map for large structural projects or mining pits, ranging from some villages being removed in Germany to facilitate brown coal mining to moving 1.3 million people for the construction of the
village has been [[WordOfGod exclusively identified as]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Gorges_Dam Three Gorges Dam and Reservoir]] in China. It means that not only does your home no longer exist, even its location has completely vanished.
*** One of the more brutal examples of this
org/wiki/Shostka Shostka, Ukraine]]... which is the flooding of the Welsh town of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capel_Celyn Capel Celyn]] by the Liverpool Coporation in 1960. The town was a center for Welsh culture, and one of the last towns where the entire population could speak welsh fluently. Capel Celyn, Wales, was flooded to provide Liverpool, England, with water. The action was brought to parliament by the Liverpool City Council. Every Welsh elected official from every party in Wales voted against the plan, as well as a good handful of Scots, but the plan was pushed through largely on the strength of English votes. It led to mass protests, the rise of the modern Welsh Nationalist movement, and a spate of bombings by a Paramilitary Organization known as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mudiad_Amddiffyn_Cymru Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru]]. The issue still isn't settled, with the Liverpool City Council issuing an insulting nonapology in 2005, which mentioned all the wonderful things Liverpool has done for Wales. When it isn't, you know, destroying parts of the country.
*** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_Villages The Lost Villages]] in [[CanadaEh Canada]] can be included on that list. Most of them were abandoned, the others relocated, to allow for the building of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Building foundations
standing today.
* In ''WesternAnimation/Madagascar3EuropesMostWanted'', Alex
and sidewalks can still sometimes be seen when the water level is low. Other than those brief glimpses, and a memorial park, the villages have disappeared beneath the water.
*** Another Canadian example was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettlement_%28Newfoundland%29 resettlement of much of coastal Newfoundland]]; the population of hundreds of tiny and isolated fishing communities were concentrated in more accessible areas. Played with because many families physically removed their houses from the foundations and literally towed them overseas to their new communities. See the song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNF3V2y5hKo Out From St Leonards]].
* The inhabitants of Pripyat and towns near the Fukushima nuclear power plant won't be able to go
his friends finally make it back to their homes for a very long time due to catastrophic nuclear meltdowns.
* Americans [[TheStateless who renounce their citizenship]] often find their ability to stay
the Central Park Zoo in their country of origin severely limited. For example, Creator/TerryGilliam, an American who became a British citizen, is New York City, only allowed to visit the U.S. for 29 days ''a year'', much lower than most U.K. natives are allowed realize that they [[spoiler:have grown to visit. On the other hand, people who do this in theory ''don't want to go home again''.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania Centralia]], PA. It was more or less condemned
prefer being free after a mine fire started all]].
* A major conflict
in 1967, ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut,'' where Riley and the government moved everyone out, and only seven people remain. The old inhabitants and their children won't be able to her Emotions come back here for a very, very long time.
* The town of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wittenoom,_Western_Australia Wittenoom]] in Western Australia was a case of this in the 1960s. The town was located around Australia's only asbestos mining site and when the dangers became apparent, the entire place was condemned and most of the residents relocated. Today, only three people remain in the town, which receives no government services, has been erased from maps and signs, and has all roads leading
to it permanantly blocked off.terms with leaving behind Minnesota.



[[folder: Video Games]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonsWake'': The PlayerCharacter is a young dragon that was adopted by a village of lizardfolk. When the player returns from destroying a village of goblins, they find that the lizardfolk village has also been destroyed by a BlackKnight.
* ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive'': After leaving her village to [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge take revenge]] on Raidou for crippling Hayate when no one else would, this seems to be Kasumi's fate thus far, in addition to being marked for death by the Mugen Tenshin Clan. However, the endings of ''Dimensions'' and ''[=DOA5=]'', the two most recent games in the franchise, have [[AmbiguousSituation called this into question]].
* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' for the SNES kicked off the plot with this, when TheHero is kicked out of his home village for removing a rusty sword from a stone, thus drawing monsters to it. In order to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong, he has to find a way to unlock the sword's true potential.
** With a little glitching, he can go home again, [[GameBreakingBug but he can't get out.]]
** Also, in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'', if you have Duran in your party and try to enter his house in Forcena, he will say that he can't return home until he has killed Koren, and the party will be unable to enter the house. Even after you kill Koren you still can't enter his house!
* In ''VideoGame/LuminousArc3'' [[spoiler:Sara and Sion come from a hundred years in the past, but were sent forward in time due to an experiment. While Sion adapted to living in the future, Sara still wants to return to the past. In the end [[IChooseToStay both of them give up and continue their current lives]], with Sara becoming the principal of Urgard and Sion becoming a famous actress. Depending on who you choose, the main reason they want to stay is they want to be with Levi.]]
* For most of ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'', Lloyd is exiled from his hometown due to a petulant proclamation by an arrogant mayor who scapegoats him for the town's problems. Admittedly, Lloyd did cause Iselia to be damaged, but it was accidental and more the fault of the Desians attacking the town after they spotted Lloyd. It's ultimately averted, since he's let back in during the game's second act, despite the mayor's protests.
** There's also a more literal example with Presea, after [[spoiler: Ozette is destroyed by Cruxis]].
* The premise of the first ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'' game, where [[spoiler:you can't return to [[DoomedHometown Kharak]] because TheEmpire has [[AtmosphereAbuse annihilated all life on the surface]]]]. In the end, everything works out fine, though.
** The backstory for the second (numbered) game reveals that the reason the Taiidani took Hiigara for themselves was because their original homeworld was devastated by the Hiigarans.
* In ''[[VideoGame/WildArms1 Wild ARMs]]'' as well, Rudy is exiled from his adopted hometown by the town's mayor for releasing monsters into the village, after said mayor [[NeverMyFault orders him to go into a dank cave and poke random things with a stick until something interesting happens]].
** Made stranger by the fact that not even an hour later he is in the company of a knight and a princess, both of whom could have easily stood up for his character and cleared his name.
** Less strange when you realize he was exiled for using forbidden LostTechnology (even if, in the original, you choose not to; TheRemake changes things so that the gun is the only weapon Rudy has.)
* ''VideoGame/HalfLife1: Opposing Force'''s Adrian Shephard can't go home again because he [[spoiler:was trapped by the G-man in an alternate dimension to ''preserve him''. All in the name of "discretion". Which ultimately is made more depressing by the fact that Earth is now a CrapSackWorld under the jackboots of the Combine.]]
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'': Tidus spends most of the game looking forward to returning to [[DoomedHometown Zanarkand]], which he discovers is pretty impossible seeing that it's been in ruins for the past thousand years and [[spoiler:wasn't even really ''his'' Zanarkand anyway because he had been living in a literal dreamworld.]]
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' has it too. Cloud and Tifa can never have their home town back because it was [[DoomedHometown burned to the ground]] by Sephiroth. Although [[spoiler:the town is rebuilt by Shinra and stocked with actors to cover up the event later in the game, the implication is still the same.]]
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', this happens to a lot of the characters due to the massive property damage over the course of the game, but special mention to the Terrans ([[spoiler:including Zidane]]), whose home planet gets [[EarthShatteringKaboom blown up]], and the summoners Eiko and [[spoiler:Garnet]], whose village was nuked in the backstory.
* Might be the fate of the crew of the ''Spirit of Fire'' from ''VideoGame/HaloWars''.
* Rath from ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem 7]]'' was outcast from the Kutolah tribe at a very young age, due to a prophecy that said he'd have a great future if he saw the world on his own. In his solo ending, he returns to the tribe after the end and his tribesmen welcome him back warmly; in his paired ending with Lyn, Rath comes back alone but some time later Lyn joins him and they have a daughter, [[spoiler:Sue]].
* This is a recurring trait in the ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' series:
** ''VideoGame/SuikodenI'' has you [[spoiler: being branded as traitors to the Empire, and being forced to flee from Gregminster. After taking up arms against them and fighting their forces back for the entire game, you finally return to and invade Gregminster at the very end of the game]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'', [[spoiler: you become branded as traitor's to your home country, and upon first returning to Kyaro, are arrested. After being rescued from your imminent execution, you're unable to return there until quite late in the game, around the time when you lay siege to the country's capital]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII'', [[spoiler: Hugo]] experiences this early on when [[spoiler: the Zexen Knights invade and burn down Karaya Village]]. Also implied for [[spoiler: Watari, whose ninja clan is set to kill him for abandoning them]].
** Averted in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV''. Though you are scapegoated and exiled for a crime you didn't commit early in the game, you do eventually come back. Given the circumstances of your return, it's not a very happy occasion. [[spoiler:And it's not really your homeland anyway. Ironically your original home is one of the first places you visit after you are exiled.]]
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', [[spoiler:you are forced to leave home when the palace is attacked and the hero's parents are killed, and are unable to return to Sol Falena until winning every battle in the game.]]
* ''Manga/InuYasha: Secret of the Cursed Mask'' (which has little to do with a cursed mask) the main character is yanked out of his or her time and can't return. Kagome's normal method of using the well is established early on to not work for the protagonist.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Terranigma}}'', Ark is literally unable to return to his home in the underworld, as the portal in the ground closes after he goes to the surface. The game plays with this idea, allowing him to purchase a home in the surface world, but it only serves to heighten a sense of homesickness which the character comments on in one of the climaxes. In the end, he is finally allowed to return home... [[spoiler:only for him to seal it away by necessity, since his home was the domain of Dark Gaia.]]
* ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'': Jedi certainly aren't ''supposed'' to go home. Or have any contact with their family ever again, for that matter.
** Carth Onasi's homeworld Telos was [[ApocalypseHow glassed]] by the Sith in the backstory.
*** A similar fate is inflicted on Juhani's and Mission's adopted homeworld Taris [[ApocalypseWow during the game]].
** Zaalbar was exiled from his homeworld for attacking his brother with his claws, a massive taboo among the Wookiees.
** Visas Marr in the second game is [[LastOfHisKind one of the few remaining Miraluka]] after Darth Nihilus ate the souls of the entire population of Katarr.
** The Handmaiden [[GreenEyedMonster pissed]] [[KnightTemplar Atris]] [[GreenEyedMonster off]] enough by leaving with the male Exile that she probably wouldn't be welcome if she ever chose to return.
* In ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'', the village where the Spirit Monk and Dawn Star grew up is [[DoomedHometown burned to the ground at the end of the prologue]]. Subverted in that [[spoiler: the Spirit Monk actually gets to go to Dirge, their real home, later in the game]].
* In ''Franchise/MassEffect'', all three of Shepard's backgrounds ensure that they can never go home again: if you choose Earthborn, Shepard is an orphan who grew up on the streets; if you choose Colonist, Shepard's parents were killed and the colony razed in a batarian raid; if you choose Spaceborn, Shepard has a family, but grew up on multiple space stations and colonies as they moved around with the military.
** Played with for Colonist Shepard in the third game. S/he mentions that they rebuilt Mindoir, but it wasn't the same afterwards, with his/her tone of voice indicating that it also contains too many painful memories. Shepard can go home again, s/he just doesn't want to.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', Miranda parted from her father on rather bad terms.
---> '''Miranda:''' Shots were fired.
** Also in ''Mass Effect 2'', Tali can end up exiled from her fleet during her loyalty mission.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', Shepherd has to leave Earth due to the Reaper invasion, although that's only their "home" in one of the three possible backgrounds.
* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', the trope is both played straight and averted for the six origins. Five of the six are not only able to return home, but ''have'' to return there in the course of playing the game. The Mage returns to the Circle of Magi during the "Broken Circle" quest; the City Elf helps drive slavers out of the Alienage where they grew up; the Dalish Elf returns to the Brecilian Forest to recruit members of another elven clan to help fight the darkspawn; and the Dwarf Noble and Dwarf Commoner both go back to Orzammar to settle the question of who becomes king. The trope is played painfully straight, however, for the Human Noble, whose ancestral home - Castle Cousland - is never seen again after the origin is completed, which is probably for the best since it's littered with the corpses of everyone else who lived there.
** Sten also has this issue, as he cannot return home to give his report because his sword was lost. As he explains it, the sword was forged for his hands, and he "was to die wielding it." If he returned home without it, he would be slain on-sight by the Qunari border guards as it would mean he was 'without his soul'.
** Zevran has quit his role as an Antivan Crow, and thus if he ever goes anywhere near Antiva again they'll probably have him assassinated.
** Leliana is in Ferelden after a botched mission left her with treason charges in Orlais.
* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', Hawke's DoomedHometown of Lothering is destroyed by the Darkspawn horde at the beginning of the game. It's eventually rebuilt at some point over the next seven years, but by that time Hawke is pretty enmeshed in Kirkwall's problems and has begun to set in roots. However, Hawke's mother comments that Hawke and his/her siblings "are Fereldan to your toes," and dialogue in one minor quest can have Hawke state that despite their role as Champion of Kirkwall, s/he will always consider Ferelden to be their home.
** Invoked by Aveline when discussing her own reticence to return to post-Blight Ferelden in Act One, much like Hawke's family.
--> '''Aveline''': You can't go home again. That's supposed to be about maturity. It's not the same if you don't have the option.
** Fenris doesn't ''want'' to go home after all the Magisters of Tevinter did to him. Merrill's character arc begins with her leaving her clan to live in the Kirkwall alienage - [[spoiler: and the ''least'' bloody ending still leaves her exiled forever.]]
** The shipwrecked qunari platoon spend roughly four years "waiting for a second ship", when in reality they're stuck in Kirkwall until their Arishok recovers [[spoiler: their sacred text and the one who stole it.]] As Kirkwall is almost the perfect opposite of ordered qunari society, this really gets to the Arishok.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', your NinjaButterfly Issun [[spoiler:ran away from home rather than become a celestial envoy]] and refuses to accompany you when you have a chance to go to his hometown. Also, [[spoiler:the celestial beings murdered by Yami]] can't ever go back to the Celestial Plane.
* In ''VideoGame/ThreeInThree'', the main character spends most of the plot trying to get back to the spreadsheet she lived in, only to discover in the end that she doesn't really belong there anymore.
* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'', Gorion's influence was pretty much the only reason Ulraunt tolerated your presence in Candlekeep. When he dies, the fortress becomes as off limits to you as it is to the rest of the world. The sequel touches on this a few times as well: as time passes, you become a big fish in a very small pond -- even if they did let you go back home, [[StrangerInAFamiliarLand could you ever be content there?]]
** You can (and in fact have to) go back to Candlekeep some time after Gorion's death while following the conspiracy you have been embroiled in all this time, only to discover [[spoiler:that nearly everyone you knew there was killed and replaced by doppelgangers.]]
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' universe, those High Elves who remain loyal to the Alliance, after most of their brethren join the Blood Elves who defect to the Horde. Also those humans and elves who fled the kingdom of Lordaeron when it fell to the [[ZombieApocalypse undead]].
** Recent developments in ''WorldOfWarcraft'': [[spoiler:The blood elves of formerly-neutral Dalaran have all been arrested, kicked out, or killed as the city-state joins the Alliance. Also, Vol'jin, leader of the Horde's trolls, lived through an assassination attempt from one of Garrosh's soldiers and is now hiding out in Pandaria while the Horde believes him dead.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Otherspace}}'', the universe that houses our solar system began to break apart due to a massive war between titanic forces, forcing the players to make the journey to a new universe and start over there.
* In ''[[VideoGame/{{X}} X: Beyond the Frontier]]'', Terran test pilot [[PlayerCharacter Kyle Brennan]] is marooned in a distant star system after the [[XtremeKoolLetterz Xperimental Shuttle's]] [[FasterThanLightTravel jumpdrive]] goes haywire during a test flight. He spends the rest of the game surviving, and the expansion pack ''[[StealthPun X-Tension]]'' building a MegaCorp called [=TerraCorp=] to try and develop a way to get back home.
** In ''X3: Reunion'', three games and several dozen years later, the Solar System is reconnected to the X-Universe's PortalNetwork at the end of the main plot. By this time, Kyle Brennan has a grown son in the X-Universe, is a war hero, and is the head of a multibillion-[[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credit]] company. At best, he'd likely be a StrangerInAFamiliarLand.
** The ''[[AllThereInTheManual X-Encyclopedia]]'' included in the X-Superbox series collection states that he did return to Earth after ''Reunion'', and began working as a political activist in favor of closer diplomatic relations between the Terrans and the Community of Planets. It didn't help much; Earth soon became embroiled in a SpaceColdWar with the Commonwealth, which erupted into a hot war about a decade later.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' had a subplot which demonstrated that remaining in space too long will result in you finding all of your friends on Earth now long dead.
* At the beginning of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'', [[PlayerCharacter the Lone Wanderer]] is living with their father, James, in the underground shelter Vault 101. However, when James leaves the Vault, the paranoid Vault Overseer tries to have the Wanderer killed, forcing them to flee into the Wasteland to find their father. Later, the Wanderer returns to the Vault to find that its inhabitants are embroiled in a civil war over whether or not to keep the Vault locked down. If the Wanderer finds a peaceful solution, their childhood friend Amata becomes the new Overseer. However, as she explains, a lot of people still blame them for everything that went wrong. For the sake of peace in the Vault, the Wanderer is forced to leave again, this time for good.
** In ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas: Lonesome Road'', the Courier finds out that they [[WhereIWasBornAndRazed destroyed their implied hometown]] by delivering a mysterious package from Navarro that detonated the Divide's nuclear missiles.
** The original ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' ends with the Vault Dweller being banished from his Vault, due to having been radically changed by his experiences in the wastes and possible hero worship amongst the Vault's younger dwellers causing them to leave en masse.
* Played with almost to the point of MindScrew in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2''. The [[PlayerCharacter Knight-Captain's]] DoomedHometown actually ''fights off'' the attack that normally destroys it in that trope, with only four villagers (a GuestStarPartyMember and three militia {{redshirt}}s) confirmed dead. About two-thirds of the way through the plot, the village actually ''is'' destroyed by the BigBad, [[spoiler:but most of the villagers survive and, in the good ending, return to rebuild]]. ''[[ExpansionPack Mask of the Betrayer]]'' takes the tack of moving the Knight-Captain to the other side of the continent. [[spoiler:In two of the MultipleEndings, s/he gets to go home and potentially get married there. Another two endings play it straight by either having the Knight-Captain stay on the Fugue Plane permanently to bind the Spirit-eater there, or having him/her embrace their hunger and go on a rampage through the universe eating every spirit in sight.]]
* The Exiles of ''Videogame/WildStar'' are an entire faction of this, depressingly enough.
** The Exile Humans were chased off of their homeworld of Cassus when TheEmpire instituted oppressive policies and cracked down on any and all dissenters.
** The Granok fought against the Dominion, turning the tide of the war by stealing their tech and chasing them off. Their leaders, however, believed them to have betrayed their ideals (said leaders were ready to accept death) and banished them.
** The Aurin were innocents who the Dominion targeted when they learned they were helping the Exiles, harvesting their planet's natural resources until it was laid barren.
** The Mordesh used to be allies of the Dominion until a medical breakthrough they created backfired horribly, turning the race into "space zombies". When the Dominion abandoned them, they turned to the Exiles for help.
* In the first TheSims game, if a child fails school, s/he will be sent to military school and will never be seen or heard from again.
** Same thing for couples who break up. One of them will leave the house and will never be seen or heard from again.
* In the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series, Misty Fey was forced into hiding after she was publicly disgraced after the DL-6 Incident. [[spoiler:Even after her name was cleared, in the first game, she isn't able to return to her old life.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LittleInferno'', the ArcWords are "You can go as far as you like, but you can't ever go back". [[spoiler:And when your home burns down, that's it - it's time for you to to walk away, go on an adventure, and find something to do in the world more worthwhile than burning things in a fireplace.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LufiaCurseOfTheSinistrals'', after Daos threatens all who ally themselves with Maxim, the people of every city in the world refuse to allow Maxim and his allies to enter—even Elcid and Parcelyte. [[spoiler:Once acquaintances of the party convince the world leaders to stand up against Daos and help stop Daos from inflicting his wrath, Maxim and his party are allowed back in.]]
* In ''VideoGame/DistortedTravesty'', after the heroes get warped into an amalgamate video game world, their first priority is finding a way to get back home. After a few levels, it's revealed that while they can technically go home, [[spoiler:their home has been warped into the same world. The "real" world is forever beyond their reach.]]

to:

[[folder: Video Games]]
[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonsWake'': A major element in 2007's ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie.The PlayerCharacter is a young dragon that was adopted by a village of lizardfolk. When civil war on Cybertron damaged the player returns from destroying a village of goblins, they find that planet's surface, and the lizardfolk village has also been Allspark being destroyed by a BlackKnight.
* ''VideoGame/DeadOrAlive'': After leaving her village to [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge take revenge]] on Raidou for crippling Hayate when no one else would, this seems to be Kasumi's fate thus far, in addition to being marked for death by
means that the Mugen Tenshin Clan. However, planet will die eventually. [[spoiler: At the endings end of ''Dimensions'' and ''[=DOA5=]'', ''TransformersDarkOfTheMoon'', the two most recent games in Space Bridge's destruction possibly causes Cybertron to collapse on itself, forever preventing the franchise, have [[AmbiguousSituation called this into question]].
* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' for the SNES kicked off the plot with this, when TheHero is kicked out of his home village for removing a rusty sword
Autobots from a stone, thus drawing monsters returning to it. In order to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong, he has to find a way to unlock the sword's true potential.
** With a little glitching, he can go home again, [[GameBreakingBug but he can't get out.
their old home.]]
** Also, in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'', if you have Duran in your party and try * In ''Film/GrossePointeBlank'', John Cusack's charcter, Martin Blank, return to enter his house in Forcena, home town for a reunion. While there, he will say visits his childhood home, only to find that he can't it's become a convenience store. This causes him to say the line, "You can never go home again, but I guess you can shop there."
* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the sole reason for Cobb to accept the mission is because Saito has enough influence to allow him to
return home until he has killed Koren, to his children. [[spoiler:He is wanted by the police as the primary suspect for his wife's death and went into hiding, leaving his children behind with their grandparents. In a particularly painful twist to [[ClearMyName the party will be unable to enter old plot]], his wife believed that the house. Even after you kill Koren you still can't enter his house!
* In ''VideoGame/LuminousArc3'' [[spoiler:Sara
real world was a shared dream of them and Sion come from a hundred years that they would have to die to wake up in the past, but were sent forward in time due to an experiment. While Sion adapted to living in the future, Sara still wants real world. So she set up her own suicide making it appear as if he murdered her, directly mentioning that he would no longer be able to return to his family in the past. In supposed dream, in the end [[IChooseToStay hope that he would also kill himself so they could both of them give wake up and continue their current lives]], with Sara becoming in the principal of Urgard and Sion becoming a famous actress. Depending on who you choose, the main reason they want to stay is they want to be with Levi.real world.]]
* For most of ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia'', Lloyd is exiled from his hometown due to a petulant proclamation by an arrogant mayor who scapegoats him for the town's problems. Admittedly, Lloyd did cause Iselia to be damaged, but it was accidental In ''Film/StarTrek'', [[spoiler:Spock and more the fault of the Desians attacking the town after they spotted Lloyd. It's ultimately averted, since Spock Prime]] both wind up afflicted by this trope: [[spoiler:Spock because Vulcan has just imploded]] and [[spoiler:Spock Prime because he's let back marooned in during the game's second act, despite the mayor's protests.
** There's also a more literal example with Presea, after [[spoiler: Ozette is destroyed by Cruxis]].
* The premise of the first ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}}'' game, where [[spoiler:you can't return to [[DoomedHometown Kharak]] because TheEmpire
another timeline...''and'' Vulcan has [[AtmosphereAbuse annihilated all life on the surface]]]]. In the end, everything works out fine, though.
** The backstory for the second (numbered) game reveals that the reason the Taiidani took Hiigara for themselves was because their original homeworld was devastated by the Hiigarans.
* In ''[[VideoGame/WildArms1 Wild ARMs]]'' as well, Rudy is exiled from his adopted hometown by the town's mayor for releasing monsters into the village, after said mayor [[NeverMyFault orders him to go into a dank cave and poke random things with a stick until something interesting happens]].
** Made stranger by the fact that not even an hour later he is in the company of a knight and a princess, both of whom could have easily stood up for his character and cleared his name.
** Less strange when you realize he was exiled for using forbidden LostTechnology (even if, in the original, you choose not to; TheRemake changes things so that the gun is the only weapon Rudy has.)
* ''VideoGame/HalfLife1: Opposing Force'''s Adrian Shephard can't go home again because he [[spoiler:was trapped by the G-man in an alternate dimension to ''preserve him''. All in the name of "discretion". Which ultimately is made more depressing by the fact that Earth is now a CrapSackWorld under the jackboots of the Combine.
just imploded.]]
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'': Tidus spends most ** And, of course, the game looking forward BigBad, Nero, is in the same boat, thanks to returning to [[DoomedHometown Zanarkand]], which he discovers is pretty impossible seeing [[spoiler:the supernova that it's been in ruins for the past thousand years took out Romulus and [[spoiler:wasn't even really ''his'' Zanarkand anyway because he had been living in a literal dreamworld.his subsequent time-traveling.]]
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' has it too. Cloud and Tifa can never have their home town back because it was [[DoomedHometown burned to the ground]] by Sephiroth. Although [[spoiler:the town is rebuilt by Shinra and stocked * ''TheSearchers'' ends with actors to cover up the event later in the game, the implication is still the same.]]
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', this happens to a lot of the characters due to the massive property damage over the course of the game, but special mention to the Terrans ([[spoiler:including Zidane]]), whose home planet gets [[EarthShatteringKaboom blown up]], and the summoners Eiko and [[spoiler:Garnet]], whose village was nuked in the backstory.
* Might be the fate of the crew of the ''Spirit of Fire'' from ''VideoGame/HaloWars''.
* Rath from ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem 7]]'' was outcast from the Kutolah tribe at a very young age, due to a prophecy that said he'd have a great future if he saw the world on his own. In his solo ending, he returns to the tribe after the end and his tribesmen welcome him back warmly; in his paired ending with Lyn, Rath comes back alone but some time later Lyn joins him and they have a daughter, [[spoiler:Sue]].
* This is a recurring trait in the ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' series:
** ''VideoGame/SuikodenI'' has you [[spoiler: being branded as traitors to the Empire, and being forced to flee from Gregminster. After taking up arms against them and fighting their forces back for the entire game, you finally return to and invade Gregminster at the very end of the game]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'', [[spoiler: you become branded as traitor's to your home country, and upon first returning to Kyaro, are arrested. After being rescued from your imminent execution, you're unable to return there until quite late in the game, around the time when you lay siege to the country's capital]].
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenIII'', [[spoiler: Hugo]] experiences this early on when [[spoiler: the Zexen Knights invade and burn down Karaya Village]]. Also implied for [[spoiler: Watari, whose ninja clan is set to kill him for abandoning them]].
** Averted in ''VideoGame/SuikodenIV''. Though you are scapegoated and exiled for a crime you didn't commit early in the game, you do eventually come back. Given the circumstances of your return, it's not a very happy occasion. [[spoiler:And it's not really your homeland anyway. Ironically your original home is one of the first places you visit after you are exiled.]]
** In ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'', [[spoiler:you are forced to leave home when the palace is attacked and the hero's parents are killed, and are unable to return to Sol Falena until winning every battle in the game.]]
* ''Manga/InuYasha: Secret of the Cursed Mask'' (which has little to do with a cursed mask) the main character is yanked out of his or her time and can't return. Kagome's normal method of using the well is established early on to not work for the protagonist.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Terranigma}}'', Ark is literally unable to return to his home in the underworld, as the portal in the ground closes after he goes to the surface. The game plays with this idea, allowing him to purchase a home in the surface world, but it only serves to heighten a sense of homesickness which the character comments on in one of the climaxes. In the end, he is finally allowed to return home... [[spoiler:only for him to seal it away by necessity, since his home was the domain of Dark Gaia.]]
* ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'': Jedi certainly aren't ''supposed'' to go home. Or have any contact with their family ever again, for that matter.
** Carth Onasi's homeworld Telos was [[ApocalypseHow glassed]] by the Sith in the backstory.
*** A similar fate is inflicted on Juhani's and Mission's adopted homeworld Taris [[ApocalypseWow during the game]].
** Zaalbar was exiled from his homeworld for attacking his brother with his claws, a massive taboo among the Wookiees.
** Visas Marr in the second game is [[LastOfHisKind one of the few remaining Miraluka]] after Darth Nihilus ate the souls of the entire population of Katarr.
** The Handmaiden [[GreenEyedMonster pissed]] [[KnightTemplar Atris]] [[GreenEyedMonster off]] enough by
John Wayne leaving with the male Exile that she probably wouldn't be welcome if she ever chose to return.
* In ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'', the village where the Spirit Monk and Dawn Star grew up is [[DoomedHometown burned to the ground at the end of the prologue]]. Subverted in that [[spoiler: the Spirit Monk actually gets to go to Dirge, their real home, later in the game]].
* In ''Franchise/MassEffect'', all three of Shepard's backgrounds ensure that they can never go home again: if you choose Earthborn, Shepard is an orphan who grew up on the streets; if you choose Colonist, Shepard's parents were killed and the colony razed in a batarian raid; if you choose Spaceborn, Shepard has a family, but grew up on multiple space stations and colonies as they moved around with the military.
** Played with for Colonist Shepard in the third game. S/he mentions that they rebuilt Mindoir, but it wasn't the same afterwards, with his/her tone of voice indicating that it also contains too many painful memories. Shepard can go home again, s/he just doesn't want to.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', Miranda parted from her father on rather bad terms.
---> '''Miranda:''' Shots were fired.
** Also in ''Mass Effect 2'', Tali can end up exiled from her fleet during her loyalty mission.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', Shepherd has to leave Earth due to the Reaper invasion, although that's only their "home" in one of the three possible backgrounds.
* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', the trope is both played straight and averted for the six origins. Five of the six are not only able to return home, but ''have'' to return there in the course of playing the game. The Mage returns to the Circle of Magi during the "Broken Circle" quest; the City Elf helps drive slavers out of the Alienage where they grew up; the Dalish Elf returns to the Brecilian Forest to recruit members of another elven clan to help fight the darkspawn; and the Dwarf Noble and Dwarf Commoner both go back to Orzammar to settle the question of who becomes king. The trope is played painfully straight, however, for the Human Noble, whose ancestral home - Castle Cousland - is never seen again after the origin is completed, which is probably for the best since it's littered with the corpses of everyone else who lived there.
** Sten also has this issue, as he cannot return home to give his report
because his sword was lost. As he explains it, the sword was forged for behavior has alienated his hands, and he "was to die wielding it." If he returned home without it, he would be slain on-sight by the Qunari border guards as it would mean he was 'without his soul'.
** Zevran has quit his role as an Antivan Crow, and thus if he ever goes anywhere near Antiva again they'll probably have him assassinated.
** Leliana is in Ferelden after a botched mission left her with treason charges in Orlais.
* In ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'', Hawke's DoomedHometown of Lothering is destroyed by the Darkspawn horde at the beginning of the game. It's eventually rebuilt at some point over the next seven years, but by that time Hawke is pretty enmeshed in Kirkwall's problems and has begun to set in roots. However, Hawke's mother comments that Hawke and his/her siblings "are Fereldan to your toes," and dialogue in one minor quest can have Hawke state that despite their role as Champion of Kirkwall, s/he will always consider Ferelden to be their home.
** Invoked by Aveline when discussing her own reticence to return to post-Blight Ferelden in Act One, much like Hawke's
family.
--> '''Aveline''': You can't go home again. That's supposed to be about maturity. It's not the same if you don't have the option.
** Fenris doesn't ''want'' to go home after all the Magisters of Tevinter did to him. Merrill's character arc begins with her leaving her clan to live in the Kirkwall alienage - [[spoiler: and the ''least'' bloody ending still leaves her exiled forever.]]
** The shipwrecked qunari platoon spend roughly four years "waiting for a second ship", when in reality they're stuck in Kirkwall until their Arishok recovers [[spoiler: their sacred text and the one who stole it.]] As Kirkwall is almost the perfect opposite of ordered qunari society, this really gets to the Arishok.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', your NinjaButterfly Issun [[spoiler:ran away from home rather than become a celestial envoy]] and refuses to accompany you when you have a chance to go to his hometown. Also, [[spoiler:the celestial beings murdered by Yami]] can't ever go back to the Celestial Plane.
* In ''VideoGame/ThreeInThree'', the main character spends most of the plot trying to get back to the spreadsheet she lived in, only to discover in the end that she doesn't really belong there anymore.
* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'', Gorion's influence was pretty much the only reason Ulraunt tolerated your presence in Candlekeep. When he dies, the fortress becomes as off limits to you as it is to the rest of the world. The sequel touches on this a few times as well: as time passes, you become a big fish in a very small pond -- even if they did let you go back home, [[StrangerInAFamiliarLand could you ever be content there?]]
** You can (and in fact have to) go back to Candlekeep some time after Gorion's death while following the conspiracy you have been embroiled in all this time, only to discover [[spoiler:that nearly everyone you knew there was killed and replaced by doppelgangers.]]
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}'' universe, those High Elves who remain loyal to the Alliance, after most of their brethren join the Blood Elves who defect to the Horde. Also those humans and elves who fled the kingdom of Lordaeron when it fell to the [[ZombieApocalypse undead]].
** Recent developments in ''WorldOfWarcraft'': [[spoiler:The blood elves of formerly-neutral Dalaran have all been arrested, kicked out, or killed as the city-state joins the Alliance. Also, Vol'jin, leader of the Horde's trolls, lived through an assassination attempt from one of Garrosh's soldiers and is now hiding out in Pandaria while the Horde believes him dead.]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Otherspace}}'', the universe that houses our solar system began to break apart due to a massive war between titanic forces, forcing the players to make the journey to a new universe and start over there.
* In ''[[VideoGame/{{X}} X: Beyond the Frontier]]'', Terran test pilot [[PlayerCharacter Kyle Brennan]] is marooned in a distant star system after the [[XtremeKoolLetterz Xperimental Shuttle's]] [[FasterThanLightTravel jumpdrive]] goes haywire during a test flight. He spends the rest of the game surviving, and the expansion pack ''[[StealthPun X-Tension]]'' building a MegaCorp called [=TerraCorp=] to try and develop a way to get back home.
** In ''X3: Reunion'', three games and several dozen years later, the Solar System is reconnected to the X-Universe's PortalNetwork at the end of the main plot. By this time, Kyle Brennan
''ForrestGump'' movie, Forrest has a grown son in the X-Universe, is a war hero, and is the head of a multibillion-[[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credit]] company. At best, he'd likely be a StrangerInAFamiliarLand.
** The ''[[AllThereInTheManual X-Encyclopedia]]'' included in the X-Superbox series collection states that he did return to Earth after ''Reunion'', and began working as a political activist in favor of closer diplomatic relations between the Terrans and the Community of Planets. It didn't help much; Earth soon became embroiled in a SpaceColdWar with the Commonwealth, which erupted into a hot war about a decade later.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' had a subplot which demonstrated that remaining in space too long will result in you finding all of your friends on Earth now long dead.
* At the beginning of ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'', [[PlayerCharacter the Lone Wanderer]] is living with their father, James, in the underground shelter Vault 101. However, when James leaves the Vault, the paranoid Vault Overseer tries to have the Wanderer killed, forcing them to flee into the Wasteland to find their father. Later, the Wanderer returns to the Vault to find that its inhabitants are embroiled in a civil war over whether or not to keep the Vault locked down. If the Wanderer finds a peaceful solution, their
Jenny's childhood friend Amata becomes the new Overseer. However, as she explains, a lot house razed in order to bring closure to years of people still blame them for everything that went wrong. For the sake of peace in the Vault, the Wanderer is forced to leave again, abuse by her father.
* ''Film/PaintYourWagon'' features
this time lyric: "Home is made for good.
** In ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas: Lonesome Road'', the Courier finds out that they [[WhereIWasBornAndRazed destroyed their implied hometown]] by delivering a mysterious package from Navarro that detonated the Divide's nuclear missiles.
** The original ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' ends
coming from, for dreams of going to/ which, with any luck will never come true."
* In
the Vault Dweller being banished from his Vault, due to having been radically changed by his experiences in film version of ''Film/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'', the wastes and possible hero worship amongst the Vault's younger dwellers causing them to leave en masse.
* Played with almost to the point of MindScrew in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2''. The [[PlayerCharacter Knight-Captain's]] DoomedHometown actually ''fights off'' the attack that normally destroys it in that trope, with only four villagers (a GuestStarPartyMember and three militia {{redshirt}}s) confirmed dead. About two-thirds of the way through the plot, the village actually
Earth ''is'' destroyed by restored, but Arthur Dent decides that the BigBad, [[spoiler:but most world would be a better place ''without'' him, having fallen in love with Trillian and wanting to share her wanderlust.
* ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober''. Marco Ramius makes ''sure'' that his defection will be real by burning all
of the villagers survive and, bridges behind him.
* In ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'', where the main characters, after hibernating in pods for 500 years, wake up to a world of naturally selected idiots.
* In ''Film/HarlemNights'' (1989), Quick (Eddie Murphy) and Sugar Ray (Richard Pryor) pull TheCaper that results in [[spoiler:the death of the major rival crime boss.]]. Knowing the danger of what they have done, they take a last wistful look at the New York skyline before bidding the city goodbye.
* The movie ''Film/SilentHill'' after Rose and Sharon leave Silent Hill and appear to arrive back home, they are still in another reality because they entered the world of Silent Hill. Thus they can never truly return home.
* It takes Columbus a while to come to this conclusion in ''Film/{{Zombieland}}''. He wants to get back to Ohio to see if his family is still alive (although he eventually admits that that wouldn't mean much even if they were). He reacts appropriately when Wichita tells him that that's a pretty fruitless venture, as it's "a total ghost town". He still doesn't quite get it until he's about to leave and he realizes that he really can't go back home.
* Done
in the good ending, movie ''Film/{{Vamp}}'', when Keith finds his friend AJ.
--> '''AJ''': You don't get it do you? For me, home is a million miles away now. Home is on another planet. (He hunches over before rising with fangs and gold eyes) I'm a fucking zombie now!
* In ''Film/AboutSchmidt'', during one of his excursions on the way to his daughter's wedding, Schmidt goes to visit his childhood home from many years ago, only to find a tyre shop now standing in its place. He still goes inside and tries to reminisce, to the bemusement of the clerk.
* In ''Film/HowardTheDuck'' this is what happens to the title character in order to save the Earth.
* Ash's fate in the original ending of ''Film/ArmyOfDarkness'', in which he [[spoiler:drinks too many drops of a sleeping potion and wakes up after the apocalypse]].
* In ''Film/ShanghaiNoon'', [[BigBad Lo Fang]] [[TraumaticHaircut cuts off Chon Wang's queue]], knowing full well that he can never
return to rebuild]]. ''[[ExpansionPack Mask China afterwards, which was absolutely TruthInTelevision for Chinese natives.
* After Stryker's raid on the school in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'', they stopped by Bobby Drake's house in hopes of regrouping, which in the process revealed his mutant abilities to his parents. His ''own brother'' calls the police on the group despite them coming with no ill intentions. After Pyro stupidly attacks the police in the standoff that follows, he's forced to flee with the others knowing he can never come back.
* In ''Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1990'', the Foot find out where the Turtles' lair is and kidnap Splinter, forcing the Turtles to stay at April's...until the Foot find them there and attack. This is the reason why the Turtles are at April's new apartment in the beginning
of the Betrayer]]'' takes sequel ''[[Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesIITheSecretOfTheOoze Secret of the tack of moving the Knight-Captain Ooze]]'' and looking for a new home; "We could always go back to the other side old sewer den." "Oh, right, Raph. It's a little tough, when about five hundred members of the continent. [[spoiler:In two Foot clan ''know where you live.''"
* ''Franchise/StarWars'': WordOfGod states that the reason Obi-Wan had Luke Skywalker go to Tatooine after birth to live with the Lars family despite it being Vader's home planet is because Darth Vader is unwilling to ever return to Tatooine due to painful memories
of the MultipleEndings, s/he gets to go home place.
** By the end of ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke has lost pretty much everything. His aunt
and potentially get married there. Another two endings play it straight by either having uncle are dead, he can't go back to the Knight-Captain stay on farm, because he would have been killed even before the Fugue Plane permanently Death Star incident thanks to bind the Spirit-eater there, or having him/her embrace their hunger droids. [[TheObiWan His mentor]] dies, and go on Biggs, his best friend, dies being a rampage through human shield protecting him during the Battle of Yavin. [[TraumaCongaLine This all takes place over the course of a couple days tops]]. A few expanded universe eating every spirit in sight.]]
* The Exiles of ''Videogame/WildStar'' are an entire faction of this, depressingly enough.
** The Exile Humans were chased off of their homeworld of Cassus when TheEmpire instituted oppressive policies and cracked down on any and all dissenters.
** The Granok fought against
novels imply that the Dominion, turning the tide of the war by stealing their tech and chasing them off. Their leaders, however, believed them to have betrayed their ideals (said leaders were ready to accept death) and banished them.
** The Aurin were innocents who the Dominion targeted when they learned they were helping the Exiles, harvesting their planet's natural resources until it was laid barren.
** The Mordesh used to be allies of the Dominion until a medical breakthrough they created backfired horribly, turning the race into "space zombies". When the Dominion abandoned them, they turned to the Exiles for help.
* In the first TheSims game, if a child fails school, s/he will be sent to military school and will never be seen or heard from again.
** Same
only thing that got Luke though was the adrenaline and the fact that he was given practically no downtime for couples who break up. One of them will leave the house and will never be seen or heard from again.
* In the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series, Misty Fey was forced into hiding after she was publicly disgraced after the DL-6 Incident. [[spoiler:Even after her name was cleared,
him to think about it. Subverted in the first game, she isn't able ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', when he has to return to her old life.]]
rescue Han Solo from Jabba the Hutt.
* In ''VideoGame/LittleInferno'', the ArcWords are "You can go as far as you like, but you can't ever go back". [[spoiler:And ''Film/{{Suffragette}}'', when your home burns down, that's it - it's time for you to to walk away, go on an adventure, and find something to do in the world more worthwhile than burning things in a fireplace.]]
* In ''VideoGame/LufiaCurseOfTheSinistrals'', after Daos threatens all who ally themselves with Maxim, the people of every city in the world refuse to allow Maxim and his allies to enter—even Elcid and Parcelyte. [[spoiler:Once acquaintances of the party convince the world leaders to stand up against Daos and help stop Daos
Maud returns from inflicting his wrath, Maxim and his party are allowed back in.]]
* In ''VideoGame/DistortedTravesty'', after the heroes get warped into an amalgamate video game world,
a suffrage meeting, her husband doesn't let her enter their first priority is finding a way to get back home. After a few levels, it's revealed that while they can technically go home, [[spoiler:their shared home has been warped into and leaves her to sleep on the same world. The "real" world streets. [[spoiler: Fortunately the suffrage movement is forever beyond their reach.prepared for such cases, and a room with affordable rent is provided almost immediately.]]



[[folder: Western Animation]]
[[quoteright:353:[[WesternAnimation/PinkyElmyraAndTheBrain http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/22c2eae4578babe0a6d827cb525fa86a.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:353:''"The situation's changed, for WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain. No laboratory, alone in the rain..."'']]
* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' for most of the third season.
-->"''I live in the games. I search through systems, people, and cities, for this place: Mainframe; my home. My format? I have no format. I am a renegade, lost on the Net.''"
** In more ways than one too. While Matrix and Andraia are lost on the Net, Bob is lost in the Web. At the same time Dot and Mouse are forced to abandon the Principal Office offscreen and are forced into hiding. The Tor also gets destroyed forcing Megabyte to find a new place to "set up shop". Seems like everyone in this show loses their home at one point or another.
* For ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', it was his home ''time''.
* Part of the series premise for ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars''. Everyone was stranded on a strange planet far from their homeworld of Cybertron; at the end of the first season, this was [[spoiler:revealed to be prehistoric Earth EarthAllAlong]], far from their home ''time'', which would be about three hundred years past our present day.
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': One of the things that makes Aang and Zuko NotSoDifferent is that neither can go home again -- Zuko because he's been exiled, and Aang because [[DoomedHometown it's not there anymore]].
** Subverted when [[spoiler:Zuko betrays Iroh and is allowed to come back. Then subverted right back to straight when Zuko realizes it wasn't worth it and makes a HeelFaceTurn. And subverted ''again'' in the finale when he not only goes home, but he ''owns'' the home.]]
** Also happened in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' to [[FallenPrincess Asami Sato]]. [[spoiler:After discovering that her father is an Equalist, she had to abandon her home and her previous lifestyle that came with it.]]
* Mario and Luigi in ''Series/TheSuperMarioBrosSuperShow''.
** One episode did focus on the duo finding a way back home, but they opt to stay in order to protect the Princess.
** In another episode, they ''did'' go back home, only to find out Koopa was terrorizing Brooklyn. They then tricked him into following them back to Mushroom Kingdom and blew up the way so he'd not be able to return to Brooklyn.
* A conversation between the ComicBook/MartianManhunter and Hawkgirl in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' notes that this trope applies to so many of them -- Superman and J'onn are each the LastOfHisKind, Hawkgirl is stranded light-years from home, and WonderWoman has just been exiled from [[strike: Paradise Island]] Themyscira -- that they should call themselves the "Just Us League". It's even more poignant for the audience, who (unlike J'onn and Hawkgirl) know that Batman lost his family as a child.
** This trope is played with in Hawkgirl's case. [[spoiler: She is actually an agent sent by the Thanagarians to spy on Earth and its secrets. The Thanagarians eventually come to Earth and take it over. She then finds out that they are going to use Earth as part of a weapon against this one alien species they are at war with. Unfortunately, Earth would be destroyed once the weapon is activated. In the end, she ends up alienating a lot of people, causes a chain of events that lead to the destruction of Thanagar, and it takes a long time before she is allowed back into the Justice League.]] Wonder Woman eventually manages to work things out with her mother, and she is allowed to set foot on Themyscira again.
* Danielle in ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' can't return to Vlad's manor where she was cloned and raised on the virtue that the owner is ''willing to kill her in order to make a better clone''! She spends her time constantly on the move.
* For a while in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', [[AlienAmongUs Mark Chang]] was unable to return to Yugopotamia, since it would force him into an ArrangedMarriage with Princess Mandie.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' sometimes plays with this trope, for example in "Enter Macbeth," in which Xanatos is released from jail and free to return to his castle... forcing the titular gargoyles to leave said castle and find a new home. It doesn't stop them from visiting occasionally, though...
** Also notable is the Avalon arc, where several characters spend much of the second season being dragged around the planet by a magic boat.
** [[spoiler:In the "Hunter's Moon" arc (the last canonical arc of the show), the clock tower where they've been living is also destroyed. Luckily, Xanatos owes them for saving his son and allows them to return the castle.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' parodied this a Tree House of Horror episode where Homer inadvertently travels back in time and repeatedly makes changes to the world. After some time, he settles on a world almost identical but where everyone has long forked tongues.
--> "Eh... close enough."
* In the last two episodes of ''WesternAnimation/WhereOnEarthIsCarmenSandiego?'', appropriately named "Can You Ever Go Home Again?" (pt. I & II), [[spoiler:Carmen meets her father, Malcolm Avalon, who has believed for almost thirty years that she died in a fire. At first, he disowns her but later acknowledges her "willful determination" and seems ready to accept her. Then Lee Jordan captures him, and while Carmen and ACME are trying to rescue him, he falls off a roof and suffers amnesia, causing him to forget ever meeting her. Carmen resolves herself never to get close to him again.]]
* The basis of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''. [[HumanPopsicle Fry]] subverts it in the final moments before the OpeningTheme, however:
--> "My God, it's the future. My parents. My co-workers. My girlfriend. I'll never see any of them again... [{{beat}}] [[MoodWhiplash Yahoo!]]"
* Played with in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', Cybertron itself had been reduced to a lifeless planet with so little energon resources it can't contain more than a few small pockets of life. It isn't that they ''can't'' return home so much as there isn't much to return to. The video game ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'' suggests that the planet core was "rebooting" itself and would take eons to do so before energon production would continue, while late in the second season of ''Prime'' there is an option presented that might speed the process up. [[spoiler: Too bad that option had to be violently removed from the picture...]]
** [[spoiler: As of the Beast Hunters finale, Cybertron is finally restored and the Autobots, and what remains of the Decepticons, return home.]]
* Dreamy Smurf in ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurf Who Would Be King" thought this to be the case when he and his ship were dragged down a whirlpool and shipwrecked in the land of the Pookies...only for the whole thing to be AllJustADream...OrWasItADream, as finds a crystal similar to the ones that were in the land of the Pookies.
* The whole premise behind ''WesternAnimation/TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh'' episode ''Home Is Where The Home Is''. Christopher Robin accidentally breaks a statue of a family member and decides that he can't stay there anymore.
* The ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E3CastleSweetCastle Castle, Sweet Castle]]" has something of a variant as it's about Twilight not wanting to ''stay'' at the new castle, missing the Golden Oak Library, which was destroyed by Lord Tirek at the end of the previous season.
* Pictured above, what sets up the premise of ''WesternAnimation/PinkyElmyraAndTheBrain''. Acme Labs was torn down, leaving those poor mice homeless until they came across [[WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures Elmyra Duff.]] [[TheScrappy Whoop dee doo.]]
* ''Oh No! It's an Alien Invasion'': After the Brainlings kidnapped all the grown-ups they were supposed to leave Earth, but their leader Emperor Brainlius insisted on staying because he finds it a great party spot, much to the annoyance of his assistant Briiian who wants to leave.
* The plot of ''WesternAnimation/BrandyAndMrWhiskers''. [[ItsAllAboutMe Brandy]] [[RichBitch Harrington]] can't return to her affluent family in Florida because [[TheDitz Mr. Whiskers]] has stranded them in the Amazon Rain Forest. Several episodes tease them returning to civilization, but [[StatusQuoIsGod of course]] [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption it never worked out]].
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' concludes with Ahsoka Tano on trial for multiple sabotages and war crimes. She's eventually cleared of all charges, but leaves the Jedi Order without hesitation because [[spoiler:of the revelation that the Jedi Council, even when acting with honor and wisdom, is capable of cruelty and inhumanity that overshadows the ''Sith'']]. This turns out to be a good thing, as almost everyone who stays affiliated with the Jedi Council is wiped out in Star Wars Episode III anyway.
** Which allows her to survive long enough to become the grandmaster of the rebels. Then she finds out what happened to Anakin...
* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': The Crystal Gems can't go back to the Gem homeworld; their sinister plans for Earth led to Rose Quartz and the others deciding to stay and protect it. Garnet goes so far as to smash Earth's connection to the Galaxy Warp after Peridot repairs it, with the implication that they were the ones that broke it the first time.
** [[spoiler: Peridot]] winds up in the same boat as them and becomes a Crystal Gem after the events of "Message Received".

to:

[[folder: Western Animation]]
[[quoteright:353:[[WesternAnimation/PinkyElmyraAndTheBrain http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/22c2eae4578babe0a6d827cb525fa86a.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:353:''"The situation's changed, for WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain. No laboratory, alone in
[[folder:Music]]
* The song "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdPR8gq3NsA I Can Never Go Home Anymore]]" by
the rain..."'']]
* ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' for most
Shangri-Las is made of the third season.
-->"''I live in the games. I search through systems, people, and cities, for
this place: Mainframe; my home. My format? I have no format. I am trope. It's essentially AnAesop about a renegade, lost on the Net.''"
** In more ways than one too. While Matrix and Andraia are lost on the Net, Bob is lost in the Web. At the same time Dot and Mouse are forced to abandon the Principal Office offscreen and are forced into hiding. The Tor also gets destroyed forcing Megabyte to find a new place to "set up shop". Seems like everyone in this show loses their
girl who runs away from home at one point or another.
* For ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', it was his home ''time''.
* Part of the series premise for ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars''. Everyone was stranded on a strange planet far from their homeworld of Cybertron; at the end of the first season, this was [[spoiler:revealed
and breaks her mother's heart to be prehistoric Earth EarthAllAlong]], far from their home ''time'', which would be with a boy, who she forgets about three hundred years past our present day.
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': One of the things that makes Aang and Zuko NotSoDifferent is that neither can go home again -- Zuko because he's been exiled, and Aang because [[DoomedHometown
almost immediately, while it's not there anymore]].
** Subverted when [[spoiler:Zuko betrays Iroh and is allowed to come back. Then subverted right back to straight when Zuko realizes it wasn't worth it and makes a HeelFaceTurn. And subverted ''again'' in the finale when he not only goes home, but he ''owns'' the home.]]
** Also happened in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' to [[FallenPrincess Asami Sato]]. [[spoiler:After discovering
implied that her father mother dies of loneliness in the meantime.
* "You Can Never Go Home" by Music/TheMoodyBlues presents a psychological/spiritual version of the trope.
* Burt Bacharach and Hal David's ''24 hours from Tulsa'', which
is an Equalist, she had as close to abandon her home and her previous lifestyle that came with it.]]
* Mario and Luigi in ''Series/TheSuperMarioBrosSuperShow''.
** One episode did focus on the duo finding a way back home, but they opt
as Gene Pitney gets due to stay in order to protect the Princess.
** In another episode, they ''did'' go back home, only to find out Koopa was terrorizing Brooklyn. They then tricked him into following them back to Mushroom Kingdom and blew up the way so he'd not be able to return to Brooklyn.
* A conversation between the ComicBook/MartianManhunter and Hawkgirl in
an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' notes that this trope applies to so many of them -- Superman and J'onn are each the LastOfHisKind, Hawkgirl is stranded light-years from home, and WonderWoman has just been exiled from [[strike: Paradise Island]] Themyscira -- that they should call themselves the "Just Us League". It's even more poignant for the audience, who (unlike J'onn and Hawkgirl) know that Batman lost unplanned encounter at his family as a child.
** This trope is played with in Hawkgirl's case. [[spoiler: She is actually an agent sent by the Thanagarians to spy on Earth and its secrets. The Thanagarians
stop-off, which eventually come leads to Earth and take it over. She then finds out that they are going "I hate to use Earth as part of a weapon against say this one alien species they are at war with. Unfortunately, Earth would be destroyed once the weapon is activated. In the end, she ends up alienating a lot of people, causes a chain of events that lead to the destruction of Thanagar, and it takes a long time before she is allowed back into the Justice League.]] Wonder Woman eventually manages to work things out with her mother, and she is allowed to set foot on Themyscira again.
* Danielle in ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' can't return to Vlad's manor where she was cloned and raised on the virtue that the owner is ''willing to kill her in order to make a better clone''! She spends her time constantly on the move.
* For a while in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'', [[AlienAmongUs Mark Chang]] was unable to return to Yugopotamia, since it would force him into an ArrangedMarriage with Princess Mandie.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' sometimes plays with this trope, for example in "Enter Macbeth," in which Xanatos is released from jail and free to return to his castle... forcing the titular gargoyles to leave said castle and find a new home. It doesn't stop them from visiting occasionally, though...
** Also notable is the Avalon arc, where several characters spend much of the second season being dragged around the planet by a magic boat.
** [[spoiler:In the "Hunter's Moon" arc (the last canonical arc of the show), the clock tower where they've been living is also destroyed. Luckily, Xanatos owes them for saving his son and allows them to return the castle.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' parodied this a Tree House of Horror episode where Homer inadvertently travels back in time and repeatedly makes changes to the world. After some time, he settles on a world almost identical
you, but where everyone has long forked tongues.
--> "Eh... close enough.
I love somebody new. What can I do? And I can never, never, never go home again."
* In the last two episodes of ''WesternAnimation/WhereOnEarthIsCarmenSandiego?'', appropriately named "Can You Ever Go Home Again?" (pt. I & II), [[spoiler:Carmen meets her father, Malcolm Avalon, who has believed for almost thirty years that she died in a fire. At first, he disowns her but later acknowledges her "willful determination" and seems ready to accept her. Then Lee Jordan captures him, and while Carmen and ACME are trying to rescue him, he falls off a roof and suffers amnesia, causing him to forget ever meeting her. Carmen resolves herself never to get close to him again.]]
* The basis of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''. [[HumanPopsicle Fry]] subverts it in the final moments before the OpeningTheme, however:
--> "My God, it's the future. My parents. My co-workers. My girlfriend. I'll never see any of them again... [{{beat}}] [[MoodWhiplash Yahoo!]]"
* Played with in ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', Cybertron itself had been reduced to a lifeless planet with so little energon resources it can't contain more than a few small pockets of life. It isn't that they ''can't'' return home so much as there isn't much to return to. The video game ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'' suggests that the planet core was "rebooting" itself
Finnish military march ''Jääkärimarssi'' (Yeager March). ''Syvä iskumme on, viha voittamaton, meillä armoa ei, kotimaata'' (Our strike is deep, our wrath implacable, we have no mercy and would take eons to do so before energon production would continue, while late in the second season of ''Prime'' there is an option presented that might speed the process up. [[spoiler: Too bad that option had to be violently removed from the picture...]]
** [[spoiler: As of the Beast Hunters finale, Cybertron is finally restored and the Autobots, and what remains of the Decepticons, return home.]]
* Dreamy Smurf in ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Smurf Who Would Be King" thought this to be the case when he and his ship were dragged down a whirlpool and shipwrecked in the land of the Pookies...only for the whole thing to be AllJustADream...OrWasItADream, as finds a crystal similar to the ones that were in the land of the Pookies.
* The whole premise behind ''WesternAnimation/TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh'' episode ''Home Is Where The Home Is''. Christopher Robin accidentally breaks a statue of a family member and decides that he can't stay there anymore.
* The ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E3CastleSweetCastle Castle, Sweet Castle]]" has something of a variant as it's about Twilight not wanting to ''stay'' at the new castle, missing the Golden Oak Library, which was destroyed by Lord Tirek at the end of the previous season.
* Pictured above, what sets up the premise of ''WesternAnimation/PinkyElmyraAndTheBrain''. Acme Labs was torn down, leaving those poor mice homeless until they came across [[WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures Elmyra Duff.]] [[TheScrappy Whoop dee doo.]]
* ''Oh No! It's an Alien Invasion'': After the Brainlings kidnapped all the grown-ups they were supposed to leave Earth, but their leader Emperor Brainlius insisted on staying
no homeland). Makes sense, because he finds it a great party spot, much to the annoyance of his assistant Briiian Yeagers were patriots (or traitors, depends on which side you look at) who wants during the WWI joined the German Army to leave.
*
get military training for liberation war against Czarist Russia. The plot of ''WesternAnimation/BrandyAndMrWhiskers''. [[ItsAllAboutMe Brandy]] [[RichBitch Harrington]] can't return Czarist Law stated mandatory death penalty from high treason.
* "Golden Slumbers" on ''Abbey Road'', Music/TheBeatles' last album, starts "Once, there was a way
to her affluent family in Florida because [[TheDitz Mr. Whiskers]] has stranded them in get back homeward..."
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ud6LiVJkwyA Pushin'
the Amazon Rain Forest. Several episodes tease them returning to civilization, but [[StatusQuoIsGod of course]] [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption it never worked out]].
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' concludes with Ahsoka Tano on trial for multiple sabotages and war crimes. She's eventually cleared of all charges, but leaves the Jedi Order without hesitation because [[spoiler:of the revelation that the Jedi Council, even when acting with honor and wisdom, is capable of cruelty and inhumanity that overshadows the ''Sith'']]. This turns out to be
Speed Of Light]], a good thing, as almost everyone who stays affiliated filksong about crewing an STL ship ends with the Jedi Council line "You've left behind you the world of men, with no way in space to go home again."
* A number of Jacobite songs focus on this trope, since many were either exiled or refused to live in a land that no longer seemed their own. Two standards of this type are ''The Highlander's Farewell'' and ''It Was All For Our Rightful King''.
* ''When We Return to Portland''
is wiped out in Star Wars Episode III anyway.
** Which allows her to survive long enough
a song about fugitives who flee Portland to become pirates. They long for their old city, but return would be a sure death sentence, thus "may fate never let us return".
* The ''DJ Shadow'''s song ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAhYNzuJDMw You Can't Go Home Again]]''. Despite being mostly instrumental,
the grandmaster overall feeling of the rebels. Then she finds out what happened to Anakin...
* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': The Crystal Gems can't go back to the Gem homeworld; their sinister plans for Earth led to Rose Quartz and the others deciding to stay and protect it. Garnet goes so far as to smash Earth's connection to the Galaxy Warp after Peridot repairs it, with the implication that they were the ones that broke it the first time.
** [[spoiler: Peridot]] winds up
song can be describe in the same boat as them and becomes a Crystal Gem after only words spoken at the events of "Message Received".beginning:
-->''And here is a story about... being free''.



[[folder:Comic Books]]
* This trope is the premise of the story of the ''ComicBook/SilverSurfer''. After sacrificing himself to become a slave to a supernatural godlike [[PlanetEater destroyer of worlds]] (to save his own homeworld, of course), the hero's memory is taken from him AND his homeworld gets displaced. After he (very quickly into the story) regains his memories, the rest of the plot is largely about finding his home planet again.
* Occurs to mutant alligator Leatherhead in ''Comicbook/{{Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles|Mirage}}'' after he is inadvertently left behind on Earth by the escaping Utroms; several stories involve him unsuccessfully trying to reach the Utrom homeworld.
* This is the premise of the ''Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'' story Legion Lost. A group of Legionnaires find themselves galaxies away from Earth in a thrashed starbase.
* Creator/AlanMoore wrote a ''Time Twister'' for ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' centered around a character, Sideways Scuttleton, who can travel to alternate universes by "wiggling his back in a certain way." Unfortunately, he didn't count on his back going out in his later years, making it difficult to him to return to his own universe. The story is also possibly a subversion because when he asks someone for bus fare in a dimension that he's pretty certain is his own, the man produces the British £1 coin which upsets Scuttleton because in his dimension people use paper notes instead of coins; however, the story was written shortly after such coins were first introduced in 1983, and Scuttleton very well may have stumbled into his home dimension without fully realizing it.
* Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck combines this with StrangerInAFamiliarLand. Having spent most of his teen and adult life abroad, Scrooge has a great deal of trouble fitting in with the traditional Scottish people. He decides to begin a new life in America, this time bringing his sisters along for the ride.
* Used as the in-story reason for Comicbook/{{Static}} joining the Comicbook/TeenTitans. He was worried that his family believed him to be dead due to the months he spent in captivity, so he stayed with the Titans for a while until he could work up the nerve to return home and confront his parents.
* When ComicBook/PowerGirl finally had her back story settled during ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' it was decided that she still came from the alternate universe of Earth-2 which had been destroyed in ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths''. Under GeoffJohns run Karen struggled with being the sole survivor of an entire universe, until she was seemingly sent back to Earth-2 by the being called Gog. The residents of Earth-2 believed theirs was the only Earth that survived the first Crisis, until it was discovered that this Earth-2 was a brand new version with a copy of Power Girl already living in it. Karen was then hunted down like a criminal because her copy believed she was an impostor who had something to do with the disappearance of Superman.
* The ''ComicBook/GreenLantern''[=/=]''Film/StarTrek'' crossover "The Spectrum War" ends with some of the surviving Lanterns (John Stewart, Hal Jordan and Saint Walker) serving on the ''Enterprise'', some (Kilowog, Guy Gardner and Star Sapphire) remaining on Earth, the remaining (Sinestro, Atrocious and Larfleeze) MIA but all of them unable to return to their universe.
* As one might expect from their team name, the ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' are all displaced kids; the original team became orphans after their efforts to stop their supervillain parents from destroying the world resulted in said parents all dying, Victor became an orphan after his mother was murdered, Xavin lost their homeworld to a war, and Klara fled from an abuser.

to:

[[folder:Comic Books]]
[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* This trope is ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''
** The Deep Imaskari race in
the premise ''Underdark'' setting live in a HiddenElfVillage. If anyone decides to leave, they automatically have the location of their home erased from their memory so that in the (highly likely) chance they are captured by something evil that can read minds, they will be unable to divulge the secret location.
** Elminster Aumar
of the story ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''. At the start of [[Literature/TheElminsterSeries his book series]] a magelord on a dragon burns down his home village to assassinate his father, [[spoiler:a prince of Athalantar who had abdicated]]. About a century later, an orc horde destroyed the entire kingdom. The present day city of Secomber is built on its capital's ruins.
* The odds of a member
of the ''ComicBook/SilverSurfer''. After sacrificing himself Imperial Guard of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' making it to become a slave to a supernatural godlike [[PlanetEater destroyer of worlds]] (to save his own homeworld, of course), retirement age are pretty low, considering that the hero's memory Imperium is taken from him AND his homeworld gets displaced. After he (very quickly into almost continuously at war with some if not all of its neighbors (and quite frequently itself). Those that make it are generally discharged on the story) regains his memories, the rest of the plot is largely about finding his planet they happen to be on when they retire, and their retirement package does not include a ticket back to their home planet again.
* Occurs to mutant alligator Leatherhead in ''Comicbook/{{Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles|Mirage}}'' after he is inadvertently left behind on Earth by the escaping Utroms; several stories involve him unsuccessfully trying to reach the Utrom homeworld.
* This is the premise of the ''Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'' story Legion Lost. A group of Legionnaires find themselves galaxies away from Earth in a thrashed starbase.
* Creator/AlanMoore wrote a ''Time Twister'' for ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' centered around a character, Sideways Scuttleton, who can travel to alternate universes by "wiggling his back in a certain way." Unfortunately, he didn't count on his back going out in his later years, making it difficult to him to return to his own universe. The story is also possibly a subversion because when he asks someone for bus fare in a dimension that he's pretty certain is his own, the man produces the British £1 coin which upsets Scuttleton because in his dimension people use paper notes instead of coins; however, the story was written shortly after such coins were first introduced in 1983, and Scuttleton very well may have stumbled into his home dimension without fully realizing it.
* Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck combines this with StrangerInAFamiliarLand. Having spent most of his teen and adult life abroad, Scrooge has a great deal of trouble fitting in with the traditional Scottish people. He decides to begin a new life in America, this time bringing his sisters along for the ride.
* Used as the in-story reason for Comicbook/{{Static}} joining the Comicbook/TeenTitans. He was worried that his family believed him to be dead due to the months he spent in captivity, so he stayed with the Titans for a while until he
(which could work up the nerve to return home and confront his parents.
* When ComicBook/PowerGirl finally had her back story settled
be thousands of light years away, depending on what events happened during ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' it was decided their deployment). As such, there is a very good chance that she still came from the alternate universe of Earth-2 which had been destroyed in ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths''. Under GeoffJohns run Karen struggled with being the sole survivor of an entire universe, until she was seemingly sent back to Earth-2 by the being called Gog. The residents of Earth-2 believed theirs was the only Earth that survived the first Crisis, until it was discovered that this Earth-2 was a brand new version with a copy of Power Girl already living in it. Karen was then hunted down like a criminal because her copy believed she was an impostor anyone who had something to do with the disappearance of Superman.
* The ''ComicBook/GreenLantern''[=/=]''Film/StarTrek'' crossover "The Spectrum War" ends with some of the surviving Lanterns (John Stewart, Hal Jordan and Saint Walker) serving on the ''Enterprise'', some (Kilowog, Guy Gardner and Star Sapphire) remaining on Earth, the remaining (Sinestro, Atrocious and Larfleeze) MIA but all of them unable to
enlists in a Guard regiment will never return to their universe.
* As one might expect from
home planet, let alone their team name, home town, ever again. Indeed, the ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' are all displaced kids; lucky ones instead get a commission and some land on the original team became orphans after their efforts to stop their supervillain parents from destroying the world resulted in said parents all dying, Victor became an orphan after his mother was murdered, Xavin lost their homeworld to a war, and Klara fled from an abuser.planet they conquered most recently, essentially becoming landed gentry there.



[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* A series of {{Peanuts}} strips followed Snoopy taking Woodstock to the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm where he (Snoopy) was born, only to find it had been replaced by a parking garage. This became the basis for one of the Peanuts specials where Snoopy is reunited with his siblings.
--> '''Snoopy''': You stupid people! You're parking on my ''memories''!!!

to:

[[folder:Comic Strips]]
[[folder:Web Comics]]
* A series Parodied in ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'', where Piro and Largo end up in Japan without any money to buy a ticket back home. They get several opportunities to fix this, yet for whatever reason, they never actually go back home.
** ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'' is an interesting case indeed... With the plot and ''CharacterDevelopment'' going the way it is, it seems that Piro and Largo feel too tied up in the personal lives
of {{Peanuts}} strips all the people they've interacted with. As such, even if they were offered a fool-proof method to return to America, neither would likely take it.
*** One scene with Meimi and Junpei implies that they may end up being ''forced'' out of Japan at some point. Until then...
* This trope is the premise of Webcomic/DummComics [[http://www.dummcomics.com/index?sid=95 Earthward-Ho!]].
* ''Webcomic/TowerOfGod'': Urek Mazino
followed Snoopy taking Woodstock Phantaminum in to the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm where Tower, but he (Snoopy) was born, only discovered he could not get out of it anymore.
* ''Webcomic/QuentynQuinnSpaceRanger'': [[http://www.rhjunior.com/QQSR/00051.html It's impossible, really,
to find it acclimatize to a world which has changed over a decade while you had been replaced by a parking garage. This became the basis for one of the Peanuts specials where Snoopy three months.]]
* In ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', it
is reunited foretold that Durkon ''will'' return to his homeland--posthumously. However, he's actually ''happy'' to learn this because he'd much rather be buried with his siblings.
--> '''Snoopy''': You stupid people! You're parking on my ''memories''!!!
ancestors than to die somewhere else.
** Of course, he doesn't know the ''real'' reason he was sent away from his home in the first place: [[spoiler:it's prophecized that when he returns, it will result in the land's destruction]].
** Then there's Vaarsuvius, [[spoiler:whose quest for power cost V's marriage and nearly the lives of spouse and children.]]
* A minor plot point in ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' and partially a source of angst in the first parts of the story. The kids get over it fairly quickly though. [[spoiler: The reason they can't go home is because Earth is a desolate wasteland and they're the sole survivors of mankind]].
* Zeetha from ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'' doesn't know where her tribe is from. Everyone who was involved in her journey to Europa ended up dead one way or another.
* A plot arc in ''Webcomic/AtArmsLength'' allowed for the introduction of a new character, one that was in their Character contest back in 2012. This character appeared in a flash of light, and apparently is from another reality. Sadly, nobody knows how he got there, or if they will be able to send him back.
* In ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'', [[LoveableRogue Sam Starfall]] is prohibited from returning to his home world, due to his acquiring knowledge of technology far above the approximately "Steam Age" technology level there.



[[folder:Fan Works]]
* In ''FanFic/RorschachInEquestria'', [[ComicBook/{{Watchmen}} Rorschach]] is sent to [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Equestria]] by Dr. Manhattan, with no way back. [[spoiler: Turns out Dr. Manhattan had to kill him in the Watchmenverse in order to make that happen]].
* In ''FanFic/StarsAbove'', [[spoiler:[[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica Homura]]'s trip from her own time and universe was one-way. Even with [[TimeMaster her powers]], it took a significant boost from another Puella Magi to go back six years, and there's no way to do it again.]]
* Happens to Nanoha in ''Fanfic/GameTheoryFanFic'' [[spoiler:when she joins Precia, since she can't return home without being captured by the TSAB.]]
* In ''FanFic/SophisticationAndBetrayal'', the protagonist ends up permanently stuck in Equestria after efforts to send him back home fail, resulting in the spell unable to be cast on him again without killing him in the process.
* People's responses to this discovery in ''FanFic/{{Pokeumans}}'' have varied, but much angst and personal drama has been caused over this issue.
* In Raven Child's ''Fanfic/TheSmurfetteVillage'' series, the Smurfettes lose their village to a volcanic eruption in the second story, then ten surviving Smurfs in the third story lose their home in the Smurf Village due to a SyntheticPlague.
* Fanfic/LanternPrime begins with the devastation of Cybertron; Optimus is the only survivor and he is in stasis lock until Ganthet repairs him. Even after that, Prime struggles with being the last of his kind ([[spoiler: at least initially]]). Even at the end of the story Cybertron is still incapable of providing him any kind of home.
* In ''Fanfic/ToInfinity'', [[spoiler:it's revealed that it's over two million years after Cortana's rebellion- Roland had to go to relativistic speeds in order to escape Cortana's sensors.]]

to:

[[folder:Fan Works]]
[[folder:Web Original]]
* In ''FanFic/RorschachInEquestria'', [[ComicBook/{{Watchmen}} Rorschach]] is sent ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'': The Gunslinger's pocketwatch was made specifically to [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Equestria]] by Dr. Manhattan, with no avert this trope. Under normal circumstances, travelling to another dimension would either be fatal to him, or it would cause the dimension to assimilate him, thereby making his own dimension fatal to him. The pocketwatch prevents these effects from occurring. But then Linkara destroyed the pocketwatch, causing The Gunslinger to be trapped in Linkara's world forever, unable to return. When Linkara realizes this, [[MustMakeAmends he swears that he'll find a way back. [[spoiler: Turns out Dr. Manhattan had to kill him fix it]].
* The Dimensional Guardians trapped in Creturia
in the Watchmenverse web fiction serial ''Literature/DimensionHeroes''.
* In the WhateleyUniverse, Phase can't go home again. His family are the largest anti-mutant force on the planet.
* Ultra-Man, from the ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'', can't go home again because his home was seventy years
in order the past. His parents, his siblings, and all but one of his friends are now dead, and the surviving friend is almost ninety years old and has Alzheimer's. The town he grew up in has ten times as many people in it now than it did then, and looks nothing like it did. And of course, his house is long since been bulldozed down and replaced by a shopping mall.
* qntm's "Be Here Now" story introduces a multiple-universes system of time travel. It's impossible
to make time-travel in one's own timeline, but you can "jump the tracks" to any point in any other timeline. The only thing is, the destination timeline is always "the next one down the [infinite] chain", so you can never go back home again once you've time-jumped once.
* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'': At the end of v3, [[spoiler:JR Rizzolo]] manages to return home after (ostensibly) being the SoleSurvivor, only to find
that happen]].
* In ''FanFic/StarsAbove'', [[spoiler:[[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica Homura]]'s trip from her own time
[[spoiler:his family has disowned him and universe was one-way. Even with [[TimeMaster her powers]], it took completely moved out]].
* The premise of ''[[Literature/TheMagicForIdiots Mabaka! Magic is for Idiots!]]'' revolves around
a significant boost novice wizard from another Puella Magi to go back six years, and there's dimension getting stuck on Earth with no way to do it again.]]
* Happens to Nanoha in ''Fanfic/GameTheoryFanFic'' [[spoiler:when she joins Precia, since she can't return home without being captured by the TSAB.]]
* In ''FanFic/SophisticationAndBetrayal'', the protagonist
get back. Naturally, [[InnocentCohabitation he ends up permanently staying with the same girl]] [[CrashIntoHello whose yard he crash-landed into]]. At least until a year is up and he can return via a dimensional transport system.
* ''WebVideo/TheAutobiographyOfJaneEyre'': In episode 9, Jane has caught cold and is really sick, which also triggers her homesickness. It's all the more sad because she doesn't really have her home. The house feels empty and isolated, she doesn't have anybody to talk to; she misses university, but concludes that it was just a dorm room.
-->''"I just want to go home, except for I don't know where that is."''
* ''Podcast/RandomAssault'': Kate will never be accepted by her family for wanting to be a female.
* In ''Literature/TheJenkinsverse'', Xiù Chang returns to Earth after spending two years living among an alien species called Gaoians, barely survives the effects of a nervejam grenade, spends three years hiding in exile pretending to *be* a Gaoian, and five years
stuck in Equestria a stasis pod after efforts to send him back home fail, resulting in narrowly surviving the spell destruction of a starship. Her experiences leave her unable to be cast on him again without killing him in relate to her family and friends back home, but unwilling to return to Gao as that would put the process.
* People's responses to this discovery
Gaoians in ''FanFic/{{Pokeumans}}'' have varied, but much angst danger from the Hunters. In the end, the only people she feels at home with are fellow abductees Julian and personal drama Allison.
* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': As of the Volume 3 finale, [[spoiler: [[ExtranormalInstitute Beacon]]
has been caused over this issue.
* In Raven Child's ''Fanfic/TheSmurfetteVillage'' series,
overrun by Grimm and the Smurfettes lose their village to a volcanic eruption in the second story, then ten surviving Smurfs in the third story lose their home in the Smurf Village due to a SyntheticPlague.
* Fanfic/LanternPrime begins with the devastation of Cybertron; Optimus
frozen dragon's presence is the only survivor and he is in stasis lock until Ganthet repairs him. Even after that, Prime struggles with being the last of his kind ([[spoiler: at least initially]]). Even at the end of the story Cybertron is still incapable of providing him any kind of home.
* In ''Fanfic/ToInfinity'', [[spoiler:it's revealed that it's over two million years after Cortana's rebellion- Roland had to go to relativistic speeds in order to escape Cortana's sensors.
attracting even more.]]



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' : The reason the Mousekewitz family emigrates to America is because the Cossacks burned their village to the ground.
** Interestingly, the village has been [[WordOfGod exclusively identified as]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shostka Shostka, Ukraine]]... which is still standing today.
* In ''WesternAnimation/Madagascar3EuropesMostWanted'', Alex and his friends finally make it back to the Central Park Zoo in New York City, only to realize that they [[spoiler:have grown to prefer being free after all]].
* A major conflict in ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut,'' where Riley and her Emotions come to terms with leaving behind Minnesota.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* A major element in 2007's ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie.The civil war on Cybertron damaged the planet's surface, and the Allspark being destroyed means that the planet will die eventually. [[spoiler: At the end of ''TransformersDarkOfTheMoon'', the Space Bridge's destruction possibly causes Cybertron to collapse on itself, forever preventing the Autobots from returning to their old home.]]
* In ''Film/GrossePointeBlank'', John Cusack's charcter, Martin Blank, return to his home town for a reunion. While there, he visits his childhood home, only to find that it's become a convenience store. This causes him to say the line, "You can never go home again, but I guess you can shop there."
* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the sole reason for Cobb to accept the mission is because Saito has enough influence to allow him to return home to his children. [[spoiler:He is wanted by the police as the primary suspect for his wife's death and went into hiding, leaving his children behind with their grandparents. In a particularly painful twist to [[ClearMyName the old plot]], his wife believed that the real world was a shared dream of them and that they would have to die to wake up in the real world. So she set up her own suicide making it appear as if he murdered her, directly mentioning that he would no longer be able to return to his family in the supposed dream, in the hope that he would also kill himself so they could both wake up in the real world.]]
* In ''Film/StarTrek'', [[spoiler:Spock and Spock Prime]] both wind up afflicted by this trope: [[spoiler:Spock because Vulcan has just imploded]] and [[spoiler:Spock Prime because he's marooned in another timeline...''and'' Vulcan has just imploded.]]
** And, of course, the BigBad, Nero, is in the same boat, thanks to [[spoiler:the supernova that took out Romulus and his subsequent time-traveling.]]
* ''TheSearchers'' ends with John Wayne leaving because his behavior has alienated his family.
* In the ''ForrestGump'' movie, Forrest has Jenny's childhood house razed in order to bring closure to years of abuse by her father.
* ''Film/PaintYourWagon'' features this lyric: "Home is made for coming from, for dreams of going to/ which, with any luck will never come true."
* In the film version of ''Film/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'', the Earth ''is'' restored, but Arthur Dent decides that the world would be a better place ''without'' him, having fallen in love with Trillian and wanting to share her wanderlust.
* ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober''. Marco Ramius makes ''sure'' that his defection will be real by burning all of the bridges behind him.
* In ''Film/{{Idiocracy}}'', where the main characters, after hibernating in pods for 500 years, wake up to a world of naturally selected idiots.
* In ''Film/HarlemNights'' (1989), Quick (Eddie Murphy) and Sugar Ray (Richard Pryor) pull TheCaper that results in [[spoiler:the death of the major rival crime boss.]]. Knowing the danger of what they have done, they take a last wistful look at the New York skyline before bidding the city goodbye.
* The movie ''Film/SilentHill'' after Rose and Sharon leave Silent Hill and appear to arrive back home, they are still in another reality because they entered the world of Silent Hill. Thus they can never truly return home.
* It takes Columbus a while to come to this conclusion in ''Film/{{Zombieland}}''. He wants to get back to Ohio to see if his family is still alive (although he eventually admits that that wouldn't mean much even if they were). He reacts appropriately when Wichita tells him that that's a pretty fruitless venture, as it's "a total ghost town". He still doesn't quite get it until he's about to leave and he realizes that he really can't go back home.
* Done in the movie ''Film/{{Vamp}}'', when Keith finds his friend AJ.
--> '''AJ''': You don't get it do you? For me, home is a million miles away now. Home is on another planet. (He hunches over before rising with fangs and gold eyes) I'm a fucking zombie now!
* In ''Film/AboutSchmidt'', during one of his excursions on the way to his daughter's wedding, Schmidt goes to visit his childhood home from many years ago, only to find a tyre shop now standing in its place. He still goes inside and tries to reminisce, to the bemusement of the clerk.
* In ''Film/HowardTheDuck'' this is what happens to the title character in order to save the Earth.
* Ash's fate in the original ending of ''Film/ArmyOfDarkness'', in which he [[spoiler:drinks too many drops of a sleeping potion and wakes up after the apocalypse]].
* In ''Film/ShanghaiNoon'', [[BigBad Lo Fang]] [[TraumaticHaircut cuts off Chon Wang's queue]], knowing full well that he can never return to China afterwards, which was absolutely TruthInTelevision for Chinese natives.
* After Stryker's raid on the school in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'', they stopped by Bobby Drake's house in hopes of regrouping, which in the process revealed his mutant abilities to his parents. His ''own brother'' calls the police on the group despite them coming with no ill intentions. After Pyro stupidly attacks the police in the standoff that follows, he's forced to flee with the others knowing he can never come back.
* In ''Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1990'', the Foot find out where the Turtles' lair is and kidnap Splinter, forcing the Turtles to stay at April's...until the Foot find them there and attack. This is the reason why the Turtles are at April's new apartment in the beginning of the sequel ''[[Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesIITheSecretOfTheOoze Secret of the Ooze]]'' and looking for a new home; "We could always go back to the old sewer den." "Oh, right, Raph. It's a little tough, when about five hundred members of the Foot clan ''know where you live.''"
* ''Franchise/StarWars'': WordOfGod states that the reason Obi-Wan had Luke Skywalker go to Tatooine after birth to live with the Lars family despite it being Vader's home planet is because Darth Vader is unwilling to ever return to Tatooine due to painful memories of the place.
** By the end of ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke has lost pretty much everything. His aunt and uncle are dead, he can't go back to the farm, because he would have been killed even before the Death Star incident thanks to the droids. [[TheObiWan His mentor]] dies, and Biggs, his best friend, dies being a human shield protecting him during the Battle of Yavin. [[TraumaCongaLine This all takes place over the course of a couple days tops]]. A few expanded universe novels imply that the only thing that got Luke though was the adrenaline and the fact that he was given practically no downtime for him to think about it. Subverted in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', when he has to return to rescue Han Solo from Jabba the Hutt.
* In ''Film/{{Suffragette}}'', when Maud returns from a suffrage meeting, her husband doesn't let her enter their shared home and leaves her to sleep on the streets. [[spoiler: Fortunately the suffrage movement is prepared for such cases, and a room with affordable rent is provided almost immediately.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
* The song "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdPR8gq3NsA I Can Never Go Home Anymore]]" by the Shangri-Las is made of this trope. It's essentially AnAesop about a girl who runs away from home and breaks her mother's heart to be with a boy, who she forgets about almost immediately, while it's implied that her mother dies of loneliness in the meantime.
* "You Can Never Go Home" by Music/TheMoodyBlues presents a psychological/spiritual version of the trope.
* Burt Bacharach and Hal David's ''24 hours from Tulsa'', which is as close to home as Gene Pitney gets due to an unplanned encounter at his stop-off, which eventually leads to "I hate to say this to you, but I love somebody new. What can I do? And I can never, never, never go home again."
* The Finnish military march ''Jääkärimarssi'' (Yeager March). ''Syvä iskumme on, viha voittamaton, meillä armoa ei, kotimaata'' (Our strike is deep, our wrath implacable, we have no mercy and no homeland). Makes sense, because the Yeagers were patriots (or traitors, depends on which side you look at) who during the WWI joined the German Army to get military training for liberation war against Czarist Russia. The Czarist Law stated mandatory death penalty from high treason.
* "Golden Slumbers" on ''Abbey Road'', Music/TheBeatles' last album, starts "Once, there was a way to get back homeward..."
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ud6LiVJkwyA Pushin' the Speed Of Light]], a filksong about crewing an STL ship ends with the line "You've left behind you the world of men, with no way in space to go home again."
* A number of Jacobite songs focus on this trope, since many were either exiled or refused to live in a land that no longer seemed their own. Two standards of this type are ''The Highlander's Farewell'' and ''It Was All For Our Rightful King''.
* ''When We Return to Portland'' is a song about fugitives who flee Portland to become pirates. They long for their old city, but return would be a sure death sentence, thus "may fate never let us return".
* The ''DJ Shadow'''s song ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAhYNzuJDMw You Can't Go Home Again]]''. Despite being mostly instrumental, the overall feeling of the song can be describe in the only words spoken at the beginning:
-->''And here is a story about... being free''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''
** The Deep Imaskari race in the ''Underdark'' setting live in a HiddenElfVillage. If anyone decides to leave, they automatically have the location of their home erased from their memory so that in the (highly likely) chance they are captured by something evil that can read minds, they will be unable to divulge the secret location.
** Elminster Aumar of the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms''. At the start of [[Literature/TheElminsterSeries his book series]] a magelord on a dragon burns down his home village to assassinate his father, [[spoiler:a prince of Athalantar who had abdicated]]. About a century later, an orc horde destroyed the entire kingdom. The present day city of Secomber is built on its capital's ruins.
* The odds of a member of the Imperial Guard of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' making it to retirement age are pretty low, considering that the Imperium is almost continuously at war with some if not all of its neighbors (and quite frequently itself). Those that make it are generally discharged on the planet they happen to be on when they retire, and their retirement package does not include a ticket back to their home planet (which could be thousands of light years away, depending on what events happened during their deployment). As such, there is a very good chance that anyone who enlists in a Guard regiment will never return to their home planet, let alone their home town, ever again. Indeed, the lucky ones instead get a commission and some land on the planet they conquered most recently, essentially becoming landed gentry there.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* Parodied in ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'', where Piro and Largo end up in Japan without any money to buy a ticket back home. They get several opportunities to fix this, yet for whatever reason, they never actually go back home.
** ''Webcomic/MegaTokyo'' is an interesting case indeed... With the plot and ''CharacterDevelopment'' going the way it is, it seems that Piro and Largo feel too tied up in the personal lives of all the people they've interacted with. As such, even if they were offered a fool-proof method to return to America, neither would likely take it.
*** One scene with Meimi and Junpei implies that they may end up being ''forced'' out of Japan at some point. Until then...
* This trope is the premise of Webcomic/DummComics [[http://www.dummcomics.com/index?sid=95 Earthward-Ho!]].
* ''Webcomic/TowerOfGod'': Urek Mazino followed Phantaminum in to the Tower, but he discovered he could not get out of it anymore.
* ''Webcomic/QuentynQuinnSpaceRanger'': [[http://www.rhjunior.com/QQSR/00051.html It's impossible, really, to acclimatize to a world which has changed over a decade while you had three months.]]
* In ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', it is foretold that Durkon ''will'' return to his homeland--posthumously. However, he's actually ''happy'' to learn this because he'd much rather be buried with his ancestors than to die somewhere else.
** Of course, he doesn't know the ''real'' reason he was sent away from his home in the first place: [[spoiler:it's prophecized that when he returns, it will result in the land's destruction]].
** Then there's Vaarsuvius, [[spoiler:whose quest for power cost V's marriage and nearly the lives of spouse and children.]]
* A minor plot point in ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' and partially a source of angst in the first parts of the story. The kids get over it fairly quickly though. [[spoiler: The reason they can't go home is because Earth is a desolate wasteland and they're the sole survivors of mankind]].
* Zeetha from ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'' doesn't know where her tribe is from. Everyone who was involved in her journey to Europa ended up dead one way or another.
* A plot arc in ''Webcomic/AtArmsLength'' allowed for the introduction of a new character, one that was in their Character contest back in 2012. This character appeared in a flash of light, and apparently is from another reality. Sadly, nobody knows how he got there, or if they will be able to send him back.
* In ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'', [[LoveableRogue Sam Starfall]] is prohibited from returning to his home world, due to his acquiring knowledge of technology far above the approximately "Steam Age" technology level there.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'': The Gunslinger's pocketwatch was made specifically to avert this trope. Under normal circumstances, travelling to another dimension would either be fatal to him, or it would cause the dimension to assimilate him, thereby making his own dimension fatal to him. The pocketwatch prevents these effects from occurring. But then Linkara destroyed the pocketwatch, causing The Gunslinger to be trapped in Linkara's world forever, unable to return. When Linkara realizes this, [[MustMakeAmends he swears that he'll find a way to fix it]].
* The Dimensional Guardians trapped in Creturia in the web fiction serial ''Literature/DimensionHeroes''.
* In the WhateleyUniverse, Phase can't go home again. His family are the largest anti-mutant force on the planet.
* Ultra-Man, from the ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'', can't go home again because his home was seventy years in the past. His parents, his siblings, and all but one of his friends are now dead, and the surviving friend is almost ninety years old and has Alzheimer's. The town he grew up in has ten times as many people in it now than it did then, and looks nothing like it did. And of course, his house is long since been bulldozed down and replaced by a shopping mall.
* qntm's "Be Here Now" story introduces a multiple-universes system of time travel. It's impossible to time-travel in one's own timeline, but you can "jump the tracks" to any point in any other timeline. The only thing is, the destination timeline is always "the next one down the [infinite] chain", so you can never go back home again once you've time-jumped once.
* ''SurvivalOfTheFittest'': At the end of v3, [[spoiler:JR Rizzolo]] manages to return home after (ostensibly) being the SoleSurvivor, only to find that [[spoiler:his family has disowned him and completely moved out]].
* The premise of ''[[Literature/TheMagicForIdiots Mabaka! Magic is for Idiots!]]'' revolves around a novice wizard from another dimension getting stuck on Earth with no way to get back. Naturally, [[InnocentCohabitation he ends up staying with the same girl]] [[CrashIntoHello whose yard he crash-landed into]]. At least until a year is up and he can return via a dimensional transport system.
* ''WebVideo/TheAutobiographyOfJaneEyre'': In episode 9, Jane has caught cold and is really sick, which also triggers her homesickness. It's all the more sad because she doesn't really have her home. The house feels empty and isolated, she doesn't have anybody to talk to; she misses university, but concludes that it was just a dorm room.
-->''"I just want to go home, except for I don't know where that is."''
* ''Podcast/RandomAssault'': Kate will never be accepted by her family for wanting to be a female.
* In ''Literature/TheJenkinsverse'', Xiù Chang returns to Earth after spending two years living among an alien species called Gaoians, barely survives the effects of a nervejam grenade, spends three years hiding in exile pretending to *be* a Gaoian, and five years stuck in a stasis pod after narrowly surviving the destruction of a starship. Her experiences leave her unable to relate to her family and friends back home, but unwilling to return to Gao as that would put the Gaoians in danger from the Hunters. In the end, the only people she feels at home with are fellow abductees Julian and Allison.
* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': As of Volume 3 finale,[[spoiler: [[ExtranormalInstitute Beacon]] has been overrun by Grimm and the frozen dragon's presence is attracting even more.]]
[[/folder]]
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