History Main / YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm

7th Jul '17 5:21:44 PM DarkHunter
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* In Creator/JunjiIto's ''My Dear Ancestors'', the protagonist is so traumatised by the sight of [[spoiler:the antagonist's father (and later, the antagonist) connected to the scalps of each of his ancestors like a centipede]] that she loses her memory. ''Twice''.


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* In Creator/JunjiIto's ''My Dear Ancestors'', the protagonist is so traumatised by the sight of [[spoiler:the antagonist's father (and later, the antagonist) connected to the scalps of each of his ancestors like a centipede]] that she loses her memory. ''Twice''.
6th Jul '17 5:56:25 AM Owlorange1995
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* Many ''Manga/Naruto'' fanfics depict the natural forms of the Tailed Beasts as unbearably horrific and mind-numbing to humans.

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* Many ''Manga/Naruto'' ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' fanfics depict the natural forms of the Tailed Beasts as unbearably horrific and mind-numbing to humans.
6th Jul '17 5:48:03 AM Owlorange1995
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* Many ''Manga/Naruto'' fanfics depict the natural forms of the Tailed Beasts as unbearably horrific and mind-numbing to humans.
18th Jun '17 4:45:50 PM nombretomado
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* Although imaginary numbers are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, they actually have, more or less, practical and perhaps physical applications. ThatOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_number#Applications has plenty of examples]].

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* Although imaginary numbers are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, they actually have, more or less, practical and perhaps physical applications. ThatOtherWiki Wiki/ThatOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_number#Applications has plenty of examples]].
6th Jun '17 2:03:16 AM kageshirou
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* The power of Houjuu Nue from ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' is this minus the GoMadFromTheRevelation part. She can also imbue other things with the same characteristic by placing a "Seed of Non-Identification" on them, although knowing what the actual object is prevents it from working.

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* The power of Houjuu Nue from ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' is this minus the GoMadFromTheRevelation part. She can also imbue other things with the same characteristic by placing a "Seed of Non-Identification" Unknown Form" on them, although knowing what the actual object is prevents it from working.
22nd May '17 4:28:34 PM ZombieAladdin
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See also AFormYouAreComfortableWith, UltimateEvil, HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace, and WeirdnessCensor.

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See also AFormYouAreComfortableWith, UltimateEvil, HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace, and WeirdnessCensor.
WeirdnessCensor. Not to be confused with YouCantGetYeFlask.
17th May '17 5:49:29 AM MrCandle
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* Dark Matter/Energy. A postulated form of "something" that makes up over 90% of the universe but does not have any interaction with the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact the only "Observable" effect, and hint that it exists, is it's effect on gravity. Humans (and all life as we know it) is made of "normal" matter and evolved to perceive the world through a thin slice of the EM spectrum. Through technology we have been able to extend that thin slice to allow use to visualize other parts of the EM spectrum (which really makes another example of this trope: we cannot grasp the true form of any part of the EM spectrum except for the visible spectrum, only convert it into visual light which we are able to understand), but we are still limited to the parts of the universe that are also able to interact with the EM spectrum. Something that doesn't interact with it is therefore completely unimaginable.

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* Dark Matter/Energy. A postulated form of "something" that makes up over 90% of the universe but does not have any interaction with the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact the only "Observable" effect, and hint that it exists, is it's its effect on gravity. Humans (and all life as we know it) is made of "normal" matter and evolved to perceive the world through a thin slice of the EM spectrum. Through technology we have been able to extend that thin slice to allow use to visualize other parts of the EM spectrum (which really makes another example of this trope: we cannot grasp the true form of any part of the EM spectrum except for the visible spectrum, only convert it into visual light which we are able to understand), but we are still limited to the parts of the universe that are also able to interact with the EM spectrum. Something that doesn't interact with it is therefore completely unimaginable.
12th May '17 2:20:41 AM spydre
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* People exposed to something that they have literally no frame of reference for in their prior experience often flail to construct what they are seeing in their minds. A classic example is the Native Americans believing Cortez's horsemen were giant creatures with two heads, because they had never seen a horse, let alone a man riding one, before. Another example is the crazed German private who babbled to his superior about "a crocodile in the trenches" upon seeing a tank for the first time.
27th Apr '17 1:59:34 PM MarqFJA
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** Some people have four types of cone cells [[note]]the type of cell which is primarily responsible for our perception of color[[/note]] in their eyes rather than three, which gives them a small advantage in distinguishing colors, particularly in the red region of the spectrum. Because these genes are carried on the X chromosome, this condition is more common in women, but some men also carry both variants of the red-green gene on a single X chromosome. [[note]]You aren't missing much if you don't have this condition, for the record. It mostly just makes it really, really frustrating to set the gamma on your monitor using only three colors, and makes people look at you funny when you try to explain the obvious difference between red and dark maroon.[[/note]] People with only two sets of cone cells instead of three (color blindness) or with inadequate numbers of or malfunctioning cone cells (milder forms of color blindness) are less able to distinguish colors, and as a result colors which contain light of the wavelength they are "blind" to appear considerably different to them. Related to this are images taken by telescopes (or other instruments for the case) designed to work with wavelengths that do not correspond with visible light, like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitzer_Space_Telescope Spitzer]] (infrared) or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandra_X-ray_Observatory Chandra]] (X-Rays). The images of SpaceClouds that we see that have been taken by them are actually processed false-color images, so we can see them with our eyes and if they were sensible to those wavelengths while we'd see something more or less with the same aspect (ie: an infrared-bright region of star formation, an X-Ray emitting galactic nucleus, etc) their "colors" would be quite different.

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** Some people have four types of cone cells [[note]]the type of cell which is primarily responsible for our perception of color[[/note]] in their eyes rather than three, which gives them a small advantage in distinguishing colors, particularly in the red region of the spectrum. Because these genes are carried on the X chromosome, this condition is more common in women, but some men also carry both variants of the red-green gene on a single X chromosome. [[note]]You aren't missing much if you don't have this condition, for the record. It mostly just makes it really, really frustrating to set the gamma on your monitor using only three colors, and makes people look at you funny when you try to explain the obvious difference between red and dark maroon.[[/note]] People with only two sets of cone cells instead of three (color blindness) or with inadequate numbers of or malfunctioning cone cells (milder forms of color blindness) are less able to distinguish colors, and as a result colors which contain light of the wavelength they are "blind" to appear considerably different to them. Related to this are images taken by telescopes (or other instruments for the case) designed to work with wavelengths that do not correspond with visible light, like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitzer_Space_Telescope Spitzer]] (infrared) or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandra_X-ray_Observatory Chandra]] (X-Rays). The images of SpaceClouds that we see that have been taken by them are actually processed false-color images, images so we can see them with our eyes and eyes; if they were sensible to those wavelengths while we'd see something more or less with the same aspect (ie: an infrared-bright region of star formation, an X-Ray emitting galactic nucleus, etc) their "colors" would be quite different.



** Human brains are designed to perceive the world in three dimensions, but the human eye only perceives the world in two dimensions. The brain uses the 2-dimensional input from each eye in addition to some image process recognition to construct the perception of a third dimension inside the brain, which is why people with only one eye have diminished depth perception. This can be thrown off in various well-known ways, such as presenting a different image to each eye - something 3D glasses take advantage of to create a stronger illusion of the third dimension from a 2D image. Many visual illusions take advantage of the brain's visual processing - perspective in paintings is a matter of tricking the eye into seeing 3D distance which is not actually present, while real-world environments can be constructed in order to trick the brain into seeing a 3D space as being larger, smaller, or otherwise strangely shaped. Because the brain is designed to construct 3D images, it makes visualizing a object which has more than three spatial dimensions, such as some mathematical constructs, very strange - one of the more common ways of doing so is essentially taking 3-dimensional "slices" of a 4D object, and presenting them in series over time. Similarly, human brains are designed to only perceive on dimension of time. Time and space aren't intrinsically different from one-another, so in the same way that a 1-dimensional being could not perceive the concept of turning around, we can only see the flow of time in one direction. If the universe had two or more dimensions of time, then you could "turn around" and face the past. What that would look like is anyone's guess.

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** Human brains are designed to perceive the world in three dimensions, but the human eye only perceives the world in two dimensions. The brain uses the 2-dimensional input from each eye in addition to some image process recognition to construct the perception of a third dimension inside the brain, which is why people with only one eye have diminished depth perception. This can be thrown off in various well-known ways, such as presenting a different image to each eye - something 3D glasses take advantage of to create a stronger illusion of the third dimension from a 2D image. Many visual illusions take advantage of the brain's visual processing - perspective in paintings is a matter of tricking the eye into seeing 3D distance which is not actually present, while real-world environments can be constructed in order to trick the brain into seeing a 3D space as being larger, smaller, or otherwise strangely shaped. Because the brain is designed to construct 3D images, it makes visualizing a object which has more than three spatial dimensions, such as some mathematical constructs, very strange - one of the more common ways of doing so is essentially taking 3-dimensional "slices" of a 4D object, and presenting them in series over time. Similarly, human brains are designed to only perceive on one dimension of time. Time and space aren't intrinsically different from one-another, so in the same way that a 1-dimensional being could not perceive the concept of turning around, we can only see the flow of time in one direction. If the universe had two or more dimensions of time, then you could "turn around" and face the past. What that would look like is anyone's guess.
25th Apr '17 4:26:03 PM CnHGirl
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* Sleep. When you do it, it might feel like a sudden stop and start, but your brain doesn't actually shut down. You simply lose conscious control for anywhere from a few minutes to several hours while your body acts on its own, maintaining its vitals and keeping you busy with dreams until you wake back up. Most of what happens then doesn't even stick and will be forgotten the moment you wake up. Since the brain is still active, we don't even know the true purpose of sleep in the first place.

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* Sleep. When you do it, it might feel like a sudden stop and start, but your brain doesn't actually shut down. You simply lose conscious control for anywhere from a few minutes to several hours while your body acts on its own, maintaining its vitals and keeping you busy with dreams until you wake back up. Most of what happens then doesn't even stick and will be forgotten the moment you wake up. Since the brain is still active, we don't even know the true purpose of sleep in the first place. All we know for sure is, if we go too long without it, we die.
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