History Main / YouCanNotGraspTheTrueForm

17th Jul '16 7:51:59 PM Discar
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* In ''[[VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity]]'' [[spoiler:the Bittercold's]] attacks are implied to be this. Ontop of [[spoiler:the Bittercold]] being an [[spoiler: OutsideContextVillain]], it also uses attacks [[spoiler:never seen in the Pokemon franchise before, hits the entire room, can confuse or vastly lower your party's stats, and the names of said attacks don't appear in the message log at all.]]

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* In ''[[VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeonGatesToInfinity Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity]]'' [[spoiler:the Bittercold's]] attacks are implied to be this. Ontop of [[spoiler:the Bittercold]] being an [[spoiler: OutsideContextVillain]], OutsideContextProblem]], it also uses attacks [[spoiler:never seen in the Pokemon franchise before, hits the entire room, can confuse or vastly lower your party's stats, and the names of said attacks don't appear in the message log at all.]]
1st Jul '16 7:00:17 AM Quanyails
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* One of VideoGame/{{OFF}}'s endings implies there's something like this going on in regards to [[spoiler: [[VillainProtagonist The Batter]]. Sure, when you control him, you see just a man with baseball attire and a bat, but when, in the Judge's ending, you're using the Judge against him, what you see ''then'' is [[HumanoidAbomination a monstrosity that could only be called humanoid in the vaguest sense of the word]], wearing his same (perfectly fitting, which could argue against [[OneWingedAngel a transformation]]) baseball player attire. In the end, you never know if you, the Judge, or neither, ever saw the Batter properly]].

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* One of VideoGame/{{OFF}}'s ''VideoGame/{{OFF}}''[='=]s endings implies there's something like this going on in regards to [[spoiler: [[VillainProtagonist The Batter]]. Sure, when you control him, you see just a man with baseball attire and a bat, but when, in the Judge's ending, you're using the Judge against him, what you see ''then'' is [[HumanoidAbomination a monstrosity that could only be called humanoid in the vaguest sense of the word]], wearing his same (perfectly fitting, which could argue against [[OneWingedAngel a transformation]]) baseball player attire. In the end, you never know if you, the Judge, or neither, ever saw the Batter properly]].
20th Jun '16 4:24:55 PM ReloadPsi
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* Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.



* Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.

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* Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.
20th Jun '16 4:24:22 PM ReloadPsi
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** Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.

to:

** * Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.
20th Jun '16 4:23:46 PM ReloadPsi
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to:

** Many people on the autistic spectrum describe their perception and empathy for the world around them in this way.
9th Jun '16 5:51:56 AM shadowmanwkp
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* [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] in ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', whose protagonists are two-dimensional polygons for whom the very notion of three-dimensional creatures inspires {{Cosmic Horror Stor|y}}ies. When a Flatlander is [[PalsWithJesus befriended by a]] 3-dimensional sphere, he literally [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm Cannot Grasp The True Form]] without touching it. A cube looks like an EldritchAbomination, constantly changing shape at various angles.

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* [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] in ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', whose protagonists are two-dimensional polygons for whom the very notion of three-dimensional creatures inspires {{Cosmic Horror Stor|y}}ies. When a Flatlander is [[PalsWithJesus befriended by a]] 3-dimensional sphere, he literally [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm Cannot Grasp The True Form]] Form without touching it. A cube looks like an EldritchAbomination, constantly changing shape at various angles.



-->''Words describing it fail. [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm Pages]] relating it shrivel. Tales recounting it end.''

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-->''Words describing it fail. [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm Pages]] Pages relating it shrivel. Tales recounting it end.''



** WordOfGod says that YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm happens to EVERYONE in the setting; with the whole world gone insane, everyone's brains are approximating what they THINK their senses are glimpsing. The Batter sees himself as a normal human but his enemies think he's a monstrous psycho mutant.

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** WordOfGod says that YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm You cannot grasp the true form happens to EVERYONE in the setting; with the whole world gone insane, everyone's brains are approximating what they THINK their senses are glimpsing. The Batter sees himself as a normal human but his enemies think he's a monstrous psycho mutant.



** She can also use the power of YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm to initiate an attack in a similar vein to [[VideoGame/{{Earthbound}} Giygas]]/[[SpellMyNameWithAnS Gie]][[VideoGame/{{MOTHER}} gue]]. [[spoiler:As the [[StoryBreakerPower Witch of Theatregoing]], she can literally ''stop time, rip out the script of a world and rewrite it''. In the eighth and final book when she [[CurbStompBattle "fights"]] Lambdadelta, she starts from the end of the incoming fight scene and works her way back, only to the part where she deals a rather ''brutal'' finishing blow to Lambda. She doesn't even write ''what'' killed Lambda, deciding to think it up later. When time resumes, the poor Witch of Certainty suffered just as Featherine wrote and had no idea what just happened before perishing, the narrative almost quoting this trope word for word.]]

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** She can also use the power of YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm You cannot grasp the true form to initiate an attack in a similar vein to [[VideoGame/{{Earthbound}} Giygas]]/[[SpellMyNameWithAnS Gie]][[VideoGame/{{MOTHER}} gue]]. [[spoiler:As the [[StoryBreakerPower Witch of Theatregoing]], she can literally ''stop time, rip out the script of a world and rewrite it''. In the eighth and final book when she [[CurbStompBattle "fights"]] Lambdadelta, she starts from the end of the incoming fight scene and works her way back, only to the part where she deals a rather ''brutal'' finishing blow to Lambda. She doesn't even write ''what'' killed Lambda, deciding to think it up later. When time resumes, the poor Witch of Certainty suffered just as Featherine wrote and had no idea what just happened before perishing, the narrative almost quoting this trope word for word.]]
28th May '16 9:07:11 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Ever wondered why PurpleIsTheNewBlack? '''[[Analysis/PurpleIsTheNewBlack Because there is no black.]]''' A true black would reflect no light whatsoever and would look like a hole in space. That only happens in black holes.
** ''True'' black is theoretically impossible on a physical level, as stated above; since vision works by light reflecting off of objects, and true black is the absorption of light, our human eyes literally can not see true black. A good demonstration is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack Vantablack]]. That photo is neither a pile of it sitting on a sheet of aluminum foil, nor is it a PortableHole. It's simply a layer of Vantablack coating a sheet of foil. The reason it looks like a blank, formless blob is because it absorbs all the light needed to see the foil's crinkles and ridges.
* One of the great challenges for an artist learning advanced color theory is to get comfortable with exploiting the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_constancy Color Constancy illusion]]. In any piece with strong MoodLighting, colors you think you are seeing are usually just slight tints of one or two hues. What looks like a strong green in the image may actually be, say, a pale orange-grey- it only ''looks'' green compared to the colors around it.
* The color magenta does not correspond to a single wavelength of light, and is not part of the light spectrum - there is no such thing as "pure" magenta light. Rather, it is the brain's way of interpreting multiple wavelengths of light from disparate parts of the color spectrum being received by your eye at the same time. [[http://www.null-hypothesis.co.uk/science/strange-but-true/colour_spectrum_magenta_complimentary_bizarre In the case of magenta, it is a combination of red and violet light, which are from opposite ends of the color spectrum; in order to "properly" interpret this, rather than seeing it as an intermediate color, the human brain instead perceives it as magenta.]] \\
Yet while pink is often highlighted as an example of such an "unnatural" color, in reality, the majority of colors humans see are this - anything which is not one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Spectrum.svg colors of the rainbow]] is the human brain's way of interpreting a mixture of different wavelengths of light. Indeed, white and gray are the most common examples - white light is merely light which contains a mixture of light wavelengths in high enough and close-to-equal concentration, whereas gray is the same thing, only there is less stimulation. Thus, while there is red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet light, colors like pink, white, and black are mixtures of light. Creatures with different peaks for their visual spectrum would likely interpret such mixed colors in a different way.
** A fascinating experiment involving a similar illusory color made from tiny checkerboards of green and red proved impossible to describe properly in normal terms. Trained artists could describe aspects of it like its chroma value and saturation, but the color itself refused categorization within the color wheel.
* [[SchmuckBait Try to imagine a completely new colour.]] Just try it. You can't.
** This is why Don Joyce's "Squant" never ceases to madden us with its premise and Crosley's matter-of-fact discussion.
* Language is also linked to our perception colors. If a language and culture has a bigger difference between colors, people in that society are better able to distinguish colors. This goes the other way too, as people who lack distinctions for colors are slower to recognize differences between them. However, the idea that they are incapable of doing so is pure myth; the difference is in fractions of a second of recognition speed, not actual differences in visual acuity. There is evidence that colors which humans cannot manufacture do not have names and are therefore not recognized. Scholars have studied ancient texts, including The Iliad and The Odyssey, specifically looking at the usage of color words. Many very strange color identifications are given: Green Honey, Violet Sheep, and Wine-Dark Seas. These were often regarded as "colorful" metaphors until linguist Guy Deutscher realized '''there is no blue mentioned in them anywhere'''. At the time there were no blue dyes available and there simply wasn't a word for blue, so people had to use other colors to describe what we now know as blue. This is a pattern across all cultures: color usage appears in stages, and blue is always last. This can also be seen in young children; if they don't yet know a color they'll refer to things of that color by a color they do know. An example, again involving blue, children will refer to the sky as white (which most adults will reflexively say is blue) before they know the color blue.
* Some people have four types of cone cells [[note]]the type of cell which is primarily responsible for our perception of color[[/note]] in their eyes rather than three, which gives them a small advantage in distinguishing colors, particularly in the red region of the spectrum. Because these genes are carried on the X chromosome, this condition is more common in women, but some men also carry both variants of the red-green gene on a single X chromosome. [[note]]You aren't missing much if you don't have this condition, for the record. It mostly just makes it really, really frustrating to set the gamma on your monitor using only three colors, and makes people look at you funny when you try to explain the obvious difference between red and dark maroon.[[/note]] People with only two sets of cone cells instead of three (color blindness) or with inadequate numbers of or malfunctioning cone cells (milder forms of color blindness) are less able to distinguish colors, and as a result colors which contain light of the wavelength they are "blind" to appear considerably different to them.
** Related to this are images taken by telescopes (or other instruments for the case) designed to work with wavelengths that do not correspond with visible light, like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitzer_Space_Telescope Spitzer]] (infrared) or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandra_X-ray_Observatory Chandra]] (X-Rays). The images of SpaceClouds that we see that have been taken by them are actually processed false-color images, so we can see them with our eyes and if they were sensible to those wavelengths while we'd see something more or less with the same aspect (ie: an infrared-bright region of star formation, an X-Ray emitting galactic nucleus, etc) their "colors" would be quite different.
* In (amateur) astronomy an interesting physiological effect takes often place when observing a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_star double star]], as the less bright of the pair is seen in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complementary_colors complementary color]] of the brightest one -ie, when observing a double whose brightest component is orange seeing the less luminous as green or blue, even if it's actually yellow or white.-
* Human brains are designed to perceive the world in three dimensions, but the human eye only perceives the world in two dimensions. The brain uses the 2-dimensional input from each eye in addition to some image process recognition to construct the perception of a third dimension inside the brain, which is why people with only one eye have diminished depth perception. This can be thrown off in various well-known ways, such as presenting a different image to each eye - something 3D glasses take advantage of to create a stronger illusion of the third dimension from a 2D image. Many visual illusions take advantage of the brain's visual processing - perspective in paintings is a matter of tricking the eye into seeing 3D distance which is not actually present, while real-world environments can be constructed in order to trick the brain into seeing a 3D space as being larger, smaller, or otherwise strangely shaped. Because the brain is designed to construct 3D images, it makes visualizing a object which has more than three spatial dimensions, such as some mathematical constructs, very strange - one of the more common ways of doing so is essentially taking 3-dimensional "slices" of a 4D object, and presenting them in series over time. Similarly, human brains are designed to only perceive on dimension of time. Time and space aren't intrinsically different from one-another, so in the same way that a 1-dimensional being could not perceive the concept of turning around, we can only see the flow of time in one direction. If the universe had two or more dimensions of time, then you could "turn around" and face the past. What that would look like is anyone's guess.
* [[http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/blindspot1.html Blind spots]]. Your brain compensates for the existing blind spots in your eyes (spots which are not covered with cones or rods due to the presence of the optical nerve), filling in the lost information. People who get retinal burns (because of handling lasers or arc welders carelessly, for example) get additional blind spots in addition to the natural ones. The brain input-processing mechanism conceals these spots and the afflicted human thinks he's perfectly okay, up until the point that enough of his retina is burned that the brain is no longer able to compensate.

to:

* Color and perception both have plenty of unusual examples:
**
Ever wondered why PurpleIsTheNewBlack? '''[[Analysis/PurpleIsTheNewBlack Because there is no black.]]''' A true black would reflect no light whatsoever and would look like a hole in space. That only happens in black holes.
** ''True'' black is theoretically impossible on a physical level, as stated above;
holes. And since vision works by light reflecting off of objects, and true black is the absorption of light, our human eyes literally can not ''cannot'' see true black. A good demonstration is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack Vantablack]]. That photo is neither a pile of it sitting on a sheet of aluminum foil, nor is it a PortableHole. It's simply a layer of Vantablack coating a sheet of foil. The reason it looks like a blank, formless blob is because it absorbs all the light needed to see the foil's crinkles and ridges.
* ** One of the great challenges for an artist learning advanced color theory is to get comfortable with exploiting the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_constancy Color Constancy illusion]]. In any piece with strong MoodLighting, colors you think you are seeing are usually just slight tints of one or two hues. What looks like a strong green in the image may actually be, say, a pale orange-grey- it only ''looks'' green compared to the colors around it.
* ** The color magenta does not correspond to a single wavelength of light, and is not part of the light spectrum - there is no such thing as "pure" magenta light. Rather, it is the brain's way of interpreting multiple wavelengths of light from disparate parts of the color spectrum being received by your eye at the same time. [[http://www.null-hypothesis.co.uk/science/strange-but-true/colour_spectrum_magenta_complimentary_bizarre In the case of magenta, it is a combination of red and violet light, which are from opposite ends of the color spectrum; in order to "properly" interpret this, rather than seeing it as an intermediate color, the human brain instead perceives it as magenta.]] \\
Yet while pink is often highlighted as an example of such an "unnatural" color, in reality, the majority of colors humans see are this - anything which is not one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Spectrum.svg colors of the rainbow]] is the human brain's way of interpreting a mixture of different wavelengths of light. Indeed, white and gray are the most common examples - white light is merely light which contains a mixture of light wavelengths in high enough and close-to-equal concentration, whereas gray is the same thing, only there is less stimulation. Thus, while there is red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet light, colors like pink, white, and black are mixtures of light. Creatures with different peaks for their visual spectrum would likely interpret such mixed colors in a different way.
**
way. A fascinating experiment involving a similar illusory color made from tiny checkerboards of green and red proved impossible to describe properly in normal terms. Trained artists could describe aspects of it like its chroma value and saturation, but the color itself refused categorization within the color wheel.
* ** [[SchmuckBait Try to imagine a completely new colour.]] Just try it. You can't.
**
can't. The brain cannot process or even imagine a color that is outside the range of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to humans. This is why Don Joyce's "Squant" never ceases to madden us people with its premise and Crosley's matter-of-fact discussion.
* ** Language is also linked to our perception colors. If a language and culture has a bigger difference between colors, people in that society are better able to distinguish colors. This goes the other way too, as people who lack distinctions for colors are slower to recognize differences between them. However, the idea that they are incapable of doing so is pure myth; the difference is in fractions of a second of recognition speed, not actual differences in visual acuity. There is evidence that colors which humans cannot manufacture do not have names and are therefore not recognized. Scholars have studied ancient texts, including The Iliad and The Odyssey, specifically looking at the usage of color words. Many very strange color identifications are given: Green Honey, Violet Sheep, and Wine-Dark Seas. These were often regarded as "colorful" metaphors until linguist Guy Deutscher realized '''there is no blue mentioned in them anywhere'''. At the time there were no blue dyes available and there simply wasn't a word for blue, so people had to use other colors to describe what we now know as blue. This is a pattern across all cultures: color usage appears in stages, and blue is always last. This can also be seen in young children; if they don't yet know a color they'll refer to things of that color by a color they do know. An example, again involving blue, children will refer to the sky as white (which most adults will reflexively say is blue) before they know the color blue.
* ** Some people have four types of cone cells [[note]]the type of cell which is primarily responsible for our perception of color[[/note]] in their eyes rather than three, which gives them a small advantage in distinguishing colors, particularly in the red region of the spectrum. Because these genes are carried on the X chromosome, this condition is more common in women, but some men also carry both variants of the red-green gene on a single X chromosome. [[note]]You aren't missing much if you don't have this condition, for the record. It mostly just makes it really, really frustrating to set the gamma on your monitor using only three colors, and makes people look at you funny when you try to explain the obvious difference between red and dark maroon.[[/note]] People with only two sets of cone cells instead of three (color blindness) or with inadequate numbers of or malfunctioning cone cells (milder forms of color blindness) are less able to distinguish colors, and as a result colors which contain light of the wavelength they are "blind" to appear considerably different to them.
**
them. Related to this are images taken by telescopes (or other instruments for the case) designed to work with wavelengths that do not correspond with visible light, like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitzer_Space_Telescope Spitzer]] (infrared) or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandra_X-ray_Observatory Chandra]] (X-Rays). The images of SpaceClouds that we see that have been taken by them are actually processed false-color images, so we can see them with our eyes and if they were sensible to those wavelengths while we'd see something more or less with the same aspect (ie: an infrared-bright region of star formation, an X-Ray emitting galactic nucleus, etc) their "colors" would be quite different.
* ** In (amateur) astronomy an interesting physiological effect takes often place when observing a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_star double star]], as the less bright of the pair is seen in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complementary_colors complementary color]] of the brightest one -ie, when observing a double whose brightest component is orange seeing the less luminous as green or blue, even if it's actually yellow or white.-
* ** Human brains are designed to perceive the world in three dimensions, but the human eye only perceives the world in two dimensions. The brain uses the 2-dimensional input from each eye in addition to some image process recognition to construct the perception of a third dimension inside the brain, which is why people with only one eye have diminished depth perception. This can be thrown off in various well-known ways, such as presenting a different image to each eye - something 3D glasses take advantage of to create a stronger illusion of the third dimension from a 2D image. Many visual illusions take advantage of the brain's visual processing - perspective in paintings is a matter of tricking the eye into seeing 3D distance which is not actually present, while real-world environments can be constructed in order to trick the brain into seeing a 3D space as being larger, smaller, or otherwise strangely shaped. Because the brain is designed to construct 3D images, it makes visualizing a object which has more than three spatial dimensions, such as some mathematical constructs, very strange - one of the more common ways of doing so is essentially taking 3-dimensional "slices" of a 4D object, and presenting them in series over time. Similarly, human brains are designed to only perceive on dimension of time. Time and space aren't intrinsically different from one-another, so in the same way that a 1-dimensional being could not perceive the concept of turning around, we can only see the flow of time in one direction. If the universe had two or more dimensions of time, then you could "turn around" and face the past. What that would look like is anyone's guess.
* ** [[http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/blindspot1.html Blind spots]]. Your brain compensates for the existing blind spots in your eyes (spots which are not covered with cones or rods due to the presence of the optical nerve), filling in the lost information. People who get retinal burns (because of handling lasers or arc welders carelessly, for example) get additional blind spots in addition to the natural ones. The brain input-processing mechanism conceals these spots and the afflicted human thinks he's perfectly okay, up until the point that enough of his retina is burned that the brain is no longer able to compensate.compensate.
** Extremely distant objects in the sky are so far away that the brain does not naturally model them as being three-dimensional objects in space. This is especially true of the Sun, Moon, and stars, all of which are huge objects which are extremely large distances away, but the brain does not naturally perceive them as large, nor accurately model their distance, due to lack of perspective.
** This is why the moon '''appears''' to be larger when it is low on the horizon versus up in the sky. There isn't an atmospheric lensing effect as many people believe, it's simply a visual illusion. The exact reasons [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_illusion are still debated]] - sometimes it's stated to be because there are trees/buildings/the ground now visible in proximity to it and your brain is better able to judge a relative size, but it seems to work just as well with a featureless sea as the background. Another explanation is that we are simply used to objects on the horizon being smaller, but the moon doesn't become smaller, so we automatically compensate.
** Even non-celestial distant objects can mess with the brain's perception if there is no relative comparison. Just look at a plane in the sky, you have no way of judging how high or how fast it is moving other than "it's small so it's got to be pretty high". From the ground 2 planes (or their contrails) could appear to intersect with each other and nearly collide, when in actuality there may be 2 miles or more difference in their altitudes. Without perspective the brain just gives up and renders it as a 2D image.



* Despite the fact that imaginary numbers are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, they actually have, more or less, practical and perhaps physical applications. ThatOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_number#Applications has plenty of examples]].

to:

* Despite the fact that Although imaginary numbers are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, they actually have, more or less, practical and perhaps physical applications. ThatOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_number#Applications has plenty of examples]].



* Extremely distant objects in the sky are so far away that the brain does not naturally model them as being three-dimensional objects in space. This is especially true of the Sun, Moon, and stars, all of which are huge objects which are extremely large distances away, but the brain does not naturally perceive them as large, nor accurately model their distance, due to lack of perspective.
* This is why the moon '''appears''' to be larger when it is low on the horizon versus up in the sky. There isn't an atmospheric lensing effect as many people believe, it's simply a visual illusion. The exact reasons [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_illusion are still debated]] - sometimes it's stated to be because there are trees/buildings/the ground now visible in proximity to it and your brain is better able to judge a relative size, but it seems to work just as well with a featureless sea as the background. Another explanation is that we are simply used to objects on the horizon being smaller, but the moon doesn't become smaller, so we automatically compensate.
* Even non-celestial distant objects can mess with the brain's perception if there is no relative comparison. Just look at a plane in the sky, you have no way of judging how high or how fast it is moving other than "it's small so it's got to be pretty high". From the ground 2 planes (or their contrails) could appear to intersect with each other and nearly collide, when in actuality there may be 2 miles or more difference in their altitudes. Without perspective the brain just gives up and renders it as a 2D image.
28th May '16 7:58:50 PM DoctorTItanX
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* In ''Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods'', Beerus and Whis' ''ki'' is so alien that cannot be perceived by non-divine beings.

to:

* In ''Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods'', Beerus and Whis' ''ki'' is so alien that it cannot be perceived by non-divine beings.



* While a living being can easily look upon the "Dark Matter" entity from the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' series, ''analyzing'' it is something else. [[spoiler:Star Dream, the ultra-advanced supercomputer developed by the Haltmann Works Company in ''Planet Robobot'', recreates the Blade version of Dark Matter last seen in ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand2''... not because it would be the ideal opponent, but because it is literally all that the supercomputer, something on par with ''[[VideoGame/KirbySuperStar Galactic Nova]]'', is capable of replicating. Apparently, the mightiest digital minds in existence have a very hard time comprehending a being made of pure evil.]]

to:

* While a living being can easily look upon the "Dark Matter" entity from the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' series, ''analyzing'' it is something else. [[spoiler:Star Dream, the ultra-advanced supercomputer developed by the Haltmann Works Company in ''Planet Robobot'', recreates the Blade version of Dark Matter last seen in ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand2''... not because it would be the ideal opponent, but because it is literally all that the supercomputer, something on par with ''[[VideoGame/KirbySuperStar Galactic Nova]]'', is capable of replicating. Apparently, even the mightiest digital minds in existence have a very hard time comprehending a being made of pure evil.]]



* Ever wondered why PurpleIsTheNewBlack? '''[[Analysis/PurpleIsTheNewBlack Because there is no black.]]''' A true black would reflect no light what so ever and would look like a hole in space. That only happens in black holes.
** ''True'' black is theoretically impossible on a physical level, as stated above; since vision works by light reflecting off of objects, and true black is the absorption of light, our human eyes literally can not see true black. A good demonstration is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack Vantablack]]. That photo is not a pile of it sitting on a sheet of aluminum foil (nor is it a PortableHole); it's simply a layer of Vantablack coating a sheet of foil. The reason it looks like a blank, formless blob is because it absorbs all the light needed to see the foil's crinkles and ridges.

to:

* Ever wondered why PurpleIsTheNewBlack? '''[[Analysis/PurpleIsTheNewBlack Because there is no black.]]''' A true black would reflect no light what so ever whatsoever and would look like a hole in space. That only happens in black holes.
** ''True'' black is theoretically impossible on a physical level, as stated above; since vision works by light reflecting off of objects, and true black is the absorption of light, our human eyes literally can not see true black. A good demonstration is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack Vantablack]]. That photo is not neither a pile of it sitting on a sheet of aluminum foil (nor foil, nor is it a PortableHole); it's PortableHole. It's simply a layer of Vantablack coating a sheet of foil. The reason it looks like a blank, formless blob is because it absorbs all the light needed to see the foil's crinkles and ridges.
14th May '16 9:21:26 PM jormis29
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* In ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'', most people see the Vorlons as whatever equivalent their culture has to "angel," but Londo apparently sees nothing. Whether this was because the Vorlon ignored the Centauri race and focused their [[{{Precursors}} ancient genetic manipulation]] on the now-extinct Xon race that also evolved on Centauri Prime, or because Londo is just a {{Jerkass}}, is never explained. JMS claimed somewhere, in response to a fan's question, that Garibaldi (an agnostic) would have seen himself in Kosh. This statement seems to support the idea that it was Londo's having been touched by Shadows that led him to see nothing, rather than any faith-related matters/crises on his part.
* Parodied somewhat in ''TheMiddleman'', when MM and Wendy visit the underworld. It appears to Wendy (and the camera) like an office building, but when she mentions this to MM, he claims to see an overgrown field full of feral creatures. [[spoiler:He's kidding, he sees an office. "Someone's funny in the underworld."]]

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* In ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'', ''Series/BabylonFive'', most people see the Vorlons as whatever equivalent their culture has to "angel," but Londo apparently sees nothing. Whether this was because the Vorlon ignored the Centauri race and focused their [[{{Precursors}} ancient genetic manipulation]] on the now-extinct Xon race that also evolved on Centauri Prime, or because Londo is just a {{Jerkass}}, is never explained. JMS claimed somewhere, in response to a fan's question, that Garibaldi (an agnostic) would have seen himself in Kosh. This statement seems to support the idea that it was Londo's having been touched by Shadows that led him to see nothing, rather than any faith-related matters/crises on his part.
* Parodied somewhat in ''TheMiddleman'', ''Series/TheMiddleman'', when MM and Wendy visit the underworld. It appears to Wendy (and the camera) like an office building, but when she mentions this to MM, he claims to see an overgrown field full of feral creatures. [[spoiler:He's kidding, he sees an office. "Someone's funny in the underworld."]]



** The novel ''I, Q'' goes so far as to say that the human mind does this automatically to stay sane and that Data normally shuts down because his android mind tries to "see" everything and crashes. Q must filter the sensor input so Data can function.

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** The novel ''I, Q'' ''Literature/{{IQ}}'' goes so far as to say that the human mind does this automatically to stay sane and that Data normally shuts down because his android mind tries to "see" everything and crashes. Q must filter the sensor input so Data can function.



* In ''{{Grimm}}'', it's explained that it's generally a bad idea for normal humans to see the true forms of Wesen, as it could make them GoMadFromTheRevelation. Someone like Hank whose sanity was able to withstand the initial shock then ''thinks'' he was going crazy. For weeks, he was unable to sleep and was becoming increasingly paranoid. Nick had to stop him from shooting his own goddaughter in a blind panic when she accidentally reveals her GameFace.

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* In ''{{Grimm}}'', ''Series/{{Grimm}}'', it's explained that it's generally a bad idea for normal humans to see the true forms of Wesen, as it could make them GoMadFromTheRevelation. Someone like Hank whose sanity was able to withstand the initial shock then ''thinks'' he was going crazy. For weeks, he was unable to sleep and was becoming increasingly paranoid. Nick had to stop him from shooting his own goddaughter in a blind panic when she accidentally reveals her GameFace.



* ''MagicTheGathering'': The Alara block gives us the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=188962 Nemesis of Rea-]] [[{{Candlejack}} THE END]].

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* ''MagicTheGathering'': ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'': The Alara block gives us the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=188962 Nemesis of Rea-]] [[{{Candlejack}} THE END]].



* The dragons of ''{{Rift}}'' [[EldritchAbomination aren't dragons at all...]]

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* The dragons of ''{{Rift}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Rift}}'' [[EldritchAbomination aren't dragons at all...]]
8th May '16 8:38:26 PM Shishkahuben
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* ''{{TabletopGame/Pathfinder}}'' works this into the stat block for [[CthulhuMythos Cthulhu]] himself. Since Cthulhu is [[AlienGeometries non-Euclidian]] and not wholly in the Material plane, or the third dimension at all for that matter, Cthulhu's attacks naturally cleave in a ten-foot cube around what he appears to actually strike. Additionally, his apparent and actual position don't line up quite right, granting him a flat 50% miss chance against all attacks. This can be defeated by using [[TrueSight the True Seeing spell]], but this is a generally inadvisable option, [[ThingsManWasNotMeantToKnow forcing a Will save versus instant and permanent]] [[GoMadFromTheRevelation insanity as you are suddenly forced to grasp Cthulhu's true form.]]
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