History Main / YouAreNumberSix

23rd Jan '17 5:05:11 AM LadyJaneGrey
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Zigzagged in ''Film/TheCatFromOuterSpace'', where the title character's name combines words ''and'' numbers. His full name is Zunar-J-5/9 Doric-4-7, but is called "Jake" for most of the film.
21st Jan '17 4:13:08 AM princessbinas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Our Amethyst is Facet 5, Cut 8XM.

to:

** Our Amethyst is revealed to have the serial number Facet 5, Cut 8XM.8XM in "That Will be All".
21st Jan '17 4:11:29 AM princessbinas
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Our Amethyst is Facet 5, Cut 8XM.
18th Jan '17 12:58:59 PM NoxSky12599
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** PlayedForLaughs in the ''Voyager'' episode "The Omega Directive", when Seven of Nine is put in charge of a project and assigns each member of the group a Borg-style designation to "improve efficiency". When Six of Ten (aka Harry Kim) complains, Seven "demotes" him to Two of Ten.
17th Jan '17 11:54:01 PM Orbiting
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Webcomic/{{Nebula}}'': Gliese 504 b and 59 Virginis, which is probably a good part of the reason that they're {{Only Known By Their Nickname}}s, going by B and Virginis when talking to each other.
17th Jan '17 12:05:49 AM 017Bluefield
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Fanfic/ProjectBluefield'', the [[DimensionalTraveler Zeros]] have a set of numbers followed by a chosen name. Trey, Dreyza, Vespyr, and Kyoku have this taken one further, with a "-R" appended to the number.
14th Jan '17 3:23:45 AM Sabrewing
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Precursor]] ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'', Seibzehn and Achtzehn are the German words for "seventeen" and "eighteen," respectively. In Gear shops, equipment for Seibzehn is even prefixed with "#17."

to:

* In [[SpiritualSuccessor Spiritual Precursor]] ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'', Seibzehn and Achtzehn are the German words for "seventeen" "seventeen[[labelnote:*]]albeit spelled incorrectly in this case[[/labelnote]]" and "eighteen," respectively. In Gear shops, equipment for Seibzehn is even prefixed with "#17."
7th Jan '17 8:30:59 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For some reason, these implications are usually somewhat lessened when [[MyHeroZero the number in question is "zero"]]. They also don't necessarily apply to spy or superhero {{Code Name}}s that are numbers (like [[Franchise/JamesBond 007]]), unless they become part of a SecretIdentityIdentity. Having a low number (i.e. in the single digits) as a name is generally considered less humiliating than a large one. And Heaven help you if your name is "[[FourIsDeath 4]]" [[note]]Unless you're [[http://knd.wikia.com/wiki/Numbuh_4 this guy]]. Or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Doctor this guy.]] Good luck if you're [[Characters/LorienLegaciesGarde this guy]].[[/note]] "[[ThirteenIsUnlucky 13]]", "[[OneHundredAndEight 108]]", "[[NumberOfTheBeast 666]]", or a combination of them.

to:

For some reason, these implications are usually somewhat lessened when [[MyHeroZero the number in question is "zero"]]. They also don't necessarily apply to spy or superhero {{Code Name}}s that are numbers (like [[Franchise/JamesBond 007]]), unless they become part of a SecretIdentityIdentity. Having a low number (i.e. in the single digits) as a name is generally considered less humiliating than a large one. And Heaven help you if your name is "[[FourIsDeath 4]]" [[note]]Unless you're [[http://knd.wikia.com/wiki/Numbuh_4 this guy]]. Or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Doctor this guy.]] Good luck if you're [[Characters/LorienLegaciesGarde this guy]].[[/note]] [[/note]], "[[ThirteenIsUnlucky 13]]", "[[OneHundredAndEight 108]]", "[[NumberOfTheBeast 666]]", or a combination of them.
7th Jan '17 8:30:34 AM WildKatGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For some reason, these implications are usually somewhat lessened when [[MyHeroZero the number in question is "zero"]]. They also don't necessarily apply to spy or superhero {{Code Name}}s that are numbers (like [[Franchise/JamesBond 007]]), unless they become part of a SecretIdentityIdentity. Having a low number (i.e. in the single digits) as a name is generally considered less humiliating than a large one. And Heaven help you if your name is "[[FourIsDeath 4]]" [[note]]Unless you're [[http://knd.wikia.com/wiki/Numbuh_4 this guy]]. Or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Doctor this guy.]] Good luck if you're [[Characters/LorienLegaciesGarde this guy]].[[/note]], "[[ThirteenIsUnlucky 13]]", "[[OneHundredAndEight 108]]", "[[NumberOfTheBeast 666]]", or a combination of them.

to:

For some reason, these implications are usually somewhat lessened when [[MyHeroZero the number in question is "zero"]]. They also don't necessarily apply to spy or superhero {{Code Name}}s that are numbers (like [[Franchise/JamesBond 007]]), unless they become part of a SecretIdentityIdentity. Having a low number (i.e. in the single digits) as a name is generally considered less humiliating than a large one. And Heaven help you if your name is "[[FourIsDeath 4]]" [[note]]Unless you're [[http://knd.wikia.com/wiki/Numbuh_4 this guy]]. Or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Doctor this guy.]] Good luck if you're [[Characters/LorienLegaciesGarde this guy]].[[/note]], [[/note]] "[[ThirteenIsUnlucky 13]]", "[[OneHundredAndEight 108]]", "[[NumberOfTheBeast 666]]", or a combination of them.
18th Nov '16 8:55:42 AM RezaMaulana98
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In contrast with NASCAR's practice, UsefulNotes/FormulaOne now issues drivers numbers for their entire careers, following the number system used in [=MotoGP=], a practice which began in the 2014 season. The #1 is reserved for the reigning Drivers' Champion; drivers can choose any number from #2 to #99, as long as it isn't taken by another driver. The champion's "regular" number is placed in reserve while he uses #1 in order to prevent other drivers from taking it.
** As mentioned above, in [=MotoGP=], riders are issued with numbers that they are going to keep for their entire career. Changes usually happened under several circumstances; such as the number they used is already taken by someone else when they joined a new class, sponsorship obligations (such as Pons Racing's #40 bike), or optionally, if the rider becomes the world champion and stayed in the class they won it.
*** After rider numbers became standardized[[note]]In almost all racing categories in the past (NASCAR is a notable exception, due to their team-based numbering system), riders/drivers used to have their number based on what the organizer gave to them before the race. This means they almost always have a different number ''in every single race they participate''[[/note]] and before the advent of the [=MotoGP=] class to replace the [=500cc=] class, the rules stated that if you finished in the top 5 the previous season, you have the option to use rider numbers indicating that you finished in whatever position you did finish the previous year (i.e. champion gets #1, runner up gets #2, and so on). While it is OK to not follow this rule[[note]]For example, Kevin Schwantz kept the #34 for his entire career, only changing to #1 in 1994 after when he won the title in 1993[[/note]], all but one champion[[note]]Barry Sheene, who kept his #7 after winning his two titles in 1976 and 1977[[/note]] changed his number to #1 after he won the title. This all changed when Valentino Rossi gets promoted to the-then [=500cc=] in 2000. After Rossi finished second in the 2000 season, he decided to kept his iconic #46 the following season. Then Rossi won the title in 2001 and kept the #46 in the following season despite his champion status. As a result, virtually ''everyone'' decided to [[FollowTheLeader follow his lead]] and kept the same number they use for their entire career. This results in the near-abolition of the rule, now with only the champions given the option to change their number to #1[[note]]Post-Rossi's 2001 title, only in ''three'' occasions where non-champions changed their numbers in the following season: Colin Edwards in 2005 (after finishing fifth in 2004; unlike Pedrosa, he would stick to #5 for the rest of his career), Dani Pedrosa in 2008 (after finishing second in 2007), and Pedrosa again in 2009 (after finishing third in 2008)[[/note]] in the following season.

to:

** In contrast with NASCAR's practice, UsefulNotes/FormulaOne now issues drivers numbers for their entire careers, following the number system used in [=MotoGP=], a practice which began in the 2014 season. The #1 is reserved for the reigning Drivers' Champion; drivers can choose any number from #2 to #99, #99 (except #17, which is retired in honor for Jules Bianchi), as long as it isn't taken by another driver. The champion's "regular" number is placed in reserve while he uses #1 in order to prevent other drivers from taking it.
it. In addition, if a driver doesn't race in Formula One three years after their last race, their number can be re-issued to another driver who wants that number.
** As mentioned above, in [=MotoGP=], riders are issued with numbers that they are going to keep for their entire career. Changes usually happened under several circumstances; such as the number they used is already taken by someone else when they joined a new class, sponsorship obligations (such as Pons Racing's #40 bike), the number was retired by the organizers[[note]]So far, three numbers have been retired from all classes: Kevin Schwantz's #34, Daijiro Kato's #74, and Marco Simoncelli's #58. Several other numbers (Loris Capirossi's #65, Shoya Tomizawa's #48, and Luis Salom's #39) have also been retired, but for specific classes only (Capirossi's number is retired in [=MotoGP=], while Tomizawa and Salom's were retired in [=Moto2=])[[/note]], or optionally, if the rider becomes the world champion and stayed in the class they won it.
*** After rider numbers became standardized[[note]]In almost all racing categories in the past (NASCAR is a notable exception, due to their team-based numbering system), riders/drivers used to have their number based on what the organizer gave to them before the race. This means they almost always have a different number ''in every single race they participate''[[/note]] and before the advent of the [=MotoGP=] class to replace the [=500cc=] class, the rules stated that if you finished in the top 5 the previous season, you have the option to use rider numbers indicating that you finished in whatever position you did finish the previous year (i.e. champion gets #1, runner up gets #2, and so on). While it is OK to not follow this rule[[note]]For example, Kevin Schwantz kept the #34 for his entire career, only changing to #1 in 1994 after when he won the title in 1993[[/note]], all but one champion[[note]]Barry Sheene, who kept his #7 after winning his two titles in 1976 and 1977[[/note]] changed his number to #1 after he won the title. This all changed when Valentino Rossi gets promoted to the-then [=500cc=] in 2000. After Rossi finished second in the 2000 season, he decided to kept his iconic #46 the following season. Then Rossi won the title in 2001 and kept the #46 in the following season despite his champion status. As a result, virtually ''everyone'' decided to [[FollowTheLeader follow his lead]] and kept the same number they use for their entire career. This results in the near-abolition of the rule, now with only the champions given the option to change their number to #1[[note]]Post-Rossi's 2001 title, only in ''three'' occasions where non-champions changed their numbers in the following season: Colin Edwards in 2005 (after finishing fifth in 2004; unlike Pedrosa, he would stick to #5 for the rest of his career), Dani Pedrosa in 2008 (after finishing second in 2007), and Pedrosa again in 2009 (after finishing third in 2008)[[/note]] in the following season.
This list shows the last 10 events of 781. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.YouAreNumberSix