History Main / YouAreInCommandNow

22nd Jun '16 6:43:56 AM BeerBaron
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*** Garrus himself, now that he is a high-ranking government advisor. After seeing turian ''generals'' saluting Garrus on the battlefield, [[PlayerCharacter Sheppard]] can ask Garrus about how close he is in the chain of command to being named turian Primarch. Garrus' obvious discomfort with the line of questioning likely means that he is far closer than he or anyone else would like to admit to being in that position.

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*** Garrus himself, now that he is a high-ranking government advisor. After seeing turian ''generals'' saluting Garrus on the battlefield, [[PlayerCharacter Sheppard]] Shepard]] can ask Garrus about how close he is in the chain of command to being named turian Primarch. Garrus' obvious discomfort with the line of questioning likely means that he is far closer than he or anyone else would like to admit to being in that position.
21st Jun '16 11:29:43 AM BeerBaron
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* Happens repeatedly with several of the longer sidequests in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''. In the Winterhold College, you go from greenhorn student to arch-mage after [[spoiler:the previous arch-mage is killed by his deceitful advisor, you singlehandedly ends a world threat, and the Psijic Monks back you]]. Among the Companions, you start as a fresh Shieldbrother/sister and end as Harbinger after [[spoiler:avenging the previous Harbinger's death (which you indirectly caused), reforging their prize artifact, and ending a curse]]. The Thief Guild sees you join as a simple cutpurse and end as Guildmaster by [[spoiler:killing the previous Guildmaster after revealing his treachery, joining the Nightingales, returning an incredible Daedric artifact, and restoring the guild to its full glory]]. And you join the Dark Brotherhood by inadvertently stealing one of their hits and end up leading them after [[spoiler:legitimately assassinating the previous Matron, proving that you are the Listener, performing the greatest and most elaborate assassination of the era, and bringing the Brotherhood back to its glory days]]. Unsurprisingly almost all of these involve the deaths of the original leaders of the groups.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** Assuming that an intelligence service (with an openly active branch serving as elite bodyguards) can count as 'the military', and that there is an allowance for the one telling you that you are in command now to note that it doesn't actually mean much, ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features this in the course of the main quest -- your superior in the Blades, Caius Cosades, promotes you to Operative (a mid-range rank, although the confirmation of that is only found if one looks in the editor) and then explains that he is being withdrawn to Cyrodiil for consultations and to investigate reports of his cover (a drug-addict) being more true than it should be, leaving you the highest ranking Blades agent on Vvardenfell (to Caius' knowledge, but as the Grand Spymaster for Vvardenfell he ought to know) for the time being and thus technically in charge. Of course, since the other Blades agents mostly do their own things and any orders from Cyrodiil to the contrary are liable to come with an actual superior, Caius basically tells you to ignore the big picture and just keep doing what you're already doing.
**
Happens repeatedly with several of the longer sidequests in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''. In the Winterhold College, you go from greenhorn student to arch-mage after [[spoiler:the previous arch-mage is killed by his deceitful advisor, you singlehandedly ends a world threat, and the Psijic Monks back you]]. Among the Companions, you start as a fresh Shieldbrother/sister and end as Harbinger after [[spoiler:avenging the previous Harbinger's death (which you indirectly caused), reforging their prize artifact, and ending a curse]]. The Thief Guild sees you join as a simple cutpurse and end as Guildmaster by [[spoiler:killing the previous Guildmaster after revealing his treachery, joining the Nightingales, returning an incredible Daedric artifact, and restoring the guild to its full glory]]. And you join the Dark Brotherhood by inadvertently stealing one of their hits and end up leading them after [[spoiler:legitimately assassinating the previous Matron, proving that you are the Listener, performing the greatest and most elaborate assassination of the era, and bringing the Brotherhood back to its glory days]]. Unsurprisingly almost all of these involve the deaths of the original leaders of the groups.



* Assuming that an intelligence service (with an openly active branch serving as elite bodyguards) can count as 'the military', and that there is an allowance for the one telling you that you are in command now to note that it doesn't actually mean much, ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features this in the course of the main quest -- your superior in the Blades, Caius Cosades, promotes you to Operative (a mid-range rank, although the confirmation of that is only found if one looks in the editor) and then explains that he is being withdrawn to Cyrodiil for consultations and to investigate reports of his cover (a drug-addict) being more true than it should be, leaving you the highest ranking Blades agent on Vvardenfell (to Caius' knowledge, but as the Grand Spymaster for Vvardenfell he ought to know) for the time being and thus technically in charge. Of course, since the other Blades agents mostly do their own things and any orders from Cyrodiil to the contrary are liable to come with an actual superior, Caius basically tells you to ignore the big picture and just keep doing what you're already doing.
21st Jun '16 11:23:43 AM BeerBaron
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*** Garrus himself, now that he is a high-ranking government advisor. After seeing turian ''generals'' saluting Garrus on the battlefield, [[PlayerCharacter Sheppard]] can ask Garrus about how close he is in the chain of command to being named turian Primarch. Garrus' obvious discomfort with the line of questioning likely means that he is far closer than he or anyone else would like to admit to being in that position.
19th Jun '16 2:57:10 PM nombretomado
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** Toyed with repeatedly in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' (the {{Trope Namer|s}}): Darth Vader, as Supreme Commander, holds no formal rank in the Imperial system save as an agent of the Emperor himself (meaning that any order he gives is treated as no different from an order by the Emperor), allowing him to hand out nice little impromptu promotions by [[YouHaveFailedMe Force-choking the incompetent officers]]. In one scene, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7O1Qd_FNgfM he chokes Admiral Ozzel for screwing up,]] and immediately addresses Ozzel's XO Captain Piett as ''Admiral'' Piett, putting him in command right then and there (before Ozzel's body has even hit the floor). Piett's first order of business is then removing Ozzel's body. In the ''StarWars'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]], the novel ''[[TheThrawnTrilogy Heir To The Empire]]'' reveals that while it was risky, serving aboard Vader's flagship, the ''Executor'', was also seen as the fast track to promotion for the sufficiently quick-thinking and competent--and that Vader's tactics ''worked'', weeding out the officers who couldn't keep up, so that only the very good or the very lucky were left. This meant, though, that when ''Executor'' was destroyed at Endor, the Empire lost more than just a powerful warship...

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** Toyed with repeatedly in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' (the {{Trope Namer|s}}): Darth Vader, as Supreme Commander, holds no formal rank in the Imperial system save as an agent of the Emperor himself (meaning that any order he gives is treated as no different from an order by the Emperor), allowing him to hand out nice little impromptu promotions by [[YouHaveFailedMe Force-choking the incompetent officers]]. In one scene, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7O1Qd_FNgfM he chokes Admiral Ozzel for screwing up,]] and immediately addresses Ozzel's XO Captain Piett as ''Admiral'' Piett, putting him in command right then and there (before Ozzel's body has even hit the floor). Piett's first order of business is then removing Ozzel's body. In the ''StarWars'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]], the novel ''[[TheThrawnTrilogy Heir To The Empire]]'' ''Literature/HeirToTheEmpire'' reveals that while it was risky, serving aboard Vader's flagship, the ''Executor'', was also seen as the fast track to promotion for the sufficiently quick-thinking and competent--and that Vader's tactics ''worked'', weeding out the officers who couldn't keep up, so that only the very good or the very lucky were left. This meant, though, that when ''Executor'' was destroyed at Endor, the Empire lost more than just a powerful warship...
15th Jun '16 3:39:01 PM margdean56
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In RealLife, if there are a number of survivors of the same rank, the most senior of them holds command (unless otherwise designated, ie, the XO is always second-in-command and the OPS officer is always third, regardless of rank, and doctors, lawyers and clergy cannot be placed in command over combat units even if they are the only officers present -- in which case the most senior NCO would assume command, or the most senior ''private''). In fiction, the situation is often adequately chaotic that the one that actually gives orders may find himself pressed into command and {{leader}}ship. (In ''really'' chaotic situations, it may dawn on him that he is giving orders to superiors -- at which point, the highest-ranking superior generally tells everyone to follow their plan. Contrast WithDueRespect.)

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In RealLife, if there are a number of survivors of the same rank, the most senior of them holds command (unless otherwise designated, ie, i.e., the XO is always second-in-command and the OPS officer is always third, regardless of rank, and doctors, lawyers and clergy cannot be placed in command over combat units even if they are the only officers present -- in which case the most senior NCO would assume command, or the most senior ''private''). In fiction, the situation is often adequately chaotic that the one that actually gives orders may find himself pressed into command and {{leader}}ship. (In ''really'' chaotic situations, it may dawn on him that he is giving orders to superiors -- at which point, the highest-ranking superior generally tells everyone to follow their plan. Contrast WithDueRespect.)



Note that if the character does not command, it falls under FieldPromotion, since it is handled out by the commander, even if he would not normally be the commander.

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Note that if the character does not command, it falls under FieldPromotion, since it is handled handed out by the commander, even if he would not normally be the commander.
9th Jun '16 5:22:57 PM nombretomado
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* Played for laughs in an early episode of ''{{Roseanne}}'' when Becky is allowed to babysit Darlene and DJ for the evening. Darlene says that if Becky has a heart attack, she's in charge. Then DJ says that if Darlene also has a heart attack, he's in charge.

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* Played for laughs in an early episode of ''{{Roseanne}}'' ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' when Becky is allowed to babysit Darlene and DJ for the evening. Darlene says that if Becky has a heart attack, she's in charge. Then DJ says that if Darlene also has a heart attack, he's in charge.
2nd May '16 5:03:26 PM Discar
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* ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'' (second book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): Highprince Valam ends up as king of Jah Keved due simply to being the last highprince standing after a succession war--and when he discovers this, he's got a nasty gut wound that will kill him painfully over a few weeks. He realizes that [[spoiler:King Taravingian of the minor city-state of Kharbranth]] is the one who engineered the war in the first place, and that he plans to inherit the kingdom after Valam's death. Valam, rather than waiting for people to "conveniently" discover [[spoiler:Taravingian]]'s claim to inheritance through a distant cousin, has [[spoiler:Taravingian]] named as his heir right then and there, then has his bastard son MercyKill him.

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* ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'' (second book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): Highprince Valam ends up as king of Jah Keved due simply to being the last highprince standing after a succession war--and when he discovers this, he's got a nasty gut wound that will kill him painfully over a few weeks. He realizes that [[spoiler:King Taravingian Taravangian of the minor city-state of Kharbranth]] is the one who engineered the war in the first place, and that he plans to inherit the kingdom after Valam's death. Valam, rather than waiting for people to "conveniently" discover [[spoiler:Taravingian]]'s [[spoiler:Taravangian]]'s claim to inheritance through a distant cousin, has [[spoiler:Taravingian]] [[spoiler:Taravangian]] named as his heir right then and there, then has his bastard son MercyKill him.
29th Apr '16 3:23:29 AM Adept
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* The ''MagicSchoolBus'' episode "Out of This World" had Dorothy Ann take command of the [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries USS Enterprise-]]ShoutOut bus and both rescue Ms. Frizzle and Carlos from an asteroid and prevent said asteroid from hitting Earth.

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* The ''MagicSchoolBus'' ''Literature/MagicSchoolBus'' episode "Out of This World" had Dorothy Ann take command of the [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries USS Enterprise-]]ShoutOut bus and both rescue Ms. Frizzle and Carlos from an asteroid and prevent said asteroid from hitting Earth.
2nd Apr '16 9:58:20 AM PatBerry
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*** While the episode itself does not feature it, ''Tapestry'' reveals that this is how Picard got his first command -- he was serving as a bridge officer on the ''Stargazer'' when the captain was killed and the first officer was injured, leading to Picard taking command and salvaging the situation. In the aftermath, Starfleet Command was impressed enough with Picard's actions that they promoted him directly to captain and made him the new commanding officer of the ''Stargazer''.

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*** While the episode itself does not feature it, ''Tapestry'' "Tapestry" reveals that this is how Picard got his first command -- he command. He was serving as a bridge officer on the ''Stargazer'' when the captain was killed and the first officer was injured, leading to injured. Picard taking took command and salvaging salvaged the situation. In the aftermath, Starfleet Command was impressed enough with Picard's actions that they promoted him directly to captain and made gave him the new commanding officer command of the ''Stargazer''.
2nd Apr '16 9:55:34 AM PatBerry
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* A frequent occurrence on ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The very premise of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' is that the original Starfleet crew is blended with the absorbed Maquis, and three members of the main cast receive their positions following the catastrophe that created that situation; the EMH arguably gets promoted to the status of ''sentient being'' as the result of this trope. This also occurs in several individual episodes:
*** The episode "Displaced" has the crew being abducted one by one, thus forcing everyone else to pick up the slack. Suddenly a VERY young ensign is the Chief of Security. In a bit of gallows humor Chakotay jokes, "Who said there was no room for advancement on this ship?"
*** The Doctor commanding ''Voyager'' all by himself in "Workforce" when the crew has to evacuate, although this was actually the point of him being upgraded to the Emergency ''Command'' Hologram that temporarily replaces his medical database with a tactical one. This is how he is able to pull off a tricky ShootTheBullet maneuver that disables two enemy ships.
*** And "One", where the Doctor and Seven of Nine are the only crew members not in stasis.
*** "Course: Oblivion" has the crew being afflicted by a strange disease one by one, which causes this trope when the higher-ups get affected. [[spoiler: They were a duplicate crew from a previous episode. Then they blow up.]]
** At least six ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episodes:
*** "Disaster" puts Troi in command, as the most senior officer left on the bridge during the eponymous disaster (despite the fact that she has no command training, which gets addressed in a later episode). This is one of the areas where Starfleet breaks from current-day practices. Troi would most likely have been a commissioned officer and would not have taken command. Ensign Ro would have, especially since she was a command division (line) officer.
*** "Descent" leaves Dr. Crusher in command of a skeleton crew while everyone senior to her had off-ship duties. Unlike Troi, however, Crusher had taken and passed the Bridge Officers' Test, and actually enjoys command, as she would later get command of the medical ship USS ''Pasteur'' (in an AlternateTimeline).

to:

* A frequent occurrence on ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
in the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise.
** The very premise of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' is ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'':
*** "Catspaw": A landing party
that includes Scott and Sulu is taken prisoner. Kirk assigns himself and Spock to the rescue party, which ''also'' gets captured. This leaves Assistant Chief Engineer Lt. [=DeSalle=], an obscure character that most viewers have never heard of, in command of the ''Enterprise''. ([=DeSalle=] appeared in a grand total of 3 episodes.) Robert Bloch's original Starfleet crew is blended with the absorbed Maquis, and three members of the main cast receive their positions following the catastrophe that created that situation; the EMH arguably gets promoted to the status of ''sentient being'' as the result of this trope. This also occurs in several individual episodes:
*** The episode "Displaced" has the crew being abducted one by one, thus forcing
script had everyone else senior to pick up Uhura off the slack. Suddenly ship, and left her in command, but ExecutiveMeddling wouldn't allow for a VERY young ensign is black woman being put in command of the Chief of Security. In a bit of gallows humor Chakotay jokes, "Who said there was no room for advancement on ''Enterprise''.
*** "Amok Time": After blood-fever affected Spock apparently kills the captain, Dr. [=McCoy=] invokes
this ship?"
trope.
-->'''[=McCoy=]''': As strange as it may seem, Mister Spock, you're in command now. Any orders?
-->'''Spock''': Yes. I'll follow you up in a few minutes. You will instruct Mister Chekov to plot a course for the nearest Starbase where I must surrender myself to the authorities.
*** The Doctor commanding ''Voyager'' all by himself in "Workforce" when the crew "The Menagerie": When Spock finds out that Kirk's shuttle has to evacuate, although this was actually passed the point of him being upgraded return, he places Lt. Hanson in operational command, but he surrenders to Dr. [=McCoy=], who is the Emergency ''Command'' Hologram that temporarily replaces his medical database with a tactical one. This is how he is able to pull off a tricky ShootTheBullet maneuver that disables two enemy ships.
*** And "One", where the Doctor and Seven of Nine are the only crew members not in stasis.
*** "Course: Oblivion" has the crew being afflicted by a strange disease one by one, which causes this trope
senior officer present. Later, when the higher-ups get affected. [[spoiler: They were a duplicate crew from a previous episode. Then they blow up.]]
Capt. Kirk comes onboard, Hanson formally gives him command back.
** At least six ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episodes:
''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
*** "Disaster" puts Troi in command, as the most senior officer left on the bridge during the eponymous disaster (despite the fact that she has no command training, which gets addressed in a later episode). This is one of the areas where Starfleet breaks from current-day practices. Troi would most likely have been a commissioned officer and would not have taken command. Ensign Ro would have, especially since she was a command division (line) officer.
*** "Descent" leaves Dr. Crusher in command of a skeleton crew while everyone senior to her had has off-ship duties. Unlike Troi, however, Crusher had has taken and passed the Bridge Officers' Test, and actually enjoys command, as command. (In an AlternateTimeline, she would later get command of the eventually gets her own command--the medical ship USS ''Pasteur'' (in an AlternateTimeline).''Pasteur''.)



*** "Remember Me" has Dr. Crusher quickly ascend the ranks as everyone else on the ship ceased to have ever existed in the local universe.

to:

*** "Remember Me" has Dr. Crusher quickly ascend the ranks as everyone else on the ship ceased ceases to have ever existed in the local universe.



** ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'':

to:

** ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'':''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':



** In the ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Catspaw", a landing party that includes Scott and Sulu is taken prisoner. Kirk assigns himself and Spock to the rescue party, which ''also'' gets captured. This leaves Assistant Chief Engineer Lt. [=DeSalle=], an obscure character that most viewers have never heard of, in command of the ''Enterprise''. ([=DeSalle=] appeared in a grand total of 3 episodes.) Robert Bloch's original script had everyone senior to Uhura off the ship, and left her in command, but ExecutiveMeddling wouldn't allow for a black woman being put in command of the ''Enterprise''.
** Exact words spoken by Dr. [=McCoy=] in the ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Amok Time". Blood-fever affected Spock apparently kills the captain. After coming to his senses, Spock finds himself in command.
-->'''[=McCoy=]''': As strange as it may seem, Mister Spock, you're in command now. Any orders?
-->'''Spock''': Yes. I'll follow you up in a few minutes. You will instruct Mister Chekov to plot a course for the nearest Starbase where I must surrender myself to the authorities.
** In "The Menagerie," when Spock finds out that Kirk's shuttle has passed the point of return, he places Lt. Hanson in operational command, but he surrenders to Dr. [=McCoy=], who is the senior officer present. Later, when Capt. Kirk comes onboard, Hanson formally gives him command back.

to:

** In the ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Catspaw", a landing party that includes Scott and Sulu is taken prisoner. Kirk assigns himself and Spock to the rescue party, which ''also'' gets captured. This leaves Assistant Chief Engineer Lt. [=DeSalle=], an obscure character that most viewers have never heard of, in command ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
*** The premise
of the ''Enterprise''. ([=DeSalle=] appeared in a grand total of 3 episodes.) Robert Bloch's series is that the original script had Starfleet crew is blended with the absorbed Maquis, and three members of the main cast receive their positions following the catastrophe that created that situation. The EMH gets promoted to the status of ''sentient being'' as the result of this trope.
*** "Displaced": The crew is abducted one by one, forcing
everyone senior else to Uhura off pick up the ship, and left her in command, but ExecutiveMeddling wouldn't allow slack. Suddenly a ''very''young ensign is Chief of Security. In a bit of gallows humor, Chakotay jokes, "Who said there was no room for a black woman being put in command of the ''Enterprise''.
** Exact words spoken
advancement on this ship?"
*** "Workforce": The Doctor commands ''Voyager'' all
by Dr. [=McCoy=] in the ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Amok Time". Blood-fever affected Spock apparently kills the captain. After coming to his senses, Spock finds himself in command.
-->'''[=McCoy=]''': As strange as it may seem, Mister Spock, you're in command now. Any orders?
-->'''Spock''': Yes. I'll follow you up in a few minutes. You will instruct Mister Chekov to plot a course for the nearest Starbase where I must surrender myself to the authorities.
** In "The Menagerie,"
when Spock finds out that Kirk's shuttle the crew has passed to evacuate. This is the point of return, he places Lt. Hanson in operational command, but he surrenders upgrading him to Dr. [=McCoy=], who is the senior officer present. Later, Emergency ''Command'' Hologram, temporarily replacing his medical database with a tactical one. With the aid of this new subroutine, he is able to pull off a tricky ShootTheBullet maneuver that disables two enemy ships.
*** "One": The Doctor and Seven of Nine are the only crew members not in stasis.
*** "Course: Oblivion": The crew is afflicted by a strange disease one by one, which causes this trope
when Capt. Kirk comes onboard, Hanson formally gives him command back.the higher-ups get affected. [[spoiler: They are a duplicate crew from a previous episode. Then they blow up.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.YouAreInCommandNow