History Main / YouAlreadyChangedThePast

17th Jun '17 2:14:17 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Film/DejaVu'', the first few attempts at actually changing the past just end up causing things the characters and audience have already seen happen. [[spoiler: Eventually, for the sake of having a happy ending, they do manage to make a change that works.]] This could be a case of [[spoiler:[[SubvertedTrope subversion]], as it was mentioned in passing during the course of the movie that a big enough change could change the future (i.e., not having the ferry blow up). As the OtherWiki has a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Deja_Vu_Timeline.png diagram showing at least four runs]] of the timeline are needed to explain how the events of the movie are possible, perhaps several trips of smaller changes adds up to one big enough change.]]

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* In ''Film/DejaVu'', the first few attempts at actually changing the past just end up causing things the characters and audience have already seen happen. [[spoiler: Eventually, for the sake of having a happy ending, they do manage to make a change that works.]] This could be a case of [[spoiler:[[SubvertedTrope subversion]], as it was mentioned in passing during the course of the movie that a big enough change could change the future (i.e., not having the ferry blow up). As the OtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Deja_Vu_Timeline.png diagram showing at least four runs]] of the timeline are needed to explain how the events of the movie are possible, perhaps several trips of smaller changes adds up to one big enough change.]]
22nd May '17 9:27:11 PM PaulA
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's short story "The Red Queen's Race" has a character who tries to ''make'' this trope happen. [[spoiler:He was asked to translate several modern books on physics into ancient Greek, with the work being beamed back into humanity's past. History fails to change because the translator was very careful to leave out most of the advanced material.]]
** Specifically, [[spoiler: the translator only includes information which would account for discoveries and advances already present in our own time line.]]
** Inverted in ''The End Of Eternity''. Despite changing history themselves all the time, the Eternals are certain that the existence of their organization is guaranteed by this trope--how can they eliminate their own existence? The exception, an Eternal who is certain that time loops are intrinsically unstable, turns out to be correct, and Eternity eliminates itself.

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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's works:
** The
short story "The Red Queen's Race" has a character who tries to ''make'' this trope happen. [[spoiler:He was asked to translate several modern books on physics into ancient Greek, with the work being beamed back into humanity's past. History fails to change because the translator was very careful to leave out most of the advanced material.material, only including information which would account for discoveries and advances already present in our own time line.]]
** Specifically, [[spoiler: the translator only includes information which would account for discoveries and advances already present in our own time line.]]
** Inverted in ''The End Of Eternity''.''Literature/TheEndOfEternity''. Despite changing history themselves all the time, the Eternals are certain that the existence of their organization is guaranteed by this trope--how can they eliminate their own existence? The exception, an Eternal who is certain that time loops are intrinsically unstable, turns out to be correct, and Eternity eliminates itself.
21st May '17 9:30:33 AM nombretomado
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[[folder:Theater]]
* At the end of ''Theatre/AVeryPotterSequel'' Hermione asks future!Draco what was really supposed to happen during their first year and Draco says that this was how it all played out originally, it just makes sense now that he lived through it.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Web Original]]
* At the end of ''AVeryPotterSequel'' Hermione asks future!Draco what was really supposed to happen during their first year and Draco says that this was how it all played out originally, it just makes sense now that he lived through it.
[[/folder]]
16th Mar '17 7:12:17 PM AthenaBlue
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* The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Assignment Earth" ends with the reveal that the Enterprise's historical records show that a malfunctioning nuclear platform exploded just as it did in the episode, indicating that Gary Seven's mission (complete with Kirk and Spock's interference therewith) was part of their existing timeline.



* The first TimeTravel episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' ("1969") can be perceived as following this logic, but none of the subsequent TimeTravel episodes in the Franchise/StargateVerse can -- they all involve alternate timelines instead.
** Though it seems SG-1 held to the "Alternate timelines/universes" first. The 20th episode of Season 1 had the "Quantum Mirror" which put Daniel Jackson in an alternate timeline/universe. "1969" was the 21st episode of Season 2.
** ''Film/StargateContinuum'' shows the present universe being [[DelayedRippleEffect erased]] by Baal's actions in the past. As a part of the SG-1 team consciously try to outrun the phenomenon, the stargate wormhole somehow shields them from it. So, while there are alternate realities in the Franchise/StargateVerse, those may be unrelated to time travel. Either that, or the writers [[TimeyWimeyBall just can't decide]].
* In the ''Series/MurderMostHorrid'' episode "A Determined Woman", a female scientist working on a time machine becomes so frustrated with her idiot husband's antics that she kills him. Several years later she is released from prison, finishes her time machine and goes back to try and save her husband, only to find that his confusion between the two versions of her is what caused his erratic behavior in the first place.
* After the film ''Film/{{Hobgoblins}}'' was shown on ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', Tom Servo tried to go back in time to stop the movie from being made by hunting down the director and... kicking him in the shin. Upon Tom's return to his present, Crow pulls up an article where the director claimed that his inspiration for ''Hobgoblins'' was that time when a squat red robot ran up to him out of the blue and kicked him in the shin...
* In the ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' two part adventure "Armageddon Now", Callisto goes back in time to prevent who she thinks was [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]] (because her army was in the village) from killing her parents. While trying to protect her family from Xena's army, the adult Callisto accidentally kills her own father and is forced to kill her mother after realizing that she can't change anything. She then tries to burn her younger self alive, either wishing to break the loop or remembering herself being rescued from a fire.
* This is actually done multiple times in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' universe [[TimeyWimeyBall (as are most time travel theories)]]:
** In the series 4 episode [[spoiler:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E2TheFiresOfPompeii "The Fires of Pompeii"]]]], The Doctor doesn't want to avert [[spoiler:the destruction of Pompeii]], is convinced to avert it anyway, and then is forced to cause the disaster in order to avert a larger catastrophe.

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* The first TimeTravel only time-travel arc on ''Series/BabylonFive'' involves this trope, and it is absolutely central to both the MythArc and the background mythology of the show. [[spoiler:Babylon 4 appears in Babylon 5 space four years after it disappears (the episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' ("1969") can be perceived as following this logic, but none of the subsequent TimeTravel episodes "Babylon Squared." The events leading up to that appearance are explained in the Franchise/StargateVerse can -- they all involve alternate timelines instead.
** Though it seems SG-1 held
two-parter "War Without End," in which we find out that Babylon 4 was taken to the "Alternate timelines/universes" first. The 20th episode of Season 1 had year 1260 AD (or so) to help the "Quantum Mirror" which put Daniel Jackson in an alternate timeline/universe. "1969" was Minbari and their allies gather to fight the 21st episode of Season 2.
** ''Film/StargateContinuum'' shows the present universe being [[DelayedRippleEffect erased]] by Baal's actions in the past. As a part of the SG-1 team consciously try to outrun the phenomenon, the stargate wormhole somehow shields them
Shadows. To prevent this from it. So, while there are alternate realities in happening, the Franchise/StargateVerse, those may be unrelated Shadows sent a big bomb to time travel. Either that, or the writers [[TimeyWimeyBall Babylon 4 just can't decide]].
* In
as it was about to come on line in 2254. However, the ''Series/MurderMostHorrid'' episode "A Determined Woman", a female scientist working on a time machine becomes so frustrated with her idiot husband's antics that she kills him. Several years later she is released from prison, finishes her time machine and White Star also goes back to try and save her husband, only to find that his confusion between the two versions of her is what caused his erratic behavior in the first place.
* After the film ''Film/{{Hobgoblins}}'' was shown on ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', Tom Servo tried to go
back in time to stop (because Delenn, Sinclair, Sheridan, and Ivanova see it in a recording), destroys the movie bomb, and (as it turns out) takes it back in time as well. However, this is not before the time device (sent by Draal and transported by Zathras) malfunctions, dropping Babylon 4 into 2258, leading to the events of "Babylon Squared." Sinclair then realizes (having received a message from being made by hunting down Valen before the director and... kicking him journey) that he must take Babylon 4 back in time himself, and then uses the triluminary device to turn himself into a Minbari--specifically, Valen, who led them in the shin. Upon Tom's return to his present, Crow pulls up an article where First Shadow War, organized their society, and effectively became the director claimed main prophet of their religion.]] The StableTimeLoop is fully completed, so to speak, by the fact that [[spoiler:when Valen dies, he eventually gets reincarnated as Sinclair.]]
** [[spoiler: Valen/Sinclair doesn't need to be ''re''incarnated. From
his inspiration for ''Hobgoblins'' was that time when point of view, he is born in the 23rd century as a squat red robot ran up to him out human, goes through the War and subsequent events of the blue series up to "War Without End" and kicked him in the shin...
* In the ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' two part adventure "Armageddon Now", Callisto
then goes back in time to prevent who she thinks was [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]] (because her army was the 13th century as a Minbari and lives out his life as Valen. The Minbari ''think'' he is Valen reincarnated when they encounter him at the Battle of the Line because he has Valen's soul; not knowing about the time travel, they don't see that Sinclair will ''become'' Valen in the village) from killing her parents. While trying future before travelling back to protect her family from Xena's army, the adult Callisto accidentally kills her own father and is forced past.]]
** Additionally, during the Battle of the Line, Delenn wants
to kill her mother after realizing bring in a human prisoner to study, so she picks a Starfury about to ram their warcruiser, which happens to be piloted by Sinclair. [[spoiler:She later finds out that she can't change anything. She then tries to burn her younger she's a direct descendant of Valen, who is Sinclair's future self alive, either wishing to break (in the loop or remembering herself being rescued from past). Thus, Delenn inadvertently saves her great-great-great-something-grandfather, which would eventually allow her to be born]].
** There ''are'' some odd things involving [[spoiler:''Babylon 4'']], namely Sinclair getting visions of
a fire.
* This
BadFuture, in which his friends are killed and the ''Babylon 5'' station is destroyed during a battle. That future never comes to pass, although it's possible he simply misinterpreted the vision ([[spoiler:his friends don't actually done multiple times die, and the station ''is'' destroyed in the future, but it's actually decommissioned and scuttled]]).
*
''Series/DoctorWho'' universe has, unsurprisingly, used this one multiple times [[TimeyWimeyBall (as are with most time travel theories)]]:
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E1DayOfTheDaleks "Day of the series 4 episode [[spoiler:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E2TheFiresOfPompeii "The Fires of Pompeii"]]]], The Daleks"]]: freedom fighters from a Dalek-dominated DarkFuture come back to the UNIT era to kill the diplomat they believe incited a nuclear war, but it turns out that ''they'' were responsible for the terrorist bomb that started the conflict. Fortunately, the Doctor doesn't want is able to avert [[spoiler:the destruction of Pompeii]], is convinced to avert it anyway, talk down the bomb-carrier and then is forced to cause the disaster in order to avert a larger catastrophe.break them out of their StableTimeLoop.



** [[spoiler:The rift in space time]] that already exists in [[spoiler:Cardiff]] is created by the Doctor's actions in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead "The Unquiet Dead"]].
** The [[spoiler: TARDIS explosion]] at the end of Series 5 was successfully prevented (in a fairly static timeline, [[MindScrew probably]]) with the help of River Song, who wouldn't exist until a series of events that could only have happened ''after'' (?) it. Adding to the [[TimeyWimeyBall temporal weirdness]] which comes with this is the fact that she was around to see a crack in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E5FleshAndStone "Flesh and Stone"]], even though, from her perspective, the cracks ''never existed'' (or maybe they did, but she had just played a ''direct'' role in making sure they were completely erased from the universe). Every encounter with River can basically be summed up as "an inexplicably StableTimeLoop".
** Another one related to the [[spoiler:TARDIS explosion. It's revealed in [[Recap/DoctorWho2013CSTheTimeOfTheDoctor "The Time of the Doctor"]] that those responsible were a splinter group of the Silence, who had traveled back in time to kill the Doctor in order to prevent him reaching Trenzalore, where the Time Lords were preparing to return to the universe through a crack in time after having the Doctor confirm his name to them. The explosion of the TARDIS is what caused the cracks to begin with.]]
** Also used in the Classic era's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E1DayOfTheDaleks Day of the Daleks]]": freedom fighters from a Dalek-dominated DarkFuture come back to the UNIT era to kill the diplomat they believe incited a nuclear war, but it turns out that ''they'' were responsible for the terrorist bomb that started the conflict. Fortunately, the Doctor is able to talk down the bomb-carrier and break them out of their StableTimeLoop.

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** [[spoiler:The rift in space time]] that already exists in [[spoiler:Cardiff]] is created by the Doctor's actions in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E2TheFiresOfPompeii "The Unquiet Dead"]].
Fires of Pompeii"]], [[spoiler:the Doctor doesn't want to avert the destruction of Pompeii, is convinced to avert it anyway, and then is forced to cause the disaster in order to avert a larger catastrophe]].
** The [[spoiler: TARDIS explosion]] at the end of Series 5 in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens "The Pandorica Opens"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang "The Big Bang"]] was successfully prevented (in a fairly static timeline, [[MindScrew probably]]) with the help of River Song, who wouldn't exist until a series of events that could only have happened ''after'' (?) it. Adding to the [[TimeyWimeyBall temporal weirdness]] which comes with this is the fact that she was around to see a crack in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E5FleshAndStone "Flesh and Stone"]], even though, from her perspective, the cracks ''never existed'' (or maybe they did, but she had just played a ''direct'' role in making sure they were completely erased from the universe). Every encounter with River can basically be summed up as "an inexplicably StableTimeLoop".
** Another one related to the [[spoiler:TARDIS explosion. ]] It's revealed in [[Recap/DoctorWho2013CSTheTimeOfTheDoctor "The Time of the Doctor"]] that those responsible were [[spoiler:were a splinter group of the Silence, who had traveled back in time to kill the Doctor in order to prevent him reaching Trenzalore, where the Time Lords were preparing to return to the universe through a crack in time after having the Doctor confirm his name to them. The explosion of the TARDIS is what caused the cracks to begin with.]]
** Also used in the Classic era's "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E1DayOfTheDaleks Day of the Daleks]]": freedom fighters from a Dalek-dominated DarkFuture come back to the UNIT era to kill the diplomat they believe incited a nuclear war, but it turns out that ''they'' were responsible for the terrorist bomb that started the conflict. Fortunately, the Doctor is able to talk down the bomb-carrier and break them out of their StableTimeLoop.
]]



* The only time-travel arc on ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'' involves this trope, and it is absolutely central to both the MythArc and the background mythology of the show. [[spoiler:Babylon 4 appears in Babylon 5 space four years after it disappears (the episode "Babylon Squared." The events leading up to that appearance are explained in the two-parter "War Without End," in which we find out that Babylon 4 was taken to the year 1260 AD (or so) to help the Minbari and their allies gather to fight the Shadows. To prevent this from happening, the Shadows sent a big bomb to Babylon 4 just as it was about to come on line in 2254. However, the White Star also goes back in time (because Delenn, Sinclair, Sheridan, and Ivanova see it in a recording), destroys the bomb, and (as it turns out) takes it back in time as well. However, this is not before the time device (sent by Draal and transported by Zathras) malfunctions, dropping Babylon 4 into 2258, leading to the events of "Babylon Squared." Sinclair then realizes (having received a message from Valen before the journey) that he must take Babylon 4 back in time himself, and then uses the triluminary device to turn himself into a Minbari--specifically, Valen, who led them in the First Shadow War, organized their society, and effectively became the main prophet of their religion.]] The StableTimeLoop is fully completed, so to speak, by the fact that [[spoiler:when Valen dies, he eventually gets reincarnated as Sinclair.]]
** [[spoiler: Valen/Sinclair doesn't need to be ''re''incarnated. From his point of view, he is born in the 23rd century as a human, goes through the War and subsequent events of the series up to "War Without End" and then goes back in time to the 13th century as a Minbari and lives out his life as Valen. The Minbari ''think'' he is Valen reincarnated when they encounter him at the Battle of the Line because he has Valen's soul; not knowing about the time travel, they don't see that Sinclair will ''become'' Valen in the future before travelling back to the past.]]
** Additionally, during the Battle of the Line, Delenn wants to bring in a human prisoner to study, so she picks a Starfury about to ram their warcruiser, which happens to be piloted by Sinclair. [[spoiler:She later finds out that she's a direct descendant of Valen, who is Sinclair's future self (in the past). Thus, Delenn inadvertently saves her great-great-great-something-grandfather, which would eventually allow her to be born]].
** There ''are'' some odd things involving [[spoiler:''Babylon 4'']], namely Sinclair getting visions of a BadFuture, in which his friends are killed and the ''Babylon 5'' station is destroyed during a battle. That future never comes to pass, although it's possible he simply misinterpreted the vision ([[spoiler:his friends don't actually die, and the station ''is'' destroyed in the future, but it's actually decommissioned and scuttled]]).
* This concept became a major plot point in the fifth season of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' (which Hurley couldn't quite grasp) though it was put to the test in the cliffhanger finale...

to:

* The only time-travel arc on ''[[Series/BabylonFive Babylon 5]]'' involves this trope, and it is absolutely central to both In the MythArc and the background mythology of the show. [[spoiler:Babylon 4 appears in Babylon 5 space four years after it disappears (the ''Series/{{Haven}}'' episode "Babylon Squared." The events leading up to that appearance are explained in the two-parter "War Without End," in which we find out that Babylon 4 was taken to the year 1260 AD (or so) to help the Minbari and their allies gather to fight the Shadows. To prevent this from happening, the Shadows "Sarah", Duke is sent a big bomb to Babylon 4 just as it was about to come on line in 2254. However, the White Star also goes back in time (because Delenn, Sinclair, Sheridan, and Ivanova see it in a recording), destroys the bomb, and (as it turns out) takes it back in time as well. However, this is not before the time device (sent by Draal and transported by Zathras) malfunctions, dropping Babylon 4 into 2258, leading to the events of "Babylon Squared." Sinclair then realizes (having received a message from Valen before point when his grandfather Roy was killed, and decides to try and avert this. Instead he accidentally tips the journey) guy off that he must take Babylon 4 back in time himself, and then uses the triluminary device to turn himself into a Minbari--specifically, Valen, who led them in the First Shadow War, organized their society, and effectively became the main prophet of their religion.]] The StableTimeLoop is fully completed, so to speak, by the fact that [[spoiler:when Valen dies, he eventually gets reincarnated as Sinclair.]]
** [[spoiler: Valen/Sinclair doesn't need
he's about to be ''re''incarnated. From killed and by whom, sending Roy racing off to start the shootout that ends in his point of view, he is born in death.
* In
the 23rd century as a human, goes through the War and subsequent events of the series up to "War Without End" and then ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' two part adventure "Armageddon Now", Callisto goes back in time to the 13th century as a Minbari and lives out his life as Valen. The Minbari ''think'' he is Valen reincarnated when they encounter him at the Battle of the Line because he has Valen's soul; not knowing about the time travel, they don't see that Sinclair will ''become'' Valen prevent who she thinks was [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]] (because her army was in the future before travelling back village) from killing her parents. While trying to protect her family from Xena's army, the past.]]
** Additionally, during the Battle of the Line, Delenn wants
adult Callisto accidentally kills her own father and is forced to bring in a human prisoner to study, so she picks a Starfury about to ram their warcruiser, which happens to be piloted by Sinclair. [[spoiler:She later finds out kill her mother after realizing that she's a direct descendant of Valen, who is Sinclair's future she can't change anything. She then tries to burn her younger self (in alive, either wishing to break the past). Thus, Delenn inadvertently saves her great-great-great-something-grandfather, which would eventually allow her to be born]].
** There ''are'' some odd things involving [[spoiler:''Babylon 4'']], namely Sinclair getting visions of
loop or remembering herself being rescued from a BadFuture, in which his friends are killed and the ''Babylon 5'' station is destroyed during a battle. That future never comes to pass, although it's possible he simply misinterpreted the vision ([[spoiler:his friends don't actually die, and the station ''is'' destroyed in the future, but it's actually decommissioned and scuttled]]).
fire.* This concept became a major plot point in the fifth season of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' (which Hurley couldn't quite grasp) though it was put to the test in the cliffhanger finale...



* In the ''Series/MurderMostHorrid'' episode "A Determined Woman", a female scientist working on a time machine becomes so frustrated with her idiot husband's antics that she kills him. Several years later she is released from prison, finishes her time machine and goes back to try and save her husband, only to find that his confusion between the two versions of her is what caused his erratic behavior in the first place.
* After the film ''Film/{{Hobgoblins}}'' was shown on ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', Tom Servo tried to go back in time to stop the movie from being made by hunting down the director and... kicking him in the shin. Upon Tom's return to his present, Crow pulls up an article where the director claimed that his inspiration for ''Hobgoblins'' was that time when a squat red robot ran up to him out of the blue and kicked him in the shin...
* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': This is a recurring theme in the time travel episodes of the Nicholas Prentice arc.
** In the episode "Tribunal", history professor and Holocaust scholar Aaron Zgierski is taken back to Auschwitz by time-traveler Nicholas Prentice (who turns out to be Zgierski's own great-grandson). While there, they [[TimeTravelEscape rescue Aaron's "older" sister]] (who is only eight at the time) by bringing her into the future to live out her life free of Nazi oppression. History recorded Aaron's sister as dying at Auschwitz after being "dragged away" by a couple of guards, who were actually Zgierski and Prentice in disguise.
** In "Gettysburg", Prentice wants to ''change'' the past by convincing a Civil War buff (who has pro-Confederate views) of the wrongness of his convictions by taking him and his friend to just before the Battle of Gettysburg. Originally, the buff was going to assassinate a black President in his own future. Instead, the buff takes this opportunity to try to alter the course of the battle in the Confederate favor. He accidentally uses Prentice's time machine (shaped as an old-fashioned camera) to transport a Confederate general through time. His attempts at preventing the (from his viewpoint) catastrophe result in him getting shot for cowardice. Prentice takes the friend back to his time, and the latter finds an old newspaper with the picture of his dead friend. MeanwhileInTheFuture, the transported Confederate general appears at the moment of the original assassination, and he ends up being the presidential assassin (he was actually aiming for a man dressed as UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, who was standing next to the president).
** "Time To Time" subverts this when a new recruit into the temporal agency goes back in time and prevents her father's death due to eco-terrorists' bomb going off prematurely. This results in another member of the agency suddenly vanishing. His colleagues figured out that, without her father to tamper with the bomb, it went off as planned and killed a lot of innocent people, including an ancestor of the temporal agent who disappeared. Reluctantly, the girl has to let her father sacrifice himself. However, she does alter her mother's fate somewhat by giving her a coping mechanism (in her timeline, her mother's a wreck; in the altered one, she is an accomplished artist).
** Another episode (not part of the arc) involves a scientist building a time machine and traveling several days into the future, where he sees his wife bleeding out from a gunshot wound in their living room. Distraught, he goes back and does his best to prevent this from happening. Not only does he sound crazy to everyone around him (including his wife), but his time travel has also unhinged him, slowly driving him crazy for real, until he accidentally shoots his wife with the gun he got to ''save'' her from being shot. The episode then promptly subverts this by having him go back to the day he first met his wife and killing his younger self before the event, himself vanishing due to the GrandfatherParadox. Then we're shown his future wife, who appears to be depressed and preparing to commit suicide (it's implied that meeting him would have helped get through the depression).



* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': This is a recurring theme in the time travel episodes of the Nicholas Prentice arc.
** In the episode "Tribunal", history professor and Holocaust scholar Aaron Zgierski is taken back to Auschwitz by time-traveler Nicholas Prentice (who turns out to be Zgierski's own great-grandson). While there, they [[TimeTravelEscape rescue Aaron's "older" sister]] (who is only eight at the time) by bringing her into the future to live out her life free of Nazi oppression. History recorded Aaron's sister as dying at Auschwitz after being "dragged away" by a couple of guards, who were actually Zgierski and Prentice in disguise.
** In "Gettysburg", Prentice wants to ''change'' the past by convincing a Civil War buff (who has pro-Confederate views) of the wrongness of his convictions by taking him and his friend to just before the Battle of Gettysburg. Originally, the buff was going to assassinate a black President in his own future. Instead, the buff takes this opportunity to try to alter the course of the battle in the Confederate favor. He accidentally uses Prentice's time machine (shaped as an old-fashioned camera) to transport a Confederate general through time. His attempts at preventing the (from his viewpoint) catastrophe result in him getting shot for cowardice. Prentice takes the friend back to his time, and the latter finds an old newspaper with the picture of his dead friend. MeanwhileInTheFuture, the transported Confederate general appears at the moment of the original assassination, and he ends up being the presidential assassin (he was actually aiming for a man dressed as UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, who was standing next to the president).
** "Time To Time" subverts this when a new recruit into the temporal agency goes back in time and prevents her father's death due to eco-terrorists' bomb going off prematurely. This results in another member of the agency suddenly vanishing. His colleagues figured out that, without her father to tamper with the bomb, it went off as planned and killed a lot of innocent people, including an ancestor of the temporal agent who disappeared. Reluctantly, the girl has to let her father sacrifice himself. However, she does alter her mother's fate somewhat by giving her a coping mechanism (in her timeline, her mother's a wreck; in the altered one, she is an accomplished artist).
** Another episode (not part of the arc) involves a scientist building a time machine and traveling several days into the future, where he sees his wife bleeding out from a gunshot wound in their living room. Distraught, he goes back and does his best to prevent this from happening. Not only does he sound crazy to everyone around him (including his wife), but his time travel has also unhinged him, slowly driving him crazy for real, until he accidentally shoots his wife with the gun he got to ''save'' her from being shot. The episode then promptly subverts this by having him go back to the day he first met his wife and killing his younger self before the event, himself vanishing due to the GrandfatherParadox. Then we're shown his future wife, who appears to be depressed and preparing to commit suicide (it's implied that meeting him would have helped get through the depression).
* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (2000s revival) episode "Cradle of Darkness", a young woman (played by Katherine Heigl) is one of the few people capable of surviving time travel. She agrees to take a one-way trip to the past to kill Hitler as a baby (it's not clear why the future people think that the new reality will be better). She pretends to be a new maid and ingrains herself into the Hitler family, realizing that Hitler Sr. is the one who taught his son to hate the "lesser races". In the end, she grabs the baby and jumps into the river (also unexplained why she had to jump herself, possibly guilt for killing an as-yet-innocent baby, though it was mentioned in the beginning it was a one way trip so it's not like she could get back to her original timeline). The other maid, takes a homeless gypsy's baby and passes it off as young Adolf. So yeah, if this is believed, Hitler was one of the "lesser races" he hated so much.

to:

* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': This is a recurring theme in The first TimeTravel episode of ''Series/StargateSG1'' ("1969") can be perceived as following this logic, but none of the time travel subsequent TimeTravel episodes of in the Nicholas Prentice arc.
Franchise/StargateVerse can -- they all involve alternate timelines instead.
** In Though it seems SG-1 held to the "Alternate timelines/universes" first. The 20th episode "Tribunal", history professor and Holocaust scholar Aaron Zgierski is taken back to Auschwitz by time-traveler Nicholas Prentice (who turns out to be Zgierski's own great-grandson). While there, they [[TimeTravelEscape rescue Aaron's "older" sister]] (who is only eight at of Season 1 had the time) by bringing her into "Quantum Mirror" which put Daniel Jackson in an alternate timeline/universe. "1969" was the future to live out her life free 21st episode of Nazi oppression. History recorded Aaron's sister as dying at Auschwitz after Season 2.
** ''Film/StargateContinuum'' shows the present universe
being "dragged away" [[DelayedRippleEffect erased]] by a couple of guards, who were actually Zgierski and Prentice Baal's actions in disguise.
** In "Gettysburg", Prentice wants to ''change''
the past by convincing past. As a Civil War buff (who has pro-Confederate views) part of the wrongness of his convictions by taking him and his friend to just before the Battle of Gettysburg. Originally, the buff was going to assassinate a black President in his own future. Instead, the buff takes this opportunity to SG-1 team consciously try to alter outrun the course of phenomenon, the battle stargate wormhole somehow shields them from it. So, while there are alternate realities in the Confederate favor. He accidentally uses Prentice's Franchise/StargateVerse, those may be unrelated to time machine (shaped as an old-fashioned camera) to transport a Confederate general through time. His attempts at preventing travel. Either that, or the (from his viewpoint) catastrophe result in him getting shot for cowardice. Prentice takes the friend back to his time, and the latter finds an old newspaper writers [[TimeyWimeyBall just can't decide]].
* The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "Assignment Earth" ends
with the picture of his dead friend. MeanwhileInTheFuture, reveal that the transported Confederate general appears at Enterprise's historical records show that a malfunctioning nuclear platform exploded just as it did in the moment of the original assassination, episode, indicating that Gary Seven's mission (complete with Kirk and he ends up being the presidential assassin (he Spock's interference therewith) was actually aiming for a man dressed as UsefulNotes/AbrahamLincoln, who was standing next to the president).
** "Time To Time" subverts this
part of their existing timeline.
* Heartbreakingly (how else?) done in ''Series/{{Supernatural}}''
when a new recruit into the temporal agency goes Dean is sent back in time to 1973 and prevents her father's death due meets his father. He [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong decides to eco-terrorists' bomb going off prematurely. This results in another member of kill the agency suddenly vanishing. His colleagues figured out that, without her father Yellow Eyed Demon]] that killed his mother, poisoned his brother and set his family on a decades long revenge quest, before it ever comes near his family. Unfortunately, his efforts to tamper kill the YED is what attracts it to his mother [[spoiler: who is manipulated into making a [[DealWithTheDevil deal with the bomb, it went off as planned and killed a lot of innocent people, including an ancestor of the temporal agent who disappeared. Reluctantly, the girl has to let her father sacrifice himself. However, she does alter her mother's fate somewhat by giving her a coping mechanism (in her timeline, her mother's a wreck; in the altered one, she is an accomplished artist).
** Another episode (not part of the arc) involves a scientist building a time machine and traveling several days into the future, where he sees
YED]], thus dooming his wife bleeding out from a gunshot wound in their living room. Distraught, he goes back and does his best to prevent this from happening. Not only does he sound crazy to everyone around him (including his wife), but his time travel has also unhinged him, slowly driving him crazy for real, until he accidentally shoots his wife with the gun he got to ''save'' her from being shot. The episode then promptly subverts this by having him go back to the day he first met his wife and killing his younger self before the event, himself vanishing due to the GrandfatherParadox. Then we're shown his future wife, who appears to be depressed and preparing to commit suicide (it's implied that meeting him would have helped get through the depression).
* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (2000s revival) episode "Cradle of Darkness", a young woman (played by Katherine Heigl) is one of the few people capable of surviving time travel. She agrees to take a one-way trip to the past to kill Hitler as a baby (it's not clear why the future people think that the new reality will be better). She pretends to be a new maid and ingrains herself into the Hitler family, realizing that Hitler Sr. is the one who taught his son to hate the "lesser races". In the end, she grabs the baby and jumps into the river (also unexplained why she had to jump herself, possibly guilt for killing an as-yet-innocent baby, though it was mentioned in the beginning it was a one way trip so it's not like she could get back to her original timeline). The other maid, takes a homeless gypsy's baby and passes it off as young Adolf. So yeah, if this is believed, Hitler was one of the "lesser races" he hated so much.
family]].



* In the ''Series/{{Haven}}'' episode "Sarah", Duke is sent back in time to the point when his grandfather Roy was killed, and decides to try and avert this. Instead he accidentally tips the guy off that he's about to be killed and by whom, sending Roy racing off to start the shootout that ends in his death.
* Heartbreakingly (how else?) done in ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' when Dean is sent back in time to 1973 and meets his father. He [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong decides to kill the Yellow Eyed Demon]] that killed his mother, poisoned his brother and set his family on a decades long revenge quest, before it ever comes near his family. Unfortunately, his efforts to kill the YED is what attracts it to his mother [[spoiler: who is manipulated into making a [[DealWithTheDevil deal with the YED]], thus dooming his family]].
* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'' episode "[[Recap/TheTwilightZone1985S1E20AProfileInSilver Profile in Silver]]", a time travelling historian saves his ancestor UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy from being assassinated. The resulting damage to space time then creates a timeline where WorldWarIII and the extinction of humanity is inevitable. Kennedy volunteers to go back to set things right but the historian instead sends Kennedy to the future and takes Kennedy's place in the motorcade, being assassinated in his place. A colleague of the historian then tells the Secret Service agent who helped him that "Even the act of traveling in time is part of history" and that the historian's sacrifice was part of the "correct" timeline.


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* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'' episode "[[Recap/TheTwilightZone1985S1E20AProfileInSilver Profile in Silver]]", a time travelling historian saves his ancestor UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy from being assassinated. The resulting damage to space time then creates a timeline where WorldWarIII and the extinction of humanity is inevitable. Kennedy volunteers to go back to set things right but the historian instead sends Kennedy to the future and takes Kennedy's place in the motorcade, being assassinated in his place. A colleague of the historian then tells the Secret Service agent who helped him that "Even the act of traveling in time is part of history" and that the historian's sacrifice was part of the "correct" timeline.
* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (2000s revival) episode "Cradle of Darkness", a young woman (played by Katherine Heigl) is one of the few people capable of surviving time travel. She agrees to take a one-way trip to the past to kill Hitler as a baby (it's not clear why the future people think that the new reality will be better). She pretends to be a new maid and ingrains herself into the Hitler family, realizing that Hitler Sr. is the one who taught his son to hate the "lesser races". In the end, she grabs the baby and jumps into the river (also unexplained why she had to jump herself, possibly guilt for killing an as-yet-innocent baby, though it was mentioned in the beginning it was a one way trip so it's not like she could get back to her original timeline). The other maid, takes a homeless gypsy's baby and passes it off as young Adolf. So yeah, if this is believed, Hitler was one of the "lesser races" he hated so much.
14th Mar '17 6:04:30 PM Gosicrystal
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The Ancient [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greeks]] and [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse]] ''loved'' the notion that YouCannotChangeTheFuture, and their works heavily imply that they believed in this specific notion of time (which even the Gods were trapped in). Although they used predictions rather than time travel, the effect is the same. Many first-time readers of the classics who don't buy into this notion of time, or don't realize this is ''why'' YouCantFightFate in the classics, have a hard time accepting TheFatalist behavior of classical Greek and European heroes.

to:

The Ancient [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greeks]] and [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse]] ''loved'' the notion that YouCannotChangeTheFuture, You Cannot Change The Future, and their works heavily imply that they believed in this specific notion of time (which even the Gods were trapped in). Although they used predictions rather than time travel, the effect is the same. Many first-time readers of the classics who don't buy into this notion of time, or don't realize this is ''why'' YouCantFightFate in the classics, have a hard time accepting TheFatalist behavior of classical Greek and European heroes.
4th Mar '17 2:40:15 AM skadooshbag
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This trope ''arguably'' makes the most sense when considering time travel from a scientific point of view, see the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novikov_self-consistency_principle Novikov self-consistency principle]].[[note]]Novikov's self-consistency principle was named "the Law of Conservation of History" by Creator/LarryNiven in his short piece "The Theory and Practice of Time Travel," published at least ten years prior to Novikov's work. Of course, Larry Niven is a ScienceFiction writer, which may explain why nobody cares. Alternatively, this is an illustration of something called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stigler%27s_law_of_eponymy Stigler's Law of Eponymy: nothing ever gets named after the first person to discover it.]][[/note]] However, the number of time-travel plots that it allows for are extremely limited and the logic gets complicated ''very'' quickly. This, however, also has the side-effect of creating a '[[FunctionalMagic self-correcting universe]]' usually by a slew of {{Contrived Coincidence}}s (e.g. if you try to shoot your grandfather the gun will jam; if you try poisoning him he will recover; if you try strangling him you will be overcome; if you wear PowerArmor from the future you will have second thoughts; if you try sending a bomb back through time and detonating it directly inside his chest the time machine will break down). This can also lead to a scenario where the ''only'' reason why the past is not changed is because someone else says 'you cannot' and you take his advice. Meaning ''the advice itself'' is a part of the universe's self-correcting nature.

to:

This trope ''arguably'' makes the most sense when considering time travel from a scientific point of view, see the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novikov_self-consistency_principle Novikov self-consistency principle]].[[note]]Novikov's self-consistency principle was named "the Law of Conservation of History" by Creator/LarryNiven in his short piece "The Theory and Practice of Time Travel," published at least ten years prior to Novikov's work. Of course, Larry Niven is a ScienceFiction writer, which may explain why nobody cares. Alternatively, this is an illustration of something called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stigler%27s_law_of_eponymy Stigler's Law of Eponymy: nothing ever gets named after the first person to discover it.]][[/note]] However, the number of time-travel plots that it allows for are extremely limited and the logic gets complicated ''very'' quickly. This, however, also has the side-effect of creating a '[[FunctionalMagic self-correcting universe]]' usually by a slew of {{Contrived Coincidence}}s (e.g. if you try to shoot your grandfather the gun will jam; if you try poisoning him he will recover; if you try strangling him you will be overcome; if you wear PowerArmor from the future you will have second thoughts; if you try sending a bomb back through time and detonating it directly inside his chest the time machine will break down). This can also lead to a scenario where the ''only'' reason why the past is not changed is because someone else says 'you cannot' and you take his advice. Meaning ''the ''[[SelfFulfillingProphecy the advice itself'' itself]]'' is a part of the universe's self-correcting nature.
24th Jan '17 2:39:55 AM ShorinBJ
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* Invoked and averted in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans''. Starfire ends up 20 years in the future, and the time-traveling criminal responsible for this explains this trope. Then she gets back to her time and find that something ''has'' changed.
19th Jan '17 1:50:20 PM Yandie666
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* In Ludo's rock opera "The Broken Bride" the narrator builds a time machine to go back and save his wife/girlfriend who had died in a car wreck. [[spoiler: After fighting dinosaurs in the past and a zombie apocalypse in the future, he makes it back to his own time, only to find that the same events are occurring as they did before. Instead of saving his girlfriend/wife, he decides to go along for the ride. One can assume they both die, this time.]]
3rd Jan '17 4:49:16 PM SteveMB
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* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' ("Assignment Earth")

to:

* The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' ("Assignment Earth")episode "Assignment Earth" ends with the reveal that the Enterprise's historical records show that a malfunctioning nuclear platform exploded just as it did in the episode, indicating that Gary Seven's mission (complete with Kirk and Spock's interference therewith) was part of their existing timeline.
23rd Dec '16 7:38:13 AM TotalDramaRox97
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* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (2000s revival) episode "Cradle of Darkness", a young woman (played by Katherine Heigl) is one of the few people capable of surviving time travel. She agrees to take a one-way trip to the past to kill Hitler as a baby (it's not clear why the future people think that the new reality will be better). She pretends to be a new maid and ingrains herself into the Hitler family, realizing that Hitler Sr. is the one who taught his son to hate the "lesser races". In the end, she grabs the baby and jumps into the river (also unexplained why she had to jump herself, possibly guilt for killing an as-yet-innocent baby). The other maid, takes a homeless gypsy's baby and passes it off as young Adolf. So yeah, if this is believed, Hitler was one of the "lesser races" he hated so much.

to:

* In ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (2000s revival) episode "Cradle of Darkness", a young woman (played by Katherine Heigl) is one of the few people capable of surviving time travel. She agrees to take a one-way trip to the past to kill Hitler as a baby (it's not clear why the future people think that the new reality will be better). She pretends to be a new maid and ingrains herself into the Hitler family, realizing that Hitler Sr. is the one who taught his son to hate the "lesser races". In the end, she grabs the baby and jumps into the river (also unexplained why she had to jump herself, possibly guilt for killing an as-yet-innocent baby).baby, though it was mentioned in the beginning it was a one way trip so it's not like she could get back to her original timeline). The other maid, takes a homeless gypsy's baby and passes it off as young Adolf. So yeah, if this is believed, Hitler was one of the "lesser races" he hated so much.


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* Subverted in ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' a young engineer has a discussion with his fellow rich friends about this topic. He then finds himself back in time to the night of Abraham Lincoln's assassination. He desperately tries to warn everyone that Lincoln will be assassinated, but he's brushed off as drunk and a man named Wellington (who late turns out to be John Wilkes Booth) takes him in. While in his care Wellington drugs him and goes to assassinate Lincoln. When the engineer wakes up, the president is shot mere moments later and he discovers the man who drugged him was in fact John Wilkes Booth. When he goes back to his original timeline, he discovers he did actually change one thing. The police officer who believed him and tried to save the president got promoted to chief of police then a councilman and later became a millionaire allowing his descendant (who in the original timeline was an attendant at club the engineer was a part of) to inherit his fortune.
** Played straight in "No Time Like The Past" where after a scientist fails several times to change history, he decides to go back to a time where there were no issues, 1888. Upon realizing there will be a fire at the school so he tries to stop it, but when a horse and buggy swerves to avoid hitting him, it launches a lantern which hits the school causing the aforementioned fire.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.YouAlreadyChangedThePast