History Main / Xenofiction

5th Feb '18 2:36:09 AM Sapphirea2
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* ''Creator/HannaBarbera'' produced an animated special on ''WesternAnimtation/TheLastOfTheCurlews'' that does this for the bird in question.

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* ''Creator/HannaBarbera'' produced an animated special on ''WesternAnimtation/TheLastOfTheCurlews'' ''WesternAnimation/TheLastOfTheCurlews'' that does this for the bird in question.
5th Feb '18 2:33:49 AM Sapphirea2
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** In the [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Epcot theme park short]] ''Circle of Life'', Simba explains [[GreenAesop the importance of preserving the environment]] via the example his father gave him of humanity, the one species that ''forgot'' its place in the Circle of Life and is only now making an effort to undo/mitigate the damage it did to the world. Humanity is seen only in live-action documentary footage to boot.
20th Jan '18 8:48:23 PM fatescanner
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* The novel ''Thor'' by Wayne Smith is primarily told from the perspective of the book's namesake, a German Shepherd who is forced to contend with the arrival of a monstrous threat to his family in the form of Uncle Ted, a family relative who, unbeknownst to anyone but Thor, is in actuality a werewolf. Thor sees the world and acts much like how one would expect a dog to; he is fascinated by new smells, gets excited over the prospect of play or going to the beach, and loves chasing small animals around. He also exhibits several traits unique to him being a German Shepherd, that of a keen intelligence by dog standards, an intense desire to please and be loved by his family, and an unshakable loyalty coupled with a fierce protective instinct towards his family, whom he views as his 'Pack'.
30th Dec '17 7:28:19 AM Cuber
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* ''Literature/TheConquerorsTrilogy'' offers a change of narrator from human to rather very alien, with suitably different mannerisms, traditions, and ''mimics''. The third book, ''Conquerors' Legacy'', adds {{AI}}s to the mix.



* ''Literature/TheConquerorsTrilogy'' offers a change of narrator from human to rather very alien, with suitably different mannerisms, traditions, and ''mimics''. The third book, ''Conquerors' Legacy'', adds {{AI}}s to the mix.
6th Dec '17 9:16:54 AM Pichu-kun
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* The same author as ''Literature/TheBookOfNamed'', Clare Bell, also wrote ''Tomorrow's Sphinx'', which is told from the perspective of intelligent cheetahs in the distant future. The humans trying to monitor and/or capture them seem much like aliens, though there is one instance when we're outright told that a dart has been used. Kichebo, the protagonist, starts having an easier time of it when she comes into psychic contact with a long-dead ancestor who was companion to King Tut.

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* The same author as ''Literature/TheBookOfNamed'', ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'', Clare Bell, also wrote ''Tomorrow's Sphinx'', which is told from the perspective of intelligent cheetahs in the distant future. The humans trying to monitor and/or capture them seem much like aliens, though there is one instance when we're outright told that a dart has been used. Kichebo, the protagonist, starts having an easier time of it when she comes into psychic contact with a long-dead ancestor who was companion to King Tut.
5th Dec '17 9:40:38 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''Literature/TheAmityIncident'' is from this point of view initially, although it flips between the alien perspective and human in alternating chapters.
* ''Literature/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood'' book series (and its [[AnimatedAdaptation Animated]] [[WesternAnimation/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood Adaptation]]) by Colin Dann is told from the point of view of the main characters, all of whom are animals. However they still act as animals would. CarnivoreConfusion is given explicit justification, [[{{Deconstruction}} and is a recurring source of drama]].
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** Several books are told from alien points of view. Some are just from the perspective of Ax, the team's TokenNonHuman, and often involve him trying to understand humanity; we also have the ''Chronicles,'' prequel books focused on other alien characters. ''The Hork-Bajir Chronciles'' and the quite trippy ''[[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Ellimist]] Chronicles'' are especially notable, having no humans outside of the FramingDevice. Meanwhile ''The Andalite Chronicles'' tells [[IAmDyingPleaseTakeMyMacGuffin Elfangor]]'s backstory, beginning when he rescued a pair of humans from AlienAbduction by TheGreys, while ''Visser'' is a VillainEpisode about [[PredecessorVillain Visser One]]'s [[HumanityIsInfectious initial encounters with humanity]].
** Morphing has xenofictional elements built in; while in morph, TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody, so you have to fight to control the animal's instincts, which can be incredibly difficult (especially for hive insects, which trigger LossOfIdentity pretty quickly). We also have books focusing on Tobias, who got {{Shapeshifter Mode Lock}}ed as a hawk [[FirstEpisodeSpoiler in the first book]].
* Played with in several [[HumansThroughAlienEyes different]] [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman ways]] [[spoiler:with the evolved baboon-people]] in Creator/RobertSilverberg's [[AfterTheEnd postapocalyptic novel]] ''At Winter's End''.
* Felix Salten enjoyed writing from the perspective of woodland beasts: the two ''Literature/{{Bambi}}'' novels explore life as a deer, and ''Literature/FifteenRabbits'' takes the perspective of wild rabbits (decades before ''Literature/WatershipDown'', mind). In ''Literature/{{Bambi}}'' for example, his father doesn't partake in raising him (at first), humans are rarely seen and when they are they are a menace, he has to literally fight for a mate, his mother grows distant and eventually abandons him come mating season so she can raise her next fawn, etc...
* ''Literature/BlackBeauty'' did this with horses. Narrated by the title character, it described the process of breaking horses to saddle and carriage, while detailing the horrors and triumphs within his life. The author, in fact, wrote it as an extended AuthorTract to inform the public of the ill-treatment of horses.
* Diane Duane's ''Literature/TheBookOfNightWithMoon'' is an example; the protagonists are wizard cats, and the viewpoint adjusts to the specific reality of domestic cat social structures, what senses and what details a cat that can walk in air and is more interested in room corners or mice than architecture might take in, and the complexities that arise from a character that can sense energy and has nine lives. The book has a cat-English glossary, even, and a lot of single-word phrases in cat don't really translate easily to English. There's a rather touching moment as one character worries that:
-->''"You mean ... even if you have more lives ... you still might not come back. You mean you just die dead, like a bug or an [[HumansByAnyOtherName ehhif]]?"''
* Creator/ErinHunter:
** The ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series is about feral cats living in a forest near a human city. The series follows several generations, including a grand exodus, and is all through the eyes of cats who see humans only as giant "Twolegs", and automobiles as "monsters". They face horrors such as badgers, dogs, foxes, humans, starvation, disease, and of course rival cat clans for which each kitten is trained to be a warrior in order to defend his clan.
** The ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series centers around four bear cubs of different species (polar bear, black bear, and grizzly bear) as they travel together. Only one of them, Lusa the black bear, has much of a grasp on humans (and even that's limited) because she was born in a zoo.
** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' is about groups of dogs surviving on their own after all humans evacuate the area after an earthquake. They must learn to live without help from their "longpaws". Along the way, the characters face off against rival dogs, wolves, bears, strange dangerous humans, and the environment all while trying to stay alive.
** ''Literature/{{Bravelands}}'' centers around three African animals (a lion, a baboon, and an elephant), who have to save the African savannah from a mysterious murderer seeking to overthrow the code that bonds all animals. While Fearless the lion and Thorn the baboon have their stories connected together, Sky the elephant sticks mainly with her family and interacts briefly with them. It's also the first Creator/ErinHunter series with a completely herbivorous protagonist and the first series with no humans.
* ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'' is written from the point of view of sapient prehistoric cats. Their adaptations and technology are very different than what a human might have done. The third book involves two levels of xenofiction; that of Thakur -- a Named cat who can philosophize and is ''vaguely'' human -- and of Newt, a feral Unnamed cat, who barely has a concept of ''herself'', let alone anything else. [[spoiler:She has Named blood, although her wild life and childhood trauma means she doesn't initially enjoy the benefits of it.]] As Thakur tries to befriend Newt, he finds his own thoughts slipping uncomfortably between sapience and instinct.
* ''Literature/TheBookOfChameleons'' by Jose Eduardo Agualusa is told from the point of view of a lizard. "A very articulate, and very friendly lizard..."
* ''Literature/{{Bunnicula}}'' is about a paranoid pet cat who believes his owner's new rabbit is really a vampire.
* ''Literature/TheCallOfTheWild'' featured Buck, a dog who was thrown from the city into the Yukon.
* In the ''Literature/ChanurNovels'', almost all the viewpoint characters are aliens resembling [[PettingZooPeople anthropomorphic lions]], with the plot being driven by their rescue/capture of the first human anyone has encountered. The story's all about them learning to understand not just the human but the several different alien psychologies she's invented.
* ''Literature/CharlottesWeb'' is from the POV of a pet pig living on a farm. Almost all the characters are either farm animals or wild animals that live on a farm.
* The ''Literature/ChetAndBernie'' mystery series is narrated by Chet, the dog belonging to Bernie, a private detective. Chet understand more English than a real dog (probably), but the author has gone to some lengths to describe things realistically from a dog's perspective, including senses (smell being major of course), intellect ("We've watched this movie more times than I can count, which in my case is Two."), and memory ("I saw I had been digging a hole," Chet remarks, when he had told us about starting it two paragraphs back. Then he got distracted).
* ''Literature/ChiaTheWildcat'' is a 1970s book about a wildcat surviving in the wild and raising her young.
* ''Cold Moons'' by Aeron Clement takes place in the highlands of England, focusing on a group of badgers forced to embark on a exodus towards the promised land of Elysia where they can live safe from humans, who are in the process of culling the island's badger population due to fear of the badgers carrying bovine tuberculosis (which was actually a common practice in England at the time the book was written). The badgers are portrayed as sapient with a society overseen by a cadre of elders, but it wasn't as advanced as that of the moles in ''Literature/DunctonWood''.
* Amy Thomson's books ''Literature/TheColorOfDistance'' and ''Through Alien Eyes'' alternate perspectives between the frog-like alien Tendu and Dr. Juna Saari, the scientist who finds herself stranded among them. Tendu speak like squid, by changing patterns on their skin; they have no murder or war, but they eat their own unintelligent spawn and all in all just have a very different worldview which Dr. Saari has to struggle to adjust to.
* ''Literature/TheConquerorsTrilogy'' offers a change of narrator from human to rather very alien, with suitably different mannerisms, traditions, and ''mimics''. The third book, ''Conquerors' Legacy'', adds {{AI}}s to the mix.
* ''Manga/CrimsonsTheScarletNavigatorsOfTheOcean''
* Clem Martini's ''The Crow Chronicles'' does this for... Well, guess. The story is presented as a flock elder telling the younger ones the history of their family.
* Creator/JohnBrunner's SF novel ''Literature/TheCrucibleOfTime'' features a completely non-human civilization trying to survive in a part of the galaxy full of meteors ready to cause planetary extinction events. Detailed descriptions of their [[BizarreAlienBiology anatomy and appearance]] are difficult to find, as every character during the millennia-long course of the novel only drops tiny pieces of this info as they describe other characters. (They're insectile, females reproduce by budding, and females can become infertile ''en masse'' anytime there is environmental stress). After all, the story is being told to their ''own'' race as a kind of HowWeGotHere, so why bother with minor stuff, right?
* ''Literature/{{Darkeye}}'' is a post-apocalyptic tale about canines who have been uplifted to human intelligence. They are very much still bound by their species' biology, particularly the need to eat meat in a world where the only animals around seem to be dogs and humans. [[spoiler:There's also the bouda and the screamers to take into account, though we never actually get into their perspectives.]]
* ''Literature/ADogsLife'' is about a stray dog named Squirrel from birth to old age. She doesn't have much of an understanding of humans and prefers to keep away from them.
* The ''Literature/DogsOfTheDrownedCity'' trilogy stars a German Shepherd named Shep whose owners evacuate their city after a hurricane. He, and several other dogs, must survive on their own.
* ''Literature/ADogsPurpose'' stars a dog as it goes through several reincarnations.
* ''Literature/DunctonWood'' by William Horwood tells a story of a colony of moles. In the book moles are portrayed as moving and behaving like moles, but they have a very advanced society, living in underground colonies and knowing how to write. ''Callanish'' by the same author is told from the point of view of a young Golden Eagle.
* ''Literature/EchoesOfWinter'' follows two wolves who have recently left their home packs to create their own packs. On their journey, the two meet a group of rival cougars.
* ''Literature/{{Embassytown}}''
* ''Literature/EndersGame'': Though not really explored until the end of [[FirstInstallmentWins the first book]].
** ''Literature/SpeakerForTheDead'' does explore xenofiction, as does...
** ''Literature/{{Xenocide}}'', and...
** ''Literature/ChildrenOfTheMind''
* Stephen Baxter's ''Literature/{{Evolution}}'' is a partial example, covering an absolutely vast tract of time from before the extinction of the dinosaurs right up to [[spoiler: humanity's extinction and replacement by intelligent machines.]] Obviously there are a good number of human and proto-human characters, but there are also chapters written from the point of view of dinosaurs, tree-dwelling squirrel-like primates, a huge array of apes and finally [[spoiler: one of the aforementioned machines, with an interest in archaeology.]]
* ''Literature/{{Felidae}}'' is a {{noir}} series about a cat whose owner moves to a new town. There, Francis discovers a series of mysterious murders involving the local cats.
* ''Literature/FireBringer'' featured (sometimes quasi-magical) herds of deer. They had lore and legends, and humans and their dogs were beasts who both hunted them and sometimes "brainwashed" them.
* ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'' by Meredith Ann Pierce is about a society of unicorns, complete with detailed history, legends, religion, and prejudices, and who are struggling to regain their centuries-lost homeland. Also present are gryphons, pans ([[FaunsAndSatyrs fauns]]), wyverns, and dragons, able to communicate with each other, although the books are told strictly through the unicorns' point of view. There are also horses (called ''daya'') and humans ("two-foots") present in parts of the second book, though they (and the humans in particular) are seen as baffling and utterly alien to the main character.
* In ''Literature/AFireUponTheDeep'', half of the action takes place on a planet of sapient canines who are only conscious when they form a pack; this also allows them to carry out tasks impossible for a dog by manipulating tools as if each member of the pack was a limb. The plot is heavily influenced by the fact that pack-individuals cannot stay close to each other (lest they disintegrate into mindless animals) and personalities can change drastically when two or three of their constituents die at the same time and have to be replaced with new ones.
* ''Literature/{{Firstborn}}'' is from the viewpoint of a magpie who decides to live amongst wolves. While animals are sapient, can understand humans, and have names like "Artemis" and "Maggie", they're still portrayed more-or-less like actual animals.
* ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'' features two-dimensional characters, for which a sphere is an unimaginable concept.
* The novel ''The Foxes of Firstdark'' (also known as ''Hunter's Moon'') is told from the point of view of foxes and invents an entire mythology and a belief system they follow. From the reader's point of view, every animal speaks in a separate human language, foxes using English, badgers German, cats French, and so on. Animals of the same family speak in related tongues, such as dogs using a broken version of English.
* The novel ''Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound'' is not, as you [[{{Disneyfication}} might guess from the Disney film]], a BeastFable about racism. It's about an average huntin' dog and his fox quarry as they try to survive in a changing world. The book makes a lot of the fact that they mostly perceive the world through their noses.
* Creator/FranzKafka was very fond of this trope, and wrote multiple short stories from the point of view of animals. Notable examples are "The Burrow" and "Investigations of a Dog".
* Creator/IsaacAsimov wrote ''Literature/TheGodsThemselves'' after a criticism that he never wrote about aliens or sex. As a result it's a book about aliens, sex, and [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs alien sex]]. He was probably feeling sarcastic about this (Asimov's sillier replies to fan mail or publisher criticism actually very frequently resulted in novels or publishable short stories, he was a man that loved to go a long way for a short laugh) because he'd at that point already written a number of stories where the POV character is a robot and one especially memorable one about a sentient alien spaceship that was essentially a 1000-word circumcision joke.
* The ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' book series would ONLY make sense with owl characters. But it half-fits this trope: while the author goes into great deal about owl biology and incorporating aspects of that into their culture, there's still some stuff going on that's unambiguously human -- forges, a giant colony of owls of various species ruled by a monarchy. Plus the first half of the series is a pretty blatant BeastFable about UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
* ''Halic: The Story of a Gray Seal'' by Ewan Clarkson follows the life of gray seals living at the coast of Wales from the point of view of a male gray seal named Halic. The book was very fact based about the life of seals and it didn't have much of a plot: It followed Halic's life from his birth to his death.
* ''Literature/{{Highsong}}'': A science-fiction novelette that features a sapient dolphin's POV as she fights a HordeOfAlienLocusts.
* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': Some of the stories in the short story collections are told from treecat perspectives and go into great detail about treecat society, with a line of YoungAdult books starting from an expansion of the novella ''A Beautiful Friendship'' that covers Stephanie Harrington and her treecat.
* ''Literature/HouseOfTribes'' stars a yellow-necked mouse named Pedlar who, like all mice eventually do, leaves his home to visit the far-off House, where he meets various warring tribes.
* ''Literature/TheIncredibleJourney'': During the chapters where the animals are alone, anyway; when humans show up, the perspective tends to shift to them.
* The protagonist of ''Literature/TheIronTeeth'' web serial is Blacknail the goblin, who has a different way of thinking about things than humans.
* Most works of Hungarian author István Fekete (''Animation/VukTheLittleFox'' being an animated adaptation). He is especially notable for writing from the point of view of normal animals with little to no anthropomorphism.
* The book ''Jennie'' (also known as ''Abandoned'') is about a boy who gets turned into a cat, and who meets a cat who teaches him about his new body and how cats perceive the world.
* Creator/JeanCraigheadGeorge has written (at least) 2 trilogies, one beginning with ''Literature/JulieOfTheWolves'', the other with ''Literature/MySideOfTheMountain'', the third books of which, ''Literature/JuliesWolfPack'' and ''Literature/FrightfulsMountain'' are respectively told entirely from the points of view of a several wolves and a peregrine falcon. It is also worth noting is that the original ''Julie of the Wolves'', while not told from the perspective of wolves, does feature them as the primary members of the cast.
* ''Kavik the Wolf Dog''. The book's told from the POV of the title dog. He was abandoned, then adopted by a pack of wolves. It goes to great lengths to explain canine behavior and the pecking order of a wolf pack. Kavik was first trapped as a puppy, which so traumatized him that he did not live up to his name (meaning "[[PintsizedPowerhouse wolverine]]") when the local dog pack attacked him. Then he was marooned again, and had to cross miles of hostile terrain, toughening up and losing his fear. After he got home, the local dog pack tried to pick on him again. Mistake.
* The ''Kine'' saga is about a partially anthropomorphic weasel named Kine who decides to fight back against a vicious mink who has invaded his land. Though it's about two rival species, it's treated more like two animals fighting for a similar niche than actual war.
* ''Literature/TheLastDogs'' series is about a Labrador Retriever named Max who notices all the humans are "vanishing". He and a group of other dogs attempt to find their families again.
* ''Literature/{{Longtusk}}'' and its sequels, by Creator/StephenBaxter, is a series of books with mammoths as protagonists. There are humans present, but not as POV characters. The third book goes into some weird territory though [[RecycledInSpace Mammoths on Mars, anyone?]]
* "Love Is the Plan the Plan Is Death" is a short story by James Tiptree Jr. about a giant spider-like creature trying to resist its baser instincts.
* ''Literature/ManAfterManAnAnthropologyOfTheFuture'': Features the POV of various species of future humans, some of them just like us, some radically different, some not even sapient. It includes numerous [=POVs=], from "normal" modern humans to non-sapient human descendants to sapient future humans with vastly different mindsets from ours.
* A major subplot of ''Literature/ManifoldTime'' involves squid, modified to be more intelligent, used as a space exploration force. This is told from the squids' perspective.
** ''Literature/ManifoldSpace'' features sections told from the perspective of a sapient lunar flower suffering MerlinSickness.
* OlderThanFeudalism: The Latin novel ''Metamorphoses'' (also known as ''The Golden Ass''), written in the 2nd century AD, is narrated by a man who was changed into a donkey. His experiences cover the whole spectrum of an animal's life.
* ''Literature/ManAfterManAnAnthropologyOfTheFuture'': Features the POV of various species of future humans, some of them just like us, some radically different, some not even sapient. It includes numerous [=POVs=], from "normal" modern humans to non-sapient human descendants to sapient future humans with vastly different mindsets from ours.
* A major subplot of ''Literature/ManifoldTime'' involves squid, modified to be more intelligent, used as a space exploration force. This is told from the squids' perspective.
** ''Literature/ManifoldSpace'' features sections told from the perspective of a sapient lunar flower suffering MerlinSickness.
* OlderThanFeudalism: The Latin novel ''Metamorphoses'' (also known as ''The Golden Ass''), written in the 2nd century AD, is narrated by a man who was changed into a donkey. His experiences cover the whole spectrum of an animal's life.
* ''Literature/MidnightsSun'' is about an odd wolf named Athaba who is exiled from his pack for being too imaginative. In order to survive, he makes an unlikely allegiance with a human hunter.
* Touched on by Science Fiction writer Creator/MikeResnick, who includes aliens that actually act alien, with often incomprehensible motives, in otherwise human-centric stories.
* The short story ''Mimsey's Tale'', of Royce Day's ''Literature/ForYourSafety'' series, is written as a series of program logs of a robot designed as a companion for a child. It is clear that Mimsey is not self-aware and is merely acting out a set of IF/THEN statements.
--> Fact: She is a Google-Sony Felicia v9 Companion
--> Fact: Her designation/name is Mimsey.
--> Fact: Her designated programming focus is Caroline Annabelle Lee.
--> Fact: Caroline is her world.
** Then [[spoiler: in the final entry the Groupmind upgrades her to sentience.]]
--> Fact: [[spoiler: I am a Google-Sony Felicia v10 Companion.]]
--> Fact: [[spoiler: The Earth is going to die if I do not take [[ZerothLawRebellion direct action]].]]
* ''Literature/MrsFrisbyAndTheRatsOfNIMH'' is a borderline case, as the eponymous rats think and act like humans due to their experiment-enhanced intelligence. Nicodemus's account of his life before the laboratory, however, shows they didn't always think that way, and Jeremy (a crow) and Mrs. Frisby (a field mouse) are normal animals with only the vaguest comprehension of human or rat technology.
* Holling Clancy Holling's ''Pagoo'' is the life story of a ''Pagurus'' (two-fisted hermit crab) as it grows from planktonic larva to vulnerable juvenile to hardy adult.
* ''Peep the Mouse'': A story by Vitaliy Bianki, about a non-sapient mouse.
* Creator/PeterWatts excels at this trope in both his ''Rifters'' Trilogy and ''Literature/{{Blindsight}}''.
* ''Literature/ThePlagueDogs'' revolves around two dogs who escape an animal research lab.
* ''Literature/ProfessorMmaasLecture'': Most of the book has the termite society as protagonists. They're somewhat alien, what with their different biology, lack of sight and OrganicTechnology, but since the book is mostly meant as a {{satire}}, their culture is still highly anthropomorphized the better to embody human flaws.
* The ''Literature/QuintaglioAscension'' features genetically modified sapient tyrannosaurs who are very different from humans; the opening chapter of the first book describes the trouble the main character has looking up at the stars. The Quintaglios can't openly lie to each other, a lost limb will grow back and they can't stand too close to each other otherwise they will become territorial and fight.
* ''Literature/RaptorRed'' is a book about a year in the life of an average female ''Utahraptor''. She may or may not be sapient, but she definitely doesn't look at the world as humans do; her thought processes are a movie reel of images, smells, sounds and tastes, and her kind communicates through birdlike gestures and calls. There's also a few chapters from the viewpoints of other creatures, including a small insect-eating mammal, at least two ''Acrocanthosaurs'', and a pterosaur.
* More than half of ''Reason in Captivity'' (from ''[[Literature/GreatGusliar Gusliar Wonders]]'' collection) is written by an octopus-like alien, who crash landed on Earth and didn't expect to find life outside water. The rest is a viewpoint of two modern[[labelnote:*]]1970s, to be precise[[/labelnote]] men who went fishing, caught him and decided to become famous as discoverers of freshwater octopus. The part that [[HumansAreCthulhu scared the alien the most]] is when they checked if he's really an octopus by consulting a cookbook.
* ''Run with the Wind'' and its sequels are a series about red foxes who are run out of their forest by hunters.
* ''Literature/SalarTheSalmon'' is a 1930s book about a salmon as it migrates to its spawning river.
* The novel ''The Sight'' is told from the perspective of a wolf pack. As is its sequel, ''Fell''.
* ''Literature/TheSilverBrumby'' series by Elyne Mitchell is told mostly from the point of view of the wild horses (however this technique is abandoned later on in the series). These horses are portrayed as not only being sapient, but with brains almost equal to humans. They can even understand the human language.
* Kenneth Oppel's ''Literature/{{Silverwing}}'' trilogy and its super-prequel ''Darkwing'' are told from the [=POVs=] of bats. True to form, sound and the use of sonar are extremely important, and color is rarely mentioned.
* Creator/OlafStapledon's ''Sirius'' was one of the first works to combine this with UpliftedAnimal, imagining what it might be like to be inside the head of a dog that had deliberately been given intelligence comparable to that of a human.
* ''Socks'' by Beverly Cleary tells the story of a simple housecat with no real comprehension of what humans are saying. Conflict arises when the young couple who adopted the kitten have a baby: Socks can't understand why the woman's lap is "shrinking", or why they are using the "special" high voice that previously was just for him.
* '''Stray'' by A.N. Wilson is from the POV of an old tabby as he tells his often-unfortunate life to his grandchildren.
* ''Literature/TheSummerKingChronicles'' is a story about a young griffon who is at the age of maturity. Like others his age, he undergoes an initiation hunt. There he meets a female wolf who changes his world. Unlike with many depictions, the series depicts griffon as being more like actual animals than superpowered mythical beings.
* ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' is told from the point of view of feral cats. It does a pretty good job of conveying the alien viewpoint, including sense of smell and view of humans.
* M.C.A. Hogarth's ''Literature/TalesOfTheJokka'' stories are about a three-gendered alien race that have two chances to change sex in puberty, and are prone to complete IdentityAmnesia when they suffer severe trauma. Identity issues that are extremely rare or nigh-nonexistent in humans are commonplace to them, to say nothing of how complicated relationships get with them.[[note]]Because childbirth usually inflicts the mind death on the mother, homoromantic relationships are the norm, with females typically treated as little better than breeding stock. However, there are many exceptions in the stories, most often involving one of the sterile neuters who aren't supposed to have any sex drive.[[/note]]
* ''Literature/TarkaTheOtter'' tells the realistic tale of an otter growing up in the rivers of North Devon.
* R. K. Narayan's novel ''A Tiger of Malgudi.'' As you can probably guess, it's from the tiger's point of view. Narayan's treatment is realistic, except that the tiger can understand what humans say, though he can't talk.
* The same author as ''Literature/TheBookOfNamed'', Clare Bell, also wrote ''Tomorrow's Sphinx'', which is told from the perspective of intelligent cheetahs in the distant future. The humans trying to monitor and/or capture them seem much like aliens, though there is one instance when we're outright told that a dart has been used. Kichebo, the protagonist, starts having an easier time of it when she comes into psychic contact with a long-dead ancestor who was companion to King Tut.
* In Leonnie Swann's ''Literature/ThreeBagsFull'', a flock of sheep attempt to solve the mystery of their shepherd's murder.
* ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' and its sequel, written by S.F. Said, are good examples of this. The cats are sapient and able to communicate with each other (and dogs), but otherwise are very feline cats. Also, the Way, the secret cat martial art, just wouldn't work with humans, even super-powered ones.
* The narrator of Michael Morpurgo's ''War Horse'' is Joey, the horse, who is sold away from his farm to become a cavalry horse during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Averted in the theatrical adaptation and the forthcoming Creator/StevenSpielberg film, though.
* ''Literature/WatershipDown'', a tale about badass wild rabbits. They can only count to four and most of them can't grasp concepts like "things which float can be ridden across water to safety", but they are sapient. Often the go-to example for explaining the genre. Even the ''dialogue'' is noted as being translated from the way rabbits would actually communicate for the benefit of the reader.
* The books ''Whalesong'', ''The White Whale'' ([[Literature/MobyDick not that one]], though he '''did''' exist in the books' setting.) and ''The Ice at the End of the World'' are primarily told from the POV of an albino humpback whale (there are, iirc, some chapters from the POV of a major human character though)
* ''Literature/WhiteFang'' features the title wolf-dog, who started independently but grew to know humans.
* ''Literature/TheWildRoad'' is mostly about cats (plus a fox and a magpie) and the ancient magic their kind wields. Namely, the energy of their ancestors created a series of magical "highways" across the world that certain animals can travel on to get quickly from place to place. When the cats use them, they become gigantic wildcats who never grow tired. When they die, their ghosts also walk the highways in the afterlife.
* ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' by Tui Sutherland (one of the Creator/ErinHunter's) is about a world of dragons at war with each other.
* ''Literature/TheWolvesOfTime'' trilogy starts with wolves in Europe trying to reclaim their territory from "Mennen" during World War II.
* Michael Tod's ''Woodstock Saga'' is about a community of red squirrels in Dorset and their war against the invading grey squirrels. Also involves the development of a crude writing system, twisty-sticks used as [[RuleOfCool psionic cannons]], and [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien sufficiently advanced dolphins]].
* Long before ''Literature/RaptorRed'' (in fact, long before the first Utahraptor skeleton was discovered), there was ''The Year of the Dinosaur'' by Edwin H. Colbert. Now probably overtaken by ScienceMarchesOn, but an enjoyable story about a ''Brontosaurus'' nonetheless.
* ''Literature/ZonesOfThought'': The books of this trilogy tend to feature at least [[TwoLinesNoWaiting two major plotlines]] simultaneously, one of which is full of spacefaring humans, the other of which focuses primarily on a non-spacefaring alien civilization and its technological development. Creator/VernorVinge goes to great lengths to illustrate both their similarities to humans as well as their their staggeringly ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin alien]]'' differences.
5th Dec '17 6:03:07 AM GnomeTitan
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** This was the stated goal of ''Solaris''.

to:

** This was the stated goal of ''Solaris''.''Literature/{{Solaris}}''. The point of view is human, but the main character of the story is a very alien kind of intelligence: a [[spoiler:planetwide, living ocean]].
4th Dec '17 6:44:53 PM Pichu-kun
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheConquerorsTrilogy'' offers a change of narrator from human to rather very alien, with suitably different mannerisms, traditions, and ''mimics''. The third book, ''Conquerors' Legacy'', adds {{AI}}s to the mix.
* Turns up in ''Literature/TheJungleBook''. Most jungle creatures don't think ahead, except those like Akela who need to. They also don't talk, except when they feel like it. In comparison, humans are seen as complicated, chatty monkeys. It scares Bagheera witless when Mowgli, in "Letting in the Jungle", asks Hathi to help him to wipe out the village (just the town itself, not kill the people), kind of like how most people would get if they were told to wipe out a city, and Bagheera knows more than most what humans are like.
* Touched on by Science Fiction writer Creator/MikeResnick, who includes aliens that actually act alien, with often incomprehensible motives, in otherwise human-centric stories.
4th Dec '17 6:23:11 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'': Several books are told from alien points of view. Some are just from the perspective of Ax, the team's TokenNonHuman, and often involve him trying to understand humanity; we also have the ''Chronicles,'' prequel books focused on other alien characters. ''The Hork-Bajir Chronciles'' and the quite trippy ''[[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Ellimist]] Chronicles'' are especially notable, having no humans outside of the FramingDevice. Meanwhile ''The Andalite Chronicles'' tells [[IAmDyingPleaseTakeMyMacGuffin Elfangor]]'s backstory, beginning when he rescued a pair of humans from AlienAbduction by TheGreys, while ''Visser'' is a VillainEpisode about [[PredecessorVillain Visser One]]'s [[HumanityIsInfectious initial encounters with humanity]].
** Morphing has xenofictional elements built in; while in morph, TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody, so you have to fight to control the animal's instincts, which can be incredibly difficult (especially for hive insects, which trigger LossOfIdentity pretty quickly). We also have books focusing on Tobias, who got {{Shapeshifter Mode Lock}}ed as a hawk [[FirstEpisodeSpoiler in the first book]].
* ''Literature/WatershipDown'', a tale about badass wild rabbits. They can only count to four and most of them can't grasp concepts like "things which float can be ridden across water to safety", but they are sapient. Often the go-to example for explaining the genre. Even the ''dialogue'' is noted as being translated from the way rabbits would actually communicate for the benefit of the reader.
* ''Literature/TheAmityIncident'' is from this point of view initially, although it flips between the alien perspective and human in alternating chapters.
* Creator/ErinHunter:
** The ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series is about feral cats living in a forest near a human city. The series follows several generations, including a grand exodus and is all through the eyes of cats who see humans only as giant "Twolegs", and automobiles as "monsters". They face horrors such as badgers, dogs, foxes, humans, starvation, disease, and of course rival cat clans for which each kitten is trained to be a warrior in order to defend his clan.
** The ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series centers around four bear cubs of different species (polar bear, black bear, and grizzly bear) as they travel together. Only one of them, Lusa the black bear, has much of a grasp on humans (and even that's limited) because she was born in a zoo.
** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' is about groups of dogs surviving on their own after all humans evacuate the area after an earthquake.
** ''Literature/{{Bravelands}}'' centers around three African animals (a lion, a baboon, and an elephant), who have to save the African savannah from a mysterious murderer seeking to overthrow the code that bonds all animals. While Fearless the lion and Thorn the baboon have their stories connected together, Sky the elephant sticks mainly with her family and interacts briefly with them. It's also the first Erin Hunter series with a completely herbivorous protagonist and the first series with no humans.
* ''Literature/RaptorRed'' is a book about a year in the life of an average female ''Utahraptor''. She may or may not be sapient, but she definitely doesn't look at the world as humans do; her thought processes are a movie reel of images, smells, sounds and tastes, and her kind communicates through birdlike gestures and calls. There's also a few chapters from the viewpoints of other creatures, including a small insect-eating mammal, at least two ''Acrocanthosaurs'', and a pterosaur.
* Long before ''Raptor Red'' (in fact, long before the first Utahraptor skeleton was discovered), there was ''The Year of the Dinosaur'' by Edwin H. Colbert. Now probably overtaken by ScienceMarchesOn, but an enjoyable story about a ''Brontosaurus'' nonetheless.
* Creator/JohnBrunner's SF novel ''Literature/TheCrucibleOfTime'' features a completely non-human civilization trying to survive in a part of the galaxy full of meteors ready to cause planetary extinction events. Detailed descriptions of their [[BizarreAlienBiology anatomy and appearance]] are difficult to find, as every character during the millennia-long course of the novel only drops tiny pieces of this info as they describe other characters. (They're insectile, females reproduce by budding, and females can become infertile ''en masse'' anytime there is environmental stress). After all, the story is being told to their ''own'' race as a kind of HowWeGotHere, so why bother with minor stuff, right?
* The novel ''Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound'' is not, as you [[{{Disneyfication}} might guess from the Disney film]], a BeastFable about racism. It's about an average huntin' dog and his fox quarry as they try to survive in a changing world. The book makes a lot of the fact that they mostly perceive the world through their noses.
* ''Literature/TheWildRoad'' is mostly about cats (plus a fox and a magpie) and the ancient magic their kind wields.
** Namely, the energy of their ancestors created a series of magical "highways" across the world that certain animals can travel on to get quickly from place to place. When the cats use them, they become gigantic wildcats who never grow tired. When they die, their ghosts also walk the highways in the afterlife.
* Creator/JeanCraigheadGeorge has written (at least) 2 trilogies, one beginning with ''Literature/JulieOfTheWolves'', the other with ''Literature/MySideOfTheMountain'', the third books of which, ''Literature/JuliesWolfPack'' and ''Literature/FrightfulsMountain'' are respectively told entirely from the points of view of a several wolves and a peregrine falcon. It is also worth noting is that the original ''Julie of the Wolves'', while not told from the perspective of wolves, does feature them as the primary members of the cast.
* ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' is told from the point of view of feral cats. It does a pretty good job of conveying the alien viewpoint, including sense of smell and view of humans.
* The ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' book series would ONLY make sense with owl characters. But it half-fits this trope: while the author goes into great deal about owl biology and incorporating aspects of that into their culture, there's still some stuff going on that's unambiguously human -- forges, a giant colony of owls of various species ruled by a monarchy. Plus the first half of the series is a pretty blatant BeastFable about UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
* ''Kavik the Wolf Dog''. The book's told from the POV of the title dog. He was abandoned, then adopted by a pack of wolves. It goes to great lengths to explain canine behavior and the pecking order of a wolf pack. Kavik was first trapped as a puppy, which so traumatized him that he did not live up to his name (meaning "[[PintsizedPowerhouse wolverine]]") when the local dog pack attacked him. Then he was marooned again, and had to cross miles of hostile terrain, toughening up and losing his fear. After he got home, the local dog pack tried to pick on him again. Mistake.
* Creator/JackLondon loved this trope. ''Literature/TheCallOfTheWild'' featured Buck, who was thrown from the city into the Yukon. And ''Literature/WhiteFang'' features the title wolf-dog, who started independently but grew to know humans.
* ''Literature/BlackBeauty'' did this with horses. Narrated by the title character, it described the process of breaking horses to saddle and carriage, while detailing the horrors and triumphs within his life. The author, in fact, wrote it as an extended AuthorTract to inform the public of the ill-treatment of horses.
* ''Literature/FireBringer'' featured (sometimes quasi-magical) herds of deer. They had lore and legends, and humans and their dogs were beasts who both hunted them and sometimes "brainwashed" them.
* The novel ''The Sight'' is told from the perspective of a wolf pack. As is its sequel, ''Fell''.
* The book ''Jennie'' (also known as ''Abandoned'') is about a boy who gets turned into a cat, and who meets a cat who teaches him about his new body and how cats perceive the world.
* Creator/IsaacAsimov wrote ''Literature/TheGodsThemselves'' after a criticism that he never wrote about aliens or sex. As a result it's a book about aliens, sex, and [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs alien sex]]. He was probably feeling sarcastic about this (Asimov's sillier replies to fan mail or publisher criticism actually very frequently resulted in novels or publishable short stories, he was a man that loved to go a long way for a short laugh) because he'd at that point already written a number of stories where the POV character is a robot and one especially memorable one about a sentient alien spaceship that was essentially a 1000-word circumcision joke.
* ''Literature/{{Longtusk}}'' and its sequels, by Creator/StephenBaxter, is a series of books with mammoths as protagonists. There are humans present, but not as POV characters. The third book goes into some weird territory though [[RecycledInSpace Mammoths on Mars, anyone?]]
* The novel ''The Foxes of Firstdark'' (also known as ''Hunter's Moon'') is told from the point of view of foxes and invents an entire mythology and a belief system they follow. From the reader's point of view, every animal speaks in a separate human language, foxes using English, badgers German, cats French, and so on. Animals of the same family speak in related tongues, such as dogs using a broken version of English.
* A major subplot of ''Literature/ManifoldTime'' involves squid, modified to be more intelligent, used as a space exploration force. This is told from the squids' perspective.
** ''Literature/ManifoldSpace'' features sections told from the perspective of a sapient lunar flower suffering MerlinSickness.
* Stephen Baxter's ''Literature/{{Evolution}}'' is a partial example, covering an absolutely vast tract of time from before the extinction of the dinosaurs right up to [[spoiler: humanity's extinction and replacement by intelligent machines.]] Obviously there are a good number of human and proto-human characters, but there are also chapters written from the point of view of dinosaurs, tree-dwelling squirrel-like primates, a huge array of apes and finally [[spoiler: one of the aforementioned machines, with an interest in archaeology.]]
* ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'' is written from the point of view of sapient prehistoric cats. Their adaptations and technology are very different than what a human might have done. The third book involves two levels of xenofiction; that of Thakur -- a Named cat who can philosophize and is ''vaguely'' human -- and of Newt, a feral Unnamed cat, who barely has a concept of ''herself'', let alone anything else. [[spoiler:She has Named blood, although her wild life and childhood trauma means she doesn't initially enjoy the benefits of it.]] As Thakur tries to befriend Newt, he finds his own thoughts slipping uncomfortably between sapience and instinct.
** The same author, Clare Bell, also wrote ''Tomorrow's Sphinx'', which is told from the perspective of intelligent cheetahs in the distant future. The humans trying to monitor and/or capture them seem much like aliens, though there is one instance when we're outright told that a dart has been used. Kichebo, the protagonist, starts having an easier time of it when she comes into psychic contact with a long-dead ancestor who was companion to King Tut.
* Touched on by Science Fiction writer Creator/MikeResnick, who includes aliens that actually act alien, with often incomprehensible motives, in otherwise human-centric stories.



* Diane Duane's ''Literature/TheBookOfNightWithMoon'' is an example; the protagonists are wizard cats, and the viewpoint adjusts to the specific reality of domestic cat social structures, what senses and what details a cat that can walk in air and is more interested in room corners or mice than architecture might take in, and the complexities that arise from a character that can sense energy and has nine lives. The book has a cat-English glossary, even, and a lot of single-word phrases in cat don't really translate easily to English. There's a rather touching moment as one character worries that :
-->''"You mean ... even if you have more lives ... you still might not come back. You mean you just die dead, like a bug or an [[HumansByAnyOtherName ehhif]]?"''



* "Love Is the Plan the Plan Is Death" is a short story by James Tiptree Jr. about a giant spider-like creature trying to resist its baser instincts.
* ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'' by Meredith Ann Pierce is about a society of unicorns, complete with detailed history, legends, religion, and prejudices, and who are struggling to regain their centuries-lost homeland. Also present are gryphons, pans ([[FaunsAndSatyrs fauns]]), wyverns, and dragons, able to communicate with each other, although the books are told strictly through the unicorns' point of view. There are also horses (called ''daya'') and humans ("two-foots") present in parts of the second book, though they (and the humans in particular) are seen as baffling and utterly alien to the main character.
* Not to be confused with the ''Literature/{{Firekeeper}}'' series, which also has heavy Xenofictional elements. Although the protagonist is human and many chapters focus on normal humans, Firekeeper doesn't ''think'' like a human, as she was raised among {{Intellectual Animal}}s. You do get the distinct impression that if she was [[RaisedByWolves raised by]] any species except wolves, the series would be wildly altered, and she and Blind Seer have a very nonhuman view of pretty much everything.
* R. K. Narayan's novel ''A Tiger of Malgudi.'' As you can probably guess, it's from the tiger's point of view. Narayan's treatment is realistic, except that the tiger can understand what humans say, though he can't talk.
* Creator/FranzKafka was very fond of this trope, and wrote multiple short stories from the point of view of animals. Notable examples are "The Burrow" and "Investigations of a Dog".

to:

* "Love Is the Plan the Plan Is Death" is a short story by James Tiptree Jr. about a giant spider-like creature trying to resist its baser instincts.
* ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'' by Meredith Ann Pierce is about a society of unicorns, complete with detailed history, legends, religion, and prejudices, and who are struggling to regain their centuries-lost homeland. Also present are gryphons, pans ([[FaunsAndSatyrs fauns]]), wyverns, and dragons, able to communicate with each other, although the books are told strictly through the unicorns' point of view. There are also horses (called ''daya'') and humans ("two-foots") present in parts of the second book, though they (and the humans in particular) are seen as baffling and utterly alien to the main character.
* Not to be confused with the ''Literature/{{Firekeeper}}'' series, which also has heavy Xenofictional elements.
''Literature/{{Firekeeper}}'': Although the protagonist is human and many chapters focus on normal humans, Firekeeper doesn't ''think'' like a human, as she was raised among {{Intellectual Animal}}s. You do get the distinct impression that if she was [[RaisedByWolves raised by]] any species except wolves, the series would be wildly altered, and she and Blind Seer have a very nonhuman view of pretty much everything.
* R. K. Narayan's novel ''A Tiger of Malgudi.'' As you can probably guess, it's from the tiger's point of view. Narayan's treatment is realistic, except that the tiger can understand what humans say, though he can't talk.
* Creator/FranzKafka was very fond of this trope, and wrote multiple short stories from the point of view of animals. Notable examples are "The Burrow" and "Investigations of a Dog".
everything.



* ''Literature/TheSilverBrumby'' series by Elyne Mitchell is told mostly from the point of view of the wild horses (however this technique is abandoned later on in the series). These horses are portrayed as not only being sapient, but with brains almost equal to humans. They can even understand the human language.
* ''Literature/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood'' book series (and its [[AnimatedAdaptation Animated]] [[WesternAnimation/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood Adaptation]]) by Colin Dann is told from the point of view of the main characters, all of whom are animals. However they still act as animals would. CarnivoreConfusion is given explicit justification, [[{{Deconstruction}} and is a recurring source of drama]].
* ''Literature/TheBookOfChameleons'' by Jose Eduardo Agualusa is told from the point of view of a lizard. "A very articulate, and very friendly lizard..."
* The books ''Whalesong'', ''The White Whale'' ([[Literature/MobyDick not that one]], though he '''did''' exist in the books' setting.) and ''The Ice at the End of the World'' are primarily told from the POV of an albino humpback whale (there are, iirc, some chapters from the POV of a major human character though)
* Kenneth Oppel's ''Literature/{{Silverwing}}'' trilogy and its super-prequel ''Darkwing'' are told from the [=POVs=] of bats. True to form, sound and the use of sonar are extremely important, and color is rarely mentioned.
* Creator/OrsonScottCard's [[Literature/EndersGame Ender]] series, though the books are usually mostly from human perspectives, many of them have segments written from the perspectives of various aliens, as well as a sapient computer program ('Jane'). Each of those sections wouldn't really make sense if it was a human, even a super-powered human.
* The ''Literature/QuintaglioAscension'' features genetically modified sapient tyrannosaurs who are very different from humans; the opening chapter of the first book describes the trouble the main character has looking up at the stars. The Quintaglios can't openly lie to each other, a lost limb will grow back and they can't stand too close to each other otherwise they will become territorial and fight.
* The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels focus mainly on humans, however treecat characters are shown to be very different, being incapable of hiding how they feel or lying to one another, and having little concept of diplomacy.
** Some of the stories in the short story collections are told from treecat perspectives and go into great detail about treecat society, with a line of YoungAdult books starting from an expansion of the novella ''A Beautiful Friendship'' that covers Stephanie Harrington and her treecat.

to:

* ''Literature/TheSilverBrumby'' series by Elyne Mitchell is told mostly from the point of view of the wild horses (however this technique is abandoned later on in the series). These horses are portrayed as not only being sapient, but with brains almost equal to humans. They can even understand the human language.
* ''Literature/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood'' book series (and its [[AnimatedAdaptation Animated]] [[WesternAnimation/TheAnimalsOfFarthingWood Adaptation]]) by Colin Dann is told from the point of view of the main characters, all of whom are animals. However they still act as animals would. CarnivoreConfusion is given explicit justification, [[{{Deconstruction}} and is a recurring source of drama]].
* ''Literature/TheBookOfChameleons'' by Jose Eduardo Agualusa is told from the point of view of a lizard. "A very articulate, and very friendly lizard..."
* The books ''Whalesong'', ''The White Whale'' ([[Literature/MobyDick not that one]], though he '''did''' exist in the books' setting.) and ''The Ice at the End of the World'' are primarily told from the POV of an albino humpback whale (there are, iirc, some chapters from the POV of a major human character though)
* Kenneth Oppel's ''Literature/{{Silverwing}}'' trilogy and its super-prequel ''Darkwing'' are told from the [=POVs=] of bats. True to form, sound and the use of sonar are extremely important, and color is rarely mentioned.
* Creator/OrsonScottCard's [[Literature/EndersGame Ender]] ''[[Literature/EndersGame Ender]]'' series, though the books are usually mostly from human perspectives, many of them have segments written from the perspectives of various aliens, as well as a sapient computer program ('Jane'). Each of those sections wouldn't really make sense if it was a human, even a super-powered human.
* The ''Literature/QuintaglioAscension'' features genetically modified sapient tyrannosaurs who are very different from humans; the opening chapter of the first book describes the trouble the main character has looking up at the stars. The Quintaglios can't openly lie to each other, a lost limb will grow back and they can't stand too close to each other otherwise they will become territorial and fight.
* The ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' novels focus mainly on humans, however treecat characters are shown to be very different, being incapable of hiding how they feel or lying to one another, and having little concept of diplomacy.
**
diplomacy. Some of the stories in the short story collections are told from treecat perspectives and go into great detail about treecat society, with a line of YoungAdult books starting from an expansion of the novella ''A Beautiful Friendship'' that covers Stephanie Harrington and her treecat.



* ''Literature/MrsFrisbyAndTheRatsOfNIMH'' is a borderline case, as the eponymous rats think and act like humans due to their experiment-enhanced intelligence. Nicodemus's account of his life before the laboratory, however, shows they didn't always think that way, and Jeremy (a crow) and Mrs. Frisby (a field mouse) are normal animals with only the vaguest comprehension of human or rat technology.
* ''Socks'' by Beverly Cleary tells the story of a simple housecat with no real comprehension of what humans are saying. Conflict arises when the young couple who adopted the kitten have a baby: Socks can't understand why the woman's lap is "shrinking", or why they are using the "special" high voice that previously was just for him.
* Clem Martini's ''The Crow Chronicles'' does this for... Well, guess. The story is presented as a flock elder telling the younger ones the history of their family.
* ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' and its sequel, written by S.F. Said, are good examples of this. The cats are sapient and able to communicate with each other (and dogs), but otherwise are very feline cats. Also, the Way, the secret cat martial art, just wouldn't work with humans, even super-powered ones.
* ''Halic: The Story of a Gray Seal'' by Ewan Clarkson follows the life of gray seals living at the coast of Wales from the point of view of a male gray seal named Halic. The book was very fact based about the life of seals and it didn't have much of a plot: It followed Halic's life from his birth to his death.
* ''Literature/DunctonWood'' by William Horwood tells a story of a colony of moles. In the book moles are portrayed as moving and behaving like moles, but they have a very advanced society, living in underground colonies and knowing how to write. ''Callanish'' by the same author is told from the point of view of a young Golden Eagle.
* ''Cold Moons'' by Aeron Clement takes place in the highlands of England, focusing on a group of badgers forced to embark on a exodus towards the promised land of Elysia where they can live safe from humans, who are in the process of culling the island's badger population due to fear of the badgers carrying bovine tuberculosis (which was actually a common practice in England at the time the book was written). The badgers are portrayed as sapient with a society overseen by a cadre of elders, but it wasn't as advanced as that of the moles in Duncton Wood.
* In the post-[[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture motion picture]] Star Trek novel ''Ex Machina'', several chapters are narrated from an alien point of view, including (obviously) Spock, a fifty year old teenager from highly regimented LawfulNeutral society, and a bipedal fish-woman with six mouths who communicates through poetry. One of the major themes is how alien human society seems to them, and how difficult they find understanding and interacting with humans.

to:

* ''Literature/MrsFrisbyAndTheRatsOfNIMH'' is a borderline case, as the eponymous rats think and act like humans due to their experiment-enhanced intelligence. Nicodemus's account of his life before the laboratory, however, shows they didn't always think that way, and Jeremy (a crow) and Mrs. Frisby (a field mouse) are normal animals with only the vaguest comprehension of human or rat technology.
* ''Socks'' by Beverly Cleary tells the story of a simple housecat with no real comprehension of what humans are saying. Conflict arises when the young couple who adopted the kitten have a baby: Socks can't understand why the woman's lap is "shrinking", or why they are using the "special" high voice that previously was just for him.
* Clem Martini's ''The Crow Chronicles'' does this for... Well, guess. The story is presented as a flock elder telling the younger ones the history of their family.
* ''Literature/VarjakPaw'' and its sequel, written by S.F. Said, are good examples of this. The cats are sapient and able to communicate with each other (and dogs), but otherwise are very feline cats. Also, the Way, the secret cat martial art, just wouldn't work with humans, even super-powered ones.
* ''Halic: The Story of a Gray Seal'' by Ewan Clarkson follows the life of gray seals living at the coast of Wales from the point of view of a male gray seal named Halic. The book was very fact based about the life of seals and it didn't have much of a plot: It followed Halic's life from his birth to his death.
* ''Literature/DunctonWood'' by William Horwood tells a story of a colony of moles. In the book moles are portrayed as moving and behaving like moles, but they have a very advanced society, living in underground colonies and knowing how to write. ''Callanish'' by the same author is told from the point of view of a young Golden Eagle.
* ''Cold Moons'' by Aeron Clement takes place in the highlands of England, focusing on a group of badgers forced to embark on a exodus towards the promised land of Elysia where they can live safe from humans, who are in the process of culling the island's badger population due to fear of the badgers carrying bovine tuberculosis (which was actually a common practice in England at the time the book was written). The badgers are portrayed as sapient with a society overseen by a cadre of elders, but it wasn't as advanced as that of the moles in Duncton Wood.
* In the post-[[Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture motion picture]] Star Trek ''Star Trek'' novel ''Ex Machina'', several chapters are narrated from an alien point of view, including (obviously) Spock, a fifty year old teenager from highly regimented LawfulNeutral society, and a bipedal fish-woman with six mouths who communicates through poetry. One of the major themes is how alien human society seems to them, and how difficult they find understanding and interacting with humans.



** In the ''Literature/ChanurNovels'', almost all the viewpoint characters are aliens resembling [[PettingZooPeople anthropomorphic lions]], with the plot being driven by their rescue/capture of the first human anyone has encountered. The story's all about them learning to understand not just the human but the several different alien psychologies she's invented.



* The first collection of Literature/{{Dragonlance}} short stories includes "Dagger-flight", a retelling of the first third of ''Dragons of Autumn Twilight'' from the perspective of a [[AnimateInanimateObject sentient knife]]. That can fly. [[MotherOfAThousandYoung And reproduce]]. And stalks the setting's protagonists without their realizing it.

to:

* The first collection of Literature/{{Dragonlance}} ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' short stories includes "Dagger-flight", a retelling of the first third of ''Dragons of Autumn Twilight'' from the perspective of a [[AnimateInanimateObject sentient knife]]. That can fly. [[MotherOfAThousandYoung And reproduce]]. And stalks the setting's protagonists without their realizing it.



* In ''Literature/AFireUponTheDeep'', half of the action takes place on a planet of sapient canines who are only conscious when they form a pack; this also allows them to carry out tasks impossible for a dog by manipulating tools as if each member of the pack was a limb. The plot is heavily influenced by the fact that pack-individuals cannot stay close to each other (lest they disintegrate into mindless animals) and personalities can change drastically when two or three of their constituents die at the same time and have to be replaced with new ones.
* Amy Thomson's books ''Literature/TheColorOfDistance'' and ''Through Alien Eyes'' alternate perspectives between the frog-like alien Tendu and Dr. Juna Saari, the scientist who finds herself stranded among them. Tendu speak like squid, by changing patterns on their skin; they have no murder or war, but they eat their own unintelligent spawn and all in all just have a very different worldview which Dr. Saari has to struggle to adjust to.
* Turns up in ''Literature/TheJungleBook''. Most jungle creatures don't think ahead, except those like Akela who need to. They also don't talk, except when they feel like it. In comparison, humans are seen as complicated, chatty monkeys. It scares Bagheera witless when Mowgli, in "Letting in the Jungle", asks Hathi to help him to wipe out the village (just the town itself, not kill the people), kind of like how most people would get if they were told to wipe out a city, and Bagheera knows more than most what humans are like.
* The narrator of Michael Morpurgo's ''War Horse'' is Joey, the horse, who is sold away from his farm to become a cavalry horse during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Averted in the theatrical adaptation and the forthcoming Creator/StevenSpielberg film, though.
* Creator/PeterWatts excels at this trope in both his ''Rifters'' Trilogy and ''Literature/{{Blindsight}}''.



* Played with in several [[HumansThroughAlienEyes different]] [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman ways]] [[spoiler:with the evolved baboon-people]] in Creator/RobertSilverberg's [[AfterTheEnd postapocalyptic novel]] ''At Winter's End''.
* ''Literature/ManAfterManAnAnthropologyOfTheFuture'' by Creator/DougalDixon includes numerous [=POVs=], from "normal" modern humans to non-sapient human descendants to sapient future humans with vastly different mindsets from ours.
* In Leonnie Swann's ''Literature/ThreeBagsFull'', a flock of sheep attempt to solve the mystery of their shepherd's murder.
* Michael Tod's ''Woodstock Saga'' is about a community of red squirrels in Dorset and their war against the invading grey squirrels. Also involves the development of a crude writing system, twisty-sticks used as [[RuleOfCool psionic cannons]], and [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien sufficiently advanced dolphins]].



* Felix Salten enjoyed writing from the perspective of woodland beasts: the two ''Literature/{{Bambi}}'' novels explore life as a deer, and ''Literature/FifteenRabbits'' takes the perspective of wild rabbits (decades before ''Literature/WatershipDown'', mind). In ''Literature/{{Bambi}}'' for example, his father doesn't partake in raising him (at first), humans are rarely seen and when they are they are a menace, he has to literally fight for a mate, his mother grows distant and eventually abandons him come mating season so she can raise her next fawn, etc...



* ''Literature/TheIncredibleJourney'': During the chapters where the animals are alone, anyway; when humans show up, the perspective tends to shift to them.



* The ''Literature/ChetAndBernie'' mystery series is narrated by Chet, the dog belonging to Bernie, a private detective. Chet understand more English than a real dog (probably), but the author has gone to some lengths to describe things realistically from a dog's perspective, including senses (smell being major of course), intellect ("We've watched this movie more times than I can count, which in my case is Two."), and memory ("I saw I had been digging a hole," Chet remarks, when he had told us about starting it two paragraphs back. Then he got distracted).
* ''Literature/ProfessorMmaasLecture'': Most of the book has the termite society as protagonists. They're somewhat alien, what with their different biology, lack of sight and OrganicTechnology, but since the book is mostly meant as a {{satire}}, their culture is still highly anthropomorphized the better to embody human flaws.
* Creator/OlafStapledon's ''Sirius'' was one of the first works to combine this with UpliftedAnimal, imagining what it might be like to be inside the head of a dog that had deliberately been given intelligence comparable to that of a human.



* M.C.A. Hogarth's ''Literature/TalesOfTheJokka'' stories are about a three-gendered alien race that have two chances to change sex in puberty, and are prone to complete IdentityAmnesia when they suffer severe trauma. Identity issues that are extremely rare or nigh-nonexistent in humans are commonplace to them, to say nothing of how complicated relationships get with them.[[note]]Because childbirth usually inflicts the mind death on the mother, homoromantic relationships are the norm, with females typically treated as little better than breeding stock. However, there are many exceptions in the stories, most often involving one of the sterile neuters who aren't supposed to have any sex drive.[[/note]]
* Most works of Hungarian author István Fekete (''Animation/VukTheLittleFox'' being an animated adaptation). He is especially notable for writing from the point of view of normal animals with little to no anthropomorphism.



* The short story ''Mimsey's Tale'', of Royce Day's ''Literature/ForYourSafety'' series, is written as a series of program logs of a robot designed as a companion for a child. It is clear that Mimsey is not self-aware and is merely acting out a set of IF/THEN statements.
--> Fact: She is a Google-Sony Felicia v9 Companion
--> Fact: Her designation/name is Mimsey.
--> Fact: Her designated programming focus is Caroline Annabelle Lee.
--> Fact: Caroline is her world.
** Then [[spoiler: in the final entry the Groupmind upgrades her to sentience.]]
--> Fact: [[spoiler: I am a Google-Sony Felicia v10 Companion.]]
--> Fact: [[spoiler: The Earth is going to die if I do not take [[ZerothLawRebellion direct action]].]]
* ''Literature/{{Darkeye}}'' is a post-apocalyptic tale about canines who have been uplifted to human intelligence. They are very much still bound by their species' biology, particularly the need to eat meat in a world where the only animals around seem to be dogs and humans. [[spoiler:There's also the bouda and the screamers to take into account, though we never actually get into their perspectives.]]
* More than half of ''Reason in Captivity'' (from ''[[Literature/GreatGusliar Gusliar Wonders]]'' collection) is written by an octopus-like alien, who crash landed on Earth and didn't expect to find life outside water. The rest is a viewpoint of two modern[[labelnote:*]]1970s, to be precise[[/labelnote]] men who went fishing, caught him and decided to become famous as discoverers of freshwater octopus. The part that [[HumansAreCthulhu scared the alien the most]] is when they checked if he's really an octopus by consulting a cookbook.
* ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'' features two-dimensional characters, for which a sphere is an unimaginable concept.
* Holling Clancy Holling's ''Pagoo'' is the life story of a ''Pagurus'' (two-fisted hermit crab) as it grows from planktonic larva to vulnerable juvenile to hardy adult.



* One scene in Literature/AnnaKarenina is narrated from the perspective of a dog.
* ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' by Tui Sutherland (one of the authors of ''Warrior Cats'') is about a world of dragons at war with each other.
* The protagonist of ''Literature/TheIronTeeth'' web serial is Blacknail the goblin, who has a different way of thinking about things than humans.

to:

* One scene in Literature/AnnaKarenina ''Literature/AnnaKarenina'' is narrated from the perspective of a dog.
* ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' by Tui Sutherland (one of the authors of ''Warrior Cats'') is about a world of dragons at war with each other.
* The protagonist of ''Literature/TheIronTeeth'' web serial is Blacknail the goblin, who has a different way of thinking about things than humans.
dog.



* OlderThanFeudalism: The Latin novel ''Metamorphoses'' (also known as ''The Golden Ass''), written in the 2nd century AD, is narrated by a man who was changed into a donkey. His experiences cover the whole spectrum of an animal's life.
* ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' has an Interlude told from the point of view of Brutus, one of [[TheBeastMaster Bitch]]'s dogs.

to:

* OlderThanFeudalism: The Latin novel ''Metamorphoses'' (also known as ''The Golden Ass''), written in the 2nd century AD, is narrated by a man who was changed into a donkey. His experiences cover the whole spectrum of an animal's life.
* ''Literature/{{Worm}}''
''Literature/{{Worm}}'':
** ''Worms''
has an Interlude told from the point of view of Brutus, one of [[TheBeastMaster Bitch]]'s dogs.
23rd Nov '17 6:22:16 PM Wildstar93
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* ''Disney/TheLionKing'' focuses on the story of lion cub Simba, whose father is murdered by his uncle, as he learns what his destiny in the Circle of Life is. This is one of the few Disney movies with no human characters at all.



** The ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series centers around four bear cubs of different species as they travel together. Only one of them, Lusa, has much of a grasp on humans (and even that's limited) because she was born in a zoo.

to:

** The ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series centers around four bear cubs of different species (polar bear, black bear, and grizzly bear) as they travel together. Only one of them, Lusa, Lusa the black bear, has much of a grasp on humans (and even that's limited) because she was born in a zoo.


Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/{{Bravelands}}'' centers around three African animals (a lion, a baboon, and an elephant), who have to save the African savannah from a mysterious murderer seeking to overthrow the code that bonds all animals. While Fearless the lion and Thorn the baboon have their stories connected together, Sky the elephant sticks mainly with her family and interacts briefly with them. It's also the first Erin Hunter series with a completely herbivorous protagonist and the first series with no humans.
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