History Main / Xenofiction

7th Aug '17 9:05:03 PM PaulA
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* Three out of four books of the ''Literature/StarCarrier'' series intersperse two human points-of-view with a POV of alien antagonists. Creator/WilliamHKeithJr heavily explores what the world looks like to them, for example with the Slan, a heavily collectivist species that sees by echolocation, or the H'rulka, LivingGasbag colony organisms 200 meters long that view a BoardingParty of Navy SEALS[[note]]old acronym updated to "Sea, Air, Land, Space[[/note]] as bizarre parasites.

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* Three out of four books of the ''Literature/StarCarrier'' series intersperse two human points-of-view with a POV of alien antagonists. Creator/WilliamHKeithJr Creator/IanDouglas heavily explores what the world looks like to them, for example with the Slan, a heavily collectivist species that sees by echolocation, or the H'rulka, LivingGasbag colony organisms 200 meters long that view a BoardingParty of Navy SEALS[[note]]old acronym updated to "Sea, Air, Land, Space[[/note]] as bizarre parasites.
31st Jul '17 7:32:00 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ''TabletopGame/BunniesAndBurrows'', being based on ''WatershipDown'', is a roleplaying game in which the players have to take the roles of rabbits with all their limitations and strengths. In fact, since bunnies are not exactly the strongest animals out there, the game forces the player to confront enemies and obstacles with problem-solving solutions and wit. Humans appear as monsters in the game, completely alien to the players. It was very innovative in its time, since it was the first RPG that let the player play as non-humanoids creatures.

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* ''TabletopGame/BunniesAndBurrows'', being based on ''WatershipDown'', ''Literature/WatershipDown'', is a roleplaying game in which the players have to take the roles of rabbits with all their limitations and strengths. In fact, since bunnies are not exactly the strongest animals out there, the game forces the player to confront enemies and obstacles with problem-solving solutions and wit. Humans appear as monsters in the game, completely alien to the players. It was very innovative in its time, since it was the first RPG that let the player play as non-humanoids creatures.
24th Jun '17 8:13:43 AM Gideoncrawle
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* While the below are more explicit/extreme examples, the vast majority of fantasy or science-fictional [=RPGs=] include at least options for playing nonhuman characters, though the extent to which their behavior, attitudes, and priorities actually matter tend to vary widely with how much in-depth use the GM and player in question put into the section describing cultural, biological, and mental differences.
13th Jun '17 10:15:45 PM nombretomado
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* The narrator of Michael Morpurgo's ''War Horse'' is Joey, the horse, who is sold away from his farm to become a cavalry horse during WorldWarOne. Averted in the theatrical adaptation and the forthcoming Creator/StevenSpielberg film, though.

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* The narrator of Michael Morpurgo's ''War Horse'' is Joey, the horse, who is sold away from his farm to become a cavalry horse during WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Averted in the theatrical adaptation and the forthcoming Creator/StevenSpielberg film, though.
5th Jun '17 3:57:40 PM legendaryweredragon
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See XenofictionalLiterature.

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See XenofictionalLiterature.
XenofictionalLiterature for an index of Xenofiction.
4th Jun '17 9:22:35 PM Twiddler
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* ''Literature/WatershipDown'', a tale about [[KillerRabbit badass wild rabbits]]. They can only count to four and most of them can't grasp concepts like "things which float can be ridden across water to safety", but they are sapient. Often the go-to example for explaining the genre. Even the ''dialogue'' is noted as being translated from the way rabbits would actually communicate for the benefit of the reader.

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* ''Literature/WatershipDown'', a tale about [[KillerRabbit badass wild rabbits]].rabbits. They can only count to four and most of them can't grasp concepts like "things which float can be ridden across water to safety", but they are sapient. Often the go-to example for explaining the genre. Even the ''dialogue'' is noted as being translated from the way rabbits would actually communicate for the benefit of the reader.
4th Jun '17 8:50:45 PM Twiddler
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Added DiffLines:

See XenofictionalLiterature.
17th Apr '17 3:55:41 PM intastiel
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* ''Webcomic/AwfulHospital'' is set in one region of a bizarre, mutable [[TheMultiverse multiverse]] where ''everything'' that can perceive or be perceived can exist in any number of forms simultaneously, and "reality" is a subjective measure of which elements of the Perception Range you're paying attention to at the time. Humans, to those beings capable of noticing them at all, are seen as pitiably odd for having their capacity to exist constrained to a single, ephemeral, matter-bound form.

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* ''Webcomic/AwfulHospital'' is set in one region of a bizarre, mutable [[TheMultiverse multiverse]] where ''everything'' that can perceive or be perceived can exist in any number of self-aware forms simultaneously, and "reality" is a subjective measure of which elements of the Perception Range you're paying attention to at the time. Humans, to those beings capable of noticing them at all, are seen as pitiably odd for having their capacity to exist constrained to a single, ephemeral, matter-bound form.
6th Apr '17 11:10:40 AM justanid
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A good rule of thumb for figuring out if something is in this genre or not: if you can replace the non-humans with (maybe superpowered) humans without too much trouble, it's probably not {{Xenofiction}}: {{Beast Fable}}s and works about {{Funny Animal}}s are, in general, not examples. If it's taking place under the nose of humans, we [[MouseWorld may or may not]] have a {{Masquerade}}, and [[HumansThroughAlienEyes humans]] will probably either be [[HumansAreBastards bastards]] or [[HumansAreCthulhu eldritch abominations]]. If humans are taking place under the nose of it, you may have HumansAreInteresting. Contrast MostWritersAreHuman. Xenofiction usually explores BizarreAlienPsychology. Do not confuse with {{Xenafication}}, or [[VideoGame/{{Xenogears}} the]] [[VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}} Xeno]] [[VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}} series]].

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A good rule of thumb for figuring out if something is in this genre or not: if you can replace the non-humans with (maybe superpowered) humans without too much trouble, it's probably not {{Xenofiction}}: {{Beast Fable}}s and works about {{Funny Animal}}s are, in general, not examples. Likewise in many a MouseWorld, size is often the only major difference between humans and non-humans; though there is Xenofiction featuring non-humans with great differences in size.

If it's taking place under the nose of humans, we [[MouseWorld there may or may not]] not have a {{Masquerade}}, and [[HumansThroughAlienEyes humans]] will probably either be [[HumansAreBastards bastards]] or [[HumansAreCthulhu eldritch abominations]]. If humans are taking place under the nose of it, you may have HumansAreInteresting. Contrast MostWritersAreHuman. Xenofiction usually explores BizarreAlienPsychology. Do not confuse BizarreAlienPsychology.

Contrast MostWritersAreHuman.

Not to be confused
with {{Xenafication}}, or [[VideoGame/{{Xenogears}} the]] [[VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}} Xeno]] [[VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}} series]].
games]].
5th Apr '17 12:08:17 PM JoeMerl
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* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** The series has some xenofictional aspects. Whenever the Animorphs morph into a new animal, they have to learn to gain control over its instincts. Also several of the books are told from the perspective of either an alien or [[ShapeshifterModeLock a nothlit]], someone who is stuck in an animal morph and thus has to either learn to deal with that animal's instincts or give in to them.
** Then there are the books told from the perspective of Aximili "Ax" Esgarrouth Isthil, the team's TokenNonhuman, who is a stranded Andalite trying to adapt to Earth culture. More chillingly, there's the stand-alone novel ''[[{{Prequel}} Visser]]'', narrated by the Yeerk general Visser One, which describes the discovery of Earth from the perspective of the alien leader who will eventually spearhead its [[AlienInvasion conquest]].
** And there's the other stand-alone novel called ''[[{{Prequel}}The Ellimist Chronicles]]'' where it never even gives you a clear description of the bizarre creature telling the story.

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* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** The series has some xenofictional aspects. Whenever the Animorphs morph into a new animal, they have to learn to gain control over its instincts. Also several of the
''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'': Several books are told from alien points of view. Some are just from the perspective of either an alien or [[ShapeshifterModeLock a nothlit]], someone who is stuck in an animal morph and thus has to either learn to deal with that animal's instincts or give in to them.
** Then there are the books told from the perspective of Aximili "Ax" Esgarrouth Isthil,
Ax, the team's TokenNonhuman, who is a stranded Andalite TokenNonHuman, and often involve him trying to adapt to Earth culture. More chillingly, there's understand humanity; we also have the stand-alone novel ''[[{{Prequel}} Visser]]'', narrated by ''Chronicles,'' prequel books focused on other alien characters. ''The Hork-Bajir Chronciles'' and the Yeerk general quite trippy ''[[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Ellimist]] Chronicles'' are especially notable, having no humans outside of the FramingDevice. Meanwhile ''The Andalite Chronicles'' tells [[IAmDyingPleaseTakeMyMacGuffin Elfangor]]'s backstory, beginning when he rescued a pair of humans from AlienAbduction by TheGreys, while ''Visser'' is a VillainEpisode about [[PredecessorVillain Visser One, One]]'s [[HumanityIsInfectious initial encounters with humanity]].
** Morphing has xenofictional elements built in; while in morph, TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody, so you have to fight to control the animal's instincts,
which describes can be incredibly difficult (especially for hive insects, which trigger LossOfIdentity pretty quickly). We also have books focusing on Tobias, who got {{Shapeshifter Mode Lock}}ed as a hawk [[FirstEpisodeSpoiler in the discovery of Earth from the perspective of the alien leader who will eventually spearhead its [[AlienInvasion conquest]].
** And there's the other stand-alone novel called ''[[{{Prequel}}The Ellimist Chronicles]]'' where it never even gives you a clear description of the bizarre creature telling the story.
first book]].
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