History Main / WriterOnBoard

16th Feb '17 4:14:50 AM Wooboo
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* Thriller author Brad Thor does this on occasion, but ''Hidden Order'' is one of his most blatant examples of this. It begins with special operations expert Scott Harvath suddenly taking on the role of a freelance investigator looking into a series of serial murders, and breaks down into a scree against the Federal Reserve, who to no-one's surprise, turn out to be the BigBad of the story, eventually getting to the point where the narrative gets shoved aside for a character to become a mouthpiece for Thor's views on the Reserve for a chapter and a half.
14th Feb '17 5:09:30 AM Korodzik
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* Stephen King's Gunslinger series has a particularly uncomfortable section where he inserts his own real-life incident of being hit by a reckless driver into the plot. Not only does he use the actual real name of the person who hit him, he spends a considerable amount of time demonstrating and discussing that the driver was an absolute inbred moron that had no business driving on the road. This is especially awkward considering that the driver had died the year after the accident, which was before this section was written. Supposedly, King had expressed sorrow at the man's death, so it's unknown why he was determined to demean him in his later book.

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* Stephen King's Gunslinger Creator/StephenKing's ''Literature/TheDarkTower'' series has a particularly uncomfortable section where he inserts his own real-life incident of being hit by a reckless driver into the plot. Not only does he use the actual real name of the person who hit him, he spends a considerable amount of time demonstrating and discussing that the driver was an absolute inbred moron that had no business driving on the road. This is especially awkward considering that the driver had died the year after the accident, which was before this section was written. Supposedly, King had expressed sorrow at the man's death, so it's unknown why he was determined to demean him in his later book.
30th Jan '17 1:35:18 AM Luppercus
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** Several episodes of Series/ElChapulinColorado, Los Caquitos and at least one in Series/ElChavoDelOcho deal with rehabilitation of criminals. Chespirito strongly believe that criminals should be rehabilitated by society and treated in a humane way and ex convicts should be given second chances. He also was a strong opponent of death penalty (and his characters too, of course).
** Several episodes of Series/ElChavoDelOcho deal with discrimination against poor people, the need for solidarity in society, the unfairness of class differences and how people might accuse easily an orphan like Chavo of been a robber than they’ll do to other people of a better social status.
** As a pacifist he hated violent sports, particularly boxing. Series/ElChavoDelOcho gets Anvillicious sometimes with his treatment of boxing as the worst thing in the world.
** In several episodes one character would say: “No one, no one has the right to take another human being’s life” (if this is an anti-abortion or anti-death penalty or both statement is up to you).

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** Several episodes of Series/ElChapulinColorado, Los Caquitos ''Series/ElChapulinColorado'', ''Los Caquitos'' and at least one in Series/ElChavoDelOcho ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho'' deal with rehabilitation of criminals. Chespirito strongly believe believed that criminals should be rehabilitated by society and treated in a humane way and ex convicts should be given second chances. He also was a strong opponent of death penalty (and his characters too, of course).
** Several episodes of Series/ElChavoDelOcho ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho'' deal with discrimination against poor people, the need for solidarity in society, the unfairness of class differences and how people might accuse easily an orphan like Chavo of been a robber than they’ll do to other people of a better social status.
** As a pacifist he hated violent sports, particularly boxing. Series/ElChavoDelOcho ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho'' gets Anvillicious {{Anvilicious}} sometimes with his treatment of boxing as the worst thing in the world.
** In several episodes one character would say: “No one, no one '''no one''' has the right to take another human being’s life” (if this is an anti-abortion or anti-death penalty or both statement is up to you).
30th Jan '17 1:32:35 AM Luppercus
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* Creator/{{Chespirito}} was a very complex man. On one hand he was very socially conservative and a vocal opponent of abortion and gay marriage (though he was OK with gay civil unions) but much more progressive in economic issues and social reform, probably because he was a devoted Catholic.[[note]]Notice that is very common in Latin America for political Catholicism to be left-wing in political and economic issued but more conservative in social issues, as most Christian Democratic Parties would show.[[/note]] His views went into his shows in many ways:
** Several episodes of Series/ElChapulinColorado, Los Caquitos and at least one in Series/ElChavoDelOcho deal with rehabilitation of criminals. Chespirito strongly believe that criminals should be rehabilitated by society and treated in a humane way and ex convicts should be given second chances. He also was a strong opponent of death penalty (and his characters too, of course).
** Several episodes of Series/ElChavoDelOcho deal with discrimination against poor people, the need for solidarity in society, the unfairness of class differences and how people might accuse easily an orphan like Chavo of been a robber than they’ll do to other people of a better social status.
**As a pacifist he hated violent sports, particularly boxing. Series/ElChavoDelOcho gets Anvillicious sometimes with his treatment of boxing as the worst thing in the world.
** In several episodes one character would say: “No one, no one has the right to take another human being’s life” (if this is an anti-abortion or anti-death penalty or both statement is up to you).
23rd Jan '17 1:51:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* While the entire LeftBehind franchise is a massive AuthorTract, the Writer On Board aspect comes into play when a previously independent, scientifically minded character is suddenly touched by God, converts, and from that moment on reminds us repeatedly how happy they are now that they got rid of their delusions and bloated self importance brought on by education (self-importance through HolierThanThou is fine).

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* ''Literature/LeftBehind'':
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While the entire LeftBehind franchise is a massive AuthorTract, the Writer On Board aspect comes into play when a previously independent, scientifically minded character is suddenly touched by God, converts, and from that moment on reminds us repeatedly how happy they are now that they got rid of their delusions and bloated self importance brought on by education (self-importance through HolierThanThou is fine).
26th Nov '16 1:29:57 PM lucy24
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*** Every parent on Earth lost their young children, but Planned Parenthood grief councilors can't find any job except wait for new pregnancies to abort.

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*** Every parent on Earth lost their young children, but Planned Parenthood grief councilors counselors can't find any job except wait for new pregnancies to abort.
21st Nov '16 12:36:37 AM Fireblood
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** Writer John Frink is clearly some kind of raging liberal, as he created two of the series' shrillest political episodes. "Bart-Mangled Banner" is basically just one long jeremiad against an over-the-top straw man caricature of what America's political culture is supposedly like during the George W. Bush years, while "Politically Inept, with Homer Simpson" is a similarly unsubtle denunciation of the Tea Party as a movement of mindless morons. Though the Simpsons obviously always dabbles in political commentary, these two episodes are infamous for swapping the show's trademark cynicism in favor for narrow, partisan rage.

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** Writer John Frink is clearly some kind of raging liberal, as he created two of the series' shrillest political episodes. "Bart-Mangled Banner" is basically just one long jeremiad against an over-the-top straw man caricature of what America's political culture is supposedly like during the George W. Bush years, while "Politically Inept, with Homer Simpson" is a similarly unsubtle denunciation of the Tea Party as a movement of mindless morons. Though the Simpsons obviously always dabbles in political commentary, these two episodes are infamous for swapping the show's trademark cynicism in favor for of narrow, partisan rage.



** This goes beyond politics. For example, there have been ''two'' episodes that express their disapproval with George Lucas and Steven Spielberg.
** Also Cartman's promiscuous mother is named Liane after an ex girlfriend of Trey's who he walked in on having sex with another man (and in ''Film/CannibalTheMusical'' Packer's faithless horse who gets ridden by the entire town is called Liane)

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** This goes beyond politics. For example, there have been ''two'' episodes that express their disapproval with of George Lucas and Steven Spielberg.
** Also Cartman's promiscuous mother is named Liane after an ex girlfriend of Trey's who he walked in on having sex with another man (and in ''Film/CannibalTheMusical'' Packer's faithless horse who gets ridden by the entire town is called Liane)Liane).
21st Nov '16 12:24:46 AM Fireblood
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* Creator/DonaldPBellisario served with Lee Harvey Oswald in the Marines and the episode of ''Series/QuantumLeap'' that was about the JFK assassination was his rebuttal to the various theories about it, including the film ''Film/{{JFK}}'', as he does believe that Oswald to be capable of committing the act on his own.

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* Creator/DonaldPBellisario served with Lee Harvey Oswald in the Marines and the episode of ''Series/QuantumLeap'' that was about the JFK assassination was his rebuttal to the various theories about it, including the film ''Film/{{JFK}}'', as he does believe that Oswald to be was capable of committing the act on his own.own. The episode reproduces a conversation he really had then with Oswald, in fact.
20th Nov '16 11:04:36 PM Fireblood
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* After his own conversion to Spiritualism, Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle wrote a novel titled ''The Land of Mist'' to explain and justify his beliefs, including having his ultra-rationalist hero Literature/ProfessorChallenger become convinced of the rightness of Spiritualism and convert. Conan Doyle makes a point of Challenger having a believable motive for his abrupt philosophical U-turn, namely the death of his beloved wife. This follows Doyle's own conversion due to the death of his son in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, which says more about him than Spiritualism being true or false.

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* After his own conversion to Spiritualism, Sir Creator/ArthurConanDoyle wrote a novel titled ''The Land of Mist'' to explain and justify his beliefs, including having his ultra-rationalist hero Literature/ProfessorChallenger become convinced of the rightness of Spiritualism and convert. Conan Doyle makes a point of Challenger having a believable motive for his abrupt philosophical U-turn, namely the death of his beloved wife. This follows Doyle's own conversion due to the death of his son in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, which says more about him than Spiritualism being true or false.
20th Nov '16 10:57:34 PM Fireblood
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** The afterlife thing is particularly noteworthy, since Goodkind's attempt to justify it is more baffling than any RetCon could be. It is revealed in a later book that since [[TheMagicGoesAway the world was devoid of magic for a time]] the afterlife, magical in nature, has ceased to exist. So ''now'' belief in the afterlife is unfounded, even though it could be proven to exist before. This overwhelming change in the world and its profound impact on the human condition is mentioned exactly once, and after that all the characters behave as if they had always lived in a world where there was no life after death.

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** The afterlife thing is particularly noteworthy, since Goodkind's attempt to justify it is more baffling than any RetCon could be. It is revealed in a later book that since [[TheMagicGoesAway the world was devoid of magic for a time]] the afterlife, magical in nature, has ceased to exist. So ''now'' belief in the afterlife is unfounded, even though it could be proven to exist before. This overwhelming change in the world and its profound impact on the human condition is mentioned exactly once, and after that all the characters behave as if they had always lived in a world where there was no life after death. This is not so coincidentally in line with an Objectivist view, which disbelieves in any afterlife.
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