History Main / WorthlessYellowRocks

11th Feb '16 11:37:19 AM Nentuaby
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Robot City'' series, the robots of the eponymous city see gold as a very weak metal, and mostly useless. They don't even need it for its utility as a conductor, since Asimov's "[[AppliedPhlebotinum positronics]]" are said to be superior to mere electronicns and instead employ a sponge of platinum-irridium alloy. However, seeing as how gold never corrodes, they ended up finding a use for it: eating utensils for the humans that visit.
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Robot City'' series, the robots of the eponymous city see gold as a very weak metal, and mostly useless. They don't even need it for its utility as a conductor, since Asimov's "[[AppliedPhlebotinum positronics]]" are said to be superior to mere electronicns electronics and instead employ a sponge of platinum-irridium alloy. However, seeing as how gold never corrodes, they ended up finding a use for it: eating utensils for the humans that visit.
11th Feb '16 11:36:41 AM Nentuaby
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Chopped down a HUGE natter block to its essential takeaway.
* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Robot City'' series, the robots of the eponymous city see gold as a very weak metal, and mostly useless. However, seeing as how it never corrupts, they ended up finding a use for it, eating utensils for the humans that visit. ** They seem to forget it's also a great conductor. *** Not that great. Gold's main value in electronics is its resistance to corrosion, as noted by the robots. This is why it's used quite often for plating contacts; no insulating oxide layer will form. However, copper is about 40% more conductive than gold, and silver is better still. That said, silver, copper, and gold ''are'' the top three, at least when only pure elements are considered. **** It's very necessary in a host of electronic devices. Small wires tarnish very easily, if made of silver or copper, which interrupts the voltage. As such, gold's resistance to oxidation is immensely useful. Most mobile phones will contain about 40 cents of gold for this reason. And a couple cents of platinum too. ** Given that Trantorians--inhabitants of the planet-city that's the capital of the Galactic Empire in the Foundation series--still get their news via dead-tree media, the robots probably all used vacuum tubes. ** Asimov's robots use a "positronic brain" which runs on positrons not electrons. How the hell that might work is never explained but given that, its not much of a hand wave to say that gold isn't a good conductor for positrons. *** The positronic brain is usually stated to be platinum-iridium alloy. *** The only reason the "brains" of robots in Asimov's story are "positronic" is because when he wrote the first story featuring such artificial intelligence, positrons had just been discovered several years prior, and he thought [[RuleOfCool "positronic" sounded cooler]]. *** In ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'', a Terminus trader is surprised that some planet wants gold as ransom for a captured person - for him it is "old fashioned", although he has no trouble understanding the possible uses of this fact (he can synthesize significant amounts of it). Later, he is trying to convince a nobleman of that world to buy technology. He sells him a device to transform iron into gold as part of a blackmail scheme of the supposedly pious nobleman. The man is forced to buy all of the trader's goods at far more than their normal price (two shipfuls of ''tin'') in order to keep video footage of him drooling over gold from being broadcast to the citizens. He later tells a friend how laughable it was because it's just not cost-effective to transmute metals, due to the excessive power consumption in the process. The Galactic Empire is shown to use ''iridium'' the way we use silver.
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* Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Robot City'' series, the robots of the eponymous city see gold as a very weak metal, and mostly useless. They don't even need it for its utility as a conductor, since Asimov's "[[AppliedPhlebotinum positronics]]" are said to be superior to mere electronicns and instead employ a sponge of platinum-irridium alloy. However, seeing as how it gold never corrupts, corrodes, they ended up finding a use for it, it: eating utensils for the humans that visit. ** They seem to forget it's also a great conductor. *** Not that great. Gold's main value in electronics is its resistance to corrosion, as noted by the robots. This is why it's used quite often for plating contacts; no insulating oxide layer will form. However, copper is about 40% more conductive than gold, and silver is better still. That said, silver, copper, and gold ''are'' the top three, at least when only pure elements are considered. **** It's very necessary in a host of electronic devices. Small wires tarnish very easily, if made of silver or copper, which interrupts the voltage. As such, gold's resistance to oxidation is immensely useful. Most mobile phones will contain about 40 cents of gold for this reason. And a couple cents of platinum too. ** Given that Trantorians--inhabitants of the planet-city that's the capital of the Galactic Empire in the Foundation series--still get their news via dead-tree media, the robots probably all used vacuum tubes. ** Asimov's robots use a "positronic brain" which runs on positrons not electrons. How the hell that might work is never explained but given that, its not much of a hand wave to say that gold isn't a good conductor for positrons. *** The positronic brain is usually stated to be platinum-iridium alloy. *** The only reason the "brains" of robots in Asimov's story are "positronic" is because when he wrote the first story featuring such artificial intelligence, positrons had just been discovered several years prior, and he thought [[RuleOfCool "positronic" sounded cooler]]. *** In ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'', a Terminus trader is surprised that some planet wants gold as ransom for a captured person - for him it is "old fashioned", although he has no trouble understanding the possible uses of this fact (he can synthesize significant amounts of it). Later, he is trying to convince a nobleman of that world to buy technology. He sells him a device to transform iron into gold as part of a blackmail scheme of the supposedly pious nobleman. The man is forced to buy all of the trader's goods at far more than their normal price (two shipfuls of ''tin'') in order to keep video footage of him drooling over gold from being broadcast to the citizens. He later tells a friend how laughable it was because it's just not cost-effective to transmute metals, due to the excessive power consumption in the process. The Galactic Empire is shown to use ''iridium'' the way we use silver.
6th Feb '16 12:08:20 PM Quanyails
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That's a bit vocal. o3o
** The same BeachEpisode had resident moron Cosmo unearth a ''Honus Wagner baseball card'' under the sand of Dimmsdale Beach as a crab and then discard it as junk, breaking it in half with his claw. Sure, it sounds humorous, but it could be interpreted as a veritable mule kick to the testes for baseball card collectors viewing that particular episode. Who in heaven's name would destroy something that valuable!? The answer? A complete idiot. '''''COSMO.''''' * ''WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'': King Julien went to the Lost Stuff box to find something funny or entertaining. Tossing aside a bunch of dollar bills and a huge gold collar -->'''Julien''': Paper Trash....Metal Trash.... * On ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', Beezy bribes Heloise with a box filled with gold. She happily accepts it...so she can have [[KidsPreferBoxes the box it comes in]].
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** The same BeachEpisode had resident moron Cosmo unearth a ''Honus Wagner baseball card'' under the sand of Dimmsdale Beach as a crab and then discard it as junk, breaking it in half with his claw. Sure, it sounds humorous, but it could be interpreted as a veritable mule kick to the testes for baseball card collectors viewing that particular episode. Who in heaven's name would destroy something that valuable!? The answer? A complete idiot. '''''COSMO.''''' episode. * ''WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'': King Julien went to the Lost Stuff box to find something funny or entertaining. Tossing aside a bunch of dollar bills and a huge gold collar collar: -->'''Julien''': Paper Trash....trash.... Metal Trash.... trash.... * On ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'', Beezy bribes Heloise with a box filled with gold. She happily accepts it... so she can have [[KidsPreferBoxes the box it comes in]].
6th Feb '16 12:05:47 PM Quanyails
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** In another episode, Martin's mother almost sells the original handwritten script of ''Star Wars'' (AlternateEnding: Chewbacca is Luke's father!) to the Comic Book Guy for 5$.
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** In another episode, Martin's mother almost sells the original handwritten script of ''Star Wars'' (AlternateEnding: Chewbacca is Luke's father!) to the Comic Book Guy for 5$.$5.
6th Feb '16 11:58:33 AM Quanyails
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* A very interesting case showed up in the player market of ''VideoGame/DiabloII''. Due to the in-game currency of gold being ridiculously easy to obtain, it didn't take long for any item worth buying from another player to quickly become worth more gold than it was physically possible to carry. Players started using a rare drop as a ''de facto'' currency instead.
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* A very interesting case showed up in the [[PlayerGeneratedEconomy player market market]] of ''VideoGame/DiabloII''. Due to the in-game currency of gold being ridiculously easy to obtain, it didn't take long for any item worth buying from another player to quickly become worth more gold than it was physically possible to carry. Players started using a rare drop as a ''de facto'' currency instead.

** What makes this even more interesting is that the rare drop item used as currency (The Stone of Jordan, or SoJ) was originally a very highly sought after ring, so much so that it was duped/hacked to hell and back, leading to a massive supply. When the item was later nerfed to counter all the hacking, it lost its intrinsic value and thus the market was full of these essentially worthless, but still hard to come by (legitimately) items. Hence their adoption as currency.
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** What makes this even more interesting is that the rare drop item used as currency (The Stone of Jordan, or SoJ) [=SoJ=]) was originally a very highly sought after ring, so much so that it was duped/hacked to hell and back, leading to a massive supply. When the item was later nerfed to counter all the hacking, it lost its intrinsic value and thus the market was full of these essentially worthless, but still hard to come by (legitimately) items. Hence their adoption as currency.
6th Feb '16 11:53:12 AM Quanyails
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** The Villagers in Tai Bwo Wannai on Karamja consider gold to be not worth much, due to how much of it there is on Karamja, but find some plants to be useful as currency. The TzHaar also find gold useless, because the volcano they live in is hot enough that it melts (curiously, the temperature seems only to make gold worthless in TzHaar city, burn paper, and make Rum vanish, and not effect anything else), so they use bits of obsidian as currency.
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** The Villagers in Tai Bwo Wannai on Karamja consider gold to be not worth much, due to how much of it there is on Karamja, but find some plants to be useful as currency. The TzHaar [=TzHaar=] also find gold useless, because the volcano they live in is hot enough that it melts (curiously, the temperature seems only to make gold worthless in TzHaar [=TzHaar=] city, burn paper, and make Rum vanish, and not effect anything else), so they use bits of obsidian as currency.
6th Feb '16 11:52:52 AM Quanyails
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** Thanks to the new equipment modding and settlement construction systems in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout4}}'', all the junk that was VendorTrash in Fallout 3 and New Vegas has now become extremely useful material. However, your companions will still grumble about your insistence on picking up every "worthless" item you find, even after they've seen you using it to make high-tech weapons or turn a small shack into a heavily armed fortress. The sole exception to this is Piper, who instead complements you for your ability to figure out a use for all of it.
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** Thanks to the new equipment modding and settlement construction systems in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout4}}'', all the junk that was VendorTrash in Fallout 3 ''Fallout 3'' and New Vegas has now become extremely useful material. However, your companions will still grumble about your insistence on picking up every "worthless" item you find, even after they've seen you using it to make high-tech weapons or turn a small shack into a heavily armed fortress. The sole exception to this is Piper, who instead complements you for your ability to figure out a use for all of it.
6th Feb '16 11:38:34 AM Quanyails
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', the Ireland Quiddich team mascots are leprechauns that make their entrance throwing gold coins on the audience. However, this trope is [[InvertedTrope inverted]] when it becomes apparent that the leprechauns had thrown leprechaun gold - which vanishes after a few days. [[spoiler: This puts Ron in an angsty mood since paid Harry back for buying him some binoculars with the gold instead of 'real' money, and is too poor to actually pay him back, and it angers Fred and George when a rather large bet they won was paid in said gold.]]
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* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', the Ireland Quiddich team mascots are leprechauns that make their entrance throwing gold coins on the audience. However, this trope is [[InvertedTrope inverted]] when it becomes apparent that the leprechauns had thrown leprechaun gold - gold, which vanishes after a few days. [[spoiler: This puts Ron in an angsty mood since he paid Harry back for buying him some binoculars with the gold instead of 'real' money, and is too poor to actually pay him back, and it back. It also angers Fred and George when a rather large bet they won was paid in said gold.]]
30th Jan '16 1:30:16 AM bwburke94
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Namespacing The Joker
* In ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', Alfred uses an example of this to illustrate to Bruce Wayne why The Joker won't back down. Specifically, Alfred tells a story about his time in an [[BadassGrandpa unspecified army]], when they found a bandit who had been stealing precious stones. Alfred says they tried finding the bandit by looking for anyone who had bought the stolen stones but never found anyone. Later on Alfred found a child playing with one of the stones: the bandit had been throwing them away, after stealing them ForTheEvulz. ** The scene [[{{Foreshadowing}} foreshadowed]] by Alfred's story is TheJoker setting fire to an absurdly large pile of cash, which also counts. The Joker points out he has no interest in it as he can acquire things like homemade explosives and gasoline cheaply. Gasoline seems like an odd thing to say is cheap, considering its ever-rising price, until you realise it's unlikely [[BallisticDiscount he's going to pay for it]].
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* In ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', Alfred uses an example of this to illustrate to Bruce Wayne why The Joker ComicBook/TheJoker won't back down. Specifically, Alfred tells a story about his time in an [[BadassGrandpa unspecified army]], when they found a bandit who had been stealing precious stones. Alfred says they tried finding the bandit by looking for anyone who had bought the stolen stones but never found anyone. Later on Alfred found a child playing with one of the stones: the bandit had been throwing them away, after stealing them ForTheEvulz. ** The scene [[{{Foreshadowing}} foreshadowed]] by Alfred's story is TheJoker The Joker setting fire to an absurdly large pile of cash, which also counts. The Joker points out he has no interest in it as he can acquire things like homemade explosives and gasoline cheaply. Gasoline seems like an odd thing to say is cheap, considering its ever-rising price, until you realise it's unlikely [[BallisticDiscount he's going to pay for it]].
22nd Jan '16 3:35:00 PM jormis29
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Whoops wrong one
** [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-zagged]] with the in-game "news" feeds in ''VideoGame/CookieClicker''. The Alchemy Lab is stated to work by transmuting gold into cookies. One "report" states that a defective lab was "found to turn cookies into useless gold." But another remarks that "National gold reserves dwindle as more and more of the precious mineral is turned to cookies." ** In ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpires'' the [[YouRequireMoreVespeneGas Gold resource]] isn't ''entirely'' worthless, but you don't need it ''nearly'' as much as you need Wood and Food, or even Stone. This is especially true in the early game, where units generally take Food and buildings generally take Wood. It's also true if you have no allies and therefore can't trade resources. If there ''is'' a good amount of Gold in your territory but not much Wood (possible in some of the desert maps), you're going to think it's a worthless yellow rock. And even if you can trade it, [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts the value goes down every time you do.]]
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** * [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-zagged]] with the in-game "news" feeds in ''VideoGame/CookieClicker''. The Alchemy Lab is stated to work by transmuting gold into cookies. One "report" states that a defective lab was "found to turn cookies into useless gold." But another remarks that "National gold reserves dwindle as more and more of the precious mineral is turned to cookies." ** * In ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpires'' the [[YouRequireMoreVespeneGas Gold resource]] isn't ''entirely'' worthless, but you don't need it ''nearly'' as much as you need Wood and Food, or even Stone. This is especially true in the early game, where units generally take Food and buildings generally take Wood. It's also true if you have no allies and therefore can't trade resources. If there ''is'' a good amount of Gold in your territory but not much Wood (possible in some of the desert maps), you're going to think it's a worthless yellow rock. And even if you can trade it, [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts the value goes down every time you do.]]

* In one episode, the boys use a duplication device to double their pocket change so they'll have enough to buy ice cream. Then the cloned coins begin to multiply constantly. Soon, the town is flooded with coins that ''keep'' doubling themselves, even the cheapest things cost millions of dollars, and Scrooge's own fortune can't even buy a pack of gum. * In another episode, Scrooge and a member of the Status Seekers Club want something from the king of a tropical island that would make either of them president of the club. They both offer the king expensive jewelry and other fancy gifts, but he just laughs and tells them he has no need of such material wealth. Eventually, Ms. Beasely is able to get him to trade for something he actually wants - [[BribedWithFood a simple jar of peanut butter.]]
to:
* ** In one episode, the boys use a duplication device to double their pocket change so they'll have enough to buy ice cream. Then the cloned coins begin to multiply constantly. Soon, the town is flooded with coins that ''keep'' doubling themselves, even the cheapest things cost millions of dollars, and Scrooge's own fortune can't even buy a pack of gum. * ** In another episode, Scrooge and a member of the Status Seekers Club want something from the king of a tropical island that would make either of them president of the club. They both offer the king expensive jewelry and other fancy gifts, but he just laughs and tells them he has no need of such material wealth. Eventually, Ms. Beasely is able to get him to trade for something he actually wants - [[BribedWithFood a simple jar of peanut butter.]]
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