History Main / WorthlessYellowRocks

23rd Jun '16 12:06:27 PM StFan
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* In ''Manga/ElfenLied'', Nana burns thousands of yen on the beach for warmth on a cold night due to never having experienced the world outside the laboratory where she was used as a test subject.
** She then has nightmares of being crucified while naked at the hands of vengeful money-people, thanks to Mayu.
* Taken in all directions in the manga and anime ''OnePiece.'' Hidden in the Skypeian island of Upperyard is an entire ''city'' of gold. The natives of Skypeia, where otherwise people live on clouds and there is no natural soil, find the dirt of the originally blue-sea island itself far more valuable than any gold. The arc's BigBad, [[AGodAmI God Eneru]], ''does'' have a use for the gold. However, it's of no monetary value to him, either. He instead uses its conductive properties to enhance his own [[ShockAndAwe lightning-based powers]]. Finally, our heroes, the Straw Hat Pirates, ''do'' value the gold for its monetary worth, and make plans to steal what Eneru didn't make off with. The Skypeians actually intend to ''let'' the Straw Hats have all the gold they want in gratitude of the BigBad's defeat, but the Straw Hats (believing they were stealing the gold) misinterpret this as their being caught and run away with only what they were carrying, when they could have gotten far more just by waiting. Notably, this is the only time they've ever actually stolen something (as a crew, anyway, Nami's another story) before or after this point.
** The reverse is also seen: rubber doesn't exist in Skypeia, and after Luffy's rubber powers defeat Eneru it becomes insanely valuable. Thus, Usopp is able to trade rubber bands for dials, which are common to Skypeia but don't exist on the Blue Sea

to:

* In ''Manga/ElfenLied'', Nana burns thousands of yen on the beach for warmth on a cold night due to never having experienced the world outside the laboratory where she was used as a test subject.
**
subject. She then has nightmares of being crucified while naked at the hands of vengeful money-people, thanks to Mayu.
* Taken in all directions in the manga and anime ''OnePiece.''Manga/OnePiece.'' Hidden in the Skypeian island of Upperyard is an entire ''city'' of gold. The natives of Skypeia, where otherwise people live on clouds and there is no natural soil, find the dirt of the originally blue-sea island itself far more valuable than any gold. The arc's BigBad, [[AGodAmI God Eneru]], ''does'' have a use for the gold. However, it's of no monetary value to him, either. He instead uses its conductive properties to enhance his own [[ShockAndAwe lightning-based powers]]. Finally, our heroes, the Straw Hat Pirates, ''do'' value the gold for its monetary worth, and make plans to steal what Eneru didn't make off with. The Skypeians actually intend to ''let'' the Straw Hats have all the gold they want in gratitude of the BigBad's defeat, but the Straw Hats (believing they were stealing the gold) misinterpret this as their being caught and run away with only what they were carrying, when they could have gotten far more just by waiting. Notably, this is the only time they've ever actually stolen something (as a crew, anyway, Nami's another story) before or after this point.
**
point. The reverse is also seen: rubber doesn't exist in Skypeia, and after Luffy's rubber powers defeat Eneru it becomes insanely valuable. Thus, Usopp is able to trade rubber bands for dials, which are common to Skypeia but don't exist on the Blue SeaSea.



* In ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', there's a scene where a merchant throws a hissy fit when Ashitaka pays for his bag of rice with a small, yellow rock...At least until a passing monk notices and points out that it's a solid gold nugget, and that it's probably worth three times what she gave him.
* While it's not gold, when [[Manga/HayateTheCombatButler Hayate]] is told to spend a few (3) days away from the mansion because Nagi's embarrassed, he's given one million yen (~$11,000 US, £8,000). Which he promptly loses. It gets returned to the mansion and Maria counts it, stating that it's almost exactly what he was given for living expenses. Nagi passes by the table and asks what all the [[http://mangafox.me/manga/hayate_no_gotoku/v08/c077/13.html chump change]] is.
** The characters, especially Maria and Nagi, have continually shown disdain for the value of money. Such that it's a huge leap in Nagi's show of maturity when she's willing to give it up.

to:

* In ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', there's a scene where a merchant throws a hissy fit when Ashitaka pays for his bag of rice with a small, yellow rock...At least until a passing monk notices and points out that it's a solid gold nugget, and that it's probably worth three times what she gave him.
* While it's not gold, when [[Manga/HayateTheCombatButler Hayate]] is told to spend a few (3) days away from the mansion because Nagi's embarrassed, he's given one million yen (~$11,000 US, £8,000). Which he promptly loses. It gets returned to the mansion and Maria counts it, stating that it's almost exactly what he was given for living expenses. Nagi passes by the table and asks what all the [[http://mangafox.me/manga/hayate_no_gotoku/v08/c077/13.html chump change]] is.
**
is. The characters, especially Maria and Nagi, have continually shown disdain for the value of money. Such that it's a huge leap in Nagi's show of maturity when she's willing to give it up.



[[folder:Comics]]
* In ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Black Gold'', "rock oil" (''petra oleum'') is only valuable because Getafix uses it in its potion.
** And by the end of the story [[spoiler:[[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything he discovers that a local plant extract works just as well]] - ''beetroot juice''. It also tastes better.]]
*** The revelation actually puts Astérix (who just returned from a long, failed and unpleasant trip to the other end of the known world to get the oil) through a comical HeroicBSOD.

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[[folder:Comics]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* In ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} and the Black Gold'', "rock oil" (''petra oleum'') is only valuable because Getafix uses it in its potion.
**
potion. And by the end of the story [[spoiler:[[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything he discovers that a local plant extract works just as well]] - -- ''beetroot juice''. It also tastes better.]]
***
]] The revelation actually puts Astérix (who just returned from a long, failed and unpleasant trip to the other end of the known world to get the oil) through a comical HeroicBSOD.



* In one strip of ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'', the following conversation takes place:
-->'''Dilbert:''' Isn't it odd? Despite how advanced we are, we still rely on rocks for currency.
-->'''Dogbert:''' What's even dumber is that it's a rock that's hard to find.
** There's also a comic where Dogbert goes into a jewelry store and points out how utterly arbitrary the diamond market is, and convinces the seller to give him a sack of diamonds just to keep the secret from getting out.
* In pre-ComicBook/{{Crisis|on Infinite Earths}} {{Superman}} comics, gold was supposed to have been plentiful on Krypton, and worth about as much as any other fairly common industrial metal. In a flashback in "World of Krypton," the (pre-Heel) General Zod is astounded to see Jor-El building a rocket out of gold, one of the heaviest metals known. Jor-El counters "It's one of the cheapest, General--and the weight factor is irrelevant since we're dealing with anti-gravity rather than conventional thrust engines! And by using a cheap metal like gold, I've managed to cut costs by two-thirds!"
** Of course, FridgeLogic then kicks in when you remember that gold is not just heavy, but ''soft''...
* In an {{Elseworld}}s Superman comic book (wherein Superman is British), Superman attempts to pay off all of Britain's national debt by creating bags full of diamond gems from coal by [[HollywoodScience squeezing it very hard]]. Of course, since, as is pointed out later by the [[DesignatedVillain villain]] of the story, diamond's value is based on its rarity, diamonds are now worthless and Superman's act was pointless, even counterproductive, because [[WhatTheHellHero they now don't have all the coal he made into diamonds]]. We then get a panel where a poor family attempts to fuel their potbelly stove with diamonds.
** To add insult to injury, they proceed to tax Superman for the diamonds that he did create, at the value they were during the time he created them (before they became worthless). It pretty much bankrupted him.

to:

* In one strip of ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'', the following conversation takes place:
-->'''Dilbert:''' Isn't it odd? Despite how advanced we are, we still rely on rocks for currency.
-->'''Dogbert:''' What's even dumber is that it's a rock that's hard to find.
** There's also a comic where Dogbert goes into a jewelry store and points out how utterly arbitrary the diamond market is, and convinces the seller to give him a sack of diamonds just to keep the secret from getting out.
* In pre-ComicBook/{{Crisis|on Infinite Earths}} {{Superman}} comics, gold was supposed to have been plentiful on Krypton, and worth about as much as any other fairly common industrial metal. In a flashback in "World of Krypton," the (pre-Heel) General Zod is astounded to see Jor-El building a rocket out of gold, one of the heaviest metals known. Jor-El counters "It's one of the cheapest, General--and General -- and the weight factor is irrelevant since we're dealing with anti-gravity rather than conventional thrust engines! And by using a cheap metal like gold, I've managed to cut costs by two-thirds!"
**
two-thirds!" Of course, FridgeLogic then kicks in when you remember that gold is not just heavy, but ''soft''...
* In an {{Elseworld}}s Superman comic book (wherein Superman is British), Superman attempts to pay off all of Britain's national debt by creating bags full of diamond gems from coal by [[HollywoodScience squeezing it very hard]]. Of course, since, as is pointed out later by the [[DesignatedVillain villain]] of the story, diamond's value is based on its rarity, diamonds are now worthless and Superman's act was pointless, even counterproductive, because [[WhatTheHellHero they now don't have all the coal he made into diamonds]]. We then get a panel where a poor family attempts to fuel their potbelly stove with diamonds.
**
diamonds. To add insult to injury, they proceed to tax Superman for the diamonds that he did create, at the value they were during the time he created them (before they became worthless). It pretty much bankrupted him.



* In ''{{Transformers}}: [[SteamPunk Hearts of Steel]]'', this exchange occurs when the Insecticons pull off a TrainJob:
-->'''Kickback''': '''[[BoldInflation Sheets]]''' of pressed inert plant matter with pictures of humans on them? ([[ExpospeakGag Read:]] banknotes)
-->'''Bombshell''': What could these be worth to anyone?
* In the opening to the ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' adventure "In the Shadow of the Derricks", the locals are severely upset about the overabundance of "worthless" oil deposits in the area, since it makes farming difficult and water undrinkable. Until it's revealed how much it's really worth...
** ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ru%C3%A9e_sur_l%27Oklahoma Ruée sur l'Oklahoma]]'' has similar problems, with the added complication that the area is a desert and water actually is harder to get than oil at the time. Oil only becomes valuable enough ''after'' the land has been sold back to the Indians.
* Toyed with in ''CrystarCrystalWarrior''. As the name implies, the planet Crystallium is up to its armpits in enormous gems and crystals. They're literally as common as rocks, and about as valuable. Buildings are made out of them. Then in one issue, the cast winds up magically transported to the home of Comicbook/DoctorStrange, on Earth, and they're awestruck at the incalculable wealth on display: wooden furniture everywhere and entire shelves full of paper books.
* Element Lad's introduction in ''ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'' features a Tromian mother chiding her child for turning a lamppost into gold, saying "Gold is soft and useless compared to other metals. Only use your powers for useful things."
** FridgeBrilliance - a gold lamppost couldn't support its own weight, which means it's ruined, which means the mother is going to have to replace it with something of ''actual'' value, if only the labor she has to invest in fixing it.
* Trolls in ''ComicBook/ElfQuest'' set great store by gold and jewels, possibly since it takes so much effort to mine and refine them. In the trolls' patriarchal society the more mineral wealth a guy has, the better his choice of bride. By contrast, the elves of Sorrow's End consider gold jewelry mere decoration, since it has no practical value.

to:

* In ''{{Transformers}}: ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}: [[SteamPunk Hearts of Steel]]'', this exchange occurs when the Insecticons pull off a TrainJob:
-->'''Kickback''': -->'''Kickback:''' '''[[BoldInflation Sheets]]''' of pressed inert plant matter with pictures of humans on them? ([[ExpospeakGag Read:]] banknotes)
-->'''Bombshell''':
banknotes)\\
'''Bombshell:'''
What could these be worth to anyone?
* ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'':
**
In the opening to the ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' adventure "In the Shadow of the Derricks", the locals are severely upset about the overabundance of "worthless" oil deposits in the area, since it makes farming difficult and water undrinkable. Until it's revealed how much it's really worth...
** ''[[http://en."[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ru%C3%A9e_sur_l%27Oklahoma Ruée sur l'Oklahoma]]'' l'Oklahoma]]" has similar problems, with the added complication that the area is a desert and water actually is harder to get than oil at the time. Oil only becomes valuable enough ''after'' the land has been sold back to the Indians.
* Toyed with in ''CrystarCrystalWarrior''.''ComicBook/CrystarCrystalWarrior''. As the name implies, the planet Crystallium is up to its armpits in enormous gems and crystals. They're literally as common as rocks, and about as valuable. Buildings are made out of them. Then in one issue, the cast winds up magically transported to the home of Comicbook/DoctorStrange, on Earth, and they're awestruck at the incalculable wealth on display: wooden furniture everywhere and entire shelves full of paper books.
* Element Lad's introduction in ''ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'' features a Tromian mother chiding her child for turning a lamppost into gold, saying "Gold is soft and useless compared to other metals. Only use your powers for useful things."
** FridgeBrilliance -
" FridgeBrilliance: a gold lamppost couldn't support its own weight, which means it's ruined, which means the mother is going to have to replace it with something of ''actual'' value, if only the labor she has to invest in fixing it.
* ''ComicBook/ElfQuest'':
**
Trolls in ''ComicBook/ElfQuest'' set great store by gold and jewels, possibly since it takes so much effort to mine and refine them. In the trolls' patriarchal society the more mineral wealth a guy has, the better his choice of bride. By contrast, the elves of Sorrow's End consider gold jewelry mere decoration, since it has no practical value.



* In ''TheSmurfs'' comic book story "The Finance Smurf", Miner comes across a pile of "worthless yellow rocks" in his mine that he doesn't know what to do with. The title character Smurf decides to use them for minting coins as part of the Smurf Village monetary system. Later on, when the Smurfs abandon that system and return to their old communal ways, it gets used for making musical instruments.
* Even Scrooge [=McDuck=] can't avoid this one. In one story, he rockets through space to claim a moon made entirely of ''gold'' (24 karats all the way through). There, he meets an alien who claims to be the moon's owner. Scrooge tries to haggle, and learns that the alien will trade the deed of ownership for the moon in exchange for a ''handful of dirt''. After being floored by this unnaturally good bargain, Scrooge does so; the alien feeds the dirt into a machine that soon creates a rapidly-growing planet, with weather patterns and capable of supporting life. With that, the alien flies away on his new world, happy to have something other than gold to work with. In the end, Scrooge is left wondering who got the better end of the deal.

to:

* In ''TheSmurfs'' ''ComicBook/TheSmurfs'' comic book story "The Finance Smurf", Miner comes across a pile of "worthless yellow rocks" in his mine that he doesn't know what to do with. The title character Smurf decides to use them for minting coins as part of the Smurf Village monetary system. Later on, when the Smurfs abandon that system and return to their old communal ways, it gets used for making musical instruments.
* ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse:
**
Even Scrooge [=McDuck=] can't avoid this one. In one story, he rockets through space to claim a moon made entirely of ''gold'' (24 karats all the way through). There, he meets an alien who claims to be the moon's owner. Scrooge tries to haggle, and learns that the alien will trade the deed of ownership for the moon in exchange for a ''handful of dirt''. After being floored by this unnaturally good bargain, Scrooge does so; the alien feeds the dirt into a machine that soon creates a rapidly-growing planet, with weather patterns and capable of supporting life. With that, the alien flies away on his new world, happy to have something other than gold to work with. In the end, Scrooge is left wondering who got the better end of the deal.



* The Bogies in ''{{Fungus the Bogeyman}}'' regard gold as a base metal and use it to make spittoons.

to:

* The Bogies in ''{{Fungus ''ComicBook/{{Fungus the Bogeyman}}'' regard gold as a base metal and use it to make spittoons.



* ComicBook/TechJacket has the Geldarians pay for their stay on earth in lumps of gold, which he refers as 'trash metal'.
* One ''{{ComicBook/Alix}}'' story has the Roman antagonists negotiate with a Germanic tribe, the Germans paying with "that worthless yellow iron you Romans love so much".

to:

* ComicBook/TechJacket ''ComicBook/TechJacket'' has the Geldarians pay for their stay on earth in lumps of gold, which he refers as 'trash metal'."trash metal".
* One ''{{ComicBook/Alix}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Alix}}'' story has the Roman antagonists negotiate with a Germanic tribe, the Germans paying with "that worthless yellow iron you Romans love so much".



[[folder:FairyTales]]
* In one French tale, a man helps the Small Folk gather their crops and livestock (which they are allowed to do during a single night in the year), and later, to spread out their gold on the ground so it will see daylight and won't get spoilt. A large amount doesn't (luckily, the man isn't blamed for this), and the Small Folk throw it out, considering it mere trash or poison. Since the "spoiling" is merely the gold turning red, the guy becomes '''very''' rich.

to:

[[folder:FairyTales]]
[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'':
**
In one French tale, a man helps strip, the Small Folk gather their crops following conversation takes place:
--->'''Dilbert:''' Isn't it odd? Despite how advanced we are, we still rely on rocks for currency.\\
'''Dogbert:''' What's even dumber is that it's a rock that's hard to find.
** There's also a comic where Dogbert goes into a jewelry store
and livestock (which they are allowed to do during a single night in points out how utterly arbitrary the year), diamond market is, and later, to spread out their gold on convinces the ground so it will see daylight and won't get spoilt. A large amount doesn't (luckily, seller to give him a sack of diamonds just to keep the man isn't blamed for this), and the Small Folk throw it out, considering it mere trash or poison. Since the "spoiling" is merely the gold turning red, the guy becomes '''very''' rich.secret from getting out.



[[folder:Fairy Tales]]
* In one French tale, a man helps the Small Folk gather their crops and livestock (which they are allowed to do during a single night in the year), and later, to spread out their gold on the ground so it will see daylight and won't get spoilt. A large amount doesn't (luckily, the man isn't blamed for this), and the Small Folk throw it out, considering it mere trash or poison. Since the "spoiling" is merely the gold turning red, the guy becomes '''very''' rich.
[[/folder]]



* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben10}}'' fanfiction [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/3875254/1/Hero_High_Earth_style Hero High: Earth Style,]] Ren has a solid gold picture frame. She laments the fact that she was surprised how valuable the material was on earth, as it was quite common on her planet.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben10}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'' fanfiction [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/3875254/1/Hero_High_Earth_style Hero High: Earth Style,]] Ren has a solid gold picture frame. She laments the fact that she was surprised how valuable the material was on earth, as it was quite common on her planet.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

to:

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]Animation]]
* In ''Anime/PrincessMononoke'', there's a scene where a merchant throws a hissy fit when Ashitaka pays for his bag of rice with a small, yellow rock... At least until a passing monk notices and points out that it's a solid gold nugget, and that it's probably worth three times what she gave him.



--->Vinnie: Will you trade me the key for this diamond?
--->Snake: What are you, stupid? Diamonds are worthless! Why do you think it's in the trash?

to:

--->Vinnie: -->'''Vinnie: Will you trade me the key for this diamond?
--->Snake:
diamond?\\
'''Snake:'''
What are you, stupid? Diamonds are worthless! Why do you think it's in the trash?



* In ''Frontier:: VideoGame/{{Elite}} II'' there were some worlds that had rather unusual notions of waste. One, Cemeiss, would pay traders a small sum to remove gemstones and a rather larger one to remove precious metals from their worlds. Woe betide anyone who brought any such materials into the Cemeiss system... they'd be promptly fined for smuggling waste.

to:

* In ''Frontier:: ''Frontier: VideoGame/{{Elite}} II'' there were some worlds that had rather unusual notions of waste. One, Cemeiss, would pay traders a small sum to remove gemstones and a rather larger one to remove precious metals from their worlds. Woe betide anyone who brought any such materials into the Cemeiss system... they'd be promptly fined for smuggling waste.



** When platinum was first found in Russia, the ignorant population used it as shot - you had to pay for lead. Then they found out that shooting an animal was more expensive than the animal.

to:

** When platinum was first found in Russia, the ignorant population used it as shot - -- you had to pay for lead. Then they found out that shooting an animal was more expensive than the animal.



** Speaking of WW2: The one-cent Penny is struck from a zinc and copper alloy, both common metals, and considered worthless outside of pocket change, befitting its status as the lowest-value, lowest-denomination unit of the currency. But, in 1943, the demands on copper for use in component parts for the war effort made it so valuable as a strategic resource that the US Mint made all it's pennies from plain ''steel'' that year.

to:

** * Speaking of WW2: The one-cent Penny is struck from a zinc and copper alloy, both common metals, and considered worthless outside of pocket change, befitting its status as the lowest-value, lowest-denomination unit of the currency. But, in 1943, the demands on copper for use in component parts for the war effort made it so valuable as a strategic resource that the US Mint made all it's pennies from plain ''steel'' that year.



10th Jun '16 5:44:50 AM DVB
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* Done on ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', in the episode "Idiot Box." The episode begins with the titular character buying a humongous flat-screen television, only to throw it away. It's quickly revealed that he actually bought it for the cardboard box it was packed in.

to:

* Done on ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', in the episode "Idiot Box." The episode begins with the titular character buying a humongous flat-screen television, only to throw it away. It's quickly revealed that he actually bought it for the cardboard box it was packed in. Humorously enough, the television itself may be worth less than it seems as when Squidward took it, he found the tv came with only box-related content.


Added DiffLines:

** Ironically, Duck Dodgers and the Cadet still had to go and stop the diamond smuggling, as the scarcity could make them valuable again.
8th Jun '16 4:19:03 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/WildKratts'': When the brothers try out their new hermit crab power-discs, they start out at human-size and are too big to use regular snail shells. Frantically seeking an alternative, Chris finds an old treasure chest filled with gold coins on the beach, and - overwhelmed by hermit crab instinct - dumps the coins out on the sand without a glance so he can use the ''chest'' to protect his vulnerable abdomen.
31st May '16 1:59:40 PM Vir
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* In ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' [[ZigZaggedTrope goes back and forth]] on this. Gems at first ''look'' like this, but only because one of the main characters has the power of finding them in abundance and another, a dragon, eats them. In another episode, their value fluctuates wildly, a single jewel can be used for buying things ranging from four round trip train tickets plus pet fees to an industrial sized hair dryer, (and the tiniest one buys the most expensive item, and vice versa). Although they were mostly [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney being used as bribes]] in that episode, so it wasn't like the characters were getting them appraised first. Rarity later gives small ones out like tips, and most ponies react like she handed them a hundred dollar bill. So it seems ''some'' of them are rare and worth a lot, while others, may be so plentiful there ''is'' no good use for them other than cake garnish and door stops.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' [[ZigZaggedTrope [[ZigZaggingTrope goes back and forth]] on this. Gems at first ''look'' like this, but only because one of the main characters has the power of finding them in abundance and another, a dragon, eats them. In another episode, their value fluctuates wildly, a single jewel can be used for buying things ranging from four round trip train tickets plus pet fees to an industrial sized hair dryer, (and the tiniest one buys the most expensive item, and vice versa). Although they were mostly [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney being used as bribes]] in that episode, so it wasn't like the characters were getting them appraised first. Rarity later gives small ones out like tips, and most ponies react like she handed them a hundred dollar bill. So it seems ''some'' of them are rare and worth a lot, while others, may be so plentiful there ''is'' no good use for them other than cake garnish and door stops.
31st May '16 1:59:25 PM Vir
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* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'' involves Cosmo and Wanda losing their wands on the beach. FridgeBrilliance in that they can just poof up all these things with the right wish. They end up digging in the sand, turning up all sorts of priceless treasures and discarding them. This is eventually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d:

to:

* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents'' ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' involves Cosmo and Wanda losing their wands on the beach. FridgeBrilliance in that they can just poof up all these things with the right wish. They end up digging in the sand, turning up all sorts of priceless treasures and discarding them. This is eventually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d:
31st May '16 1:56:48 PM Vir
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* The ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats'' find gold in one episode, but discard it as too soft and too heavy to use for anything they can think of. Wouldn't you know it, they need the gold to help repower a fire spirit who can help Lion-O repair his WreckedWeapon. This one's weird; it showcases the 'cats non-materialism, but both Panthro and Tigra could be expected to know enough about electronics to come up with something to do with it.
** Cheetara did keep some of it because it was pretty though. The rest got dumped.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats'' find gold in one episode, but discard it as too soft and too heavy to use for anything they can think of. Wouldn't you know it, they need the gold to help repower a fire spirit who can help Lion-O repair his WreckedWeapon. This one's weird; it showcases the 'cats cats' non-materialism, but both Panthro and Tigra could be expected to know enough about electronics to come up with something to do with it.
** Cheetara did keep some of it because it was pretty pretty, though. The rest got dumped.
31st May '16 1:55:54 PM Vir
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* Sorta-kinda done on ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', in the episode "Idiot Box." The episode begins with the titular character buying a humongous flat-screen television, only to throw it away. It's quickly revealed that he actually bought it for the cardboard box it was packed in.
** In another episode, where Mr. Krabs is trying to get a penny from [=SpongeBob=]. It's revealed he was only picking up piece of chewed up gum for his collection. [=SpongeBob=] tosses it when he realizes it wasn't a piece of chewed gum after all. Just a $500 bill.

to:

* Sorta-kinda done Done on ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'', in the episode "Idiot Box." The episode begins with the titular character buying a humongous flat-screen television, only to throw it away. It's quickly revealed that he actually bought it for the cardboard box it was packed in.
** In another episode, where Mr. Krabs is trying to get a penny from [=SpongeBob=]. It's [=SpongeBob=], it's revealed he was only picking up a piece of chewed up chewed-up gum for his collection. [=SpongeBob=] tosses it when he realizes it wasn't a piece of chewed gum after all. Just all, just a $500 bill.



* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats}}'' find gold in one episode, but discard it as too soft and too heavy to use for anything they can think of. Wouldn't you know it, they need the gold to help repower a fire spirit who can help Lion-O repair his WreckedWeapon. This one's weird; it showcases the 'cats non-materialism, but both Panthro and Tigra could be expected to know enough about electronics to come up with something to do with it.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats}}'' ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats'' find gold in one episode, but discard it as too soft and too heavy to use for anything they can think of. Wouldn't you know it, they need the gold to help repower a fire spirit who can help Lion-O repair his WreckedWeapon. This one's weird; it showcases the 'cats non-materialism, but both Panthro and Tigra could be expected to know enough about electronics to come up with something to do with it.
31st May '16 1:19:46 PM Vir
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*** The cigar itself was made from ''the Declaration of Independence '' and hand-rolled by ''Queen Elizabeth II'' (during her "wild years"). Its value (and the fact that he was stealing it) made it worth more to him then the diamond, which was probably manufactured in a factory.

to:

*** The cigar itself was made from ''the Declaration of Independence '' and hand-rolled by ''Queen Elizabeth II'' (during her "wild years"). Its value (and the fact that he was stealing it) made it worth more to him then than the diamond, which was probably manufactured in a factory.
31st May '16 1:07:49 PM Vir
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** Yet, in a different episode, Bender is stealing a $10,000 cigar. He uses an enormous (easily the size of a basketball) diamond to cut the glass surrounding it, and then promptly throws it away. This raises the question of whether diamonds are valuable or not in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''...

to:

** Yet, in a different episode, Bender is stealing a $10,000 cigar. He uses an enormous (easily the size of a basketball) diamond to cut the glass surrounding it, and then promptly throws it away. This raises the question of whether diamonds are valuable or not in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''...''Futurama''...
31st May '16 1:07:19 PM Vir
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-->'''Wanda:''' Cosmo! I found something!
-->'''Cosmo:''' Eh? Let me guess, ''another'' Holy Grail? ''(rolls eyes)''

to:

-->'''Wanda:''' Cosmo! I found something!
-->'''Cosmo:'''
something!\\
'''Cosmo:'''
Eh? Let me guess, ''another'' Holy Grail? ''(rolls eyes)''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WorthlessYellowRocks