History Main / WorstNewsJudgmentEver

22nd Apr '16 7:18:10 PM LaptopGuy
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* Wrestling/{{Chyna}} and Music/{{Prince}} died on the same day in 2016. Coverage of Prince completely eclipsed that of Chyna. Although Chyna's death could be considered more "shocking" than Prince's because she was 12 years younger than him, Prince is far more widely known to the general public.

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* Wrestling/{{Chyna}} and Music/{{Prince}} died on the same day in 2016. Coverage of Prince completely eclipsed that of Chyna. Although Chyna's death could be considered more "shocking" than Prince's because she was 12 years younger than him, Prince is far more widely known to the general public.
public. Prince's death also overshadowed a series of killings in rural Ohio and a mass kidnapping in South Sudan -- while all death is tragic, Prince's was due to natural causes rather than intentional murder.
21st Apr '16 1:33:30 PM LaptopGuy
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* Wrestling/{{Chyna}} and Music/{{Prince}} died on the same day in 2016. Coverage of Prince completely eclipsed that of Chyna. Although Chyna's death could be considered more "shocking" than Prince's because she was 12 years younger than him, Prince is far more widely known to the general public.
17th Apr '16 10:46:48 AM atyxyt
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* If you wanted to know more about the 2016 7.0 earthquake in Japan. You wouldn't have gone to CNN. They spent more attention both on the air and online about a zoo employee being killed by a tiger instead. Both stories, however, were overshadowed by the 7.8 earthquake in Ecuador.
3rd Apr '16 7:58:11 PM dmcreif
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* What happens when two major news events happen close together and you have to cover both? ''[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/04/03/20-years-ago-the-unabomber-arrest-and-ron-brown-plane-crash-made-a-startling-a1/?tid=sm_fb The Washington Post]]'' had to deal with this when reporting on the arrest of the Unabomber and a plane crash that had killed the Secretary of Commerce in the same edition.

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* What happens when two major news events happen close together and you have to cover both? ''[https://www.''[[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/04/03/20-years-ago-the-unabomber-arrest-and-ron-brown-plane-crash-made-a-startling-a1/?tid=sm_fb The Washington Post]]'' had to deal with does a documentation of how there have been cases where they did a double-headline on their front page. In this when reporting on case, the arrest of the Unabomber and a plane crash that had killed coincided with the Secretary of Commerce being killed in a plane crash. Both got headlines on the front page. In other cases, though, where two major events happened at the same edition.time, only one event got a headline. Sometimes this was justified: for instance, the crash of Air Florida Flight 90 in 1982 happened on the same day that a fatal derailment happened in the WashingtonMetro tunnels. The coincidence of the events was part of the story, so it probably seemed unnecessary to break them apart.
**Another example given is how the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980 coincided with riots breaking out in Miami over the acquittal of four police officers. Naturally, most people remember May 18th for the former story as opposed to the latter. ''The Washington Post'' handled the matter by running headlines for both Mount Saint Helens and the riots on the front page, but put more photos on the front page of the eruption.
3rd Apr '16 7:47:17 PM dmcreif
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* What happens when two major news events happen close together and you have to cover both? ''[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/04/03/20-years-ago-the-unabomber-arrest-and-ron-brown-plane-crash-made-a-startling-a1/?tid=sm_fb The Washington Post]]'' had to deal with this when reporting on the arrest of the Unabomber and a plane crash that had killed the Secretary of Commerce in the same edition.
24th Mar '16 8:31:30 AM dmcreif
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***Parodied by Website/TheOnion with "[[http://www.theonion.com/content/node/30112 Ugly Girl Killed]]"
24th Mar '16 8:28:23 AM dmcreif
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* For many of these real-life examples that occur in modern times, it is important to remember that most people in advanced nations no longer bother to read newspapers and instead get their information on the internet. Therefore, ''they only read the stories and articles that interest them.'' It was the same way back when newspapers had their heyday, but back then if you wanted to read the one story in the newspaper you were actually interested in, you had to buy the whole paper. Now, if you go to the Fox News, CNN, or MSNBC webpage, there may be hundreds of stories, but you're only going to point-and-click-and-read the ones you want to. This is why that often insignificant celebrity gossip or events that are trivial in terms of the big picture are prominently displayed on the page. During the height of the Paris Hilton nonsense (covered in more detail below) surrounding her going to jail, when on-air anchors were ''loudly'' voicing their displeasure at having to report on such a unimportant event, one of the the senior editors for a news site wrote a concise article where he put the responsibility right back where it belongs, ''on the people reading the news.'' He wrote that while he personally could not stand Paris Hilton, could not stomach the fact that he was writing about her, and (like everyone else) heartedly wished she would go away, ''she was the only thing that people wanted to read about.'' He said that there were plenty of links on their web page to actual, important news, ''but no one was reading them.'' Everyone was clicking the links for the Paris Hilton stories and breathlessly reading those. These created a monster that fed itself. He had to get people to come to his news web page in order to get page views, the more page views he had, the more popular his site was, the more popular his site was the higher it was on the radar of the advertisers who bought ad space, and the more advertisers who bought ad space, the more revenue he could earn that would allow him to earn a profit and stay in business. It was only commmon sense, therefore, to give the people what they wanted in order for him to stay in business. He finished by saying that knowing all of that didn't make him feel any better about himself for running a Paris Hilton story.

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* For many of these real-life examples that occur in modern times, it is important to remember that most people in advanced nations no longer bother to read newspapers and instead get their information on the internet. Therefore, ''they only read the stories and articles that interest them.'' It was the same way back when newspapers had their heyday, but back then if you wanted to read the one story in the newspaper you were actually interested in, you had to buy the whole paper. Now, if you go to the Fox News, CNN, or MSNBC webpage, there may be hundreds of stories, but you're only going to point-and-click-and-read the ones you want to. This is why that often insignificant celebrity gossip or events that are trivial in terms of the big picture are prominently displayed on the page. During
*During
the height of the Paris Hilton nonsense (covered in more detail below) surrounding her going to jail, when on-air anchors were ''loudly'' voicing their displeasure at having to report on such a unimportant event, one of the the senior editors for a news site wrote a concise article where he put the responsibility right back where it belongs, ''on the people reading the news.'' He wrote that while he personally could not stand Paris Hilton, could not stomach the fact that he was writing about her, and (like everyone else) heartedly wished she would go away, ''she was the only thing that people wanted to read about.'' He also said that there were plenty of links on their web page to actual, important news, ''but no one was reading them.'' Everyone was clicking the links for the Paris Hilton stories and breathlessly reading those. These created a monster that fed itself. \\
He had to get people to come to his news web page in order to get page views, the more page views he had, the more popular his site was, the more popular his site was the higher it was on the radar of the advertisers who bought ad space, and the more advertisers who bought ad space, the more revenue he could earn that would allow him to earn a profit and stay in business. It was only commmon sense, therefore, to give the people what they wanted in order for him to stay in business. He finished by saying that knowing all of that didn't make him feel any better about himself for running a Paris Hilton story.
24th Mar '16 8:26:17 AM dmcreif
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* LBJ once said, "If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read: '[=PRESIDENT CAN'T SWIM=]'."

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* LBJ LyndonBJohnson once said, "If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read: '[=PRESIDENT CAN'T SWIM=]'."



* January 23rd, 2014: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GH68bSJXGE8 MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell interrupts a congresswoman being interviewed about the NSA]] to break news about Music/JustinBieber being arrested in Florida for drag racing on public streets while drunk and stoned. Justin Bieber's arrest also overshadowed such things as a massive pileup in whiteout conditions on I-94 in Indiana that killed three people, a fire at a nursing home in Quebec, and the suicide of a University of Pennsylvania student.
** It should also be noted that numerous other celebrities have also been arrested for drunk driving, but haven't been given a fraction of the attention that Bieber's incident got. The last celebrity DUI to cause a comparable media circus to Bieber's was Mel Gibson's back in 2006.

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* January 23rd, 2014: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GH68bSJXGE8 MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell interrupts a congresswoman being interviewed about the NSA]] to break news about Music/JustinBieber being arrested in Florida for drag racing on public streets while drunk and stoned. Justin Bieber's arrest also overshadowed such things as a massive pileup in whiteout conditions on I-94 Interstate 94 in Indiana that killed three people, a fire at a nursing home in Quebec, and the suicide of a University of Pennsylvania student.
** It should also be noted that numerous countless other celebrities have also been arrested for drunk driving, on [=DWI=]s, but haven't been given a fraction of the attention that Bieber's incident got. The last celebrity DUI DWI to cause a comparable media circus to Bieber's was Mel Gibson's back in 2006.



* In February-April 2014, UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} had a revolution, leading to Russia to take over Crimea and stir up trouble in eastern Ukraine, thereby raising the specter of civil war in Ukraine and returning the memory of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar and generally giving everyone the geopolitical jitters. Meanwhile, a Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 bound for Beijing mysteriously disappeared, probably crashing somewhere in the Indian Ocean, and there was a big search for the debris. CNN has been following the latter to almost egregious degrees - [=BuzzFeed=] stats say that on March 12th, the network devoted 256 out of 271 broadcast minutes covering Flight 370 on the same day that there was a fatal gas explosion in East Harlem that killed eight people, among other newsworthy stories. You would have been better off tuning in to a local New York City news station if you wanted to know about that explosion.

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* In February-April 2014, UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} had a revolution, leading to Russia to take over Crimea and stir up trouble in eastern Ukraine, thereby raising the specter of civil war in Ukraine and returning the memory of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar and generally giving everyone the geopolitical jitters. Meanwhile, a Malaysian Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 bound for Beijing mysteriously disappeared, probably crashing somewhere in the Indian Ocean, and there was a big search for the debris. CNN has been following followed the latter to almost egregious degrees - [=BuzzFeed=] stats say that on March 12th, the network devoted 256 out of 271 broadcast minutes covering Flight 370 on the same day that there was a fatal gas explosion in East Harlem that killed eight people, among other newsworthy stories. You would have been better off tuning in to a local New York City news station if you wanted to know about that explosion.



* When a U.S. Presidential Election approaches, don't expect to hear anything else on the news from October 1st to Election Day...unless a massive hurricane slams into the east coast of country, does more than $60 billion in damage, and causes the area to have potentially week-long power outages. In that case, don't even expect to hear election news, even if you're in California.
* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyLMXeGHbDI This 2015 intro]] to WTKR news in Virginia. The anchor treats a bridge re-naming [[SeriousBusiness just as seriously]] as a double murder and a homegrown terrorist. Also note that it was reported ahead of a school lockdown.

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* When a U.S. Presidential Election approaches, don't expect to hear anything else on the news from October 1st to Election Day...unless a massive hurricane slams into hits the east coast of country, New York City area, does more than $60 billion in damage, and causes the area to have potentially week-long power outages. In that case, don't even expect to hear election news, even if you're in California.
* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyLMXeGHbDI This 2015 intro]] to WTKR news in Virginia. The anchor treats a bridge re-naming renaming [[SeriousBusiness just as seriously]] as a double murder and a homegrown terrorist. Also note that it was reported ahead of a school lockdown.



* The shooting of WDBJ-TV reporter Allison Parker and her cameraman Adam Ward would probably have likely quickly dropped off the radar and out of public consciousness...had the murders not been filmed on camera by the shooter and uploaded online. Thus, the video went viral and the story quickly ballooned into a national juggernaut, wiping the likes of Creator/DonaldTrump and the Ashley Madison hacking scandal off the front pages of the papers, completely overshadowing the sentencing of Aurora shooter James Holmes to life in prison and a far deadlier massacre in Chicago, and generating far greater news coverage and public interest than a number of shootings with higher body counts (i.e. Sikh Temple, Navy Yard, UCSB) ever did, and outdoing such big stories as the Charlie Hebdo shootings or the Charleston church massacre ([[https://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=shooting&geo=US&date=6%2F2015%203m&cmpt=q&tz=Etc%2FGMT%2B4 This graph]] proves how much more public interest the Virginia story had than the Charleston one) and approaching Newtown levels. In fact, it practically turned ''the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina'' into an afterthought in the minds of most people who didn't live in New Orleans. Ironically, the media turned to the execution-style shooting of an off-duty sheriff's deputy in Houston, Texas, a few days later (in which only one person got killed compared to two at the Virginia shooting). Even with the media having moved on to Texas public interest was still on Virginia.\\

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* The shooting murders of WDBJ-TV reporter Allison Parker and her cameraman Adam Ward would probably have likely quickly dropped off the radar and out of public consciousness...had the murders not been filmed on camera by the shooter shooter, happened during a live morning broadcast, and uploaded online. Thus, the video went viral and the story quickly ballooned into a national juggernaut, wiping the likes of Creator/DonaldTrump and the Ashley Madison hacking scandal off the front pages of the papers, completely overshadowing the sentencing of Aurora theater shooter James Holmes to life in prison and a far deadlier massacre in Chicago, and generating far greater news coverage and public interest than a number of shootings with higher body counts (i.e. Sikh Temple, Navy Yard, UCSB) ever did, and outdoing such big stories as the Charlie Hebdo shootings or the Charleston church massacre ([[https://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=shooting&geo=US&date=6%2F2015%203m&cmpt=q&tz=Etc%2FGMT%2B4 This graph]] proves how much more public interest the Virginia story had than the Charleston one) and approaching Newtown Sandy Hook levels. In fact, it practically turned ''the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina'' into an afterthought in the minds of most people who didn't live in New Orleans. Ironically, the media turned to the execution-style shooting of an off-duty sheriff's deputy in Houston, Texas, a few days later (in which only one person got killed compared to two at the Virginia shooting). Even with the media having moved on to Texas public interest was still on Virginia.\\



* The death of Creator/RobinWilliams fits this trope, as it completely cannibalized news of the death of Creator/LaurenBacall (as well as nearly every other news story that week). Note that the shooting of Michael Brown didn't become a big deal until the end of the week and the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, although already huge on social media, only gained mainstream traction the week afterwards) just one day later. Keep in mind that Williams was active for nowhere near as long as Bacall, who was the [[LastOfItsKind last living Golden Age-era actor]] and was working long before Williams was even born (however, he remains far more known among the public at large than Bacall, and while she died of natural causes at the age of 89, Williams' ''suicide'' at the age of 63 justifiably took everyone by surprise and thus was given higher prevalence in the media).

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* The death of Creator/RobinWilliams fits this trope, as it completely cannibalized news of the death of Creator/LaurenBacall (as well as nearly every other news story that week). Note that the shooting death of Michael Brown didn't become a big deal until the end of the week and the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, although already huge on social media, only gained mainstream traction the week afterwards) just one day later. Keep in mind that Williams was active for nowhere near as long as Bacall, who was the [[LastOfItsKind last living Golden Age-era actor]] and was working long before Williams was even born (however, he remains far more known among the public at large than Bacall, and while she died of natural causes at the age of 89, Williams' ''suicide'' at the age of 63 justifiably took everyone by surprise and thus was given higher prevalence in the media).



* The media's handling of Islam-related terrorist attacks came to light after the Brussels bombings of March 22, 2016. As shown by [[https://www.facebook.com/188533647842714/photos/a.188695787826500.54678.188533647842714/1273898749306193/?type=3&theater this graphic]], international reaction to terrorism is different depending on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened in Western countries -- namely the two Paris attacks (Charlie Hebdo in January and the November 13th coordinated assaults), the San Bernardino, California shootings of December, and the Brussels bombings. While the October Russian airline bombing in Egypt also got plenty of attention, most of the talk about it was political rather than sympathetic to the victims. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which had higher body counts than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism in countries that are war-torn, unstable, corrupt, poor, and/or Arab/Muslim-majority is seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing only Western lives and reacting only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home. It didn't help that some of the attacks took place around the same time as the Western ones, i.e., the Beirut bombings taking a place a day before the November Paris attacks (as the link in the bullet point above discusses) or two major Turkey bombings shortly before Brussels.

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* The media's handling of Islam-related terrorist attacks came to light after the Brussels bombings of March 22, 2016. As shown by [[https://www.facebook.com/188533647842714/photos/a.188695787826500.54678.188533647842714/1273898749306193/?type=3&theater this graphic]], international reaction to terrorism is different depending seems to depend on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the they only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened solidarity if they take place in Western countries -- namely the two Paris attacks (Charlie Hebdo in January and the November 13th coordinated assaults), the San Bernardino, California shootings of December, and the Brussels bombings. While the October bombing of a Russian airline bombing in passenger jet over Egypt also got plenty of attention, most of the talk about it was political rather than sympathetic to the victims. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which had higher body counts than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism terrorist attacks in countries that are war-torn, unstable, corrupt, poor, and/or contain a Arab/Muslim-majority is population, are seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing and the rest of the world values only Western lives and reacting reacts only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home. It didn't help Not helping the case here is that some of the these unreported attacks took place around the same time as the Western ones, i.e., the Beirut bombings taking a place a day before the November Paris attacks events (as the link in the bullet point above discusses) or two major Turkey bombings shortly before in the two weeks prior to Brussels.
23rd Mar '16 12:06:13 PM LaptopGuy
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* The media's handling of Islam-related terrorist attacks came to light after the Brussels bombings of March 22, 2016. As shown by [[https://www.facebook.com/188533647842714/photos/a.188695787826500.54678.188533647842714/1273898749306193/?type=3&theater this graphic]], international reaction to terrorism is different depending on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened in Western countries. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which had higher body counts than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism in war-torn and unstable Muslim-majority countries is seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing only Western lives and reacting only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home.

to:

* The media's handling of Islam-related terrorist attacks came to light after the Brussels bombings of March 22, 2016. As shown by [[https://www.facebook.com/188533647842714/photos/a.188695787826500.54678.188533647842714/1273898749306193/?type=3&theater this graphic]], international reaction to terrorism is different depending on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened in Western countries.countries -- namely the two Paris attacks (Charlie Hebdo in January and the November 13th coordinated assaults), the San Bernardino, California shootings of December, and the Brussels bombings. While the October Russian airline bombing in Egypt also got plenty of attention, most of the talk about it was political rather than sympathetic to the victims. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which had higher body counts than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism in war-torn and unstable Muslim-majority countries that are war-torn, unstable, corrupt, poor, and/or Arab/Muslim-majority is seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing only Western lives and reacting only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home.home. It didn't help that some of the attacks took place around the same time as the Western ones, i.e., the Beirut bombings taking a place a day before the November Paris attacks (as the link in the bullet point above discusses) or two major Turkey bombings shortly before Brussels.
23rd Mar '16 10:05:45 AM dmcreif
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* This trope came to light after the Brussels terrorist bombings of March 22, 2016. International reaction to terrorism is different depending on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened in Western countries - both of the Paris incidents in 2015 (Charlie Hebdo in January and the November 13th coordinated assaults), the San Bernardino, California shooting in December, and the Brussels bombings. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which were even deadlier than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism in war-torn and unstable Muslim-majority countries is seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing only Western lives and reacting only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home.

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* This trope The media's handling of Islam-related terrorist attacks came to light after the Brussels terrorist bombings of March 22, 2016. International As shown by [[https://www.facebook.com/188533647842714/photos/a.188695787826500.54678.188533647842714/1273898749306193/?type=3&theater this graphic]], international reaction to terrorism is different depending on what country the incident happened in. Since the beginning of 2015, there have been dozens of Islam-related attacks, but the only ones that seem to gain major international attention, outrage, and/or solidarity were those that happened in Western countries - both of the Paris incidents in 2015 (Charlie Hebdo in January and the November 13th coordinated assaults), the San Bernardino, California shooting in December, and the Brussels bombings.countries. Compare that to the public's indifference to attacks in cities like Beirut, Baghdad, Ankara, St. Petersburg, and Istanbul, many of which were even deadlier had higher body counts than the Brussels, Paris, and San Bernardino events. This has led many to complain that it seems terrorism in war-torn and unstable Muslim-majority countries is seen by the rest of society as normal and routine, valuing only Western lives and reacting only when Al-Qaeda or ISIS hit particularly close to home.
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