History Main / WorstAid

24th Mar '17 8:09:51 AM shadowmanwkp
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* Approaching a person in obvious mental distress in a threatening and dominating way or suddenly trying to grab them. This one is often done in RealLife by police, and often leads to the person acting out and the police shooting them in "self-defense." If someone is in obvious mental distress (appears to be attempting suicide, appears to be hallucinating or tripping, uncontrollable crying or rage) the proper response, if no one else is at risk, is to back off and allow the person space, and to approach, if at all, slowly, calmly, and ideally with permission. Someone in mental distress, for whatever reason, often will respond to compassion and respect much better than they will to threats and orders or being, in their mind, suddenly physically assaulted.

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* Approaching a person in obvious mental distress in a threatening and dominating way or suddenly trying to grab them. This one is often done in RealLife by police, and often leads to the person acting out and out, escalating the police shooting them in "self-defense." problem. If someone is in obvious mental distress (appears to be attempting suicide, appears to be hallucinating or tripping, uncontrollable crying or rage) the proper response, if no one else is at risk, is to back off and allow the person space, and to approach, if at all, slowly, calmly, and ideally with permission. Someone in mental distress, for whatever reason, often will respond to compassion and respect much better than they will to threats and orders or being, in their mind, suddenly physically assaulted.
23rd Mar '17 2:33:43 PM BadgerBadger
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Qualifying as Worst Aid will usually mean that the work is attempting to depict useful medical care and it is done badly or counterproductive for reasons having nothing to do with ''actor'' safety (see CPR). It becomes egregious when the depiction is of a doctor or other expert doing something you ''should'' learn not to do in First Aid class.
21st Mar '17 2:27:55 PM BadgerBadger
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* Disregarding the security of an accident scene or even personal safety, in violation of the most important rule: Avoid increasing the number of casualties. Rushing onto the freeway isn't any more safe because there's an upended car on it. This one's popular in real life--paramedics get called out at least weekly in some areas for accidents caused by people running onto the freeway to help.

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* Disregarding the security of an accident scene or even personal safety, in violation of the most important rule: Avoid increasing the number of casualties. Rushing onto the freeway isn't any more safe because there's an upended car on it. This one's popular in real life--paramedics get called out at least weekly in some areas for accidents caused by people running onto the freeway to help. It may seem cold but SavingPrivateRyan outcomes aren't the goal, especially when there are many Private Ryans.
9th Mar '17 8:45:52 AM SolidSonicTH
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** [[VideoGame/FarCry3 The sequel]] tones it down and adds a little realism to it.'''''[[note]]The term "little" is the key word here.[[/note]]''''' Makeshift surgery is reserved to when you have no medication or other healing items, removing foreign objects has Jason immediately bandage the wounds to try and reduce bleeding, and the act only heals a little. It should be noted, however, that Jason still does downright stupid things that include ''removing a bullet with a dirty stick or his teeth.'' And, as an extra aside, the RPGElements in the game allow you to upgrade how effective makeshift surgery is, meaning Jason at the end of the game can potentially remove a bullet with a dirty stick or set a broken thumb to ''completely'' recover from all the damage he's recently taken.

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** [[VideoGame/FarCry3 The sequel]] tones it down and adds a little realism to it.'''''[[note]]The term "little" is the key word here.[[/note]]''''' Makeshift surgery is reserved to when you have no medication or other healing items, removing foreign objects has Jason immediately bandage the wounds to try and reduce bleeding, and the act only heals a little. It should be noted, however, that Jason still does downright stupid things that include ''removing a bullet with a dirty stick or his teeth.'' And, as an extra aside, the RPGElements in the game allow you to upgrade how effective makeshift surgery is, meaning Jason at the end of the game can potentially remove a bullet with a dirty stick or set a broken thumb to ''completely'' recover from all the damage he's recently taken. ''VideoGame/FarCry4'' reuses these animations so Ajay is just as adept at full-body healing by treating his arm.
8th Mar '17 11:31:55 PM Guerrero
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* During his last wrestling match in March 2015, Mexican wrestler Perro Aguayo Jr. or Hijo del Perro Aguayo received a dropkick that propelled him against the ropes, with his head violently whiplashing against them. He remained limp, and throughout the rest of the match, both his fellow wrestlers and his ringside helpers carelessly tried to revive him by shaking him several times. Ultimately their blatant disregard for medical procedure mattered little, Perro had tragically died almost instantly. Still, it remains a glaring and very modern example of this trope in real life, one that was witnessed in real time by thousands both in the audience and those who were watching the event from their homes.
5th Mar '17 11:33:59 AM randomguy5850
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* Treating burns with butter or oil. Butter or oil will ''worsen'' any burn from sunburn to third degree burns, and possibly get it infected. If the skin is recently burned/still burning and the burn is 1st or 2nd degree (most sunburns, brief contact with a hot object, dropped cigarette or cigar on leg, etc), immerse it in or spray it with cool water to stop ongoing damage. If it's third degree then try to keep it cool and clean, but call 911[[note]]112 in the European Union as well as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/112_%28emergency_telephone_number%29#Implementation other countries]][[/note]] and wait for the professionals to arrive rather than using cold running water.

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* Treating burns with butter or oil. Butter or oil will ''worsen'' any burn from sunburn to third degree third-degree burns, and possibly get it infected. If the skin is recently burned/still burning and the burn is 1st or 2nd degree (most sunburns, brief contact with a hot object, dropped cigarette or cigar on leg, etc), immerse it in or spray it with cool water to stop ongoing damage. If it's third degree then try to keep it cool and clean, but call 911[[note]]112 in the European Union as well as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/112_%28emergency_telephone_number%29#Implementation other countries]][[/note]] and wait for the professionals to arrive rather than using cold running water.



* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation.If the poison was a strong acid,alkali, or a petroleum product,vomiting could cause further damage to the esophagus and mouth. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline[[note]]1-800-222-1222 in the United States[[/note]], which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.

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* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol drug, alcohol, or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation.pneumonia or asphyxiation. If the poison was a strong acid,alkali, acid, alkali, or a petroleum product,vomiting product, vomiting could cause further damage to the esophagus and mouth. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline[[note]]1-800-222-1222 in the United States[[/note]], which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.



* Administering lots of acetaminophen/paracetamol/Tylenol/Panadol for pain or fever or similar. Acetaminophen/paracetamol has a surprisingly low dose before it can cause liver damage (especially in heavy drinkers or steroid users or hepatitis A, B, or C patients or others who may have compromised liver function). If a moderate dose of paracetamol doesn't help, give up on it and use ibuprofen or naproxen or, if it's legal where you are, cannabis. And if someone drinks a lot, has a hangover, or has hepatitis, don't ''ever'' give them paracetamol in the first place.

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* Administering lots of acetaminophen/paracetamol/Tylenol/Panadol for pain or fever or similar. Acetaminophen/paracetamol has a surprisingly low dose before it can cause liver damage (especially in heavy drinkers or drinkers, steroid users or users, hepatitis A, B, or C patients patients, or others who may have compromised liver function). If a moderate dose of paracetamol acetaminophen doesn't help, give up on it and use ibuprofen or naproxen or, if it's legal where you are, cannabis. And if someone drinks a lot, has a hangover, or has hepatitis, don't ''ever'' give them paracetamol acetaminophen in the first place.



* An untrained person using a shirt or other article of clothing as a makeshift tourniquet to stop bleeding from a gunshot wound. While this allows for some fanservice as the character tears away their clothing, it's a very ''bad'' idea. In real life the clothing will probably stick to the drying blood, causing other problems later when real help arrives. If the tourniquet is left on the limb in question for too long, this will result in the limb becoming necrotic and falling off or getting Compartment Syndrome. This one is subject to a bit of ScienceMarchesOn as the US Army, who have been using makeshift tourniquets out of cravats and windlasses (basically bandannas and sticks) for decades, have shown that advances in combat medicine allow a limb to have a tourniquet applied and blood flow completely cut off for up to 2 hours without permanent damage and up to 4 hours while still keeping the limb. This has gained modern tourniquets such as the CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet) a place in the gear of most modern combat soldiers, and indeed, is the US Military's preferred method of treatment for significant extremity hemorrhage and/or total limb amputation. The current consensus is that when used properly tourniquets work, but should only be used under specific circumstances by ''professionals'' unless the situation is that dire. "Dire" in this case meaning that the person is almost certain to die from blood loss before ''any'' professional medical aid arrives on site, typically meaning a limb being fully severed.

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* An untrained person using a shirt or other article of clothing as a makeshift tourniquet to stop bleeding from a gunshot wound. While this allows for some fanservice as the character tears away their clothing, it's a very ''bad'' idea. In real life the clothing will probably stick to the drying blood, causing other problems later when real help arrives. If the tourniquet is left on the limb in question for too long, this will result in the limb becoming necrotic and falling off or getting Compartment Syndrome.compartment syndrome. This one is subject to a bit of ScienceMarchesOn as the US Army, who have been using makeshift tourniquets out of cravats and windlasses (basically bandannas and sticks) for decades, have shown that advances in combat medicine allow a limb to have a tourniquet applied and blood flow completely cut off for up to 2 hours without permanent damage and up to 4 hours while still keeping the limb. This has gained modern tourniquets such as the CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet) a place in the gear of most modern combat soldiers, and indeed, is the US Military's preferred method of treatment for significant extremity hemorrhage and/or total limb amputation. The current consensus is that when used properly tourniquets work, but should only be used under specific circumstances by ''professionals'' unless the situation is that dire. "Dire" in this case meaning that the person is almost certain to die from blood loss before ''any'' professional medical aid arrives on site, typically meaning a limb being fully severed.



* Wounds and Water. There could be a page dedicated simply to the assumption in fictional media that a wound should not get in contact with water unless it's a burn. Everyone who has surgery will usually find that swimming pools and sauna are forbidden, but showering is fine as long as the wound itself is not covered in soap (having it run over the wound is ok though). In some cases the patient is even encouraged to wash the wound, such as when there is the risk of infection. Certain abscess cases even involve the patient holding the shower head straight at the wound and using the water pressure to clean the wound thoroughly.

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* Wounds and Water. There could be a page dedicated simply to the assumption in fictional media that a wound should not get in contact with water unless it's a burn. Everyone who has surgery will usually find that swimming pools and sauna are forbidden, but showering is fine as long as the wound itself is not covered in soap (having it run over the wound is ok OK though). In some cases the patient is even encouraged to wash the wound, such as when there is the risk of infection. Certain abscess cases even involve the patient holding the shower head straight at the wound and using the water pressure to clean the wound thoroughly.
24th Feb '17 9:52:10 AM babyhenchy1
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* ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has, at the climax, one character [[spoiler:(Imperator Furiosa)]] pull something she had been stabbed with out of her side. What happens next is actually pretty realistic, as she looks like death warmed over pretty much immediately, develops a pneumothorax and near exsanguinates until she's given a blood transfusion just in time, and even afterwards is still visibly in rough shape. Director George Miller actually worked in an emergency department, so this doubles as ShownTheirWork.

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* ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' has, at the climax, one character [[spoiler:(Imperator Furiosa)]] pull something she had been stabbed with out of her side. What happens next is actually pretty realistic, as she looks like death warmed over pretty much immediately, develops a pneumothorax and near exsanguinates until she's given a blood transfusion just in time, and even afterwards is still visibly in rough shape. Director George Miller Creator/GeorgeMiller actually worked in an emergency department, so this doubles as ShownTheirWork.
21st Jan '17 7:10:44 PM CountDorku
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** And ''then'' came comic #6, "The Naked and the Dead", in which his treatment for everyone concerned having their blood drained out was to ''pour it into open wounds from a bucket''. Against all reason, it works.
--->'''Miss Pauling:''' Wait, how'd you separate out the blood types?\\
'''[[TheDitz Soldier:]]''' Har! "Different types of blood"! [[EskimosArentReal Miss Pauling came back stupid!]]\\
'''Medic:''' Ha! Yes. What foolishness. (sotto voce) ''Miss Pauling, I've been using my own underwear to sponge blood out of puddles. Trust me, the type is the least of your problems.''
17th Jan '17 9:10:12 AM thatawesomedude13
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* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline[[note]]1-800-222-1222 in the United States[[/note]], which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.

to:

* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation.If the poison was a strong acid,alkali, or a petroleum product,vomiting could cause further damage to the esophagus and mouth. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline[[note]]1-800-222-1222 in the United States[[/note]], which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.
27th Dec '16 8:46:46 AM DannWoolf
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* In ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas,'' the medical personnel some how can magical revive people who died from gunfire, explosions, and fire just with CPR, and still run in to the enter the area the insane gun man (I.E. you) is still shooting up. That pales in comparison to all the people they '''run over''' in their pursuit of saving lives.

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* In ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas,'' the medical personnel some how can magical revive people who died from gunfire, explosions, and fire just with CPR, and still run in to have the enter the balls to do it in an area the an insane gun man gunman (I.E. you) is still shooting up. That pales in comparison to all the people they '''run over''' in their pursuit of saving lives.
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