History Main / WorstAid

17th Jun '18 5:49:03 PM Malady
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** Oh, and this same first-aid course apparently consisted of CPR, the Heimlich Manoeuvre and the Recovery Position and that was ''it''. Nothing on recognising the symptoms of a stroke or heart attack--the subjects of major public-awareness campaigns so that people seek medical assistance before their condition becomes life-threatening--or dealing with [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal burns, bleeding or a broken bone.]]

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** Oh, and this same first-aid course apparently consisted of CPR, the Heimlich Manoeuvre and the Recovery Position and that was ''it''. Nothing on recognising the symptoms of a stroke or heart attack--the subjects of major public-awareness campaigns so that people seek medical assistance before their condition becomes life-threatening--or dealing with [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal burns, bleeding or a broken bone.]]
20th May '18 9:18:17 PM Scifiwriterguy
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* ''Film/TheRock'' invoked this twice in the same fashion, insisting that the only means to help someone who's been exposed to a chemical warfare agent is for them to inject atropine into their heart. Themselves. In a hospital setting, this is valid, but for someone in the field to a) insert a cardiac needle into their own heart, b) not miss or do a pass-through, c) not cause a cardiac laceration, d) administer a medication, and d) not kill themselves doing it ''while suffering onset symptoms'' of nerve agent poisoning is beyond credulity. In reality, autoinjectors are used to deliver counter-agents into the thigh muscle.

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* ''Film/TheRock'' invoked this twice in the same fashion, insisting that the only means to help someone who's been exposed to a chemical warfare agent is for them to inject atropine into their heart. Themselves. In a hospital setting, this is valid, but for someone in the field to a) insert a cardiac needle into their own heart, b) not miss or do a pass-through, c) not cause a cardiac laceration, d) administer a medication, and d) e) not kill themselves doing it ''while suffering onset symptoms'' of nerve agent poisoning is beyond credulity. In reality, autoinjectors are used to deliver counter-agents into the thigh muscle.
18th May '18 6:55:15 PM Scifiwriterguy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheRock'' invoked this twice in the same fashion, insisting that the only means to help someone who's been exposed to a chemical warfare agent is for them to inject atropine into their heart. Themselves. In a hospital setting, this is valid, but for someone in the field to a) insert a cardiac needle into their own heart, b) not miss or do a pass-through, c) not cause a cardiac laceration, d) administer a medication, and d) not kill themselves doing it ''while suffering onset symptoms'' of nerve agent poisoning is beyond credulity. In reality, autoinjectors are used to deliver counter-agents into the thigh muscle.
13th May '18 8:19:04 AM angie710
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* In late 2017, a video began circulating from a wellness/alternative-medicine {{Facebook}} page, detailing a way (allegedly from a Chinese medical professor) that a layperson could save a stroke victim. It involved pricking their ears and fingers, which was supposed to somehow stabilize them and get the stroke to pass (or at least get their face to stop drooping) and ''then'' taking them to the hospital. Anyone with even a ''minimal'' amount of knowledge about strokes should know that you ''immediately'' call 911 (or 999, or whatever the number for emergency services is in your country) and get them to a hospital as quickly as you can, and let ''trained'' ER and stroke-unit staff take care of it. [[note]] Use the acronym '''FAST''': look for '''F'''acial droop, '''A'''rm weakness, '''S'''peech problems, '''T'''ime to call EMS. Some also add '''B'''alance and '''E'''yes to that, forming the acronym '''BE FAST'''. [[/note]] Pricking their ears and fingers won't help, and delaying treatment leads to brain damage, which could lead to the patient either dying or becoming ''severely and permanently'' disabled. The viral video is deconstructed [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0D-dzYkz7g4 here]] by an ''actual'' doctor.
11th May '18 10:24:47 AM KingLyger
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* Beginning care on an adult who has capacity without consent.[[note]]Capacity is defined as the ability to make one's own decisions rationally. Competence is a legal term meaning that a court has deemed a person unable to make their own decisions. However, capacity can be determined clinically; you don't need a court order for every emergency patient who's too drunk, high, or in such mental distress that they're a danger to self and others.[[/note]] The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed (Someone screaming "Please help me" is enough to give a reasonable assumption that they want your help), then you're protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults - conscious children are either assumed to give consent. or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it. The exception to implied consent is the DNR or Do Not Resuscitate order, in which a patient puts in writing that they do not want help if they fall unconscious, but this is unlikely to apply outside of a hospital or dedicated care facility.

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* Beginning care on an adult who has capacity without consent.[[note]]Capacity is defined as the ability to make one's own decisions rationally. Competence is a legal term meaning that a court has deemed a person unable to make their own decisions. However, capacity can be determined clinically; you don't need a court order for every emergency patient who's too drunk, high, or in such mental distress that they're a danger to self and others.[[/note]] The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed (Someone screaming "Please help me" is enough to give a reasonable assumption that they want your help), then you're protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults - conscious children are either assumed to give consent. consent, or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it. The exception to implied consent is the DNR or Do Not Resuscitate order, in which a patient puts in writing that they do not want help if they fall unconscious, but this is unlikely to apply outside of a hospital or dedicated care facility.
11th May '18 10:23:12 AM KingLyger
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* Beginning care on a an adult who has capacity [[note]]Capacity is defined as the ability to make one's own decisions rationally. Competence is a legal term meaning that a court has deemed a person unable to make their own decisions. However, capacity can be determined clinically; you don't need a court order for every emergency patient who's too drunk, high, or in such mental distress that they're a danger to self and others.[[/note]] without consent. The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed ("Please help" is a reasonable assumption), then you're often protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults--conscious children are either assumed to give consent or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it. The exception to implied consent is the DNR or Do Not Resuscitate order, in which a patient puts in writing that they do not want help if they fall unconscious, but this is unlikely to apply outside of a hospital or dedicated care facility.

to:

* Beginning care on a an adult who has capacity without consent.[[note]]Capacity is defined as the ability to make one's own decisions rationally. Competence is a legal term meaning that a court has deemed a person unable to make their own decisions. However, capacity can be determined clinically; you don't need a court order for every emergency patient who's too drunk, high, or in such mental distress that they're a danger to self and others.[[/note]] without consent. The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed ("Please help" (Someone screaming "Please help me" is enough to give a reasonable assumption), assumption that they want your help), then you're often protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults--conscious adults - conscious children are either assumed to give consent consent. or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it. The exception to implied consent is the DNR or Do Not Resuscitate order, in which a patient puts in writing that they do not want help if they fall unconscious, but this is unlikely to apply outside of a hospital or dedicated care facility.
7th May '18 8:26:51 AM MedicInDisquise
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** Played With in ''VideoGame/FarCry5''. The game lacks any healing animations such as removing bullets and resetting bones. Instead, the deputy actually bandages themselves up with a medkit. It makes sense, given that unlike the [[ActionSurvivor protagonists]] of previous games, the deputy would have some kind of first aid training. However, if you or any allies fall into critical condition, all you have to do is pick them up from the ground to completely heal them.

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** Played With in ''VideoGame/FarCry5''. The game lacks any healing animations such as removing bullets and resetting bones. Instead, the deputy actually bandages themselves up with a collectible medkit. It makes sense, given that unlike the [[ActionSurvivor protagonists]] of previous games, the deputy would have some kind of first aid training. However, if you or any allies fall into critical condition, all you have to do is pick them up from the ground to completely heal them. And yes, any companion can revive you. This includes the animal Fangs for Hire which revive you from critical injuries by licking your face.
7th May '18 3:07:50 AM MedicInDisquise
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Added DiffLines:

** Played With in ''VideoGame/FarCry5''. The game lacks any healing animations such as removing bullets and resetting bones. Instead, the deputy actually bandages themselves up with a medkit. It makes sense, given that unlike the [[ActionSurvivor protagonists]] of previous games, the deputy would have some kind of first aid training. However, if you or any allies fall into critical condition, all you have to do is pick them up from the ground to completely heal them.
6th May '18 9:51:02 PM foxley
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* ''Film/TheManFromKangaroo'': In a scene that is boggling to modern viewers, John rescues a boy drowning and then holds him upside down and shakes him to get the water out of his lungs.
5th May '18 7:52:40 AM Jake
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* Wounds and Water. There could be a page dedicated simply to the assumption in fictional media that a wound should not get in contact with water unless it's a burn. Everyone who has surgery will usually find that swimming pools and sauna are forbidden, but showering is fine as long as the wound itself is not covered in soap (having it run over the wound is OK though). In some cases the patient is even encouraged to wash the wound, such as when there is the risk of infection. Certain abscess cases even involve the patient holding the shower head straight at the wound and using the water pressure to clean the wound thoroughly.

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* Wounds and Water. There could be a page dedicated simply to the assumption in fictional media that a wound should not get in contact with water unless it's a burn. Everyone who has surgery will usually find that swimming pools and sauna are forbidden, but showering is fine as long as the wound itself is not covered in soap (having it run over the wound is OK though). In some cases the patient is even encouraged to wash the wound, such as when there is the risk of infection. Certain abscess cases even involve the patient holding the shower head straight at the wound and using the water pressure to clean the wound thoroughly. Note however that getting the ''dressing'' wet is a different matter; a normal adhesive dressing pad will stand up to the shower but shouldn't be fully immersed in water, and stuff like compression bandages must be kept dry at all times.
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