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History Main / WorstAid

24th May '16 12:29:42 PM Chabal2
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** Used in-universe when Averell gets knocked out, Jack and William move him under a tree. Joe yells at them that it's incredibly dangerous to move a wounded person, so they... carry him back.
19th May '16 11:45:04 AM SpocktorWho
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** An episode has Sam scooping Dean up and cradling him after he'd been hit with enormous force by a car ([[UnexplainedRecovery he got better]]), with blithe disregard for his spinal column.

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** An episode has Sam scooping Dean up and cradling him after he'd been hit with enormous force by a car ([[UnexplainedRecovery he (he got better]]), better), with blithe disregard for his spinal column.column. Moving injured characters for no reason happens on this show ''a lot''.
13th May '16 12:04:59 AM SoapheadChurch
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* The practice of bloodletting (removing significant quantities of blood) was a common practice in the 18th century that may have (if not directly caused) hastened the death of UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington following the first President becoming ill suddenly in December 1799. The rationale behind the practice was to remove the "bad blood" in the hopes that the disease would go with it, which we now knoThere is actually a use for bloodletting, and it is still used today, but only for a VERY VERY specific condition, called hemochromatosis, an excess of iron in the blood. The condition can result from a genetic defect (which makes it chronic), or an excess of iron introduced from blood transfusions. In these cases, carefully controlled amounts of bloodletting are used to relieve the iron overload. In this case, it's not called bloodletting, but therapeutic phlebotomy. This condition was not something that was known before the modern day.

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* The practice of bloodletting (removing significant quantities of blood) was a common practice in the 18th century that may have (if not directly caused) hastened the death of UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington following the first President becoming ill suddenly in December 1799. The rationale behind the practice was to remove the "bad blood" in the hopes that the disease would go with it, which we now knoThere it. There is actually a use for bloodletting, and it is still used today, but only for a VERY VERY specific condition, called hemochromatosis, an excess of iron in the blood. The condition can result from a genetic defect (which makes it chronic), or an excess of iron introduced from blood transfusions. In these cases, carefully controlled amounts of bloodletting are used to relieve the iron overload. In this case, it's not called bloodletting, but therapeutic phlebotomy. This condition was not something that was known before the modern day.
13th May '16 12:04:17 AM SoapheadChurch
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* United States President UsefulNotes/JamesGarfield was shot InTheBack by a crazed office seeker in 1881. If the doctors had confined themselves to sewing him up and giving him chicken soup, Garfield probably would have lived. But since it was 1881 and the work of Louis Pasteur (the germ theory of disease) and Joseph Lister (antiseptic surgery) was not universally accepted, especially in America, the doctors spent much of the summer sticking unsterilized instruments and ''their bare unwashed fingers'' into Garfield's back as they tried to find the bullet. Because WeHaveToGetTheBulletOut. Garfield fell victim to out-of-control infection and died eleven weeks after he was shot.
** In fact, Garfield's assassin defended himself at his trial with the argument "The doctors killed Garfield, I merely shot him" (which is [[HalfTruth technically true]] if you ignore the fact that the doctors wouldn't have been giving Garfield the treatment that led to the infection [[CompletelyMissingthePoint had he not been shot in the first place]]). The jury still found him guilty.
** Later, TheodoreRoosevelt decided to ''leave the bullet in'' after somebody tried to assassinate him, remembering that taking it out killed Garfield, surmising (correctly) that the absence of BloodFromTheMouth meant he was alright.
*** He was also just that {{badass}}. Roosevelt was shot at a campaign appearance. He gave his speech anyway (starting by saying "Ladies and Gentlemen, I don't know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot, but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose"), ''then'' sought medical treatment.
** The practice of bloodletting (removing significant quantities of blood) was a common practice in the 18th century that may have (if not directly caused) hastened the death of UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington following the first President becoming ill suddenly in December 1799.
*** Slight subversion is that bloodletting does have a use, and is still used today, but only for a VERY VERY specific condition, called hemochromatosis, an excess of iron in the blood. The condition can result from a genetic defect (which makes it chronic), or an excess of iron introduced from blood transfusions. In these cases, carefully controlled amounts of bloodletting are used to relieve the iron overload. In this case, it's not called bloodletting, but therapeutic phlebotomy. This condition was not something that was known before the modern day.

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* United States President UsefulNotes/JamesGarfield was shot InTheBack by a crazed office seeker in 1881. If the doctors had confined themselves to sewing him up and giving him chicken soup, Garfield probably would have lived. But since it was 1881 and the work of Louis Pasteur (the germ theory of disease) and Joseph Lister (antiseptic surgery) was not universally accepted, especially in America, the doctors spent much of the summer sticking unsterilized instruments and ''their bare unwashed fingers'' into Garfield's back as they tried to find the bullet. Because WeHaveToGetTheBulletOut. Garfield fell victim to out-of-control infection and died eleven weeks after he was shot.
**
shot. In fact, Garfield's assassin defended himself at his trial with the argument "The doctors killed Garfield, I merely shot him" (which is [[HalfTruth technically true]] if you ignore the fact that the doctors wouldn't have been giving Garfield the treatment that led to the infection [[CompletelyMissingthePoint had he not been shot in the first place]]). The jury still found him guilty.
** Later, TheodoreRoosevelt decided to ''leave the bullet in'' after somebody tried to assassinate him, remembering that taking it out killed Garfield, surmising (correctly) that the absence of BloodFromTheMouth meant he was alright.
***
alright. He was also just that {{badass}}. Roosevelt was shot at a campaign appearance. He gave his speech anyway (starting by saying "Ladies and Gentlemen, I don't know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot, but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose"), ''then'' sought medical treatment.
** * The practice of bloodletting (removing significant quantities of blood) was a common practice in the 18th century that may have (if not directly caused) hastened the death of UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington following the first President becoming ill suddenly in December 1799.
*** Slight subversion is
1799. The rationale behind the practice was to remove the "bad blood" in the hopes that bloodletting does have the disease would go with it, which we now knoThere is actually a use, use for bloodletting, and it is still used today, but only for a VERY VERY specific condition, called hemochromatosis, an excess of iron in the blood. The condition can result from a genetic defect (which makes it chronic), or an excess of iron introduced from blood transfusions. In these cases, carefully controlled amounts of bloodletting are used to relieve the iron overload. In this case, it's not called bloodletting, but therapeutic phlebotomy. This condition was not something that was known before the modern day.



** If someone cannot walk under their own power and/or has had previous neck or back injuries (especially if they both can't walk/are unconscious AND have previous neck/back injuries), the proper way of handling the emergency is having someone call EmergencyServices (911, 119, whatever your local number is) and mentioning the nature of the emergency, removing anything around them that could endanger them from being sharp or falling on them or being otherwise hazardous, and ''not moving them.'' Let the professionals do it.

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** * If someone cannot walk under their own power and/or has had previous neck or back injuries (especially if they both can't walk/are unconscious AND have previous neck/back injuries), the proper way of handling the emergency is having someone call EmergencyServices (911, 119, whatever your local number is) and mentioning the nature of the emergency, removing anything around them that could endanger them from being sharp or falling on them or being otherwise hazardous, and ''not moving them.'' Let the professionals do it.
5th May '16 4:36:47 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** This is parodied mercilessly in ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon''--your first aid animations consist exclusively of ridiculous things, like fixing your cybernetic arm with a welding torch he pulsls out of [[HammerSpace nowhere]] and flexing a grip strength bar to generate electricity [[note]]The protagonist is a [[WeCanRebuildHim cyborg]] so the part about repairing an arm or generating electricity ''might'' make some sense but how is [[AwesomeMcCoolName Rex 'Power' Colt]] able to rebuild his normal organs is anybody´s guess .[[/note]]

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** This is parodied mercilessly in ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon''--your first aid animations consist exclusively of ridiculous things, like fixing your cybernetic arm with a welding torch he pulsls pulls out of [[HammerSpace nowhere]] and flexing a grip strength bar to generate electricity [[note]]The protagonist is a [[WeCanRebuildHim cyborg]] so the part about repairing an arm or generating electricity ''might'' make some sense but how is [[AwesomeMcCoolName Rex 'Power' Colt]] able to rebuild his normal organs is anybody´s guess .[[/note]]
5th May '16 4:33:28 PM DastardlyDemolition
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** This is parodied mercilessly in ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon''--your first aid animations consist exclusively of ridiculous things, like fixing your cybernetic arm with a HammerSpace welding torch and flexing a grip strength bar to generate electricity [[note]]The protagonist is a [[WeCanRebuildHim cyborg]] so the part about repairing an arm or generating electricity ''might'' make some sense but how is [[AwesomeMcCoolName Rex 'Power' Colt]] able to rebuild his normal organs is anybody´s guess .[[/note]]

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** This is parodied mercilessly in ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon''--your first aid animations consist exclusively of ridiculous things, like fixing your cybernetic arm with a HammerSpace welding torch he pulsls out of [[HammerSpace nowhere]] and flexing a grip strength bar to generate electricity [[note]]The protagonist is a [[WeCanRebuildHim cyborg]] so the part about repairing an arm or generating electricity ''might'' make some sense but how is [[AwesomeMcCoolName Rex 'Power' Colt]] able to rebuild his normal organs is anybody´s guess .[[/note]]
1st May '16 4:17:54 AM Kazmahu
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** The third game shows that this behavior isn't entirely without consequence - Max is a barely-functional addict for those painkillers.


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* Discussed in ''VideoGame/ArTonelico Qoga''. The first revival item the party can get is a syringe, and in an optional skit, the characters dicuss how dangerous this is, since the don't known if it's intravenous or intramuscular, where to apply it, or the proper dosage. Consequently, they decide to only use them if things get dire (GameplayAndStorySegregation aside). When a professional MD later joins the party, later skits indicate he's been giving the other characters pointers on safely treating each other.
1st May '16 4:04:49 AM Kazmahu
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** You're also a ''heavily'' augmented human being with an optional extra that actively affects pheromone production/emissions. Suffice to say you're probably not metabolizing those substances in a normal way.
20th Apr '16 8:56:59 PM ultimomant
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* Subverted in ''Literature/{{Gate}}'' when a JDSF soldier gets shot with an arrow. While carrying him to safety, as they are in the middle of a battle, the commanding officer warns the others not to pull the arrow out or else the man will bleed to death, and to get him to a proper medic instead.



* In ''Film/TheAbyss'', the female lead has drowned. Her skin is waxy and white, and she's obviously not breathing. The medical team tries CPR, rescue breathing and a defibrillator, all of which fail to do anything. Then, in a moment of desperation, the main character bitchslap her twice, then shake her for a good 10 seconds, all while [[PleaseWakeUp desperately screaming]] [[ClusterFBomb a string of curses at her]], and she comes right to. It is TruthInTelevision that it takes a good amount of heating up for a deeply-hypothermic body to resume function, so thinking it's too late when she's not warm enough yet to revive is at least plausible, though there are plenty of other problems with her resuscitation besides that. In the {{novelization}}, it's suggested [[AWizardDidIt the aliens had a hand in many things, including this]].

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* In ''Film/TheAbyss'', the female lead has drowned. Her skin is waxy and white, and she's obviously not breathing. The medical team tries CPR, rescue breathing and a defibrillator, all of which fail to do anything. Then, in a moment of desperation, the main character bitchslap bitchslaps her twice, then shake her for a good 10 seconds, all while [[PleaseWakeUp desperately screaming]] [[ClusterFBomb a string of curses at her]], and she comes right to. It is TruthInTelevision that it takes a good amount of heating up for a deeply-hypothermic body to resume function, so thinking it's too late when she's not warm enough yet to revive is at least plausible, though there are plenty of other problems with her resuscitation besides that. In the {{novelization}}, it's suggested [[AWizardDidIt the aliens had a hand in many things, including this]].



* In ''Film/KickAss,'' after Dave is [[spoiler: hit by a car]], the next scene shows the paramedics putting a C-collar on him to immobilise his spine... in the back of the ambulance. Meaning that they have already moved him quite a bit, which makes the whole thing pointless.

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* In ''Film/KickAss,'' after Dave is [[spoiler: hit by a car]], the next scene shows the paramedics putting a C-collar on him to immobilise immobilize his spine... in the back of the ambulance. Meaning that they have already moved him quite a bit, which makes the whole thing pointless.
10th Apr '16 3:43:36 PM ajbit26
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* Somewhat averted in the TV movie ''Film/TheLostBattalion''. A soldier with a giant piece of shrapnel in his shoulder is asked if he wants it removed, to which he shrugs and decides to leave it in. In this case leaving it in place is the proper course of action. However, it is unclear whether he really understood the consequences of removing it, or whether he just wanted to be a manly man.

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* Somewhat averted Averted in the TV movie ''Film/TheLostBattalion''. A soldier with a giant piece of shrapnel in his shoulder is asked if he wants it removed, to which he shrugs and decides to leave it in. In this case leaving it in place is the proper course of action. However, it is unclear whether he really understood the consequences of removing it, or whether he just wanted to be a manly man.man.
** They were also dangerously low on medical supplies, so much so that they had begun taking used bandages off the dead to use on the still living wounded.
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