History Main / WorstAid

28th Jul '16 5:29:39 PM BlazingFlames88
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* In "Film/Star Trek Beyond", Spock [[spoiler: is injured, leaving McCoy to perform surgery on him to save his life. He gets better when he's beamed up to Jaylah's ship later on and McCoy gives him proper treatment.]]

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* In "Film/Star Trek Beyond", ''Film/StarTrekBeyond'', Spock [[spoiler: is injured, leaving McCoy to perform surgery on him to save his life. He gets better when he's beamed up to Jaylah's ship later on and McCoy gives him proper treatment.]]
28th Jul '16 5:28:53 PM BlazingFlames88
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* In Star Trek Beyond, Spock [[spoiler: is injured, leaving McCoy to perform surgery on him to save his life. He gets better when he's beamed up to Jaylah's ship later on and McCoy gives him proper treatment.]]

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* In Star "Film/Star Trek Beyond, Beyond", Spock [[spoiler: is injured, leaving McCoy to perform surgery on him to save his life. He gets better when he's beamed up to Jaylah's ship later on and McCoy gives him proper treatment.]]
28th Jul '16 5:26:00 PM BlazingFlames88
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* The British music movie ''Film/TwentyFourHourPartyPeople'' shows the ultimate in ''not'' helping an epileptic fit -- Backstage as Joy Division's Ian Curtis has a fit, bassist Hooky, instead of offering any help, bends down and retrieves his cigarettes from Ian's pocket; "he's still got me fags". Acording to an interview with ''Q'' magazine this really did did happen, but it was drummer Steve Morris and not Hooky looking for cigarettes.

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*In Star Trek Beyond, Spock [[spoiler: is injured, leaving McCoy to perform surgery on him to save his life. He gets better when he's beamed up to Jaylah's ship later on and McCoy gives him proper treatment.]]
* The British music movie ''Film/TwentyFourHourPartyPeople'' shows the ultimate in ''not'' helping an epileptic fit -- Backstage as Joy Division's Ian Curtis has a fit, bassist Hooky, instead of offering any help, bends down and retrieves his cigarettes from Ian's pocket; "he's still got me fags". Acording According to an interview with ''Q'' magazine this really did did happen, but it was drummer Steve Morris and not Hooky looking for cigarettes.
22nd Jul '16 5:53:11 PM res20stupid
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Added DiffLines:

* Subverted in ''Fanfic/TheSunSoul'' - a(n insane) Bug Catcher pulls out a knife that was stabbed into his leg. Blood starts gushing out immediately, since the blade had sliced the femoral artery. The only thing that stopped him from dying from blood loss was the Weedle got to him first.
20th Jul '16 2:27:12 PM Imagine.Wizard
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*** Especially considering that, despite the Doctor [[NotThatKindOfDoctor not being a medical doctor]], it has been shown he does know advanced first aid, and would have definitely known how to do CPR. Perhaps it is Rory's fault, seeing as, despite being a qualified nurse, he instructs Amy to do CPR 'just like they do on TV'. Which, in Amy's defence, she does exactly - she poorly executes it, gives up and starts crying and viola, Rory is revived!
11th Jul '16 10:55:50 PM Shadozcreep
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* Beginning care on a conscious adult without consent. The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed ("Please help" is a reasonable assumption), then you're often protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults -- conscious children are either assumed to give consent or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it.

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* Beginning care on a conscious adult without consent. The person can sue for assault and battery, and this applies even to choking victims.[[note]]Just so this article doesn't stop you from helping people in real emergencies, if consent is given, or if consent can be reasonably assumed ("Please help" is a reasonable assumption), then you're often protected by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Samaritan_law Good Samaritan Laws]] even if you fail to save the person.[[/note]] Note that this only applies to conscious adults -- conscious children are either assumed to give consent or you must obtain consent from the child's legal guardian (parent or otherwise) on the scene, and if there is no one else on the scene, it's assumed. Unconscious ''anything'' is also fair game under the doctrine of implied consent, which is the assumption that an unconscious person would want you to help them even if they can't communicate it. The exception to implied consent is the DNR or Do Not Resuscitate order, in which a patient puts in writing that they do not want help if they fall unconscious, but this is unlikely to apply outside of a hospital or dedicated care facility.
9th Jul '16 3:42:40 PM poi99
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** This is all to say nothing of the fact that [=MGS3=] ignores the most basic rule of first aid: make sure the area is safe before doing anything else. Snake can calmly sit down in the middle of a battlefield, while his attacker is still aiming a gun at him, and get to work splinting a broken bone. Then again, said attacker will always patiently wait for him to finish before resuming the fight.

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** This is all to say nothing of the fact that [=MGS3=] ignores the most basic rule of first aid: make sure the area is safe before doing anything else. Because [[TalkingIsAFreeAction doing medicine is a free action]] here, Snake can calmly sit down in the middle of a battlefield, while his attacker is still aiming a gun at him, and get to work splinting a broken bone. Then again, said attacker will always patiently wait for him to finish before resuming the fight.bone.
8th Jul '16 11:26:12 AM ZippyJake
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*Assuming a victim is fine because there is nothing currently flowing out of them, stuck in them, latched onto them, etc. Anyone trained in first aid can tell you that shock (the body failing to circulate blood properly) is actually one of the more dangerous threats posed to almost any accident victim. Many cases of shock can stem from what amounts to the body creating errors while responding to stressful stimuli, which means that even a comparatively minor wound (such as a cut on the thumb) can throw a person into shock. Symptoms can be anything from anxiety and confusion to irregular pulse and blackouts, and it's not unheard of for a patient who at first glance does not appear to have any life-threatening injuries to die from shock simply because the body unintentionally shut itself down. One of the best ways to prevent shock is to simply interact with the patient in a reassuring and calm tone, as well as keeping them warm and ensuring proper blood flow to the head and vital organs (usually achieved by propping up the legs).
8th Jul '16 11:15:50 AM ZippyJake
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* An untrained person using a shirt or other article of clothing as a makeshift tourniquet to stop bleeding from a gunshot wound. While this allows for some fanservice as the character tears away their clothing, it's a very ''bad'' idea. In real life the clothing will probably stick to the drying blood, causing other problems later when real help arrives. If the tourniquet is left on the limb in question for too long, this will result in the limb becoming necrotic and falling off or getting Compartment Syndrome. This one is subject to a bit of ScienceMarchesOn as the US Army, who have been using makeshift tourniquets out of cravats and windlasses (basically bandannas and sticks) for decades, have shown that advances in combat medicine allow a limb to have a tourniquet applied and blood flow completely cut off for up to 2 hours without permanent damage and up to 4 hours while still keeping the limb. This has gained modern tourniquets such as the CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet) a place in the gear of most modern combat soldiers, and indeed, is the US Military's preferred method of treatment for significant extremity hemorrhage and/or total limb amputation. The current consensus is that when used properly tourniquets work, but should only be used under specific circumstances by ''professionals'' unless the situation is that dire.

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* An untrained person using a shirt or other article of clothing as a makeshift tourniquet to stop bleeding from a gunshot wound. While this allows for some fanservice as the character tears away their clothing, it's a very ''bad'' idea. In real life the clothing will probably stick to the drying blood, causing other problems later when real help arrives. If the tourniquet is left on the limb in question for too long, this will result in the limb becoming necrotic and falling off or getting Compartment Syndrome. This one is subject to a bit of ScienceMarchesOn as the US Army, who have been using makeshift tourniquets out of cravats and windlasses (basically bandannas and sticks) for decades, have shown that advances in combat medicine allow a limb to have a tourniquet applied and blood flow completely cut off for up to 2 hours without permanent damage and up to 4 hours while still keeping the limb. This has gained modern tourniquets such as the CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet) a place in the gear of most modern combat soldiers, and indeed, is the US Military's preferred method of treatment for significant extremity hemorrhage and/or total limb amputation. The current consensus is that when used properly tourniquets work, but should only be used under specific circumstances by ''professionals'' unless the situation is that dire. "Dire" in this case meaning that the person is almost certain to die from blood loss before ''any'' professional medical aid arrives on site, typically meaning a limb being fully severed.
8th Jul '16 11:02:43 AM ZippyJake
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* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline, which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.

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* Trying to make someone vomit poisonous or infectious things they have consumed. If they aren't already vomiting (which ''does'' happen with some substances, alcohol being the most notorious), you should just get them to a hospital. Supportive treatment begun early (or antidotes/antitoxins where they exist) often does far more good than trying to purge the substance from the body. Finally, in some cases a drug or alcohol or other overdose can cause unconsciousness and someone vomiting can breathe in their own vomit (pulmonary aspiration), complicating their potential survival with a nasty case of pneumonia... Or asphyxiation. It is important to note that many countries offer a poison control hotline, hotline[[note]]1-800-222-1222 in the United States[[/note]], which can offer expert advice and specific instructions for the particular poison ingested (if known). If these guys say to induce vomiting, do it; however, as noted before, this is a situational precaution, and should not be attempted unless it is known for certain it is the right thing to do.
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