History Main / WordOfDante

23rd Jun '17 3:12:11 PM jormis29
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** The author never described the eponymous character as wearing a [[IconicOutfit deerstalker cap or smoking a calabash pipe]].[[note]] The closest he came was in "Silver Blaze", where Holmes ''is'' noted as wearing a cap with earflaps, but that's because of the illustrations, not vice versa.[[/note]] Those are elements that were popularized by illustrations -- including the pictures ''printed with the stories''[[note]] But only when Holmes was in the countryside, as in "Silver Blaze"; a gentleman wouldn't dress like that in the city[[/note]] -- and stage productions. So many people consider them canonical that the [[Film/SherlockHolmes 2009 film]] got criticized for dropping those elements. Basil Rathbone wore them in his classic 1939 films, ''Film/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' and ''[[Film/TheAdventuresOfSherlockHolmes1939 The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes]]'', more reason to associate this outfit with the great detective.

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** The author never described the eponymous character as wearing a [[IconicOutfit deerstalker cap or smoking a calabash pipe]].[[note]] The closest he came was in "Silver Blaze", where Holmes ''is'' noted as wearing a cap with earflaps, but that's because of the illustrations, not vice versa.[[/note]] Those are elements that were popularized by illustrations -- including the pictures ''printed with the stories''[[note]] But only when Holmes was in the countryside, as in "Silver Blaze"; a gentleman wouldn't dress like that in the city[[/note]] -- and stage productions. So many people consider them canonical that the [[Film/SherlockHolmes [[Film/SherlockHolmes2009 2009 film]] got criticized for dropping those elements. Basil Rathbone Creator/BasilRathbone wore them in his classic 1939 films, ''Film/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' and ''[[Film/TheAdventuresOfSherlockHolmes1939 The ''Film/{{The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes]]'', Holmes|1939}}'', more reason to associate this outfit with the great detective.
17th Jun '17 2:14:10 PM nombretomado
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** When old Bill was alive it's uncertain if he ever officially sanctioned any publication of his works. Printed versions from the time vary wildly in quality: the first quarto edition of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' is widely considered to be a garbled bootleg[[note]]Here's the first few lines of the play's most famous speech, as printed in Q1: "To be, or not to be, I there's the point, / To Die, to sleepe, is that all? I all: / No, to sleepe, to dreame, I mary there it goes, / For in that dreame of death, when wee awake, / And borne before an euerlasting Iudge, / From whence no passenger euer retur'nd, / The vndiscouered country, at whose sight / The happy smile, and the accursed damn'd."[[/note]] whereas the second quarto is much more coherent. The WordOfStPaul version of his plays is the First Folio, a collection put together in 1623 by some actor pals in The King's Men. By the 1800s, editors had begun to assemble their own editions by cutting and pasting together what they regarded as probably the most authentic bits from the good quartos and the Folio, and this is still done with most editions for school or professional use (e.g. the Penguin edition) -- these are the WordOfDante versions. Basically, scholars have been in an echo chamber for two centuries, debating what can be considered "authentic" Shakes. Today, some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' include different versions of the play, leaving it entirely up to readers to decide their own version to use.[[note]]The extent to which early Shakespeare editions differ textually from each other can be overstated: there are only "bad quarto" versions of four plays, and of the 36 plays in the First Folio, 18 had never been printed before: the OtherWiki has a full list [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Folio here.]][[/note]]

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** When old Bill was alive it's uncertain if he ever officially sanctioned any publication of his works. Printed versions from the time vary wildly in quality: the first quarto edition of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' is widely considered to be a garbled bootleg[[note]]Here's the first few lines of the play's most famous speech, as printed in Q1: "To be, or not to be, I there's the point, / To Die, to sleepe, is that all? I all: / No, to sleepe, to dreame, I mary there it goes, / For in that dreame of death, when wee awake, / And borne before an euerlasting Iudge, / From whence no passenger euer retur'nd, / The vndiscouered country, at whose sight / The happy smile, and the accursed damn'd."[[/note]] whereas the second quarto is much more coherent. The WordOfStPaul version of his plays is the First Folio, a collection put together in 1623 by some actor pals in The King's Men. By the 1800s, editors had begun to assemble their own editions by cutting and pasting together what they regarded as probably the most authentic bits from the good quartos and the Folio, and this is still done with most editions for school or professional use (e.g. the Penguin edition) -- these are the WordOfDante versions. Basically, scholars have been in an echo chamber for two centuries, debating what can be considered "authentic" Shakes. Today, some editions of ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and ''Theatre/KingLear'' include different versions of the play, leaving it entirely up to readers to decide their own version to use.[[note]]The extent to which early Shakespeare editions differ textually from each other can be overstated: there are only "bad quarto" versions of four plays, and of the 36 plays in the First Folio, 18 had never been printed before: the OtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has a full list [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Folio here.]][[/note]]
12th Jun '17 5:31:14 AM DoctorNemesis
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** It's generally accepted these days to present Mycroft Holmes and the Diogenes Club as some sort of cover organization or outpost of the British secret service. This is largely an invention of later pastiches; aside from a few hints that Mycroft's job in the British government is a bit more extensive than he likes to admit ("on certain occasions he ''is'' the British government"), it's never really suggested in the original canon that either the club nor Mycroft are anything other than what they appear to be (a near-silent club for reclusive eccentrics and a BrilliantButLazy civil servant respectively).

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** It's generally accepted these days to present Mycroft Holmes and the Diogenes Club as some sort of cover organization or outpost of the British secret service. This is largely an invention of later pastiches; aside from a few hints that Mycroft's job in the British government is a bit more extensive than he likes to admit ("on certain occasions he ''is'' the British government"), it's never really suggested in the original canon that either the club nor Mycroft are anything other than what they appear to be (a near-silent club for reclusive eccentrics and a BrilliantButLazy low-level civil servant respectively).
10th Jun '17 3:28:28 PM Pinokio
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* ''Film/{{Predators}}'' states the events of ''Film/{{Predator}}'' took place in Guatemala. Though Dutch's team was briefed in Guatemala at the beginning of the movie, Steven E. de Souza included the country Val Verde in shows and movies he has co-written, including ''Adventure Inc.'', ''Film/{{Commando}}'', ''Film/DieHard2'', and ''Supercarrier'', and has stated in interviews that ''Film/{{Predator}}'' takes place on Val Verde. The Xenopedia wiki goes with de Souza's explanation, calling the explanation in ''Film/{{Predators}}'' incorrect.
10th Jun '17 11:23:19 AM nombretomado
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* The second movement of Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven's 8th Symphony allegedly originated as a canon honoring Johann Nepomuk Maelzel for his invention of the metronome. This canon ([=WoO 162=]) is now considered non-canonical, merely one of Anton Schindler's more elaborate fabrications about Beethoven's life.

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* The second movement of Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven's Music/LudwigVanBeethoven's 8th Symphony allegedly originated as a canon honoring Johann Nepomuk Maelzel for his invention of the metronome. This canon ([=WoO 162=]) is now considered non-canonical, merely one of Anton Schindler's more elaborate fabrications about Beethoven's life.



* The common myth that Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart and Antonio Salieri were enemies, or that Salieri killed Mozart, originates with the 1830 verse drama ''Mozart and Salieri'' by Alexander Pushkin, though most people know it from the film ''Film/{{Amadeus}}''. In real life, Mozart and Salieri stood on amicable terms, but a lot of people who should know better still discuss Salieri's supposed ill will toward Mozart as though it were historical fact.

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* The common myth that Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart and Antonio Salieri were enemies, or that Salieri killed Mozart, originates with the 1830 verse drama ''Mozart and Salieri'' by Alexander Pushkin, though most people know it from the film ''Film/{{Amadeus}}''. In real life, Mozart and Salieri stood on amicable terms, but a lot of people who should know better still discuss Salieri's supposed ill will toward Mozart as though it were historical fact.
7th Jun '17 6:15:29 AM Julia1984
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Added DiffLines:

* For almost 20 years, the ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' fandom universally accepted that "Karru Marri Odonna Loma Molonu Karrano" translates to "You and I are one now" in English, despite this ''never'' being established by ''any'' book, [[Series/{{Goosebumps}} tv episode]], game, WordOfGod or any official source whatsoever until 2015 (and that was just a promotional booklet released for the [[Film/{{Goosebumps}} film adaptation]]). The closest was a line spoken by Slappy in the tv adaptation of "Night of the Living Dummy II": "You read the magic words. Karru Marri Odonna Loma Molonu Karrano. You and I are one now. You are my slave..." In context, it seems ''highly'' unlikely he was translating the incantation in that scene, but the idea stuck.
1st Jun '17 11:08:34 AM FuzzyBarbarian
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* A RunningGag in ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' fandom is that [[ComicBook/{{Robin}} Damian Wayne]] is supposedly ''crazy'' about cats, to the extent that some fans were even [[FanDumb offended]] when a writer gave him a Great Dane named Titus in one series. While Damian does own a cat in addition to several other pets (including a cow), there's little to support the notion that he's obsessed with them to the degree fandom assumes he is.

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* A RunningGag in ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' fandom is that [[ComicBook/{{Robin}} Damian Wayne]] is supposedly ''crazy'' about cats, to the extent that some fans were even [[FanDumb offended]] when a writer gave him a Great Dane named Titus (an updating of Ace the Bat-Hound) in one series. While Damian does own a cat in addition to several other pets (including a cow), there's little to support the notion that he's obsessed with them to the degree fandom assumes he is. The closest would be Damian yelling at Jon Kent for accidentally killing Lois Lane's pet cat Goldie, but beyond that, Damian's generally depicted as a more just a general animal lover.
30th Apr '17 7:10:56 PM Malysano
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->''"Now that I have said it, it must be canon!"'' [sic]

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->''"Now that I have said it, it must be canon!"'' [sic]
30th Apr '17 5:01:16 PM TVRulezAgain
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* Neither the ''Literature/{{Quran}}'' nor Muhammad ever said anything about martyrs receiving the company of 72 virgins in paradise. The idea was first written down by a commentator 200 years after the death of Muhammad. And some scholars now think the word he used meant "grapes", not virgins.

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* Neither the ''Literature/{{Quran}}'' ''Literature/TheQuran'' nor Muhammad ever said anything about martyrs receiving the company of 72 virgins in paradise. The idea was first written down by a commentator 200 years after the death of Muhammad. And some scholars now think the word he used meant "grapes", not virgins.
17th Apr '17 11:06:33 AM JulianLapostat
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** Exodus doesn't name the Pharaoh who Moses went up against, but pop culture has completely identified him with Ramesses II. [[note]] Archaeological evidence does not indicate this. Nor does it indicate a mass-migration of any people across the Sinai Peninsula, or a record of one. Indeed, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna_letters what archaeological evidence does exist]] suggests that if the Hebrews did cross from Egypt to Canaan, they did so over half a century ''before'' Ramesses' reign, during the reign of Akhenaten.[[/note]] ''Film/TheTenCommandments'' didn't invent the idea, but it probably [[TropeCodifier codified]] it and later ''WesternAnimation/ThePrinceOfEgypt'' codified it again for a new generation. It's reached the point where any screen adaptation of the story which doesn't call him "Ramesses" will simply not mention his name.

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** Exodus doesn't name the Pharaoh who Moses went up against, but pop culture has completely identified him with Ramesses II. [[note]] Archaeological evidence does not indicate this. Nor does it indicate a mass-migration of any people across the Sinai Peninsula, or a record of one. Indeed, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna_letters what archaeological evidence does exist]] suggests that if the Hebrews did cross from Egypt to Canaan, they did so over half a century ''before'' Ramesses' reign, during the reign of Akhenaten.UsefulNotes/{{Akhenaten}}.[[/note]] ''Film/TheTenCommandments'' didn't invent the idea, but it probably [[TropeCodifier codified]] it and later ''WesternAnimation/ThePrinceOfEgypt'' codified it again for a new generation. It's reached the point where any screen adaptation of the story which doesn't call him "Ramesses" will simply not mention his name.
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