History Main / WithThisHerring

27th Sep '17 5:44:51 AM PixelKnight
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** ''Paranoia'' does something even worse: It's actually not that odd to get equipment assigned to you. Lots of equipment. Tons of it. Things you don't need, even. But one small detail: You're ''responsible'' for all the equipment given to you (including things like, say, grenades), and are expected to return it in the same condition you were given it. This being ''Paranoia'', it hardly needs saying that a failure to do so is treason. Or bringing it back in perfect condition is treason, as you failed to use your resources appropriately. Or both: you get accused of treason for failing to bring one thing back in mint condition ''and'' for failing to use your resources appropriately. Even if, logically, you had no way of knowing that you could set things on fire by pouring the latest version of Bouncy Bubble Beverage on them--or that this was what Friend Computer (or your superiors, [[BadBoss who probably do want you dead]]) wanted, instead of you using your zap-gun or, y'know, a grenade. ''Never'' underestimate the ways you can get killed and/or accused of treason in ''Paranoia''.

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** ''Paranoia'' does something even worse: It's actually not that odd to get equipment assigned to you. Lots of equipment. Tons of it. Things you don't need, even. But one small detail: You're ''responsible'' for all the equipment given to you (including things like, say, grenades), and are expected to return it in the same condition you were given it.it. Yes that includes grenades. This being ''Paranoia'', it hardly needs saying that a failure to do so is treason. Or bringing it back in perfect condition is treason, as you failed to use your resources appropriately. Or both: you get accused of treason for failing to bring one thing back in mint condition ''and'' for failing to use your resources appropriately. Even if, logically, you had no way of knowing that you could set things on fire by pouring the latest version of Bouncy Bubble Beverage on them--or that this was what Friend Computer (or your superiors, [[BadBoss who probably do want you dead]]) wanted, instead of you using your zap-gun or, y'know, a grenade. ''Never'' underestimate the ways you can get killed and/or accused of treason in ''Paranoia''.
9th Sep '17 9:05:32 PM sgamer82
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* Lampshaded even more brutally in full-on RPG parody series ''Anime/MahoujinGuruGuru'' when the king loudly disavows himself of all responsibility for the child heroes after giving them a small amount of gold.

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* Lampshaded even more brutally in full-on RPG parody series ''Anime/MahoujinGuruGuru'' ''Manga/MagicalCircleGuruGuru'' when the king loudly disavows himself of all responsibility for the child heroes after giving them a small amount of gold.
6th Aug '17 12:45:22 PM benda
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** According to the author, that was actually the main point of writing the story:
-->'''Dick:''' How much is a key to a bus locker worth? One day it's worth 25 cents, the next day thousands of dollars. In this story I got to thinking that there are times in our lives when having a dime to make a phone call spells the difference between life and death. Keys, small change, maybe a theater ticket -- how about a parking receipt for a Jaguar? All I had to do was link this idea up with time travel to see how the small and useless, under the wise eyes of a time traveler, might signify a great deal more. He would know when that dime might save your life. And, back in the past again, he might prefer that dime to any amount of money, no matter how large.
23rd Jul '17 3:52:12 PM nombretomado
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** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, tries to up-armor their tanks in anyway, including using things like steel tracks, concretes, sandbags, netting, and even wood. Patton, disliking the practice due to his ordnance officers convincing him otherwise after testing, heavily disapproves of the practice, and the Third Army instead came up with stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and was adopted by several other US Armored Groups. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]

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** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: [=WW2=]: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, tries to up-armor their tanks in anyway, including using things like steel tracks, concretes, sandbags, netting, and even wood. Patton, disliking the practice due to his ordnance officers convincing him otherwise after testing, heavily disapproves of the practice, and the Third Army instead came up with stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and was adopted by several other US Armored Groups. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]
9th Jul '17 10:54:21 AM nombretomado
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* In WorldWarTwo, the United States built great numbers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator FP-45 Liberator]], a pistol whose main building material was stamped cheapness. The idea was to parachute them in large quantities into cities where significant [[LaResistance resistance]] presence could be amassed, so long as the resistance members could be given something to fight with besides sticks and stones. The FP-45 was a shoddy weapon: imprecise, low-powered and fiddly and time-consuming to reload, its sole purpose was to allow otherwise-unarmed groups of civilians-turned-guerrillas to acquire weapons - by ambushing squads of Axis troops, [[OneHitKill using 'Liberators' to shoot them from a couple of paces' range or less]], and then stealing their (proper, actually useful in pitched combat) weapons. They even had little "BazookaJoe"-style comic instructions directing the user to sneak in close, put the single round in Fritz' head, then discard the glorified zip gun and help themselves to his weapon.

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* In WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the United States built great numbers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator FP-45 Liberator]], a pistol whose main building material was stamped cheapness. The idea was to parachute them in large quantities into cities where significant [[LaResistance resistance]] presence could be amassed, so long as the resistance members could be given something to fight with besides sticks and stones. The FP-45 was a shoddy weapon: imprecise, low-powered and fiddly and time-consuming to reload, its sole purpose was to allow otherwise-unarmed groups of civilians-turned-guerrillas to acquire weapons - by ambushing squads of Axis troops, [[OneHitKill using 'Liberators' to shoot them from a couple of paces' range or less]], and then stealing their (proper, actually useful in pitched combat) weapons. They even had little "BazookaJoe"-style comic instructions directing the user to sneak in close, put the single round in Fritz' head, then discard the glorified zip gun and help themselves to his weapon.
22nd Jun '17 11:21:24 PM onyhow
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*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.

to:

*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.
22nd Jun '17 11:20:41 PM onyhow
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** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted to stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]

to:

** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted tries to up-armor their tanks in anyway, including using things like steel tracks, concretes, sandbags, netting, and even wood. Patton, disliking the practice due to his ordnance officers convincing him otherwise after testing, heavily disapproves of the practice, and the Third Army instead came up with stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded.adopted by several other US Armored Groups. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]



*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.
* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.

to:

*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.
policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.
22nd Jun '17 8:01:34 AM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted to stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]
14th Jun '17 12:59:34 PM Bisected8
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Often the first step in a SortingAlgorithmOfWeaponEffectiveness. ATasteOfPower subverts this trope... at first. For the gameplay version, see EarlyGameHell.

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Often the first step in a SortingAlgorithmOfWeaponEffectiveness. ATasteOfPower subverts this trope... at first. For the gameplay version, see EarlyGameHell. For the general trope of starting with weak gear, see StarterEquipment.
10th Jun '17 1:21:00 AM ImaginaryMetroid
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* Lampshaded in the second episode (the RPG parody) of ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi'' when king-Papan charges Sasshi and Arumi with defeating the dark lord, Aki-nee gives them a bag of gold, then the court turns around and goes back into the castle again.

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* Lampshaded in the second episode (the RPG parody) of ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi'' when king-Papan charges Sasshi and Arumi with defeating the dark lord, Aki-nee Aki-nee. The king gives them a bag of gold, then the court turns around and goes back into the castle again.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WithThisHerring