History Main / WithThisHerring

22nd Jun '17 11:21:24 PM onyhow
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*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.

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*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.
22nd Jun '17 11:20:41 PM onyhow
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** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted to stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]

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** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted tries to up-armor their tanks in anyway, including using things like steel tracks, concretes, sandbags, netting, and even wood. Patton, disliking the practice due to his ordnance officers convincing him otherwise after testing, heavily disapproves of the practice, and the Third Army instead came up with stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded.adopted by several other US Armored Groups. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]



*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.
* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.

to:

*** Some Confederate re-enactors like to think this was ''planned'', claiming that since the high (c.50%) import tariffs on manufactured goods - like machine parts - kept the South dependent on the North for building up its industry and supplying it with factory-produced consumer and other goods. This is true, insofar as it really was a side-effect of the US' longstanding protectionist economic policies.
policies.* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.
22nd Jun '17 8:01:34 AM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

** Hillbilly armour has its roots in WW2: British and American tankers, discovering how inadequate their vehicles were, resorted to stripping armour plate off wrecks of ''any'' nationality and welding it to their own vehicles. It was distinguished with the official-sounding name ''appliqué armour'' and became standard practice. The US Army realised this was a good idea and a field modification was made to standardise the practice, with rear-echelon mechanics ordered to upgrade tanks to a standard pattern as the "M4 Jumbo" - effectively a bloated Sherman carrying as much armour as the vehicle could take without being overloaded. German armour was especially favoured for this purpose and many wrecked Panthers and Tigers were stripped down to the frame.[[note]]Another reason why so few survived the war to be reconditioned for museums[[/note]]
14th Jun '17 12:59:34 PM Bisected8
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Often the first step in a SortingAlgorithmOfWeaponEffectiveness. ATasteOfPower subverts this trope... at first. For the gameplay version, see EarlyGameHell.

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Often the first step in a SortingAlgorithmOfWeaponEffectiveness. ATasteOfPower subverts this trope... at first. For the gameplay version, see EarlyGameHell. For the general trope of starting with weak gear, see StarterEquipment.
10th Jun '17 1:21:00 AM ImaginaryMetroid
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* Lampshaded in the second episode (the RPG parody) of ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi'' when king-Papan charges Sasshi and Arumi with defeating the dark lord, Aki-nee gives them a bag of gold, then the court turns around and goes back into the castle again.

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* Lampshaded in the second episode (the RPG parody) of ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi'' when king-Papan charges Sasshi and Arumi with defeating the dark lord, Aki-nee Aki-nee. The king gives them a bag of gold, then the court turns around and goes back into the castle again.
13th Apr '17 11:50:11 AM dlchen145
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** Infantry have a tendency to hop aboard passing Armored Fighting Vehicles that're going their way. Tank crews have upon occasion referred to such infantry as "applique armor".
13th Apr '17 11:49:20 AM dlchen145
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** The US Military really had no excuses, given that the Middle East is and has been the likeliest place for them to be deployed since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Of course, the military is infamously wasteful, and even more so since they outsourced a lot to contractors.
8th Feb '17 3:16:53 PM margdean56
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Frequently overlaps with NoHeroDiscount. Contrast with BagOfSpilling, in which equipment/power-ups don't carry over to the next part; and GivingTheSwordToANoob, where a powerful weapon ends up in the hands of an incompetent such as TheChosenZero. An alternative to this trope is ItMayHelpYouOnYourQuest, where useless looking equipment turn out to be unexpectedly vital later on. If it's ''literally'' a herring, see ShamuFu.

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Frequently overlaps with NoHeroDiscount. Contrast with BagOfSpilling, in which equipment/power-ups don't carry over to the next part; and GivingTheSwordToANoob, where a powerful weapon ends up in the hands of an incompetent such as TheChosenZero. An alternative to this trope is ItMayHelpYouOnYourQuest, where useless looking equipment turn turns out to be unexpectedly vital later on. If it's ''literally'' a herring, see ShamuFu.
18th Jan '17 9:24:15 PM Alas_Poor_Donny
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Added DiffLines:

** Fifth edition averts this trope entirely by attacking it from the other end: there is only one item in the game that is actually necessary for the full use of a character combat ability: the wizard's spellbook. Every other combat ability in the game is either entirely innate or can be applied at only a slightly reduced power level to improvised or trivially-obtained weapons, and full-strength gear is cheap on the level of standard adventuring profits covering a near-full replacement even at level one. Out of combat abilities such as lock-picking still require tools, but the skill required to use the tools can also be used to craft replacements on the fly in a pinch and inferior materials rarely levy a mechanical penalty on them either. Even losing your armor entirely doesn't shift your defenses enough to be a crippling loss... even for fighters.
17th Jan '17 5:58:40 AM Ambaryerno
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* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common.

to:

* Similar to the Iraq example, Sherman crews in WWII strapped just about anything they could find to their tanks to try and counter superior Axis armor and antitank weaponry. Sandbags were particularly common. In fact the Sherman ''itself'' was an example; a medium tank intended for supporting infantry, not slugging it out head-on with heavy tanks. A substantial number of Sherman losses in Europe were simply the result of pressing the tank into a job it was never designed to do.
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