History Main / WindmillPolitical

17th Jan '16 8:28:55 PM CorporalPie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--->'''Winston:''' Does he exists as you and I exist?\\

to:

--->'''Winston:''' Does he exists exist as you and I exist?\\
17th Jan '16 6:14:00 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In StarControl, the [[LovableCoward Spathi]] live in fear of the Ultimate Evil. A race of beings so sneaky, they always stay just outside detection range of the Spathi's best scanners. This is clearly proof of their sinister intent.

to:

* In StarControl, ''VideoGame/StarControl'', the [[LovableCoward Spathi]] live in fear of the Ultimate Evil. A race of beings so sneaky, they always stay just outside detection range of the Spathi's best scanners. This is clearly proof of their sinister intent.
3rd Jan '16 2:57:33 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

to:

[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



* The creation of a Windmill Political is integral to the plot of ''{{ComicBook/Watchmen}}''.
* While also playing it straight sometimes, ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' is famous for a deconstruction of this trope: Dogbert openly advises people to pick a harmless person and make him seem like a threat. Then destroy him, and have people reward you for saving you from the "threat". (The deconstruction part is that Dogbert is completely open and public with his cynicism, thus defeating the purpose.)
* In ''ComicStrip/{{Ernie}}'' (also known as ''ComicStrip/PiranhaClub''), Uncle Sid makes a lot of money selling insurance against black holes. (And no, the comic doesn't feature space travel or immortality, merely regular people living on Earth.)
* In ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'', the cynical Rat invokes this trope by campaigning against rainbows.

to:

* The creation of a Windmill Political is integral to the plot of ''{{ComicBook/Watchmen}}''.
* While also playing it straight sometimes, ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' is famous for a deconstruction of this trope: Dogbert openly advises people to pick a harmless person and make him seem like a threat. Then destroy him, and have people reward you for saving you from the "threat". (The deconstruction part is that Dogbert is completely open and public with his cynicism, thus defeating the purpose.)
* In ''ComicStrip/{{Ernie}}'' (also known as ''ComicStrip/PiranhaClub''), Uncle Sid makes a lot of money selling insurance against black holes. (And no, the comic doesn't feature space travel or immortality, merely regular people living on Earth.)
* In ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'', the cynical Rat invokes this trope by campaigning against rainbows.
''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}''.



* Parodied in ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} in Spain'', when one man the Gauls talk to charges, weapons ready, whenever [[DonQuixote windmills]] were mentioned.

to:

* Parodied in ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}} in Spain'', when one man the Gauls talk to charges, weapons ready, whenever [[DonQuixote [[Literature/DonQuixote windmills]] were are mentioned.



[[folder:Films]]

to:

[[folder:Films]][[folder:Comic Strips]]
* While also playing it straight sometimes, ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' is famous for a deconstruction of this trope: Dogbert openly advises people to pick a harmless person and make him seem like a threat. Then destroy him, and have people reward you for saving you from the "threat". (The deconstruction part is that Dogbert is completely open and public with his cynicism, thus defeating the purpose.)
* In ''Ernie'' (also known as ''ComicStrip/PiranhaClub''), Uncle Sid makes a lot of money selling insurance against black holes. (And no, the comic doesn't feature space travel or immortality, merely regular people living on Earth.)
* In ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'', the cynical Rat invokes this trope by campaigning against rainbows.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* Film/CanadianBacon is all about this.

to:

* Film/CanadianBacon ''Film/CanadianBacon'' is all about this.



* Literature/DonQuixote is the TropeNamer as well as the ur-example. The main character mistakes literal windmills for literal gigantic hostile humanoids. Even when he is a deluded fanboy and not a politician, this trope really applies to Don Quixote. At Part I Chapter I, Don Quixote praises the giant Morgante, because he is the only good giant he has encountered in his chivalry books. All other giants are evil because “the giant breed which is always arrogant and ill-conditioned” [[MoralDissonance Therefore, for a Knight, is perfectly honorable to attack giants without provocation, kill them all, and rob them of their possessions.]] The fact that Don Quixote at Part I, Chapter VIII, gets caught in one of the windmill sails could be interpreted by the reader as a funny event, a tragic failure, or the [[LaserGuidedKarma deserved fate of an HeroicSociopath wanabe]].

to:

* Literature/DonQuixote is the TropeNamer as well as the ur-example. The main character mistakes literal windmills for literal gigantic hostile humanoids. Even when he is a deluded fanboy and not a politician, this trope really applies to Don Quixote. At Part I Chapter I, Don Quixote praises the giant Morgante, because he is the only good giant he has encountered in his chivalry books. All other giants are evil because “the "the giant breed which is always arrogant and ill-conditioned” ill-conditioned" [[MoralDissonance Therefore, for a Knight, is perfectly honorable to attack giants without provocation, kill them all, and rob them of their possessions.]] The fact that Don Quixote at Part I, Chapter VIII, gets caught in one of the windmill sails could be interpreted by the reader as a funny event, a tragic failure, or the [[LaserGuidedKarma deserved fate of an HeroicSociopath wanabe]].



* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'', Harry and Dumbledore are assumed by the Ministry of Magic to be using this trope regarding Voldemort's return. As a result, this trope is ironically used against them in response.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
**
In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'', Harry and Dumbledore are assumed by the Ministry of Magic to be using this trope regarding Voldemort's return. As a result, this trope is ironically used against them in response.response.
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince'', CloudCuckoolander Luna Lovegood's windmills include Aurors, whom she believes intend "to bring down the [[TheGovernment Ministry of Magic]] from within using a combination of [[BlackMagic Dark Magic]] and gum disease".



** In [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince the book between those two]], CloudCuckoolander Luna Lovegood's windmills include Aurors, whom she believes intend "to bring down the [[TheGovernment Ministry of Magic]] from within using a combination of [[BlackMagic Dark Magic]] and gum disease".



-->Winston: Does he exists as you and I exist?
-->O'Brien: [[UnPerson You do not exist.]]

to:

-->Winston: --->'''Winston:''' Does he exists as you and I exist?
-->O'Brien:
exist?\\
'''O'Brien:'''
[[UnPerson You do not exist.]]



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

to:

[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
2nd Dec '15 6:44:03 AM Kombucha
Is there an issue? Send a Message


# WindmillCrusader, who believes his windmills to be actual threats. In the [[Literature/DonQuixote Ur-example]], this is the belief that literal windmills actually are literal gigantic hostile humanoids. However, it’s normally meant metaphorically.

to:

# WindmillCrusader, who believes his windmills to be actual threats. In the [[Literature/DonQuixote Ur-example]], this is the belief that literal windmills actually are literal gigantic hostile humanoids. However, it’s normally meant metaphorically.
25th Oct '15 4:56:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the MiniSeries {{Remake}} of ''ThePrisoner'', Number 2 convinces the Village that black holes appearing everywhere are because people do not have enough pigs to provide stability, and encourages villagers to buy more pigs.

to:

* In the MiniSeries {{Remake}} of ''ThePrisoner'', ''Series/{{The Prisoner|2009}}'', Number 2 convinces the Village that black holes appearing everywhere are because people do not have enough pigs to provide stability, and encourages villagers to buy more pigs.
19th Oct '15 9:59:43 PM BattleMaster
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** As the third game is apparently going to feature the machinations of Orlais, and how they are affected by both the way the first game featured the near-breaking of Ferelden before being saved by the Warden AND the fallout of Kirkwall's Templar/Mage civil war (which was also influenced by the events in the first game, namely the thousands of refugees displaced by the Darkspawn horde he let in), it seems like Loghain's overall fears became reality [[NiceJobBreakingItHero thanks primarily to his own actions]].
24th Sep '15 3:08:42 PM R1ck
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Another joke in a similar vein: [[Literature/TheBible Jesus]] promised the end of all wicked people. [[Myth/NorseMythology Odin]] promised the end of all ice giants. I don't see many ice giants around.
21st Sep '15 9:57:25 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Another joke in a similar vein: [[Literature/TheBible Jesus]] promised the end of all wicked people. [[NorseMythology Odin]] promised the end of all ice giants. I don't see many ice giants around.

to:

* Another joke in a similar vein: [[Literature/TheBible Jesus]] promised the end of all wicked people. [[NorseMythology [[Myth/NorseMythology Odin]] promised the end of all ice giants. I don't see many ice giants around.
10th Sep '15 12:46:48 AM Drgonzo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Another common variant on the above: "What do you do for a living?" "I'm a [insert monster here] Killer." "But [monster]s aren't real." "Have you ever seen one?" "No." "You're welcome."
8th Jul '15 2:21:52 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''PearlsBeforeSwine'', the cynical Rat invokes this trope by campaigning against rainbows.
* In the Bone comic series, Phoney Bone does the ManipulativeBastard version of this: he convinces the people of Barrelhaven that they need to be protected from the (actually harmless) dragons, and capitalizes on his new role as the Dragon Slayer to win a bet.

to:

* In ''PearlsBeforeSwine'', ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine'', the cynical Rat invokes this trope by campaigning against rainbows.
* In the Bone ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' comic series, Phoney Bone does the ManipulativeBastard version of this: he convinces the people of Barrelhaven that they need to be protected from the (actually harmless) dragons, and capitalizes on his new role as the Dragon Slayer to win a bet.



* Paul in ''TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' is briefly portrayed as the misguided kind of WindmillCrusader. However, he is quickly deconstructed as a StrawHypocrite who simply doesn’t care if the [[WindmillPolitical gospel he preaches]] is true or not.

to:

* Paul in ''TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' is briefly portrayed as the misguided kind of WindmillCrusader. However, he is quickly deconstructed as a StrawHypocrite who simply doesn’t care if the [[WindmillPolitical gospel he preaches]] is true or not.



* In AnimalFarm, Farmer Jones, his spies, and [[spoiler: eventually Snowball]] are all accused of being the source of all the farm's problems, long after Jones has apparently left the farm for good. The literal windmill, however is not.
* In ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'', Goldstein and the Brotherhood are known as LaResistance against the Party, but O'Brien suggests that they were invented to keep more control over the population and to identify dissidents.

to:

* In AnimalFarm, ''Literature/AnimalFarm'', Farmer Jones, his spies, and [[spoiler: eventually Snowball]] are all accused of being the source of all the farm's problems, long after Jones has apparently left the farm for good. The literal windmill, however is not.
* In ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'', ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'':
**
Goldstein and the Brotherhood are known as LaResistance against the Party, but O'Brien suggests that they were invented to keep more control over the population and to identify dissidents.



* In ''AFeastForCrows'', Cersei Lannister becomes convinced that her new daughter-in-law Margaery and her family are plotting against her. Ironically, her attempts to destroy Margaery backfire spectacularly, resulting in [[spoiler:her being imprisoned by the very same forces that she tried to sic on Margaery.]]

to:

* In ''AFeastForCrows'', ''Literature/AFeastForCrows'', Cersei Lannister becomes convinced that her new daughter-in-law Margaery and her family are plotting against her. Ironically, her attempts to destroy Margaery backfire spectacularly, resulting in [[spoiler:her being imprisoned by the very same forces that she tried to sic on Margaery.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 149. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WindmillPolitical