History Main / WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeaMillionaire

20th Apr '18 9:15:08 PM jayharrison
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Clueless'' (''Gra w ciemno'') created by Polish TV network Polsat (a primary rival of TVN, the channel that bought the licence to ''Who Wants to Be a Millionaire''): The major difference from WWTBAM are sealed envelopes instead of traditional money ladder. Each envelope has a check inside worth an unknown value, raging from 0 to 100,000 (in Polish zlotys). There are also traps like -50% and -100%. If the player got a -100%, they would lose the game and end with 0. If they got -50%, then the player would walk out with half of what they has. The contestant begins game by choosing several numbered envelopes from a board of 50. Next, the host poses 5 multiple choice questions that the contestant tries to answer. For each correct answer, the player gets to keep one envelope but for every incorrect answer, he or she has to destroy the envelope by shredding it in a paper shredder. After the five questions, the host starts offering the player various amounts of money to tempt them to trade their kept envelope(s) for cash. Not knowing how much money is in each envelope makes the decision very difficult and changes the show in a mind game of bidding and bluff between the player and host. The show ran from 2005 to 2007 and became very popular, prompting Polsat to sell the format to other countries, including Spain, Czech Republic, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. English-language edition is yet to appear.

to:

* ''Clueless'' (''Gra w ciemno'') created by Polish TV network Polsat (a primary rival of TVN, the channel that bought the licence to ''Who Wants to Be a Millionaire''): Millionaire?''): The major difference from WWTBAM are sealed envelopes instead of traditional money ladder. Each envelope has a check inside worth an unknown value, raging from 0 to 100,000 (in Polish zlotys). There are also traps like -50% and -100%. If the player got a -100%, they would lose the game and end with 0. If they got -50%, then the player would walk out with half of what they has. The contestant begins game by choosing several numbered envelopes from a board of 50. Next, the host poses 5 multiple choice questions that the contestant tries to answer. For each correct answer, the player gets to keep one envelope but for every incorrect answer, he or she has to destroy the envelope by shredding it in a paper shredder. After the five questions, the host starts offering the player various amounts of money to tempt them to trade their kept envelope(s) for cash. Not knowing how much money is in each envelope makes the decision very difficult and changes the show in a mind game of bidding and bluff between the player and host. The show ran from 2005 to 2007 and became very popular, prompting Polsat to sell the format to other countries, including Spain, Czech Republic, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. English-language edition is yet to appear.



* ''Series/WinBenSteinsMoney'': One episode lampooned the ''Millionaire'' motif with dramatic (and increasingly unnecessary) music and silly lifelines, though the episode's top prize didn't exceed ''WBSM''[='=]s standard $5,000 pot.
-->'''Jimmy Kimmel:''' If you are too stupid to answer the questions in this round, we've got three ways to help you cheat. Number one, you can dial 1-900-ASS-PARTY; they may not have the answers, but it is a lot of fun. Number two, you can poll our audience, but they're really only good if it's a drug question. And, number three, you can ask me, but that's not usually much help either.



* ''Series/PakDePoenDeShowVan1Miljoen'' is a subversion. It was a Belgian game show financed by the national lottery that included a top price of 1 million BF that in its first round looks more like a contest. However the final round, where the only still standing contestant is trying to get his price of 1 million BF, is straight-up this, as the contestant gets a lifeline (in the form of switching one question for another) to answer 10 questions and he would win 100000$ per correct question, but if he fails to answer a question correctly he would only gain the money that he had won with previous ones. The 100 questions were also arranged in separate packages of 10. It's a subversion because the show was made in 1987, 10 years before ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.

to:

* ''Series/PakDePoenDeShowVan1Miljoen'' is a subversion. It was a Belgian game show financed by the national lottery that included a top price of 1 million BF that in its first round looks more like a contest. However the final round, where the only still standing contestant is trying to get his price of 1 million BF, is straight-up this, as the contestant gets a lifeline (in the form of switching one question for another) to answer 10 questions and he would win 100000$ $100,000 per correct question, but if he fails to answer a question correctly he would only gain the money that he had won with previous ones. The 100 questions were also arranged in separate packages of 10. It's a subversion because the show was made in 1987, 10 years before ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.
10th Apr '18 2:13:20 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:


The oversaturation of ''Millionaire''-styled game show clones has largely withered away as of TheNewTens, as contemporary game shows since that point have largely reverted to more conventional formats.
20th Jan '18 11:03:59 AM MrEightThreeOne
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Child Support'': A contestant answers trivia questions in a "money ladder" fashion, with the top prize being $200,000. If they get a question incorrect, the lifelines come in the form of children being asked the same question in a different room, and should they get the question right, the contestant is "saved", but does not go up the money ladder and the top prize is now one tier lower. If neither gets it right, the contestant walks away with nothing; there are a few "milestones" where the contestant has the option to stop and go home with what they have. The overall feel of the show -- dark lighting, dramatic music, dramatic pauses, and the basic format give one a whole lot of "Millionaire" vibes.
27th Dec '17 12:10:48 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player in isolation must answer multiple-choice questions, and a player outside must choose where they want to drop balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. Correct answers add money to the team's bank, but wrong answers ''deduct''; hence, whether you play balls near the right depends on your confidence in whether your partner can answer correctly. The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player in isolation must answer multiple-choice questions, and a player outside must choose where they want to drop one or more balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. Correct answers add money to the team's bank, but wrong answers ''deduct''; hence, whether where you play the balls near the right depends on your confidence in whether your partner can answer correctly.correctly (higher values are pushed towards the right of the board). The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
26th Oct '17 9:40:00 AM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC brings big-money pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a couple is divided in two, with one player in isolation answering questions, and another choosing where the balls are dropped from on the giant board, based on only being shown the choices for the next question.[[note]](Higher values are pushed to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if you are uncertain thar your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here.)[[/note]] If the isolated player answers correctly, the balls add whatever values they land in to the team's bank. If not, they deduct instead. Due to the mechanics of the game, the bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC brings big-money pachinko with hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a couple is divided in two, with one player in isolation answering must answer multiple-choice questions, and another choosing a player outside must choose where the they want to drop balls are dropped from on the giant board, board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based on only being shown on seeing the choices options for the next question.[[note]](Higher values are pushed question. Correct answers add money to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if team's bank, but wrong answers ''deduct''; hence, whether you are uncertain thar play balls near the right depends on your confidence in whether your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here.)[[/note]] If the isolated player answers correctly, the balls add whatever values they land in to the team's bank. If not, they deduct instead. Due to the mechanics of the game, the The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
18th Sep '17 11:24:44 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC brings big-money pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. Based on seeing just the choices for the next question, the outside player must decide where to drop the balls from (higher values are pushed to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if you are uncertain thar your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three balls at once. Due to the mechanics of the game, the bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC brings big-money pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a couple is divided in two, with one player in isolation answering questions, and another choosing where the balls are dropped into a from on the giant board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends board, based on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. Based on seeing just only being shown the choices for the next question, the outside player must decide where to drop the balls from (higher question.[[note]](Higher values are pushed to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if you are uncertain thar your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three here.)[[/note]] If the isolated player answers correctly, the balls at once.add whatever values they land in to the team's bank. If not, they deduct instead. Due to the mechanics of the game, the bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
22nd Aug '17 4:44:13 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/YouDeserveIt'': An interesting game for ABC weighed down by its melodrama. The contestant is given a vague clue towards a subject; if they answer correctly, they win the round's pot (the game is played in five rounds, $10,000-$25,000-$50,000-$100,000-$250,000). They can receive up to nine more clues, but each one requires the player to select a MysteryBox that deducts a share from the round's pot. The game was very drawn out, ''plus'' the contestant is not playing for themselves, but for a beneficiary who gets "surprised" by Brooke Burns on-location to be told that someone had won (hopefully) a decent amount of money just for them, in a scene of melodrama rivalling ''Series/ExtremeMakeoverHomeEdition''.
22nd Aug '17 4:29:48 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/MillionDollarMindGame'': An American version of the Russian PanelGame ''What When Where'', six contestants work as a team to answer increasingly complex questions with each player taking a turn as team captain. The main difference from other shows on here is that visual aids are used for many of the questions, up to three incorrect answers are allowed and the contestants vote on whether they want to keep playing the game or walk away after each question. It's worth noting that the original Russian game have neither lifelines nor money tree. It has a lot of padding though.

to:

* ''Series/MillionDollarMindGame'': An American version of the Russian PanelGame ''What When Where'', series ''What? Where? When?'', where six contestants work as a team to answer increasingly complex questions questions, often involving logic puzzles and visual components, with each player taking a turn as team captain. The main difference from other shows on here is that visual aids are used for many of the questions, captain., up to three incorrect answers are allowed and the contestants vote on whether they want to keep playing the game or walk away after each question. It's worth noting that the original Russian game have version was structured as a PanelGame (played between a group of experts, and the viewers who submit questions), and had neither lifelines nor or a money tree. It has tree (it did have a lot of padding though.though).
22nd Aug '17 3:44:27 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to decide where they want to drop their ball from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it if you were uncertain that your partner would answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. Due to the mechanics of the game, your bank could fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed into said space). Plus at the end of the game, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) could accidentally deny you your winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions mention "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially brings big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based Based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to the outside player must decide where they want to drop their ball the balls from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it that area if you were are uncertain that thar your partner would can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. three balls at once. Due to the mechanics of the game, your the bank could can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed (often by landing into said space). Plus at the end of the game, Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
5th Aug '17 8:53:19 AM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime, [[SceneryPorn on a redecorated set with a giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]), and a larger prize budget than normal; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.

to:

* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime, [[SceneryPorn though on a redecorated set with (with more lighting effects and a [[SceneryPorn giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]), audience]]) and with a larger prize budget than normal; budget; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until clone (until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is.is). A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.
This list shows the last 10 events of 189. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeaMillionaire