History Main / WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeaMillionaire

18th Sep '17 11:24:44 PM Lirodon
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* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC brings big-money pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. Based on seeing just the choices for the next question, the outside player must decide where to drop the balls from (higher values are pushed to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if you are uncertain thar your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three balls at once. Due to the mechanics of the game, the bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC brings big-money pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a couple is divided in two, with one player in isolation answering questions, and another choosing where the balls are dropped into a from on the giant board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends board, based on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. Based on seeing just only being shown the choices for the next question, the outside player must decide where to drop the balls from (higher question.[[note]](Higher values are pushed to the right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid that area if you are uncertain thar your partner can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three here.)[[/note]] If the isolated player answers correctly, the balls at once.add whatever values they land in to the team's bank. If not, they deduct instead. Due to the mechanics of the game, the bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
22nd Aug '17 4:44:13 PM Lirodon
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/YouDeserveIt'': An interesting game for ABC weighed down by its melodrama. The contestant is given a vague clue towards a subject; if they answer correctly, they win the round's pot (the game is played in five rounds, $10,000-$25,000-$50,000-$100,000-$250,000). They can receive up to nine more clues, but each one requires the player to select a MysteryBox that deducts a share from the round's pot. The game was very drawn out, ''plus'' the contestant is not playing for themselves, but for a beneficiary who gets "surprised" by Brooke Burns on-location to be told that someone had won (hopefully) a decent amount of money just for them, in a scene of melodrama rivalling ''Series/ExtremeMakeoverHomeEdition''.
22nd Aug '17 4:29:48 PM Lirodon
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* ''Series/MillionDollarMindGame'': An American version of the Russian PanelGame ''What When Where'', six contestants work as a team to answer increasingly complex questions with each player taking a turn as team captain. The main difference from other shows on here is that visual aids are used for many of the questions, up to three incorrect answers are allowed and the contestants vote on whether they want to keep playing the game or walk away after each question. It's worth noting that the original Russian game have neither lifelines nor money tree. It has a lot of padding though.

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* ''Series/MillionDollarMindGame'': An American version of the Russian PanelGame ''What When Where'', series ''What? Where? When?'', where six contestants work as a team to answer increasingly complex questions questions, often involving logic puzzles and visual components, with each player taking a turn as team captain. The main difference from other shows on here is that visual aids are used for many of the questions, captain., up to three incorrect answers are allowed and the contestants vote on whether they want to keep playing the game or walk away after each question. It's worth noting that the original Russian game have version was structured as a PanelGame (played between a group of experts, and the viewers who submit questions), and had neither lifelines nor or a money tree. It has tree (it did have a lot of padding though.though).
22nd Aug '17 3:44:27 PM Lirodon
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* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to decide where they want to drop their ball from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it if you were uncertain that your partner would answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. Due to the mechanics of the game, your bank could fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed into said space). Plus at the end of the game, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) could accidentally deny you your winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions mention "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially brings big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] pachinko with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, board to land into slots at the bottom, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based Based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to the outside player must decide where they want to drop their ball the balls from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, right, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it that area if you were are uncertain that thar your partner would can answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. three balls at once. Due to the mechanics of the game, your the bank could can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed (often by landing into said space). Plus at the end of the game, Plus, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) the team did) could accidentally deny you your final winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} [[{{Zonk}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
5th Aug '17 8:53:19 AM Lirodon
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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime, [[SceneryPorn on a redecorated set with a giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]), and a larger prize budget than normal; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.

to:

* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime, [[SceneryPorn though on a redecorated set with (with more lighting effects and a [[SceneryPorn giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]), audience]]) and with a larger prize budget than normal; budget; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until clone (until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is.is). A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.
21st Jun '17 9:44:11 AM Lirodon
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* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to decide where they want to drop their ball from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it if you were uncertain that your partner would answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. Due to the mechanics of the game, your bank could fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed into said space). Plus at the end of the game, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) could accidentally deny you your winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions mention "life-changing money".

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice question correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to decide where they want to drop their ball from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it if you were uncertain that your partner would answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. Due to the mechanics of the game, your bank could fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed into said space). Plus at the end of the game, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) could accidentally deny you your winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions mention "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.
21st Jun '17 9:42:16 AM Lirodon
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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime show, and offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly dressed up set (let's not forget the [[SceneryPorn giant, lit-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.
* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'': The 2002-04 version (often referred to as ''Donnymid'', after host Donny Osmond) felt like Sony was trying to replicate ''Millionaire'' and fuse it with classic ''Pyramid'' (strict judging, purple and black color scheme, dark metallic set, and loud techno theme), just [[NoBudget minus a budget]]. Not helping was that one of the 2000 Osmond pilots was in fact ''The $1,000,000 Pyramid'' (for a run on NBC that didn't happen). Pretty much averted by the 2009 ''$1,000,000'' pilots, which were an updated rendition of the 70s/80s ''Pyramid'' with a tournament structure for the $1,000,000 like the 80s/90s ''$100,000'' runs.

to:

* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime show, and year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly dressed up set (let's not forget the primetime, [[SceneryPorn on a redecorated set with a giant, lit-up light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]); audience]]), and a larger prize budget than normal; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike.
* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'': The 2002-04 version (often referred to as ''Donnymid'', after host Donny Osmond) felt like Sony was trying to replicate ''Millionaire'' and fuse it with classic ''Pyramid'' (strict judging, purple and black color scheme, dark metallic set, and loud techno theme), just [[NoBudget minus a budget]]. Not helping was that one of the 2000 Osmond pilots was in fact ''The $1,000,000 Pyramid'' (for a run on NBC that didn't happen). Pretty much averted by the 2009 ''$1,000,000'' pilots, which were an updated rendition of the 70s/80s ''Pyramid'' with a tournament structure for the $1,000,000 like the 80s/90s ''$100,000'' runs. The current ''$100,000 Pyramid'' on ABC is more faithful to the classic ''$25,000'' format, except with the payouts upped to $50,000 and $100,000.



* ''Series/TheWeakestLink'': The American version had the usual "money ladder" format with only minor changes from the original version of the show.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': NBC game that is essentially big-money [[Series/ThePriceIsRight Plinko]] with [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; balls are dropped into a giant pachinko board, and whether they add or remove money from a team's bank depends on whether their isolated contestant can answer a multiple-choice correctly. The player outside must use their intuition, based on seeing just the choices for the next question, to decide where they want to drop their ball from (higher values are pushed to the right side of the board, meaning that you'd likely want to avoid it if you were uncertain that your partner would answer correctly. But of course, we are dealing with [[LuckBasedMission physics]] here), and on later questions, whether they want to drop two or three. Due to the mechanics of the game, your bank could fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (likely cause they landed into said space). Plus at the end of the game, much like the aforementioned ''Set for Life'', your partner (who is not told anything about how you are doing) could accidentally deny you your winnings by taking a ConsolationPrize buy-out, or by not taking the buy-out and unknowingly leaving with [[{{Whammy}} little or nothing]]. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama too; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promotions mention "life-changing money".
* ''Series/TheWeakestLink'': The American influence is present in its overall look and feel, with a foreboding atmosphere and music, ''and'' Anne Robinson, who hosted with a snarky demeanor. However, the game ''itself'' subverts it by being a team-based game built around timed rounds of trivia followed by democratic elimination, and not necessarily having a large cash prize (though the U.S. primetime version had ramped up the usual "money ladder" format with only minor changes from the original version of the show.theoretical top prize to $1 million).
8th May '17 6:09:34 PM themisterfree
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In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around on the networks and syndication were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better -- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.

to:

In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around on the networks and syndication were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better -- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily [[Creator/{{Freeform}} Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'': The 2002-04 version (often referred to as ''Donnymid'', after host Donny Osmond) felt like Sony was trying to replicate ''Millionaire'' and fuse it with classic ''Pyramid'' (strict judging, purple and black color scheme, dark metallic set, and loud techno theme), just [[NoBudget minus a budget]]. Not helping was that one of the 2000 Osmond pilots was in fact ''The $1,000,000 Pyramid'' (for a run on NBC that didn't happen). Pretty much averted by the 2009 ''$1,000,000'' pilots, which were an updated rendition of the 70s/80s ''Pyramid'' with a tournament structure for the $1,000,000 like the 80s/90s ''$100,000'' runs.
28th Apr '17 7:34:36 PM Lirodon
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* Perhaps the earliest clone was an obscure entry for the equally-obscure America One network, ''The Million Dollar Word Game'' (premiering in 1999), in which contestants had to clear through 14 rounds of word unscrambling in order to reach a prize board where they could possibly win $1,000,000. However, from a production standpoint, it had a very NoBudget look more akin to a public access show than one purporting to give away $1,000,000 (or, as the host announces at the start of the circulating episode, [[UpToEleven $5 million]]), and the host's demanor slowed things down more than anything.

to:

* Perhaps the earliest clone was an obscure entry for the equally-obscure America One network, ''The Million Dollar Word Game'' (premiering in 1999), in which contestants had to clear through 14 rounds of word unscrambling in order to reach a prize board where they could possibly win $1,000,000. However, from a production standpoint, it had a very NoBudget look more akin to a public access show than one purporting to give away $1,000,000 (or, as the host announces at (at the start of the circulating episode, the host even announced that they would be increasing the top prize to [[UpToEleven $5 million]]), $5,000,000]]!), and the host's demanor slowed things down more than anything.
7th Feb '17 9:38:22 AM Mario500
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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime show, and offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly dressed up set (let's not forget the [[SceneryPorn giant, lit-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the WGA strike.

to:

* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime show, and offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly dressed up set (let's not forget the [[SceneryPorn giant, lit-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the WGA Writers Guild of America strike.
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