History Main / WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeaMillionaire

20th Sep '16 6:13:46 PM themisterfree
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* ''Series/PakDePoenDeShowVan1Miljoen'' is a subversion. It was a Belgian game show financed by the national lottery that included a top price of 1 million BF that in its first round looks more like a contest. However the final round, where the only still standing contestant is trying to get his price of 1 million BF, is straight-up this, as the contestant gets a lifeline (in the form of switching one question for another) to answer 10 questions and he would win 100000$ per correct question, but if he fails to answer a question correctly he would only gain the money that he had won with previous ones. The 100 questions were also arranged in separate packages of 10. It's a subversion because the show was made in 1987, 10 years before Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire debuted.

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* ''Series/PakDePoenDeShowVan1Miljoen'' is a subversion. It was a Belgian game show financed by the national lottery that included a top price of 1 million BF that in its first round looks more like a contest. However the final round, where the only still standing contestant is trying to get his price of 1 million BF, is straight-up this, as the contestant gets a lifeline (in the form of switching one question for another) to answer 10 questions and he would win 100000$ per correct question, but if he fails to answer a question correctly he would only gain the money that he had won with previous ones. The 100 questions were also arranged in separate packages of 10. It's a subversion because the show was made in 1987, 10 years before Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire debuted.''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'' debuted.
* ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' both subverted it (as it was aired in the 1986-87 season) ''and'' played it straight; you had the dramatic fanfares, the massive confetti drops, the family in the audience. But there weren't any Lifelines, and no money ladder; rather, champions had to be on for three days and play the bonus round on their third day to get the million- which wasn't even a lump sum but rather an annuity and, for the second season, an annuity worth $900,000 in total plus $100,000 in various prizes, including two cars. Indeed, it was more of a normal game show which just happened to have a really big set and top prize (apparently it started as a 1979 pilot called ''The Letter Machine'').
8th Sep '16 4:25:20 PM themisterfree
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In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.

to:

In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around on the networks and syndication were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.
22nd Jul '16 8:18:03 PM Lirodon
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* ''Series/WhosStillStanding'': In the U.S. version of the Israeli show, there's one main challenger who challenges a circle of other contestants in duels over trivia. Most of the hallmarks are there; even better, the show managed to stay up to date and rips off the new "shuffle" format the syndicated version of ''Millionaire'' had started using; each contestant is worth between $1,000 and $20,000, and the final three contestants are worth $250,000, $500,000, and $1,000,000. Eventually got destroyed by ''Series/TheVoice'' and cancelled.

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* ''Series/WhosStillStanding'': In the U.S. version of the Israeli show, there's one main challenger who challenges a circle of other contestants in duels over trivia. trivia battles. Most of the hallmarks are there; even better, the show managed to stay up to date and rips there, plus it also ripped off the new "shuffle" format the syndicated version of ''Millionaire'' had started recently begun using; each contestant is worth a random value between $1,000 and $20,000, and the final three contestants are worth $250,000, $500,000, and $1,000,000. Eventually got destroyed by ''Series/TheVoice'' and cancelled.
26th Jun '16 11:57:33 PM Lirodon
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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as an expansion of their military salute specials. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime version, and offered a chance to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly redressed set (let's not forget the giant light-up $1,000,000 sign at the back of the audience!); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the WGA strike.

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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as an expansion a follow-up to a run of their military salute specials. "Salute" specials the show ran following the September 11 attacks. They had a higher prize budget than the daytime version, show, and offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime on a slightly redressed dressed up set (let's not forget the giant light-up $1,000,000 [[SceneryPorn giant, lit-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience!); audience]]); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the WGA strike.
24th Jun '16 3:30:49 PM themisterfree
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In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/GSN had a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.

to:

In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/GSN had Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.
24th Jun '16 3:30:29 PM themisterfree
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In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''.

to:

In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''.
''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/ABCFamily Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/GSN had a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all.
11th May '16 6:45:35 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* Foreboding music, oftentimes involving a HeartbeatSoundtrack. The music may swell and escalate as contestants reach more substantial dollar figures, beginning with a fast-paced excited music tractk variant to ease into the first round, then transitioning to a slow but somewhat suspenseful theme in the middle rounds to show the contestant is now settle in. The more easygoing music may make up for its soothing qualities by rising in octave with each new question. And when the really significant rounds are reached, it becomes ''very'' tense and just plain ominous. It may even counteractively psych out the contestants. Then, on the final question, it [[DramaticPause may go quieter]] and play a minimal tune of ''especially'' intense musical echoes and heartbeats.
** Also, music that reacts with the nature of how the games play out, sounding triumphant when a big achievement is made, very disheartening when a contestant loses, or just aesthetic music which adds weight to gameplay actions (like dramatic stings when answers disappearing after being eliminated).

to:

* Foreboding music, oftentimes involving a HeartbeatSoundtrack. The music may swell and escalate will become more suspenseful as contestants reach more substantial dollar figures, beginning ending with a fast-paced excited music tractk variant to ease into the first round, then transitioning to a slow minimal but somewhat suspenseful theme in the middle rounds to show the contestant is now settle in. The more easygoing music may make up for its soothing qualities by rising in octave with each new question. And when the really significant rounds are reached, it becomes ''very'' tense and just plain ominous. It may even counteractively psych out the contestants. Then, intense "hearbeat" on the final question, it [[DramaticPause may go quieter]] and play a minimal tune of ''especially'' intense musical echoes and heartbeats.
** Also, music that reacts
question. It will also react with the nature outcome of how the games play out, sounding game, with triumphant when a fanfares after big achievement is made, very disheartening when a contestant loses, or just aesthetic music which adds weight to gameplay actions (like wins, dramatic stings when answers disappearing after being eliminated).choices are eliminated, etc.
3rd May '16 4:36:35 PM Lirodon
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* In 2002, in the wake of the September 11 attacks, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' did a series of primetime ''The Price is Right Salutes'' specials with contestants representing branches of the U.S. military. These primetime specials eventually morphed into "Million Dollar Spectacular" episodes ([[BreadEggsBreadedEggs some of which also ended up being salutes too]]), which had a higher prize budget, and the chance to win $1 million for hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. A second run featuring then-new host Drew Carey aired during the WGA strike; to win the million, contestants now had to complete a side-mission in a specified pricing game, or get a Double Showcase win. Although the prize budget was higher and the set was glitzier (i.e. more lights, a black floor on the Drew Carey episodes, and that giant $1,000,000 sign in the back of the audience), it was essentially the daytime show in primetime, so no it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until they dimmed the lights and played epic music on the bonus spin, that is)

to:

* In 2002, in the wake of the September 11 attacks, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' did a series of started doing primetime ''The Price is Right Salutes'' specials with contestants representing branches of the U.S. military. These primetime specials eventually morphed into "Million ''Million Dollar Spectacular" Spectacular'' episodes ([[BreadEggsBreadedEggs some as an expansion of which also ended up being salutes too]]), which their military salute specials. They had a higher prize budget, budget than the daytime version, and the offered a chance to win $1 million for by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. A second run featuring then-new host Drew Carey aired during the WGA strike; to win the million, contestants now had to complete a side-mission in a specified pricing game, or get a Double Showcase win. Although the prize budget It was higher and the set was glitzier (i.e. more lights, a black floor on the Drew Carey episodes, and that giant $1,000,000 sign in the back of the audience), it was essentially otherwise the daytime show in primetime, so no primetime on a slightly redressed set (let's not forget the giant light-up $1,000,000 sign at the back of the audience!); it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until clone ... until they dimmed the lights and played epic suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is)is. A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the WGA strike.
15th Mar '16 9:10:55 PM Lirodon
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* In 2002, in the wake of the September 11 attacks, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' did a series of primetime "Salute" specials with contestants representing branches of the U.S. military. These primetime specials eventually morphed into "Million Dollar Spectacular" episodes, which had a higher prize budget, and the chance to win $1 million for hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. A second run featuring then-new host Drew Carey aired during the WGA strike; to win the million, contestants now had to complete a side-mission in a specified pricing game, or get a Double Showcase win. Although the prize budget was higher and the set was glitzier (i.e. more lights, a black floor on the Drew Carey episodes, and that giant $1,000,000 sign in the back of the audience), it was essentially the daytime show in primetime, so no it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until they dimmed the lights and played epic music on the bonus spin, that is)

to:

* In 2002, in the wake of the September 11 attacks, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' did a series of primetime "Salute" ''The Price is Right Salutes'' specials with contestants representing branches of the U.S. military. These primetime specials eventually morphed into "Million Dollar Spectacular" episodes, episodes ([[BreadEggsBreadedEggs some of which also ended up being salutes too]]), which had a higher prize budget, and the chance to win $1 million for hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown. A second run featuring then-new host Drew Carey aired during the WGA strike; to win the million, contestants now had to complete a side-mission in a specified pricing game, or get a Double Showcase win. Although the prize budget was higher and the set was glitzier (i.e. more lights, a black floor on the Drew Carey episodes, and that giant $1,000,000 sign in the back of the audience), it was essentially the daytime show in primetime, so no it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until they dimmed the lights and played epic music on the bonus spin, that is)
28th Feb '16 5:28:18 PM Gimere
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* Obscene amounts of confetti being dumped from the rafters when the contestants actually do win the grand prize (not shown: the janitors demanding a pay raise during the cleanup after the show's over)

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* [[ConfettiDrop Obscene amounts of confetti being dumped from the rafters rafters]] when the contestants actually do win the grand prize (not shown: the janitors demanding a pay raise during the cleanup after the show's over)
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