History Main / WhatsUpKingDude

17th May '18 5:57:30 AM Argon2
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* The society in ''VideoGame/KingOfDragonPass'' is made up of [[ProudWarriorRace tough]] hunter/gatherer tribes who strongly believe in SacredHospitality. So anyone, no matter how foreign or poor, can and do randomly walk in and make requests of the chief. It helps that the chief's council is semi-democratic, and when a tribe gets too big (over 1000+ people) tensions will rise because now many families aren't represented on it. According to legend, the chief god Orlanth runs his court in exactly the same way.
14th Apr '18 10:38:37 PM Lizardon
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** More to the point of the trope, Goku has had astonishing access to some pretty important folks in the ''Dragon Ball'' cosmos in his lifetime.[[note]] To wit: Kamesen'nin, Karin and the daughter of Capsule Corp. at age ten, God/Kami the Guardian of Earth, the reincarnation of Demon King Piccolo, King Yemma (who sends people to hell), the Southern Kaio, the Prince of the Saiyans, the Grand Kaioshin who oversees the universe, has befriended Buu, and is chums with the God of Destruction and the aforementioned King Zen'o[[/note]] Of them, Goku only speaks formally to the God of Destruction after learning he can easily destroy the Earth and must be appeased. The rest of the time, however...

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** More to the point of the trope, Goku has had astonishing access to some pretty important folks in the ''Dragon Ball'' cosmos in his lifetime.[[note]] To wit: Kamesen'nin, Karin and the daughter of Capsule Corp. at age ten, God/Kami the Guardian of Earth, the reincarnation of Demon King Piccolo, King Yemma (who sends people to hell), the Southern Northern Kaio, the Prince of the Saiyans, the Grand Kaioshin who oversees the universe, has befriended Buu, and is chums with the God of Destruction and the aforementioned King Zen'o[[/note]] Of them, Goku only speaks formally to the God of Destruction after learning he can easily destroy the Earth and must be appeased. The rest of the time, however...
20th Mar '18 6:12:45 PM MasterGhandalf
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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of ''Literature/TheRiddleMasterTrilogy'' trilogy, owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.

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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of ''Literature/TheRiddleMasterTrilogy'' trilogy, owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating but nonetheless fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.
20th Mar '18 6:11:25 PM MasterGhandalf
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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of the ''Literature/RiddleMaster'' trilogy, owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.

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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of the ''Literature/RiddleMaster'' ''Literature/TheRiddleMasterTrilogy'' trilogy, owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.
20th Mar '18 6:10:49 PM MasterGhandalf
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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of the ''Literature/RiddleMasterTrilogy'', owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.

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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of the ''Literature/RiddleMasterTrilogy'', ''Literature/RiddleMaster'' trilogy, owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.
20th Mar '18 6:09:16 PM MasterGhandalf
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* Not uncommon in several kingdoms of the ''Literature/RiddleMasterTrilogy'', owing to their small size and/or sparse population allowing subjects to have rather casual relationships with their monarch. Morgon, the main protagonist, is the Prince of Hed, but as Hed is a tiny island that doesn't take much more than a day to cross on foot and is mostly inhabited by farmers, his job is less that of a monarch and more that of the mayor of a rural community, complete with local swineherds dropping by most mornings for breakfast and people asking the Prince to personally fix their leaky roofs being a fairly typical occurrence (and he'll do it, too). Har, the Wolf-King of Osterland, is personally intimidating fairly genial unless you cross him, and his far-northern kingdom has more animals in it than people and his throne room tends to have the air of a mead hall more than a solemn center of government; Danan Isig, who rules the mountain of the same name, is more the patriarch of a large extended family than anything more formal. Subverted with the nations of An, Ymris, and Herun, which are larger and more powerful than any of the above and have much more formal and complex royal courts.
11th Mar '18 8:51:53 AM LadyJafaria
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* ''Literature/WolfHall'' generally doesn't have this--by the time of Henry VIII kings were more separated from their people, although Henry makes a point of showing himself in public places a few times and it's not difficult for the nun Elizabeth Barton to get close and start giving him disturbing prophecies. And on the informality front, there's his boyhood friend and brother-in-law Charles Brandon, a BoistrousBruiser who will wander into a room and shout things like "Aren't you ready Harry?!" This irritates Thomas Cromwell to no end, especially when Brandon starts gossiping loudly in front of a foreign ambassador (at which point Cromwell physically drags him out of the room).

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* ''Literature/WolfHall'' generally doesn't have this--by the time of Henry VIII kings were more separated from their people, although Henry makes a point of showing himself in public places a few times and it's not difficult for the nun Elizabeth Barton to get close and start giving him disturbing prophecies. And on the informality front, there's his boyhood friend and brother-in-law Charles Brandon, a BoistrousBruiser BoisterousBruiser who will wander into a room and shout things like "Aren't you ready Harry?!" This irritates Thomas Cromwell to no end, especially when Brandon starts gossiping loudly in front of a foreign ambassador (at which point Cromwell physically drags him out of the room).
7th Mar '18 1:27:52 PM FF32
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* Very commonplace in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', where civilians address monarchs with nicknames while partying in their palaces and royals tend to be either [[TheGuardsMustBeCrazy incompetently guarded]], if they are at all. Occasionally justified: Princess Bubblegum considers herself a mother figure to her subjects and thus regularly consorts with them, while many of the other royals are teenagers and/or live modestly. Downplayed with the Fire Kingdom under the Flame King, who must be formally and subserviently addressed, even if he does allow the same level of access.
5th Mar '18 8:26:24 PM KBABZ
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** More to the point of the trope, Goku has had astonishing access to some pretty important folks in the ''Dragon Ball'' cosmos in his lifetime.[[note]] To wit: Kamesen'nin, Karin and the daughter of Capsule Corp. at age ten, God/Kami the Guardian of Earth, the reincarnation of Demon King Piccolo, King Yemma (who sends people to hell), the Southern Kaio, the Prince of the Saiyans, the Grand Kaioshin who oversees the universe, has befriended Buu, and is chums with the God of Destruction and the aforementioned King Zen'o[[/note]] Of them, Goku only speaks formally to the God of Destruction after learning he can easily destroy the Earth and must be appeased. The rest of the time, however...
---> '''Goku''': Yo! Did a guy named Raditz pass by here a minute ago?
---> '''Kami''': ''Goku!'' You do ''not'' address the great King Yenma with a "yo"!
18th Feb '18 11:14:30 AM nombretomado
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* UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin suffered a lot from his "What's up, Premier Dude" attitude in the middle of [[RedOctober a civil war]]; one time, some gangbangers kicked him out of his car, the other time he was shot, fell ill because of the complications and died soon after. [[UsefulNotes/JosephStalin His successor]], on the other hand, was very paranoid and anal about security.

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* UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin suffered a lot from his "What's up, Premier Dude" attitude in the middle of [[RedOctober [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober a civil war]]; one time, some gangbangers kicked him out of his car, the other time he was shot, fell ill because of the complications and died soon after. [[UsefulNotes/JosephStalin His successor]], on the other hand, was very paranoid and anal about security.
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