History Main / WhatDoYouMeanItsnotDidactic

19th Aug '16 5:21:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* Kris Straub's earlier comic ''CheckerboardNightmare'' occasionally featured the arthouse critic Lance Sharps, a Creator/ScottMcCloud parody. In his review of CN itself, he remarked that "At first I imagined the robot to be some sort of rape symbolism, and was quite disappointed to find it was merely a robot."

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* Kris Straub's earlier comic ''CheckerboardNightmare'' ''Webcomic/CheckerboardNightmare'' occasionally featured the arthouse critic Lance Sharps, a Creator/ScottMcCloud parody. In his review of CN itself, he remarked that "At first I imagined the robot to be some sort of rape symbolism, and was quite disappointed to find it was merely a robot."
18th Aug '16 4:43:20 AM Enkind
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* Film/FiftyShadesOfGrey of all things. The original book was lambasted endlessly for its superficial and slanted portrayal of BDSM relationships. The movie on the other hand, partially due to the lack of the cringe-worthy inner monologues and more focus on the character-interactions, accidentally implies that the problem is not the BDSM itself, but the trust-issues in the relationship. Anastasia is being naive and inexperienced, getting all her knowledge of the topic from cursory internet searches that immediately focus on the more hardcore aspects of the fetish, thus poisoning her expectations. Grey, on the other hand, is obsessed with control and suffers from trust-issues due to a FreudianExcuse and needlessly rushes things with the contract even though they both enjoy the activity without it. Both of these things are portrayed as bad things that jeopardize their relationship, while BDSM was something they both enjoyed until the very end and isn't vilified in the movie (and even in the last scene, it turns sour because they purposefully step over Anastasia's limits). In other words, [[AccidentalAesop it is a cautionary tale about doing BDSM, and relationships in general, wrong.]]
12th Aug '16 2:59:31 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''[[Franchise/{{Halo}} HALO: Combat Evolved]]'' [and only ''Combat Evolved''] is a post-modernist work of art, comparable to the Iliad, the Chief descended from Rambo AND Captain America, and... look, you just [[http://bit.ly/alomDe got to read it]].

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* ''[[Franchise/{{Halo}} HALO: Combat Evolved]]'' [and ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' (and only ''Combat Evolved''] Evolved'') is a post-modernist work of art, comparable to the Iliad, the Chief descended from Rambo AND Captain America, and... look, you just [[http://bit.ly/alomDe got to read it]].
29th Jul '16 3:03:22 PM res20stupid
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* InUniverse in ''VideoGame/TheBeginnersGuide''. Davey keeps coming up with explanations and explaining symbolism in Coda's work, such as explaining the reason for Coda making so many prison room type games are a metaphor for Coda feeling trapped by his work and depressed that he can't come up with new game ideas. [[spoiler: Subverted in that Coda calls Davey out for assuming this and coming up with interpretations to fit a narrative he thought it should represent. As Davey sadly points out near the end "Maybe he just liked making prison games".]]
28th Jul '16 8:18:18 PM PaulA
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Fillmore}}'' has an episode where the Book Club try to steal the best books from the library for themselves. The head of said club when he is collared and sent to detention rants about how the Book Club deserve them more than others as they are the only ones who appreciate them in the right way and understand things like the subtext of JudyBlume. Ingrid Third points out, "Judy Blume doesn't ''have'' a subtext, but she ''is'' very good."

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Fillmore}}'' has an episode where the Book Club try to steal the best books from the library for themselves. The head of said club when he is collared and sent to detention rants about how the Book Club deserve them more than others as they are the only ones who appreciate them in the right way and understand things like the subtext of JudyBlume.Creator/JudyBlume. Ingrid Third points out, "Judy Blume doesn't ''have'' a subtext, but she ''is'' very good."
28th Jun '16 4:55:12 AM Morgenthaler
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* Franz Kafka, after running out of his literary writings to analyze, lit profs gathered up various [[http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8791.html insurance claim reports]] Kafka wrote in his day job as a Insurance lawyer and trawled them for meaning.

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* Franz Kafka, Creator/FranzKafka, after running out of his literary writings to analyze, lit profs gathered up various [[http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8791.html insurance claim reports]] Kafka wrote in his day job as a Insurance lawyer and trawled them for meaning.
27th Jun '16 2:57:24 PM Morgenthaler
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** Of course he also nearly demands it in the forward of ''TheDefense'' and understanding most of ''Literature/PaleFire'' is impossible without it.

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** Of course he also nearly demands it in the forward of ''TheDefense'' ''Literature/TheDefense'' and understanding most of ''Literature/PaleFire'' is impossible without it.



* Steven Brust, the author of the ''{{Dragaera}}'' series, is part of an informal group of writers who call themselves the Pre-Joycean Fellowship, in reference to their perception that Creator/JamesJoyce started a trend in literary criticism which believes that meaningful works were meant to have obscure language and lots of symbolism and anything well-plotted was not in this category.
* A popular reading of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' holds that it's an allegory for WorldWarII: the Shire was England and the hobbits were the English, the elves were the French, {{Mordor}} was UsefulNotes/NaziGermany and Sauron was [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]], and the [[ArtifactOfDoom One Ring]] was the atom bomb or nuclear power. Creator/JRRTolkien emphatically stated--including in the prologues to later printings--that ''TheLordOfTheRings'' was ''not'' an allegory for WorldWarII and that he disliked allegories anyway. Tolkien had been writing ''The Lord of the Rings'' and giving the Ring its central importance prior to WorldWarII, before he ever heard of the possibility of an atomic bomb. Eventually, Tolkien went as far as to write an outline of what the book would have been like if he had meant it as a WorldWarII allegory. Among other things, Saruman would not have been counted on as an ally, and Sauron would have betrayed ''him''; Saruman would have tried to make his own One Ring; and in the end the Fellowship would have had to use its power to win. It's also noted that both sides in that conflict would have held Hobbits in hatred and contempt, and they wouldn't have survived long even as slaves.

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* Steven Brust, the author of the ''{{Dragaera}}'' ''Literature/{{Dragaera}}'' series, is part of an informal group of writers who call themselves the Pre-Joycean Fellowship, in reference to their perception that Creator/JamesJoyce started a trend in literary criticism which believes that meaningful works were meant to have obscure language and lots of symbolism and anything well-plotted was not in this category.
* A popular reading of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' holds that it's an allegory for WorldWarII: the Shire was England and the hobbits were the English, the elves were the French, {{Mordor}} was UsefulNotes/NaziGermany and Sauron was [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]], and the [[ArtifactOfDoom One Ring]] was the atom bomb or nuclear power. Creator/JRRTolkien emphatically stated--including in the prologues to later printings--that ''TheLordOfTheRings'' ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' was ''not'' an allegory for WorldWarII and that he disliked allegories anyway. Tolkien had been writing ''The Lord of the Rings'' and giving the Ring its central importance prior to WorldWarII, before he ever heard of the possibility of an atomic bomb. Eventually, Tolkien went as far as to write an outline of what the book would have been like if he had meant it as a WorldWarII allegory. Among other things, Saruman would not have been counted on as an ally, and Sauron would have betrayed ''him''; Saruman would have tried to make his own One Ring; and in the end the Fellowship would have had to use its power to win. It's also noted that both sides in that conflict would have held Hobbits in hatred and contempt, and they wouldn't have survived long even as slaves.



* ''TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' starts with a death threat aimed at anyone who tries to analyze it. This is [[ForbiddenFruit often taken as an invitation to do so]].

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* ''TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' starts with a death threat aimed at anyone who tries to analyze it. This is [[ForbiddenFruit often taken as an invitation to do so]].



* Richard Adams has always sworn that ''WatershipDown'' [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids was intended to be a children's book]]. However, many fans and critics don't agree and often see the book the 1970s' answer to ''AnimalFarm'', a political animal fable that focuses on communism, and specifically, Stalinism.
* In-universe example: Grand Admiral Thrawn, resident MagnificentBastard of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' ExpandedUniverse, uses this as his favourite military strategy: he can [[AwesomenessByAnalysis deduce a species' entire]] [[WarriorTherapist psychological makeup]] from their works of art, and plans his tactics accordingly.

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* Richard Adams has always sworn that ''WatershipDown'' ''Literature/WatershipDown'' [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids was intended to be a children's book]]. However, many fans and critics don't agree and often see the book the 1970s' answer to ''AnimalFarm'', ''Literature/AnimalFarm'', a political animal fable that focuses on communism, and specifically, Stalinism.
* In-universe example: Grand Admiral Thrawn, resident MagnificentBastard of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' ExpandedUniverse, ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'', uses this as his favourite military strategy: he can [[AwesomenessByAnalysis deduce a species' entire]] [[WarriorTherapist psychological makeup]] from their works of art, and plans his tactics accordingly.
17th Jun '16 7:38:54 AM Malady
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See also: TrueArtIsAngsty, TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, ** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''.

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See also: TrueArtIsAngsty, TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, ** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''.Main/{{Applicability}}.



** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''

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** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''Main/{{Applicability}}
17th Jun '16 7:36:42 AM Malady
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See also: TrueArtIsAngsty, TrueArtIsIncomprehensible.

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See also: TrueArtIsAngsty, TrueArtIsIncomprehensible.TrueArtIsIncomprehensible, ** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''.


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** See ''Main/{{Applicability}}''
7th May '16 4:12:15 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''TokyoBabylon'' is a good example of the second point. The french edition's summary used for promotion reveals all the important plot points up to volume 6. Of a 7 volumes series.

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* ''TokyoBabylon'' ''Manga/TokyoBabylon'' is a good example of the second point. The french edition's summary used for promotion reveals all the important plot points up to volume 6. Of a 7 volumes series.
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