History Main / WereStillRelevantDammit

6th May '16 10:36:42 AM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also PopularityPolynomial, MascotWithAttitude, DiscreditedMeme, FollowTheLeader, TwoDecadesBehind, LongRunnerTechMarchesOn, SocietyMarchesOn, JumpingTheShark, and more than a few [[TheScrappy Scrappies]] and cases of MisaimedMarketing. Contrast GrowingWithTheAudience.

to:

See also PopularityPolynomial, MascotWithAttitude, DiscreditedMeme, FollowTheLeader, TwoDecadesBehind, LongRunnerTechMarchesOn, SocietyMarchesOn, JumpingTheShark, NetworkDecay, MagazineDecay, and more than a few [[TheScrappy Scrappies]] and cases of MisaimedMarketing. Contrast GrowingWithTheAudience.
5th May '16 9:45:10 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also PopularityPolynomial, MascotWithAttitude, DiscreditedMeme, FollowTheLeader, TwoDecadesBehind, LongRunnerTechMarchesOn, SocietyMarchesOn, and more than a few [[TheScrappy Scrappies]] and cases of MisaimedMarketing. Contrast GrowingWithTheAudience.

to:

See also PopularityPolynomial, MascotWithAttitude, DiscreditedMeme, FollowTheLeader, TwoDecadesBehind, LongRunnerTechMarchesOn, SocietyMarchesOn, JumpingTheShark, and more than a few [[TheScrappy Scrappies]] and cases of MisaimedMarketing. Contrast GrowingWithTheAudience.
5th May '16 7:02:05 AM Hjortron18
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift'' cast Nicki Minaj and Drake as characters just because the studio perceived them as being hip with the kids. It even has the characters dance along to a generic auto-tuned pop song in the end credits. Considering this is the fourth movie of a franchise that began in 2002, these elements can't help but feel like the filmmakers are falling into this.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift'' ''WesternAnimation/IceAge4ContinentalDrift'' cast Nicki Minaj and Drake as characters just because the studio perceived them as being hip with the kids. It even has the characters dance along to a generic auto-tuned pop song in the end credits. Considering this is the fourth movie of a franchise that began in 2002, these elements can't help but feel like the filmmakers are falling into this.
4th May '16 10:17:03 AM bowserbros
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Amusingly used in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]", set in the titular war during the eighties on a Russian nuclear sub. Soviet Professor Grisenko is a fan of the band Music/DuranDuran, listening to "Hungry Like the Wolf" on a Walkman. When he learns the Eleventh Doctor and Clara Oswald are from the future, he asks for details about the fate of something important to him. At first, it looks like he wants to know about major events yet to come concerning the Cold War's outcome- which could derail history given the right answer in the wrong place and wrong time, should someone wish to alter its course. He simply wants to know if his beloved band broke up by 2013.

to:

*** Amusingly used in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]", set in the titular war during the eighties on a Russian nuclear sub. Soviet Professor Grisenko is a fan of the band Music/DuranDuran, British Europop, listening to [[Music/DuranDuran "Hungry Like the Wolf" Wolf"]] on a Walkman. When he learns the Eleventh Doctor and Clara Oswald are from the future, he asks for details about the fate of something important to him. At first, it looks like he wants to know about major events yet to come concerning the Cold War's outcome- which could derail history given the right answer in the wrong place and wrong time, should someone wish to alter its course. He simply wants to know if his beloved band Music/{{Ultravox}} broke up by 2013.
4th May '16 7:33:54 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[Film/ScaryMovie Scary Movie 2]]'': The impromptu basketball scene is a parody of the Nike "Freestyle" commercial you might have missed.

to:

* ''[[Film/ScaryMovie Scary Movie 2]]'': ''Film/ScaryMovie2'': The impromptu basketball scene is a parody of the Nike "Freestyle" commercial you might have missed.
2nd May '16 5:36:54 AM WhatArtThee
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Truth anti-tobacco initiative launched their [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4srWvLXZRw "It's a Trap"]] ad in Summer 2015 to prove that they were still relevant to TheNewTens after having been active since the Bush Era. The entire video just consists of [[MemeticMutation popular Internet memes]] springing to life and yelling "[[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi It's a trap!]]" whenever kids consider casually smoking at a party. Several of the Internet memes referenced in the ad were already more than half a decade old when it aired, and many of them never even say the signature lines that made them funny in the first place.

to:

* The Truth anti-tobacco initiative launched their [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4srWvLXZRw "It's a Trap"]] ad in Summer 2015 to prove that they were still relevant to TheNewTens after having been active since the Bush Era. The entire video just consists of [[MemeticMutation popular Internet memes]] springing to life and yelling "[[Film/ReturnOfTheJedi It's a trap!]]" whenever kids consider casually smoking at a party. Several of the Internet memes referenced in the ad were already more than half a decade old when it aired, party, and many of them never even say the signature lines that made them funny in the first place.



* Golden Treasures Lottery came out with an ad for their lottery that starts with the [[http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/double-rainbow double rainbow meme]], featuring a man noticing a double rainbow that goes all the way across the sky, commenting on its beauty, and asking what it means. ''In December 2015'', five years after the meme started and years after it stopped being relevant. It comes off as extremely out of touch.
* Pop Tarts advertising and packaging occasionally ventures into this. For example, boxes from 2016 feature memes such as "This... is... tarta!" (almost a decade after ''Film/ThreeHundred'' came out) and image macro parodies.

to:

* Golden Treasures Lottery came out with an ad for their lottery that starts with the [[http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/double-rainbow double rainbow meme]], featuring a man noticing a double rainbow that goes all the way across the sky, commenting on its beauty, and asking what it means. ''In December 2015'', five years after the meme started and years after it stopped being relevant. It comes off as extremely out of touch.\n
* Pop Tarts advertising and packaging occasionally ventures into this. For example, boxes from 2016 feature memes such as "This... is... tarta!" (almost a decade after ''Film/ThreeHundred'' came out) and image macro parodies.



* ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' famously used Comicbook/TheFalcon to do a controversial storyline about affirmative action... close to 20 years after UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy actually issued it.



* ''Comicbook/FreddyVsJasonVsAsh: The Nightmare Warriors'' had a prolonged, rather random, and immature TakeThat towards George W. Bush... who had been out of office for a couple years by the comics publication.



** In ''Big Mother'' Suske and Wiske join a reality TV show called ''Big Mother'', which was based on the enormous succes of the reality TV series ''Series/BigBrother'', but is now completely forgotten.

to:

** In ''Big Mother'' Suske and Wiske join a reality TV show called ''Big Mother'', which was based on the enormous succes success of the reality TV series ''Series/BigBrother'', but is now completely forgotten.''Series/BigBrother''.



* Works of Dennis Hopeless frequently fall victim to this. ''Comicbook/AvengersArena'' drew a lot of snark for shoving Internet-slang words like "hater" and "waifu" into the conversations while completely misusing them. ''Avengers Undercover'' had a character do the "shaky leg" dance and others commenting how cool it is, ''years'' after "shaky leg" went out of style. And then there's his Spider-Woman run, where the main character throws so many references in the first pages alone that [[PoesLaw it almost feels like a parody of writers who are desperate to sound young]]. Even more egregious later in ''ComicBook/AvengersUndercover'', which gave a shout out to ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' due to the anime's message being focused on {{Determinator}} nature of the protagonists in contradiction to the comic book with its notoriety of UnfortunateImplications on [[ShellShockedVeteran the survivors of Arena]] as turning into villains due to their trauma.

to:

* Works of Dennis Hopeless frequently fall victim to this. ''Comicbook/AvengersArena'' drew a lot of snark for shoving Internet-slang words like "hater" and "waifu" into the conversations while completely misusing them. ''Avengers Undercover'' had a character do the "shaky leg" dance and others commenting how cool it is, ''years'' after "shaky leg" went out of style. is. And then there's his Spider-Woman run, where the main character throws so many references in the first pages alone that [[PoesLaw it almost feels like a parody of writers who are desperate to sound young]]. Even more egregious later in ''ComicBook/AvengersUndercover'', which gave a shout out to ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' due to the anime's message being focused on {{Determinator}} nature of the protagonists in contradiction to the comic book with its notoriety of UnfortunateImplications on [[ShellShockedVeteran the survivors of Arena]] as turning into villains due to their trauma.



* Creator/{{Disney}} flirts with this trope every so often, but the studio during the Ron Miller period (1978-1984) was probably its most {{egregious}} example. In an attempt to counter the [[TastesLikeDiabetes super kid-friendly image]] that Disney had acquired in the 1970s, Miller greenlit a slew of DarkerAndEdgier works. Their animated films ''Disney/TheRescuers'', ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' and ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron'' were more moody and atmospheric than any Disney film since the 1940s, and they began experimenting with more "adult" genres in their live action films: science fiction with ''Film/TheBlackHole'' and ''Film/{{Tron}}''; action adventure with ''Film/{{Condorman}}'' and ''Trenchcoat''; horror with ''Literature/SomethingWickedThisWayComes'' and ''Film/TheWatcherInTheWoods''; drama with ''Never Cry Wolf'', ''Film/NightCrossing'' and ''Tex''; sports biopics with ''Running Brave'' and ''Takedown''; and dark fantasy with ''Film/TheDevilAndMaxDevlin'', ''Film/{{Dragonslayer}}'' and ''Film/ReturnToOz''. Almost all of these films were financial failures, leading people to conclude that the Disney brand was [[ItIsBeyondSaving no longer viable]] and setting the stage for shareholder Saul Steinberg's 1984 greenmail attempt that nearly destroyed the studio and led to Miller's ouster.[[note]]Shortly before he left Miller set up Creator/TouchstonePictures with the intention of using it to distribute more adult films without the Disney brand stigma, which his replacements Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg used to help keep Disney afloat in the 1980s before the studio's proper comeback in 1988/1989.[[/note]]



*** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode The Shakespeare Code]]" had a few ''Literature/HarryPotter'' references, including one to the final book which came out the same month the episode aired, and "Expelliarmus!" turns out to be key to defeating the MonsterOfTheWeek (admittedly this was because the preceding word was hard to rhyme). %% Yes, Martha Jones was native to 2008. No, that doesn't disqualify this from being an example, as the viewers were native to 2007.

to:

*** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode The Shakespeare Code]]" had a few ''Literature/HarryPotter'' references, including one to the final book which came out the same month the episode aired, and "Expelliarmus!" turns out to be key to defeating the MonsterOfTheWeek (admittedly this was because the preceding word was hard to rhyme). %% Yes, Martha Jones was native to 2008. No, that doesn't disqualify this from being an example, as the viewers were native to 2007.



*** When the Master returned in the new series, he was updated into a [[PopCulturedBadass murderous pop culture junkie.]] He is shown watching an episode of ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}'' (supposedly a ShoutOut to the original series where he watches an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheClangers'') and has pop music played when he releases the Toclafane to decimate the Earth's population (''Voodoo Child'', by ''Rogue Traders'') and at the start of Series 3's finale whilst he is wheeling the Doctor around on a wheelchair (''I Can't Decide'' by the ''Scissor Sisters''). However, this falls more into SoundtrackDissonance territory just to show how much of a maniac the Master is.

to:

*** When the Master returned in the new series, he was updated into a [[PopCulturedBadass murderous pop culture junkie.]] He is shown watching an episode of ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}'' (supposedly a ShoutOut to the original series where he watches an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheClangers'') and has pop music played when he releases the Toclafane to decimate the Earth's population (''Voodoo Child'', ("Voodoo Child", by ''Rogue Traders'') Rogue Traders) and at the start of Series 3's finale whilst he is wheeling the Doctor around on a wheelchair (''I ("I Can't Decide'' Decide" by the ''Scissor Sisters'').Scissor Sisters). However, this falls more into SoundtrackDissonance territory just to show how much of a maniac the Master is.



** One episode featured a young female hacker branding several men who'd raped her. This was around the time that the ''[[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy Swedish Millennium Trilogy]]'' was still popular.

to:

** One episode featured a young female hacker branding several men who'd raped her. This was around her, clearly riding the time that success of the ''[[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy Swedish Millennium Trilogy]]'' was still popular. Trilogy]].''



* The whole premise of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' is this: taking Creator/ArthurConanDoyle's late Victorians, making them sexy, and giving them all plot-relevant access to Twitter. The "[[Recap/SherlockS03E02TheSignOfThree The Sign of Three]]" episode had a sequence involving Sherlock and John powering through trendy London pubs to a {{dubstep}} remix of the show's theme, despite dubstep being seen as a little old-hat even by 2014.

to:

* The whole premise of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' is this: taking Creator/ArthurConanDoyle's late Victorians, making them sexy, and giving them all plot-relevant access to Twitter. The "[[Recap/SherlockS03E02TheSignOfThree The Sign of Three]]" episode had a sequence involving Sherlock and John powering through trendy London pubs to a {{dubstep}} remix of the show's theme, despite dubstep being seen as a little old-hat even by 2014.theme.



* It's a shame Amy Schumer's "[[https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCAQyCkwAGoVChMIy-_inevNyAIVyJmACh3lFgsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3De39dwHozfsc&usg=AFQjCNEHsl_eDTcKtaLI4qAtrbhsFrSmBQ&sig2=PxhX0semNvuEF22pB2glNQ Honey Boo Boo spoof]] is so well-done, since it takes the edge off somewhat that she ran it in spring of 2015, ''a year and a half'' after ''Here Comes Honey Boo Boo'' was ignominiously canceled and the American public was just as glad to start pretending the show had never ever existed in the first place.



* Plenty of ProgressiveRock supergroups of TheSeventies, faced with [[AccentuateTheNegative negative press]] over their "irrelevance" in the [[ThreeChordsAndTheTruth age of punk rock/new wave]], sported EightiesHair, streamlined their images and musical styles, made hip music videos, and added high-tech synths to their sound in an attempt to keep up with the times. Some failed (Music/GentleGiant, Music/JethroTull, Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer, Music/{{Kansas}}, Music/TheWho), and some succeeded (Music/{{Yes}}, Music/{{Genesis}}, Music/{{Rush}}, Music/KingCrimson). Either way, the bands' [[BrokenBase earlier fans]] tended to [[ItsPopularNowItSucks revolt against the new sounds and styles]].

to:

* Plenty of ProgressiveRock supergroups of TheSeventies, faced with [[AccentuateTheNegative negative press]] over their "irrelevance" in the [[ThreeChordsAndTheTruth age of punk rock/new wave]], sported EightiesHair, streamlined their images and musical styles, made hip music videos, and added high-tech synths to their sound in an attempt to keep up with the times. Some failed (Music/GentleGiant, Music/JethroTull, Music/EmersonLakeAndPalmer, Music/{{Kansas}}, Music/TheWho), Music/{{Kansas}}), and some succeeded (Music/{{Yes}}, Music/{{Genesis}}, Music/{{Rush}}, Music/KingCrimson). Either way, the bands' [[BrokenBase earlier fans]] tended to [[ItsPopularNowItSucks revolt against the new sounds and styles]].



* Music/DavidBowie, despite his notorious penchant for the NewSoundAlbum trope, has largely stayed ahead of the curves that come along in music and avoided accusations of trend-jumping, owing in part to both his ''strong'' CreatorThumbprint as a lyricist and his compelling stage presence. He was mocked in the British music press over 1997's ''Earthling'', though -- it was an intelligent drum 'n' bass-heavy album that came along ''just'' as that style peaked and was on its way to DeaderThanDisco status. He'd just turned 50 years old, too, which didn't help.

to:

* Music/DavidBowie, despite his notorious penchant for the NewSoundAlbum trope, has largely stayed ahead of the curves that come along in music and avoided accusations of trend-jumping, owing in part to both his ''strong'' CreatorThumbprint as a lyricist and his compelling stage presence. He was mocked in the British music press over 1997's ''Earthling'', though -- it was an intelligent drum 'n' bass-heavy album that came along ''just'' as that style peaked and was on its way to DeaderThanDisco status. He'd written by an artist who had just turned 50 years old, too, which didn't help.old.



* ''Music/{{Slayer}}'', for about a decade, was a major victim of this trope. To put it simply: the band tried to "modernize" their sound in 1998 with the NuMetal-influenced "Diabolus In Musica." After that album's rather [[BrokenBase lukewarm critical and commercial success]] and (more importantly) numerous accusations of being unable to compete with the likes of ''Music/{{Emperor}}'' and ''Music/{{Nile}}'' in terms of brutality, the band tried to WinBACKTheCrowd with 2001's "God Hates Us All." An album with an [[ClusterFBomb unusual amount of swearing for a Slayer record]] and some other very obvious shock tactics (such as a picture of the Holy Bible with nails and the Slayer logo burned onto it). Unfortunately, the only thing people found even remotely shocking about the record was something completely unintended: it was released on ''September 11, 2001.'' After realizing they were trying way too hard to remain relevant in the extreme metal scene they ironically helped to create, the band slowly moved away from the NuMetal influences and shock tactics of those two albums with 2006's ''Christ Illusion''. And then, in 2009, they released ''World Painted Blood''. An album many consider to be their best and most genuine since the early 90s.

to:

* ''Music/{{Slayer}}'', for about a decade, was a major victim of this trope. To put it simply: the band tried to "modernize" their sound in 1998 with the NuMetal-influenced "Diabolus In Musica." After that album's rather [[BrokenBase lukewarm critical and commercial success]] and (more importantly) numerous accusations of being unable to compete with the likes of ''Music/{{Emperor}}'' and ''Music/{{Nile}}'' in terms of brutality, the band tried to WinBACKTheCrowd with 2001's "God Hates Us All." An album with an [[ClusterFBomb unusual amount of swearing for a Slayer record]] and some other very obvious shock tactics (such as a picture of the Holy Bible with nails and the Slayer logo burned onto it). Unfortunately, the only thing people found even remotely shocking about the record was something completely unintended: it was released on ''September 11, 2001.'' After realizing they were trying way too hard to remain relevant in the extreme metal scene they ironically helped to create, the band slowly moved away from the NuMetal influences and shock tactics of those two albums with 2006's ''Christ Illusion''. And then, in 2009, they released ''World Painted Blood''. An Blood'', an album many consider to be their best and most genuine since the early 90s.



* Music/{{Rush}} fell victim to this in the eyes of [[VocalMinority certain subsets of fans]] after their ''Moving Pictures'' album, which [[ToughActToFollow just also happened to be generally regarded as the peak of their career]]. Though their initial foray into popular '80s synth technology, ''Signals'', was well-received, the drastically slicker and more melodramatic sounds they utilized on the following three releases gave a strong impression of the band conforming to the style of Top 40 pop music at the time. Even when they ditched the emphasis on synthesizers at the end of the decade, they placed a heavy emphasis on funk and other "urban" influences (most infamously the rap breakdown in "Roll the Bones") for their singles—at a time when many other popular acts were doing the same thing. And it ''definitely'' didn't help when they went for a DarkerAndEdgier sound rooted in heavy guitar distortion when ''[[{{Grunge}} that]]'' sort of thing became the popular music norm ("Stick it Out" and "Driven" are especially obvious genre emulation grabs). It would be the release of ''Snakes And Arrows'' that finally marked the end of the band's two decade-long trend-following focus.

to:

* Music/{{Rush}} fell victim to this in the eyes of [[VocalMinority certain subsets of fans]] after their ''Moving Pictures'' album, which [[ToughActToFollow just also happened to be generally regarded as the peak of their career]]. Though their initial foray into popular '80s synth technology, ''Signals'', was well-received, the drastically slicker and more melodramatic sounds they utilized on the following three releases gave a strong impression of the band conforming to the style of Top 40 pop music at the time. Even when they ditched the emphasis on synthesizers at the end of the decade, they placed a heavy emphasis on funk and other "urban" influences (most infamously the rap breakdown in "Roll the Bones") for their singles—at a time when many other popular acts were doing the same thing. And it ''definitely'' didn't help when they went for a DarkerAndEdgier sound rooted in heavy guitar distortion when ''[[{{Grunge}} that]]'' sort of thing became the popular music norm ("Stick it Out" and "Driven" are especially obvious genre emulation grabs). It would be the release of ''Snakes And Arrows'' ''Vapor Trails'' that finally marked the end of the band's two decade-long trend-following focus.



* Possible example in Mark Chesnutt's 2004 song "I'm a Saint", which contains the line "I know Music/{{Justin|Timberlake}} sings lead for Music/{{NSYNC}}, so my kids think I'm cool", even though 'N Sync had been disbanded for two years at that point. Whether it's meant to portray the song's character or writers as out-of-touch is up to the listener.



** An odd example for 2012: Billy asks to go out as a specific character, "Tactical Sergeant Tarkus from the Blood Ravens 4th Company in ''Warhammer 40,000''." Not only is ''Warhammer 40000'' extremely obscure outside geek circles, Tarkus only appeared in ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'', which came out three years prior. But it was hilarious watching people on /tg/, the 4chan board that deals with ''40k'', slowly coming to the realization that yes, ''Family Circus'' of all things had just referenced Tarkus.

to:

** An odd example for 2012: Billy asks to go out as a specific character, "Tactical Sergeant Tarkus from the Blood Ravens 4th Company in ''Warhammer 40,000''." Not only is 40,000''," despite the fact ''Warhammer 40000'' is extremely obscure outside geek circles, Tarkus only appeared in ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'', which came out three years prior.circles. But it was hilarious watching people on /tg/, the 4chan board that deals with ''40k'', slowly coming to the realization that yes, ''Family Circus'' of all things had just referenced Tarkus.



** ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'', in ''2011'', apparently believes that [[http://joshreads.com/?p=11706 setting a custom song for your ringtone]] is something so new, unusual and bizarre that it can be used as a punchline in itself.
** Then there's [[http://joshreads.com/?p=26332 this]] 2015 example from ''ComicStrip/{{BC}}'', which randomly references RageComics years after their peak in popularity.

to:

** ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'', in ''2011'', apparently believes that [[http://joshreads.com/?p=11706 setting a custom song for your ringtone]] is something so new, unusual and bizarre that it can be used as a punchline in itself.
** Then there's [[http://joshreads.com/?p=26332 this]] 2015 example from ''ComicStrip/{{BC}}'', which randomly references RageComics years after their peak in popularity.RageComics.



** Circa late January 2012, they made a ''Film/ThreeHundred'' reference, only about five years after the movie was released.[[note]]Yes, you've been hearing jokes about this being SPARTAAAAA for that long.[[/note]]
** Not much better was a January 2013 strip making a TakeThat at ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', released about a couple months after the final film hit theaters.

to:

** Circa late January 2012, they made a ''Film/ThreeHundred'' reference, only about five years after the movie was released.[[note]]Yes, you've been hearing jokes about this being SPARTAAAAA for that long.[[/note]]
reference.
** Not much better was a January 2013 strip making a TakeThat at ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', released about a couple months after the final film hit theaters.''Literature/{{Twilight}}''.



* WWE has always been doing this. They had a wrestler dressed as Franchise/{{Batman}} ([[SarcasmMode imaginatively]] known as "Battman") in the mid-1960s, when the TV show was a hit. During the mid-1990s they had Rad Radford, who dressed like a grunge-rock musician. Some of WWE's most popular and enduring gimmicks started out this way: Wrestling/{{Edge}}, for example, in his original "Brood" incarnation with his BadassLongcoat and CoolShades and vampire fangs, was strikingly reminiscent of the title character of ''Film/{{Blade}}'', which had just hit theaters at the time. And Wrestling/JohnCena's "rapper" gimmick, while ostensibly a parody of "Marky Mark" Wahlberg, obviously owed a great deal of its success to the early-2000s popularity of Music/{{Eminem}} (who has since faded from the public consciousness, while Cena hasn't used that gimmick for nearly a decade now).

to:

* WWE has always been doing this. They had a wrestler dressed as Franchise/{{Batman}} ([[SarcasmMode imaginatively]] known as "Battman") in the mid-1960s, when the TV show was a hit. During the mid-1990s they had Rad Radford, who dressed like a grunge-rock musician. Some of WWE's most popular and enduring gimmicks started out this way: Wrestling/{{Edge}}, for example, in his original "Brood" incarnation with his BadassLongcoat and CoolShades and vampire fangs, was strikingly reminiscent of the title character of ''Film/{{Blade}}'', which had just hit theaters at the time. And Wrestling/JohnCena's "rapper" gimmick, while ostensibly a parody of "Marky Mark" Wahlberg, obviously owed a great deal of its success to the early-2000s popularity of Music/{{Eminem}} (who has since faded from the public consciousness, while Cena hasn't used that gimmick for nearly a decade now).Music/{{Eminem}}.



* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' is fairly notorious for this; due to having been in DevelopmentHell for so long, many of its jokes would probably have been cutting-edge and topical if it hadn't been 2011. Notable examples include a TakeThat to keycard hunting (long out-of-style by that point), a LeeroyJenkins joke (around six years old by the game's release) and the [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Holsom Twins]] (whose real-life counterparts hadn't been in a movie for seven years). The gameplay itself was generally considered [[FollowTheLeader similar to that of]] ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' (and the game features a rather odd TakeThat to it), who had released its third mainline game four years ago and was currently being displaced by ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' is fairly notorious for this; due to having been in DevelopmentHell for so long, many of its jokes would probably have been cutting-edge and topical if it hadn't been 2011. this. Notable examples include a TakeThat to keycard hunting (long out-of-style by that point), hunting, a LeeroyJenkins joke (around six years old by the game's release) and the [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Holsom Twins]] (whose real-life counterparts hadn't been in a movie for seven years). Twins]]. The gameplay itself was generally considered [[FollowTheLeader similar to that of]] ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' (and the game features a rather odd TakeThat to it), who had released its third mainline game four years ago and was currently being displaced by ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty''.it).



* An episode of the Berenstain Bears which aired in 2003 had a reference to a band called "The Backstreet Bears" - an apparent Expy of a band which had peaked two years earlier.

to:

* An episode of the Berenstain Bears which aired in 2003 had a reference to a band called "The Backstreet Bears" - an apparent Expy of a band which had peaked two years earlier.the Backstreet Boys.



** It often lampshades this by having the Simpson family be the last people in town to get in on a new trend, like when Homer bought his first computer (in 1999) and didn't even know how to start his own Internet company, when Bart complains about being the only kid (in 2009) who doesn't have a cell phone, and Marge in "Marge Gamer" (a 2007 episode) being shunned by her friends for not having an email address and thinking "Googling yourself" is a euphemism for masturbation (as opposed to the common, "looking up your name on the Google search engine"). In fact, in the last example, Lisa compared Marge to UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus, in that she "had discovered something millions of people already knew existed."
** In the sixth season episode "Two Dozen and One Greyhounds", one of the puppies leans on the TV. Marge comments, "Isn't that cute? He thinks he's one of the Models Inc.", which is of course, the Aaron Spelling ''Series/MelrosePlace'' spinoff advertised on the same network during that time, or was, as it finished its only season on March 6, 1995, a month earlier than ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode airing April 9, 1995.
** The episode "Radio Bart" was clearly inspired by the media circus that surrounded toddler Jessica [=McClure=] when she was trapped in a well. The problem was the episode aired 5 years later, when most ''Simpsons'' viewers had forgotten about that whole ordeal (assuming they were old enough to hear about it in the first place).
** In the eighth-season finale, "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E25TheSecretWarOfLisaSimpson The Secret War of Lisa Simpson]]", Lisa decides to apply to the military school Bart's been sent to, which had previously not allowed girls. Anyone watching at the time could see it was clearly inspired by Shannon Faulkner's real-life struggle to be admitted to the Citadel military college in South Carolina ... which had played out two years earlier in real life.

to:

** It often lampshades this by having the Simpson family be the last people in town to get in on a new trend, like when Homer bought his first computer (in 1999) and didn't even know how to start his own Internet company, when Bart complains about being the only kid (in 2009) who doesn't have a cell phone, and Marge in "Marge Gamer" (a 2007 episode) being shunned by her friends for not having an email address and thinking "Googling yourself" is a euphemism for masturbation (as opposed to the common, "looking up your name on the Google search engine"). In fact, in the last example, Lisa compared Marge to UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus, in that she "had discovered something millions of people already knew existed."
** In the sixth season episode "Two Dozen and One Greyhounds", one of the puppies leans on the TV. Marge comments, "Isn't that cute? He thinks he's one of the Models Inc.", which is of course, the Aaron Spelling ''Series/MelrosePlace'' spinoff advertised on the same network during that time, or was, as it finished its only season on March 6, 1995, a month earlier than ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode airing April 9, 1995.
time.
** The episode "Radio Bart" was clearly inspired by the media circus that surrounded toddler Jessica [=McClure=] when she was trapped in a well. The problem was the episode aired 5 years later, when most ''Simpsons'' viewers had forgotten about that whole ordeal (assuming they were old enough to hear about it in the first place).
well.
** In the eighth-season finale, "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E25TheSecretWarOfLisaSimpson The Secret War of Lisa Simpson]]", Lisa decides to apply to the military school Bart's been sent to, which had previously not allowed girls. Anyone watching at the time could see it was clearly inspired by Shannon Faulkner's real-life struggle to be admitted to the Citadel military college in South Carolina ... which had played out two years earlier in real life.Carolina.



** This trope is blatant in season 15's "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS15E15CoDependentsDay Co-Dependent's Day]]" when the family goes to see [[BlandNameProduct Cosmic Wars: Episode I]], and it's a parody of the disappointment towards Episode I. It would've been relevant in 1999 or 2000, but this episode was released in ''2004''. It also creates a CelebrityParadox because Franchise/StarWars has been referenced by name dozens of times. Even more insulting that they already made a quick direct reference of Episode I by name in the 1999 Treehouse of Horror episode [[note]]The first Halloween episode after the release of The Phantom Menace in the Desperately Xeeking Xena segment[[/note]] when The Collector grabs his double edged lightsaber.

to:

** This trope is blatant in season 15's "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS15E15CoDependentsDay Co-Dependent's Day]]" when the family goes to see [[BlandNameProduct Cosmic Wars: Episode I]], and it's a parody of the disappointment towards Episode I. It would've been relevant in 1999 or 2000, but this episode was released in ''2004''. It also creates a CelebrityParadox because Franchise/StarWars has been referenced by name dozens of times. Even more insulting that they already made a quick direct reference of Episode I by name in the 1999 Treehouse of Horror episode [[note]]The first Halloween episode after the release of The Phantom Menace in the Desperately Xeeking Xena segment[[/note]] when The Collector grabs his double edged lightsaber.



** The opening to the episode "To Surveil With Love," in which the entire Springfield populace lip syncs to Music/{{Kesha}}'s "[=TiK ToK=]" was an obvious attempt at pandering to a younger demographic (though this was done as part of a gimmicky stunt called "FOX Rocks" where FOX cobbles up musical moments from their Animation Domination shows, which is why the very serious ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "Brian and Stewie" had a clip show of musical moments tacked on it). Many older fans growled at this unneccessary and obviously quickly out-dated attempt to be hip.
** "The D'oh-cial Network": It had loads of references to Facebook (the episode was even a parody of ''Film/TheSocialNetwork'', which would have been fine -- had the episode actually aired around the time that that movie was popular), Twitter, Apple products, and stores that had recently gone out of business as of 2011. It also ended with an {{Anvilicious}} Aesop about not depending on technology. It doesn't help that the scenes ostensibly parodying ''The Social Network'' show little evidence that the writers even saw the movie. That the episode prominently features ''Creep'' by Music/{{Radiohead}}, which was featured in the trailer but not the actual film, reinforces this impression.

to:

** The opening to the episode "To Surveil With Love," in which the entire Springfield populace lip syncs to Music/{{Kesha}}'s "[=TiK ToK=]" was an obvious attempt at pandering to a younger demographic (though this was done as part of a gimmicky stunt called "FOX Rocks" where FOX cobbles up musical moments from their Animation Domination shows, which is why the very serious ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "Brian and Stewie" had a clip show of musical moments tacked on it). Many older fans growled at this unneccessary and obviously quickly out-dated attempt to be hip.
** "The D'oh-cial Network": It had loads of references to Facebook (the episode was even a parody of ''Film/TheSocialNetwork'', which would have been fine -- had the episode actually aired around the time that that movie was popular), ''Film/TheSocialNetwork''), Twitter, Apple products, and stores that had recently gone out of business as of 2011. It also ended with an {{Anvilicious}} Aesop about not depending on technology. It doesn't help that the scenes ostensibly parodying ''The Social Network'' show little evidence that the writers even saw the movie. That the episode prominently features ''Creep'' by Music/{{Radiohead}}, which was featured in the trailer but not the actual film, reinforces this impression.



** ''Music/FallOutBoy'' performed the ending theme songs as guests on an episode that aired in 2009 - right after their Folie a Deux album had flopped, shortly before they went on hiatus, and at any rate nowhere close to their 2006-2007 heyday.

to:

** ''Music/FallOutBoy'' performed the ending theme songs as guests on an episode that aired in 2009 - right after their Folie a Deux album had flopped, shortly before they went on hiatus, and at any rate nowhere close to their 2006-2007 heyday.2009.



** A surprisingly quick example comes from the CouchGag to "Gorgeous Grampa" which has the cast do the Harlem Shake (though the Harlem Shake was still fairly popular at the time, but still, when it reruns, who's going to remember the reference?).
** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS24E19WhiskeyBusiness Whiskey Business]]" continues the trend with references to the Occupy Wall Street pepper spray cop and the Tupac Shakur hologram ''looooong'' after they left the public mind.
** The 2005 episode "Thank God It's Doomsday" features another parody of "Who Let The Dogs Out," a song popular half a decade earlier.
** "Beware My Cheating Bart" had a subplot where Homer, intending to exercise, buys a treadmill that has streaming video built in. He soon becomes wrapped up in watching episodes of ''Stranded'', a blatant ''Series/{{Lost}}'' parody, keeping notebooks full of clues and plot points from each episode. It was funny, but it would have been transcendentally hilarious had the episode not aired in 2012 ... ''three years'' after the ''Lost'' finale, well after the last flame wars over what it meant it had died out online. This was so blatant an example of the trope the writers had to lampshade it ''twice'', with both Lisa and Lenny pointing this out to Homer.
** This trope continues in the episode "Steal This Episode" with a parody of ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', which came out almost two years earlier.
** The later Treehouse of Horror episodes have begun to feel like this with parodies of ''Film/ParanormalActivity'' (the episode airing five years after the first film was released), ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' (two years after the film was released), ''Film/{{Twilight}}'' (two years after the first film was released and already parodied to death) and ''28 Days Later'' (seven years after the first film came out and another two years after the release of the sequel, ''28 Weeks Later'')
** Season 27's "Barthood" is a parody of ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'', airing nearly two years after its debut at Sundance.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' averts this trope due to the speed at which episodes can be made, including remaking planned episodes on the fly. For example, the quintuplets episode got changed from just about [[CreepyTwins creepy quintuplets]] to being about Elian Gonzales' capture ''just after'' the raid and his return to Cuba.

to:

** A surprisingly quick example comes from the CouchGag to "Gorgeous Grampa" which has the cast do the Harlem Shake (though the Harlem Shake was still fairly popular at the time, but still, when it reruns, who's going to remember the reference?).
Shake.
** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS24E19WhiskeyBusiness Whiskey Business]]" continues the trend with references to the Occupy Wall Street pepper spray cop and the Tupac Shakur hologram ''looooong'' after they left the public mind.
hologram.
** The 2005 episode "Thank God It's Doomsday" features another parody of "Who Let The Dogs Out," a song popular half a decade earlier.
Out,".
** "Beware My Cheating Bart" had a subplot where Homer, intending to exercise, buys a treadmill that has streaming video built in. He soon becomes wrapped up in watching episodes of ''Stranded'', a blatant ''Series/{{Lost}}'' parody, keeping notebooks full of clues and plot points from each episode. It was funny, but it would have been transcendentally hilarious had the episode not aired in 2012 ... ''three years'' after the ''Lost'' finale, well after the last flame wars over what it meant it had died out online. This was so blatant an example of the trope the writers had to lampshade it ''twice'', with both Lisa and Lenny pointing this out to Homer.
episode.
** This trope continues in the episode "Steal This Episode" with a parody of ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', which came out almost two years earlier.
''Film/TheDarkKnightRises''.
** The later Treehouse of Horror episodes have begun to feel like this with parodies of ''Film/ParanormalActivity'' (the episode airing five years after the first film was released), ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' (two years after the film was released), ''Film/{{Twilight}}'' (two years after the first film was released and already parodied to death) ''Film/ParanormalActivity'', ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', ''Film/{{Twilight}}'', and ''28 Days Later'' (seven years after the first film came out and another two years after the release of the sequel, ''28 Weeks Later'')
Later''.
** Season 27's "Barthood" is a parody of ''Film/{{Boyhood}}'', airing nearly two years after its debut at Sundance.
''Film/{{Boyhood}}''.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' averts heavily uses this trope trope, due to the speed at which episodes can be made, including remaking planned episodes on the fly. For example, the quintuplets episode got changed from just about [[CreepyTwins creepy quintuplets]] to being about Elian Gonzales' capture ''just after'' the raid and his return to Cuba.



** The usual prominence of this trope made the timing of the Website/{{Facebook}}-based episode "You Have 0 Friends" especially odd, appearing several years after the site became a journalistic favorite and at least four years since Facebook first allowed members who didn't belong to a school/college. That and the overall tone made [[http://www.avclub.com/articles/you-have-0-friends,39915/ ''The [=AV=] Club'''s reviewer remark]] that the premise was akin to "a 44-year-old suburban dad who just doesn't understand what his kids are up to but knows he doesn't like it". In the DVD commentary, Trey explains that they made the episode because he had been resisting the Facebook fad for years and finally made an account, but felt like he was getting "sucked in" so the episode was based on his experiences with it, rather than trying to be hip and current.
** Despite all that, ''South Park'' has referenced a lot of stuff since 2000 that is bound to get out-dated in a few decades, because many of the trends they satirize return from the radar in a couple of months.



* ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'''s relaunch was a debatable case of this -- on the one hand, referencing things like ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' and especially ''Film/SuperSizeMe'' in 2011 did come off as the writers being late to the party. On the other hand, it provided interesting jumping off points for the duo's misadventures. "Werewolves of Highland" is about the concept of VampiresAreSexGods, and the duo ''trying'' to take advantage of that to get chicks. "Supersize Me" has them following in Morgan Spurlock's footsteps (gorging on fast food and filming themselves doing so) in hopes of becoming similarly famous and (again) getting chicks. Also, the commentary segments with music videos and MTV reality shows were strictly up-to-date humor.
* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'':
** The [=MySpace=]-centric episode when Strickland Propane starts networking with [=MySpace=] to bring in customers -- in November, 2008, when most onliners had abandoned [=MySpace=] for Facebook and/or Twitter (among other social networks). It's easy to {{misblame|d}} the writers for being so out of date, but [=MySpace=] [[ProductPlacement was owned at the time by News Corp, the parent company]] of Creator/{{FOX}}, which produced and aired ''King of the Hill''. Still, it works as FridgeBrilliance, since places like Arlen tend to not get into the latest trends in technology until long after they've been established as commonplace.
** "Get Your Freak Off," which features an 'NSYNC-esque boy band as an important part of its plot, aired in 2003 - over a year after most '90s boybands had broken up, bubblegum pop was on its way out (then newly considered childish or effeminate by many members of its target audience) and DarkerAndEdgier pop-rock acts like Simple Plan, Blink-182 and Good Charlotte were taking over their spot in the mainstream music scene.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'''s relaunch was a debatable case of this -- on the one hand, referencing things like ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' and especially ''Film/SuperSizeMe'' in 2011 did does come off as the writers being late painfully trying to the party.stay hip. On the other hand, it provided interesting jumping off points for the duo's misadventures. "Werewolves of Highland" is about the concept of VampiresAreSexGods, and the duo ''trying'' to take advantage of that to get chicks. "Supersize Me" has them following in Morgan Spurlock's footsteps (gorging on fast food and filming themselves doing so) in hopes of becoming similarly famous and (again) getting chicks. Also, the commentary segments with music videos and MTV reality shows were strictly up-to-date humor.\n
* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'':
**
''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' has had a few examples, such as The [=MySpace=]-centric episode when Strickland Propane starts networking with [=MySpace=] to bring in customers -- in November, 2008, when most onliners had abandoned [=MySpace=] for Facebook and/or Twitter (among other social networks). It's easy to {{misblame|d}} the writers for being so out of date, but [=MySpace=] [[ProductPlacement was owned at the time by News Corp, the parent company]] of Creator/{{FOX}}, which produced customers, and aired ''King of the Hill''. Still, it works as FridgeBrilliance, since places like Arlen tend to not get into the latest trends in technology until long after they've been established as commonplace.
**
"Get Your Freak Off," which features an 'NSYNC-esque boy band as an important part of its plot, aired in 2003 - over a year after most '90s boybands had broken up, bubblegum pop was on its way out (then newly considered childish or effeminate by many members of its target audience) and DarkerAndEdgier pop-rock acts like Simple Plan, Blink-182 and Good Charlotte were taking over their spot in the mainstream music scene.plot.



** The writers mocking Creator/JimmyFallon for his {{corpsing}} in the episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS4E4DontMakeMeOver Don't Make Me Over]]," which aired in June 2005 (right between the end of the 30th season and the start of SNL's 31st season[[note]]the season introducing Bill Hader, Andy Samberg, and Kristen Wiig, and the first season to be shown in high-def[[/note]]. Fallon left the show at the end of the 2003-2004 season[[note]]season 29[[/note]]). Sort of justified in that ''Family Guy'' was still canceled around the time that Fallon was on ''SNL'' and his cracking-up was a thing, but all the jokes about that dried up as soon as he left. Even ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' TakeThat against Jimmy Fallon (on the season 16 episode "Homer Away from Homer"[[note]]the episode where Flanders moves away after Homer tells everyone that Flanders is housing two college coeds who are filming softcore webcam porn[[/note]]) was timelier than this. The episode did acknowledge this by the simple fact that Fallon was ''hosting'' the show, implying he was no longer a regular cast member. The joke was little more than a throw-away at any rate; the actual plot of the episode was more about mocking teen pop stars and how they're overly sexualized.
* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad''
** Subverted in the episode "Hi Honey, I'm Homeland" where Stan gets brainwashed by some people from the Occupy movement. It's mentioned at the beginning of the episode while Occupy is not in the public eye anymore, the movement still exists.
** Also subverted in "Blagsnarst: A Love Story", the last American Dad episode to air on Fox before the ChannelHop to TBS. Roger brings out a sniper rifle to take down a helicopter. He says "Okay, it'll be simple. I just have to pretend I'm Dick Cheney and that helicopter is my friend's face". However, he then says "Not the most timely reference, but it's not my fault more current people aren't shooting their friends in the face."
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' may be falling into this, seeing as one episode was about Timmy wishing for his mom to have a popular Website/YouTube channel, and Cosmo and Wanda taking selfies and making duck-lips scenes in "The Big Fairy Share Scare" (Chloe's first appearance), and another was about Timmy wishing for a super-smartphone. The episode "Finding Emo", where Timmy wishes he could be {{emo}} (amongst wishing he was a jock and a "sensitive guy") so he could be more sensitive to impress a girl, came out in 2014 (years after the emo scene stopped being mainstream). At least the smartphone episode had a ShoutOut to [[Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey HAL]] though.

to:

** The writers mocking Creator/JimmyFallon for his {{corpsing}} in the episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS4E4DontMakeMeOver Don't Make Me Over]]," which aired in June 2005 (right between the end of the 30th season and the start of SNL's 31st season[[note]]the season introducing Bill Hader, Andy Samberg, and Kristen Wiig, and the first season to be shown in high-def[[/note]]. Fallon left the show at the end of the 2003-2004 season[[note]]season 29[[/note]]). Sort of justified in that ''Family Guy'' was still canceled around the time that Fallon was on ''SNL'' and his cracking-up was a thing, but all the jokes about that dried up as soon as he left. Even ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' TakeThat against Jimmy Fallon (on the season 16 episode "Homer Away from Homer"[[note]]the episode where Flanders moves away after Homer tells everyone that Flanders is housing two college coeds who are filming softcore webcam porn[[/note]]) was timelier than this. The episode 2005.
* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad''
did acknowledge this by the simple fact that Fallon was ''hosting'' the show, implying he was no longer a regular cast member. The joke was little more than a throw-away at any rate; the actual plot of the episode was more about mocking teen pop stars and how they're overly sexualized.
* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad''
** Subverted in
with the episode "Hi Honey, I'm Homeland" where Stan gets brainwashed by some people from the Occupy movement. It's mentioned at the beginning of the episode while Occupy is not in the public eye anymore, the movement still exists.movement.
** Also subverted in "Blagsnarst: A Love Story", the last American Dad episode to air on Fox before the ChannelHop to TBS. Roger brings out a sniper rifle to take down a helicopter. He says "Okay, it'll be simple. I just have to pretend I'm Dick Cheney and that helicopter is my friend's face". However, he then says "Not the most timely reference, but it's not my fault more current people aren't shooting their friends in the face."
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' may be falling into this, seeing as one episode was about Timmy wishing for his mom to have a popular Website/YouTube channel, and Cosmo and Wanda taking selfies and making duck-lips scenes in "The Big Fairy Share Scare" (Chloe's first appearance), and another was about Timmy wishing for a super-smartphone. The Yet another was the episode "Finding Emo", where Timmy wishes he could be {{emo}} (amongst wishing he was a jock and a "sensitive guy") so he could be more sensitive to impress a girl, came out in 2014 (years after the emo scene stopped being mainstream).girl. At least the smartphone episode had a ShoutOut to [[Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey HAL]] though.



** Referencing dated Internet memes actually goes back to the season 2 premiere (which aired late 2011) where Pinkie makes a very non-subtle reference to [[Music/TayZonday "Chocolate Rain"]].

to:

** Referencing dated Internet memes This actually goes back to the season 2 premiere (which aired late 2011) where Pinkie makes a very non-subtle reference to [[Music/TayZonday "Chocolate Rain"]].



* This is one aspect that started getting focused on more in the Kids' WB seasons of ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}''. The show started throwing throwing far more direct references and parodies to movies like ''Film/{{Speed}}'', ''Film/ForrestGump'', and ''Film/{{Fargo}}'', shows like ''Series/{{Friends}}'' and ''Series/AmericanGladiators'', and music like the Macarena a year or two after their release. It wound up having the effect of making the later seasons feel more dated than the earlier ones.
* ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'':
** ''We Bare Bears'' is usually good with being set in the mid 2010s. However, it's glaring that "Shush Ninjas" heavily referenced ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' in 2015, years after it became DeaderThanDisco. Like ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' above, however, it's mostly used as a jumping-off point for [[LetsSplitUpGang the bears to split up]], and for Panda to get stuck inside the film instead of the duties presented to the others.
** The "#bearstack" advertisement may have seen MemeticMutation for a while, but it's a bit of an example of this trope.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' started doing this in season 3, where it very constantly started making meme references and started depicting characters doing things such as making Let's Play videos on the Internet or recording themselves doing the Ice Bucket challenge. Characters will also constantly make facial expression that directly references an Internet meme face such as showing Gumball facepalming or drawing out [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/theamazingworldofgumball/images/b/bb/The_Safety_11.png/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/1024?cb=20150206161556 this scene]] for a good 20 seconds. They really hit the bottom of the barrel in the season 4 episode "The Uploads", where the entire episode was Gumball and Darwin looking up [=YouTube=] videos that made references to very relatable kinds of videos that were only popular at the time the episode was produced and out of season by the time it aired.
* ''WesternAnimation/SonicBoom'' has been falling under this, with an entire episode satirizing Justin Beiber and boy-bands, to Shadow being defeated with a selfie in one episode, to a "Don't TAZE me bro!" reference (In ''2015''), and many references to Internet memes being thrown around.

to:

* This is one aspect that started getting focused on more in the Kids' WB seasons of ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}''. The show started throwing throwing far more direct references and parodies to movies like ''Film/{{Speed}}'', ''Film/ForrestGump'', and ''Film/{{Fargo}}'', shows like ''Series/{{Friends}}'' and ''Series/AmericanGladiators'', and music like the Macarena a year or two after their release.Macarena. It wound up having the effect of making the later seasons feel more dated than the earlier ones.
* ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'':
** ''We Bare Bears'' is usually good with being set in the mid 2010s. However, it's glaring that "Shush Ninjas" heavily referenced ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' in 2015, years after it became DeaderThanDisco. Like ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' above, however, it's mostly used as a jumping-off point for [[LetsSplitUpGang the bears to split up]], and for Panda to get stuck inside the film instead of the duties presented to the others.
** The "#bearstack" advertisement may have seen MemeticMutation for a while, but it's a bit of an example of this trope.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' started doing this in season 3, where it very constantly started making meme references and started depicting characters doing things such as making Let's Play videos on the Internet or recording themselves doing the Ice Bucket challenge. Characters will also constantly make facial expression that directly references an Internet meme face such as showing Gumball facepalming or drawing out [[http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/theamazingworldofgumball/images/b/bb/The_Safety_11.png/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/1024?cb=20150206161556 this scene]] for a good 20 seconds. They really hit the bottom of the barrel in the season 4 episode "The Uploads", where the entire episode was Gumball and Darwin looking up [=YouTube=] videos that made references to very relatable kinds of videos that were only popular at the time the episode was produced and out of season by the time it aired.
videos.
* ''WesternAnimation/SonicBoom'' has been falling under this, with not only transplanting the characters into a modern sit-com setting, but having an entire episode satirizing Justin Beiber and boy-bands, to Shadow being defeated with a selfie in one episode, episode, references to a the goat scream and "Don't TAZE taze me bro!" reference (In ''2015''), bro" internet memes, a satire of internet fame, and many references to Internet the near constant use of memes being thrown around.on Sonic's Facebook and Twitter pages.



** The show has fallen into this according to many. It's an attempt at [[SettingUpdate modernizing]] the original 1990s ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls''. Buttercup's use of slang is borderline TotallyRadical, (older) memes are referenced, and the characters are more into modern culture than before. The episode "Painbow" is especially considered this due to lines such as "OMG! YAAAAAAAS!" and "I literally can't even!", as well as a scene where Bubbles and Blossom ''twerk''.

to:

** The show has fallen into this according to many. It's an attempt at [[SettingUpdate modernizing]] the original 1990s ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls''. Buttercup's use of slang is borderline TotallyRadical, (older) memes are referenced, and the characters are more into modern culture than before. The episode "Painbow" is especially considered this due to lines such as "OMG! YAAAAAAAS!" and "I literally can't even!", as well as a scene where Bubbles and Blossom ''twerk''.



* Dictionaries with a lot of tradition behind them are sometimes accused of this when they add "fashionable" words to their listings. For instance, the Oxford English Dictionary was mocked around the Internet after it added the entries "OMG" and "LOL". However, as language is something that constantly evolves, this trope might only be natural for dictionaries, unless OMG and LOL are no longer in use within the foreseeable future, and then this trope will be played straight.

to:

* Dictionaries with a lot of tradition behind them are sometimes accused of this when they add "fashionable" words to their listings. For instance, the Oxford English Dictionary was mocked around the Internet after it added the entries "OMG" and "LOL". However, as language is something that constantly evolves, this trope might only be natural for dictionaries, unless OMG and LOL are no longer in use within the foreseeable future, and then this trope will be played straight. dictionaries.
26th Apr '16 9:15:49 AM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While the RaceLift in ''Film/{{Annie 2014}}'' necessitated the SettingUpdate, the constant references to celebrities and memes (like "Boom goes the dynamite!") feel forced and will likely date the film in years to come. Parodied on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' in a version of "It's a Hard-Knock Life" that mentions the [=iPhone=] 6.

to:

* While the RaceLift in ''Film/{{Annie 2014}}'' necessitated the SettingUpdate, the constant references to celebrities and memes (like "Boom goes the dynamite!") feel forced and will likely date [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece date]] the film in years to come. Parodied on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' in a version of "It's a Hard-Knock Life" that mentions the [=iPhone=] 6.



** One episode featured a young female hacker branding several men who'd raped her. This was around the time that the [[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy Swedish Millennium Trilogy]] was still popular.

to:

** One episode featured a young female hacker branding several men who'd raped her. This was around the time that the [[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy ''[[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy Swedish Millennium Trilogy]] Trilogy]]'' was still popular.



* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'': The [=MySpace=]-centric episode when Strickland Propane starts networking with [=MySpace=] to bring in customers -- in November, 2008, when most onliners had abandoned [=MySpace=] for Facebook and/or Twitter (among other social networks). It's easy to {{misblame|d}} the writers for being so out of date, but [=MySpace=] [[ProductPlacement was owned at the time by News Corp, the parent company]] of Creator/{{FOX}}, which produced and aired ''King of the Hill''. Still, it works as FridgeBrilliance, since places like Arlen tend to not get into the latest trends in technology until long after they've been established as commonplace.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'': ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'':
**
The [=MySpace=]-centric episode when Strickland Propane starts networking with [=MySpace=] to bring in customers -- in November, 2008, when most onliners had abandoned [=MySpace=] for Facebook and/or Twitter (among other social networks). It's easy to {{misblame|d}} the writers for being so out of date, but [=MySpace=] [[ProductPlacement was owned at the time by News Corp, the parent company]] of Creator/{{FOX}}, which produced and aired ''King of the Hill''. Still, it works as FridgeBrilliance, since places like Arlen tend to not get into the latest trends in technology until long after they've been established as commonplace.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' may be falling into this, seeing as one episode was about Timmy wishing for his mom to have a popular Website/YouTube channel, and Cosmo and Wanda taking selfies and making duck-lips scenes in "The Big Fairy Share Scare" (Chloe's first appearance), and another was about Timmy wishing for a super-smartphone. The episode "Finding Emo", where Timmy wishes he could be {{emo}}} so he could be more sensitive (amongst wishing he was a jock and a sensitive guy) to impress a girl, came out in 2014 (years after the emo scene stopped being mainstream). At least the smartphone episode had a ShoutOut to [[Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey HAL]] though.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' may be falling into this, seeing as one episode was about Timmy wishing for his mom to have a popular Website/YouTube channel, and Cosmo and Wanda taking selfies and making duck-lips scenes in "The Big Fairy Share Scare" (Chloe's first appearance), and another was about Timmy wishing for a super-smartphone. The episode "Finding Emo", where Timmy wishes he could be {{emo}}} so he could be more sensitive {{emo}} (amongst wishing he was a jock and a "sensitive guy") so he could be more sensitive guy) to impress a girl, came out in 2014 (years after the emo scene stopped being mainstream). At least the smartphone episode had a ShoutOut to [[Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey HAL]] though.



* ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'' is usually good with being set in the mid 2010s. However, it's glaring that "Shush Ninjas" heavily referenced ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' in 2015, years after it became DeaderThanDisco. Like ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' above, however, it's mostly used as a jumping-off point for [[LetsSplitUpGang the bears to split up]], and for Panda to get stuck inside the film instead of the duties presented to the others.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'' ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'':
** ''We Bare Bears''
is usually good with being set in the mid 2010s. However, it's glaring that "Shush Ninjas" heavily referenced ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' in 2015, years after it became DeaderThanDisco. Like ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' above, however, it's mostly used as a jumping-off point for [[LetsSplitUpGang the bears to split up]], and for Panda to get stuck inside the film instead of the duties presented to the others.



** The show has fallen into this according to many. It's an attempt at [[SettingUpdate modernizing]] the original 1990s ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls''. Buttercup's use of slang is borderline TotallyRadical and the characters are more into modern culture than before. The episode "Painbow" is especially considered this due to lines such as "OMG! YAAAAAAAS!" and "I literally can't even!", as well as a scene where Bubbles and Blossom ''twerk''.

to:

** The show has fallen into this according to many. It's an attempt at [[SettingUpdate modernizing]] the original 1990s ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls''. Buttercup's use of slang is borderline TotallyRadical TotallyRadical, (older) memes are referenced, and the characters are more into modern culture than before. The episode "Painbow" is especially considered this due to lines such as "OMG! YAAAAAAAS!" and "I literally can't even!", as well as a scene where Bubbles and Blossom ''twerk''.
25th Apr '16 11:32:10 PM aye_amber
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Music/RollingStones' 1978 album ''Music/SomeGirls'' was a very deliberate response to critics who had dismissed them as outdated in the face of PunkRock and disco. It paid off big time, and the Stones pointed out that numerous punk rockers had grown up listening to them. It's also helped that they've absorbed many different music styles over the years, while still retaining their core blues-rock sound.

to:

* The Music/RollingStones' *Music/TheRollingStones' 1978 album ''Music/SomeGirls'' was a very deliberate response to critics who had dismissed them as outdated in the face of PunkRock and disco. It paid off big time, and the Stones pointed out that numerous punk rockers had grown up listening to them. It's also helped that they've absorbed many different music styles over the years, while still retaining their core blues-rock sound.
24th Apr '16 4:55:03 PM chopshop
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' with an in-universe tabletop game called ''[[Franchise/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons, Dungeons, and More Dungeons]]'', which desperately tried (and failed) to update itself in the '90s, leading to a hilariously bad DorkAge. The game was renamed ''Diggity Dungeons and All That'' and the BigBad, an evil warlock, got revamped into a "hip" rapper.
23rd Apr '16 1:01:27 PM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 699. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WereStillRelevantDammit