History Main / WeWillUseWikiwordsInTheFuture

15th Aug '17 8:30:29 AM Occidensill
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* Mocked in ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', when Rodney dubs the craft that would become known as a Puddle Jumper a "[=GateShip=]", and is instantly told, "Okay, you don't get to name things anymore." In an alternate timeline, [=McKay=] does get to name it [=GateShip=], mainly to set up a [='GS-1'=] joke. And the Asurans call them [=GateShips=].

to:

* Mocked in ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', when Rodney dubs the craft that would become known as a Puddle Jumper a "[=GateShip=]", and is instantly told, "Okay, you don't get to name things anymore." In an alternate timeline, [=McKay=] does get to name it [=GateShip=], mainly to set up a [='GS-1'=] joke. And Later they learn that the Asurans who built the ships did call them [=GateShips=].[=GateShips=], which enthuses McKay, but is taken as another piece of evidence of their creative bankruptcy by everyone else.
25th Jul '17 9:01:50 AM TheGreatUnknown
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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 4th Edition is starting to head in this direction with its use of compound names for classes and monsters (most recently the Shardmind race and the Battlemind and Runepriest classes from PHB3), much to the annoyance of those who prefer simpler and more resonant naming conventions. The battlemind is known as a "fightbrain" on [=RPGnet=].

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 4th Edition is starting to head briefly headed in this direction with its use of compound names for classes and monsters (most recently the Shardmind race and the Battlemind and Runepriest classes from PHB3), much to the annoyance of those who prefer simpler and more resonant naming conventions. The battlemind is known as a "fightbrain" on [=RPGnet=].
31st Mar '17 3:43:51 PM nombretomado
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* ''OrionsArm'', the collaborative sci-fi WorldBuilding project, brings us "[[GreyGoo Nanodisaster]]," "[[DeusEstMachina Archailects]]", and even "[[UsefulNotes/TheSolarSystem Solsys]]".

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* ''OrionsArm'', ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'', the collaborative sci-fi WorldBuilding project, brings us "[[GreyGoo Nanodisaster]]," "[[DeusEstMachina Archailects]]", and even "[[UsefulNotes/TheSolarSystem Solsys]]".
28th Feb '17 8:08:21 AM gemmabeta2
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* L. Ron Hubbard (creator of Scientology and author of ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'') idolized the military and incorporated a lot of Wiki Words into "Scientologese" such as [=IntBase=] (International Base, one of many headquarters) and [=SecCheck=] (Security Check, a 200-question punishment).

to:

* L. Ron Hubbard (creator of Scientology and author of ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'') idolized the military United States Navy and incorporated a lot of Navy-style Wiki Words into "Scientologese" such as [=IntBase=] (International Base, one of many headquarters) and [=SecCheck=] (Security Check, a 200-question punishment).
20th Jan '17 5:56:27 PM Game_Fan
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* This is a favorite of many military organizations worldwide; with the US military being especially fond of this trope. When military-jargon coinages are not actual acronyms, they're typically this, freqently with the inter-capitalization as well. Some examples are "milspec" (military specification, used for equipment that meets military standards), "[=OpHour=]" (Operational Hour, the time spent on an actual operation, excluding support activities), "Elint" (Electronic Intelligence), and "medevac" (Medical Evacuation).

to:

* This is a favorite of many military organizations worldwide; with the US military being especially fond of this trope. When military-jargon coinages are not actual acronyms, they're typically this, freqently with the inter-capitalization as well. Some examples are "milspec" (military specification, used for equipment that meets military standards), "[=OpHour=]" (Operational Hour, the time spent on an actual operation, excluding support activities), "Elint" (Electronic Intelligence), and "medevac" (Medical Evacuation).Evacuation).
** Intelligence services use this for various source of information. For example: HumInt (Human Intelligence), SigInt (Signals Intelligence), MASInt (Measurement and Signature Intelligence).
13th Jan '17 10:12:10 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

** Some foreign wiki-words get translated into Russian, usually with their root words being translated and then jammed together. For example, the German word "schadenfreude" (deriving pleasure from someone's misfortune), which has been borrowed verbatim into English, is translated as "zloradstvo" (злорадство) from the root words "zlo" (evil, malice) and "radost'" (happiness).
3rd Jan '17 2:39:05 PM N1KF
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-->'''Car Salesman''': Just one word: Thundercougarfalconbird

to:

-->'''Car Salesman''': Just [[TwoWordsAddedEmphasis one word: word]]: Thundercougarfalconbird



[[folder:Real Life]]

to:

[[folder:Real Life]]Life - English]]



* This is pretty common in Norwegian. For instance, "breakfast cereal" is "breakfastcereal": frokostblanding. Although, since Norwegian is technically made up from Danish and whatever old Norwegian remnants they can find and they have to make up new words somehow...
** See also the SCUBA breathing gas mixtures Trimix (helium/nitrogen/oxygen) and Heliox (helium/oxygen only) are likewise examples of the trope.
* Since Lojban only has 1300 or so root words, and only about 1000 gismu, combination is pretty much necessary to say anything of complexity. In fact the name itself is a shortened combination of logji (logic) and bangu (language).
* In Japanese, forming words like this is perfectly normal. They are built from combinations of Japanese and [[GratuitousEnglish English]] words. For example, the Japanese word for "PC" is [[Anime/{{Chobits}} "paso-kon"]], an abbreviation of "personal computer" pronounced using standard Japanese phonemes. This extends even to names, especially of celebrities. Music/JimiHendrix, for example, is something like [=JimiHen=].
** Specifically they form words of 4 moraic units as in ''pa-so-ko-n''=Personal computer, ''ji-mi-he-n''=Jimi Hendrix. Also 'lo-li-ko-n'=LolitaComplex, ''ko-n-bi-ni''=Convenience Store, or ''i-ra-su-to''=Illustration.
* This is also fairly common among Swedish computer geeks, as a lot of computer terms don't have an official translation and those that do end up sounding really, really silly. These terms are sometimes combined with Swedish words to form new words, that also end up sounding fairly silly, though less so than actual translations. Usually.
* Can also happen in German - German grammar allows one to stick any two nouns together to form a new word, and there are quite a few words that have been "imported" from other languages. The result: stuff like "Computerfabrik", "Spitzenperformance" or "Worst-Case-Analyse". Sometimes two compound words even get stuck together to form a ''huge'' word.
** Or pretty much any agglumerative language - that's how new words are lexicalized in the first place in these tongues and it's perfectly normal (at least it wouldn't seem "SciFi"). Kinda how some languages are said to have millions of words for "snow" that turn out to be adjective + snow stuck together.
** German also has lots of prefixes that can be added to change the meaning of things, including the above words created by sticking two nouns together. Mark Twain wrote a rather fantastic essay about this, and some of the other 'unusual' aspects of the language. There's a copy of it [[http://www.kombu.de/twain-2.htm here]], for anyone who's curious.
** This is a rather popular child's game in Germany. You start with a WikiWord, say, ''WikiWord''. The next player has to find (or make up a plausible) WikiWord that begins with the last part of the first,in this case ''word-counter''. If you have good or very creative players it can go on for hours.
* French gamers tend to concentrate the words "Jeux vidéos" into "Jivés" (From JV), also, Dessins Animés ("Cartoons") have usually called "Déhas" (DA) and Bandes Dessinées are called "Bédés". Except for BD/Bédés, most words are used only orally and never in any written forms outside message boards.
* In Russian, such words usually arise in military slang or bureaucrat-speak. These words usually have stresses on both of their parts to point to their structure.
** Bureaucratic [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture WikiWords]] usually arise from abbreviations: "замдекана" (zamdekana - Vice-Dean) or "главбух" (glavbukh - chief accountant). In Soviet times, this was widely adopted for naming various ministries and organizations (e.g. Comintern for Communist International) and is also used today for large, preferably state-owned companies like Gazprom ("газовая прмышленность" (gazovaya promyshlennost) means gas industry).
** Various intitutions often had their names shortened in wikiword fashon, for example, "физфак" (phisfac - Department of Physics (within a university)) or "колхоз" (kolkhoz - collective farm). Surely, such names became a target for jokes, when they got overly long.
** Military slang is another staple of Russian wikiwords. It dug in after the revolution, when former regime military ranks were abolished and [[InsistentTerminology commanders]] (remember, Soviet Army didn't have officers before 1943) went with ranks like "platoon commander" or "military engineer, 1st rank". Please note that it was a fashion of revolutionary times to abbreviate everything, and the military was leading the way. Of course, these ranks were wikiworded into something like "комвзвода" (komvzvoda - platoon commander) or "военлет" (voenlet - military pilot). After 1943 more traditional ranks were reintroduced, but the habit of abbreviating stuck, so words like "замкомвзвода" (zamkomvzvoda - deputy platoon leader) are still about.
*** Then there is a semi-apocryphal revolutionary-time "замкомпоморде(л)" (zamkompomordel - Commander-in-Chief's deputy for naval affairs) which sounds exactly like "(Being hit) in (your) face with a padlock".
** This is OlderThanTheyThink. The Russian word for "thank you" is "spasibo" (спасибо), which comes from the Old Slavic phrase "съпаси богъ" meaning "God save (you)". Eventually, it was merged into one and the "g" sound was dropped.
*** So is the word for "please". It is "pozhaluysta" (пожалуйста), coming from "pozhaluy, stariy" ("пожалуй, старый"), roughly translatable as "if you would, elder one".
** The Russian words for "battleship" (which in English is also a wiki-word) and "destroyer" are "linkor" (линкор) and "esminets" (эсминец), respectively. "Linkor" is actually short for "lineyniy korabl'", which means "ship-of-the-line". "Esminets" is short for "eskadryonniy minonosets", meaning "squadron minecarrier" (as torpedoes were originally called "self-propelled mines" in Russian). Of course, "minonosets" also qualifies as a wiki-word.
*** Battleship and destroyer in English are themselves short for "line-of-battle ship" and "torpedo boat destroyer," qualifying as wiki words.

to:

* This is pretty common in Norwegian. For instance, "breakfast cereal" is "breakfastcereal": frokostblanding. Although, since Norwegian is technically made up from Danish and whatever old Norwegian remnants they can find and they have to make up new words somehow...
** See also the SCUBA breathing gas mixtures Trimix (helium/nitrogen/oxygen) and Heliox (helium/oxygen only) are likewise examples of the trope.
* Since Lojban only has 1300 or so root words, and only about 1000 gismu, combination is pretty much necessary to say anything of complexity. In fact the name itself is a shortened combination of logji (logic) and bangu (language).
* In Japanese, forming words like this is perfectly normal. They are built from combinations of Japanese and [[GratuitousEnglish English]] words. For example, the Japanese word for "PC" is [[Anime/{{Chobits}} "paso-kon"]], an abbreviation of "personal computer" pronounced using standard Japanese phonemes. This extends even to names, especially of celebrities. Music/JimiHendrix, for example, is something like [=JimiHen=].
** Specifically they form words of 4 moraic units as in ''pa-so-ko-n''=Personal computer, ''ji-mi-he-n''=Jimi Hendrix. Also 'lo-li-ko-n'=LolitaComplex, ''ko-n-bi-ni''=Convenience Store, or ''i-ra-su-to''=Illustration.
* This is also fairly common among Swedish computer geeks, as a lot of computer terms don't have an official translation and those that do end up sounding really, really silly. These terms are sometimes combined with Swedish words to form new words, that also end up sounding fairly silly, though less so than actual translations. Usually.
* Can also happen in German - German grammar allows one to stick any two nouns together to form a new word, and there are quite a few words that have been "imported" from other languages. The result: stuff like "Computerfabrik", "Spitzenperformance" or "Worst-Case-Analyse". Sometimes two compound words even get stuck together to form a ''huge'' word.
** Or pretty much any agglumerative language - that's how new words are lexicalized in the first place in these tongues and it's perfectly normal (at least it wouldn't seem "SciFi"). Kinda how some languages are said to have millions of words for "snow" that turn out to be adjective + snow stuck together.
** German also has lots of prefixes that can be added to change the meaning of things, including the above words created by sticking two nouns together. Mark Twain wrote a rather fantastic essay about this, and some of the other 'unusual' aspects of the language. There's a copy of it [[http://www.kombu.de/twain-2.htm here]], for anyone who's curious.
** This is a rather popular child's game in Germany. You start with a WikiWord, say, ''WikiWord''. The next player has to find (or make up a plausible) WikiWord that begins with the last part of the first,in this case ''word-counter''. If you have good or very creative players it can go on for hours.
* French gamers tend to concentrate the words "Jeux vidéos" into "Jivés" (From JV), also, Dessins Animés ("Cartoons") have usually called "Déhas" (DA) and Bandes Dessinées are called "Bédés". Except for BD/Bédés, most words are used only orally and never in any written forms outside message boards.
* In Russian, such words usually arise in military slang or bureaucrat-speak. These words usually have stresses on both of their parts to point to their structure.
** Bureaucratic [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture WikiWords]] usually arise from abbreviations: "замдекана" (zamdekana - Vice-Dean) or "главбух" (glavbukh - chief accountant). In Soviet times, this was widely adopted for naming various ministries and organizations (e.g. Comintern for Communist International) and is also used today for large, preferably state-owned companies like Gazprom ("газовая прмышленность" (gazovaya promyshlennost) means gas industry).
** Various intitutions often had their names shortened in wikiword fashon, for example, "физфак" (phisfac - Department of Physics (within a university)) or "колхоз" (kolkhoz - collective farm). Surely, such names became a target for jokes, when they got overly long.
** Military slang is another staple of Russian wikiwords. It dug in after the revolution, when former regime military ranks were abolished and [[InsistentTerminology commanders]] (remember, Soviet Army didn't have officers before 1943) went with ranks like "platoon commander" or "military engineer, 1st rank". Please note that it was a fashion of revolutionary times to abbreviate everything, and the military was leading the way. Of course, these ranks were wikiworded into something like "комвзвода" (komvzvoda - platoon commander) or "военлет" (voenlet - military pilot). After 1943 more traditional ranks were reintroduced, but the habit of abbreviating stuck, so words like "замкомвзвода" (zamkomvzvoda - deputy platoon leader) are still about.
*** Then there is a semi-apocryphal revolutionary-time "замкомпоморде(л)" (zamkompomordel - Commander-in-Chief's deputy for naval affairs) which sounds exactly like "(Being hit) in (your) face with a padlock".
** This is OlderThanTheyThink. The Russian word for "thank you" is "spasibo" (спасибо), which comes from the Old Slavic phrase "съпаси богъ" meaning "God save (you)". Eventually, it was merged into one and the "g" sound was dropped.
*** So is the word for "please". It is "pozhaluysta" (пожалуйста), coming from "pozhaluy, stariy" ("пожалуй, старый"), roughly translatable as "if you would, elder one".
** The Russian words for "battleship" (which in English is also a wiki-word) and "destroyer" are "linkor" (линкор) and "esminets" (эсминец), respectively. "Linkor" is actually short for "lineyniy korabl'", which means "ship-of-the-line". "Esminets" is short for "eskadryonniy minonosets", meaning "squadron minecarrier" (as torpedoes were originally called "self-propelled mines" in Russian). Of course, "minonosets" also qualifies as a wiki-word.
***
Battleship and destroyer in English are themselves short for "line-of-battle ship" and "torpedo boat destroyer," qualifying as wiki words.



* [[TVTropesWillRuinYourLife tvtropes]] ''itself'' is having this effect, with more readers and editors of the site casually referencing trope names [=InCamelCase=], which in literary (pop culture) discussions are incredibly more recognized as tvtropes terms. tvtropes variations of trope names are also becoming more recognizable: After reading a lot of tvtropes, what sounds more natural -- the traditional literary term [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathos Bathos]], or {{Narm}}?
* In Finland, the official name for under-50cc scooters are officially called "mopo" (short of motored bicycle). Also, compound words are extremely common. The German/English name for them is "Moped", also a contraction.

to:

* [[TVTropesWillRuinYourLife tvtropes]] Wiki/TVTropes ''itself'' is having this effect, with more readers and editors of the site [[JustForFun/TVTropesWillRuinYourVocabulary casually referencing trope names names]] [=InCamelCase=], which in literary (pop culture) discussions are incredibly more recognized as tvtropes TV Tropes terms. tvtropes TV Tropes variations of trope names are also becoming more recognizable: After reading a lot of tvtropes, TV Tropes, what sounds more natural -- the traditional literary term [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathos Bathos]], or {{Narm}}?
* In Finland, the official name for under-50cc scooters are officially called "mopo" (short of motored bicycle). Also, compound words are extremely common. The German/English name for them is "Moped", also a contraction.
{{Narm}}?



* The [=EyeToy=]
** On that, the entire UsefulNotes/PlayStation line

to:

* The [=EyeToy=]
** On that, the
[=EyeToy=].
* The
entire UsefulNotes/PlayStation lineline.



* This is how Hungarian words are made.



* For Apple, the iPad, iPhone, iMac, and iPod.
** It originally meant "Internet-Ready", referring to the original iMac ("Internet-Ready Mac") being pre-installed with a free internet suite and phone modem, and being pre-configured to use a phone-line for internet access. The idea was that you could take it out the box, connect it to your phone line, and immediately access the internet. This lead to other iThings like the (also internet-ready) iBook or iTunes, and by the time Apple was to release a music player, the 'i' prefix had already come to mean 'Concerning apple products or services' rather than 'Internet Ready'.

to:

* For Apple, the iPad, iPhone, iMac, and iPod.
**
iPod. It originally meant "Internet-Ready", referring to the original iMac ("Internet-Ready Mac") being pre-installed with a free internet suite and phone modem, and being pre-configured to use a phone-line for internet access. The idea was that you could take it out the box, connect it to your phone line, and immediately access the internet. This lead to other iThings like the (also internet-ready) iBook or iTunes, and by the time Apple was to release a music player, the 'i' prefix had already come to mean 'Concerning apple products or services' rather than 'Internet Ready'.


Added DiffLines:


[[folder:Real Life - Other Languages]]
* This is pretty common in Norwegian. For instance, "breakfast cereal" is "breakfastcereal": frokostblanding. Although, since Norwegian is technically made up from Danish and whatever old Norwegian remnants they can find and they have to make up new words somehow...
** See also the SCUBA breathing gas mixtures Trimix (helium/nitrogen/oxygen) and Heliox (helium/oxygen only) are likewise examples of the trope.
* Since Lojban only has 1300 or so root words, and only about 1000 gismu, combination is pretty much necessary to say anything of complexity. In fact the name itself is a shortened combination of logji (logic) and bangu (language).
* In Japanese, forming words like this is perfectly normal. They are built from combinations of Japanese and [[GratuitousEnglish English]] words. For example, the Japanese word for "PC" is [[Anime/{{Chobits}} "paso-kon"]], an abbreviation of "personal computer" pronounced using standard Japanese phonemes. This extends even to names, especially of celebrities. Music/JimiHendrix, for example, is something like [=JimiHen=]. Specifically, they form words of four moraic units as in ''pa-so-ko-n''=Personal computer, ''ji-mi-he-n''=Jimi Hendrix. Also 'lo-li-ko-n'=LolitaComplex, ''ko-n-bi-ni''=Convenience Store, or ''i-ra-su-to''=Illustration.
* This is fairly common among Swedish computer geeks, as a lot of computer terms don't have an official translation and those that do end up sounding really, really silly. These terms are sometimes combined with Swedish words to form new words, that also end up sounding fairly silly, though less so than actual translations. Usually.
* Can also happen in German - German grammar allows one to stick any two nouns together to form a new word, and there are quite a few words that have been "imported" from other languages. The result: stuff like "Computerfabrik", "Spitzenperformance" or "Worst-Case-Analyse". Sometimes two compound words even get stuck together to form a ''huge'' word.
** Or pretty much any agglumerative language - that's how new words are lexicalized in the first place in these tongues and it's perfectly normal (at least it wouldn't seem "SciFi"). Kinda how some languages are said to have millions of words for "snow" that turn out to be adjective + snow stuck together.
** German also has lots of prefixes that can be added to change the meaning of things, including the above words created by sticking two nouns together. Mark Twain wrote a rather fantastic essay about this, and some of the other 'unusual' aspects of the language. There's a copy of it [[http://www.kombu.de/twain-2.htm here]], for anyone who's curious.
** This is a rather popular child's game in Germany. You start with a WikiWord, say, ''WikiWord''. The next player has to find (or make up a plausible) WikiWord that begins with the last part of the first,in this case ''word-counter''. If you have good or very creative players it can go on for hours.
* French gamers tend to concentrate the words "Jeux vidéos" into "Jivés" (From JV), also, Dessins Animés ("Cartoons") have usually called "Déhas" (DA) and Bandes Dessinées are called "Bédés". Except for BD/Bédés, most words are used only orally and never in any written forms outside message boards.
* In Russian, such words usually arise in military slang or bureaucrat-speak. These words usually have stresses on both of their parts to point to their structure.
** Bureaucratic [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture WikiWords]] usually arise from abbreviations: "замдекана" (zamdekana - Vice-Dean) or "главбух" (glavbukh - chief accountant). In Soviet times, this was widely adopted for naming various ministries and organizations (e.g. Comintern for Communist International) and is also used today for large, preferably state-owned companies like Gazprom ("газовая прмышленность" (gazovaya promyshlennost) means gas industry).
** Various intitutions often had their names shortened in wikiword fashon, for example, "физфак" (phisfac - Department of Physics (within a university)) or "колхоз" (kolkhoz - collective farm). Surely, such names became a target for jokes, when they got overly long.
** Military slang is another staple of Russian wikiwords. It dug in after the revolution, when former regime military ranks were abolished and [[InsistentTerminology commanders]] (remember, Soviet Army didn't have officers before 1943) went with ranks like "platoon commander" or "military engineer, 1st rank". Please note that it was a fashion of revolutionary times to abbreviate everything, and the military was leading the way. Of course, these ranks were wikiworded into something like "комвзвода" (komvzvoda - platoon commander) or "военлет" (voenlet - military pilot). After 1943 more traditional ranks were reintroduced, but the habit of abbreviating stuck, so words like "замкомвзвода" (zamkomvzvoda - deputy platoon leader) are still about.
*** Then there is a semi-apocryphal revolutionary-time "замкомпоморде(л)" (zamkompomordel - Commander-in-Chief's deputy for naval affairs) which sounds exactly like "(Being hit) in (your) face with a padlock".
** This is OlderThanTheyThink. The Russian word for "thank you" is "spasibo" (спасибо), which comes from the Old Slavic phrase "съпаси богъ" meaning "God save (you)". Eventually, it was merged into one and the "g" sound was dropped.
*** So is the word for "please". It is "pozhaluysta" (пожалуйста), coming from "pozhaluy, stariy" ("пожалуй, старый"), roughly translatable as "if you would, elder one".
** The Russian words for "battleship" (which in English is also a wiki-word) and "destroyer" are "linkor" (линкор) and "esminets" (эсминец), respectively. "Linkor" is actually short for "lineyniy korabl'", which means "ship-of-the-line". "Esminets" is short for "eskadryonniy minonosets", meaning "squadron minecarrier" (as torpedoes were originally called "self-propelled mines" in Russian). Of course, "minonosets" also qualifies as a wiki-word.
* In Finland, the official name for under-50cc scooters are officially called "mopo" (short of motored bicycle). Also, compound words are extremely common. The German/English name for them is "Moped", also a contraction.
* This is how Hungarian words are made.
[[/folder]]
25th Oct '16 4:51:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheOnion'' took the fashion of businesses to rebrand themselves with CamelCase abveviations to the logical extreme with its article "[[http://www.theonion.com/content/news_briefs/wamu_files_for_chaplev WaMu Files For ChapLev]]". [[note]]Washington Mutual files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy[[/note]]

to:

* ''TheOnion'' ''Website/TheOnion'' took the fashion of businesses to rebrand themselves with CamelCase abveviations to the logical extreme with its article "[[http://www.theonion.com/content/news_briefs/wamu_files_for_chaplev WaMu Files For ChapLev]]". [[note]]Washington Mutual files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy[[/note]]
11th Aug '16 12:45:18 PM Morgenthaler
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* Miami University's athletic teams are known as the [=RedHawks=], rather than the Red Hawks. Note that this is not ''[[NamesTheSame that]]'' {{Miami}}; the major university located there is called "University of Miami", and their teams are the Hurricanes. This is the university located in Ohio.

to:

* Miami University's athletic teams are known as the [=RedHawks=], rather than the Red Hawks. Note that this is not ''[[NamesTheSame that]]'' {{Miami}}; UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}; the major university located there is called "University of Miami", and their teams are the Hurricanes. This is the university located in Ohio.
2nd Jul '16 12:22:52 PM nombretomado
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* In ''{{Bionicle}}'', the Le-Matoran of Mata Nui/Metru Nui use a slang system called [[http://biosector01.com/wiki/index.php/Chutespeak/Treespeak treespeak/chutespeak]] based on Wiki Words. It is mentioned, in-universe, to be irritating and hard to understand by damn near everyone, especially when combined with their MotorMouth tendencies. This even goes for the writer of the series, who used every excuse he could to get out of writing it.

to:

* In ''{{Bionicle}}'', ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', the Le-Matoran of Mata Nui/Metru Nui use a slang system called [[http://biosector01.com/wiki/index.php/Chutespeak/Treespeak treespeak/chutespeak]] based on Wiki Words. It is mentioned, in-universe, to be irritating and hard to understand by damn near everyone, especially when combined with their MotorMouth tendencies. This even goes for the writer of the series, who used every excuse he could to get out of writing it.
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