History Main / WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture

12th Apr '18 1:52:47 PM SelMelvins
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* Played straight in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' and its sequels/prequels. Despite robots being portrayed as highly capable killing machines and police units even as early as [[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution 2027]], bars, clubs, and other services would still be staffed by humans as late as ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Invisible War]]'', which is set in 2072 when nanotechnology and advanced AI are increasingly common.

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* Played straight in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', its sequel, and its sequels/prequels. /prequels. Despite robots being the series' penchant for getting in-depth on the effects of {{Transhumanism}} and artificial intelligence on society and politics (especially on the basis of social class and traditional mores), there is total silence on the subject of automation, even in the game's otherwise extensive worldbuilding. Robots are portrayed as highly capable killing machines and police units even as early as [[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution 2027]], 2027]]— yet bars, clubs, and other services would still be staffed by humans as late as ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Invisible War]]'', which is set in 2072 when nanotechnology and advanced AI are increasingly common.
common.
12th Apr '18 1:40:20 PM SelMelvins
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* Played straight in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' and its sequels/prequels. Despite robots being portrayed as highly capable killing machines and police units even as early as [[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution 2027]], bars, clubs, and other services would still be staffed by humans as late as ''[[VideoGame/DeusExInvisibleWar Invisible War]]'', which is set in 2072 when nanotechnology and advanced AI are increasingly common.
27th Mar '18 10:52:58 PM sablesword
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* The oddity of using slave labor in the technically advanced Terran Empire is lampshaded and justified in Creator/PoulAnderson's ''[[Literature/TechnicHistory A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows]]'' when Kossara is MadeASlave:
-->'''Kossara:''' Why? I mean, when you have a worldful of machines, every kind of robot -- why slaves? How can it… how can it pay?
-->'''Other Slave Woman:''' What else would you do with the wicked? Kill them, even for tiny things? Give them costly psychocorrection? Lock them away at public expense, useless to themselves and everybody else? No, let them work. Let the Imperium get some money from selling them the first time, if it can.
-->'''Kossara:''' What can we do that a machine can’t do better?
-->'''Other Slave Woman:''' Personal services. Many kinds. Or… well, economics. Often a slave is less efficient than a machine, but needs less capital investment.
26th Feb '18 4:37:32 AM Cryoclaste
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* A non-future version comes up in the TalesOfTheGoldMonkey episode Black Pearl. ThoseWackyNazis are assembling an [[spoiler: atomic weapon]] and preparing it for testing using enslaved islanders. When one Nazi complains about the inefficiency of this, as well as the use of torches for light when electric generators are readily available, the other [[LampshadeHanging says that it appeals to his sense of drama.]]

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* A non-future version comes up in the TalesOfTheGoldMonkey ''Series/TalesOfTheGoldMonkey'' episode Black Pearl. ThoseWackyNazis are assembling an [[spoiler: atomic weapon]] and preparing it for testing using enslaved islanders. When one Nazi complains about the inefficiency of this, as well as the use of torches for light when electric generators are readily available, the other [[LampshadeHanging says that it appeals to his sense of drama.]]
24th Feb '18 2:39:55 PM nombretomado
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** The [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet school of design]] was informed heavily by [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo WWII]] experience: although the [[UsefulNotes/NazisWithGnarlyWeapons German Überpanzer like the Panther and the Tiger]] could [[CurbStompBattle snipe Soviet tanks at extreme ranges]], they were notoriously unreliable and [[EliteArmy few in number]], owing to [[AwesomeButImpractical their bloated size and mass]] - the "medium" Panther was larger (and heavier) than the Soviet IS-2 heavy tank - and so the bulk of Heer armour was made of [[MookMobile Panzer IV]] and [[TanksButNoTanks StuG III]], which were nothing to write home about. This meant that the Soviets would keep capitalizing on the advantages of the T-34-85 (a fast and cheap JackOfAllStats) and then apply the same logic to NATO armour, expecting to counter their super-duper machines with [[ZergRush quantity]], [[ConfusionFu surprise, speed]], [[DeathFromAbove combined arms]] and [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs deep operations]], denying them [[HollywoodTactics a head-on engagement]] in which NATO armour would exploit its advantages. Not that it had that many -- a Soviet tank of the [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Cold War]] was armed with a [[{{BFG}} bigger gun]] and equally thick armour compared to a NATO design of the same [[TechnologyLevels generation]], while being [[LightningBruiser lighter]] (modern Western [=MBTs=] are approaching 70 t; [=ComBlock=] designs are no heavier than 45 t) and hence more agile and economically and logistically affordable. The sole reason for this was because, as it became apparent in WWII, the Soviets ruthlessly cut down on interior volume -- while Western tanks are cramped, they seem [[UnnecessarilyLargeInterior ludicrously roomy]] in comparison with Soviet-school vehicles that are near ClownCar levels, which means that the crew, naturally, sit on top of ammo and fuel, and have by regulation to be shorter than 185 cm (which means that someone around 170 cm is actually comfortable). An autoloader does not worsen the safety situation, but helps shrink mass and size further by eliminating another member of the crew, and it was the Soviet mantra that the best protection is not being hit at all; also, the human loader would eventually get tired, and was a lot less effective in the more confined interior, as the pre-autoloader but equally small T-55 and T-62 show. Furthermore, Soviet tanks were expected to actively maneuver rather than snipe targets from hull-down positions (as NATO tanks were likely to be doing), and had poorer suspension; it is considerably harder to load the gun manually when the vertical stabilizer keeps thrusting the breech up and down. Additionally, the later-pattern autoloader on the T-72 is significantly less vulnerable: the shells are arranged not in a cylinder under the turret ring, but in a circle of the floor, and hidden at the very bottom of the vehicle behind an extra layer of armor - hence [[NoKillLikeOverkill anything capable of triggering a magazine detonation likely destroys the tank anyway]]. As to the spare shell lockers, the [[UsefulNotes/RussiansWithRustingRockets new T-90 variants]] do move them into a bustle storage compartment - and Hatedom run afoul of the [[{{Hatedom}} bustle haters]], who believe that any large turret bustle is extremely likely to get hit in combat, whereas the baseline T-90 has a compact (short and broad) turret, and [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe it is impossible to hit anything but the heavily-protected front from a sector of 60°]]. Also, many Abrams loaders jam the doors open, [[WhatAnIdiot completely nullifying the protective qualities of the system]] - to [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique keep the rate of fire up]]. Finally, autoloaders are believed to be more usable in future tanks for two aspects: firstly, as the LensmanArmsRace is liable to continue, [[{{BFG}} tank guns]] will likely get [[UpToEleven even bigger]]: as of 1990, there were prototypes of prototypes a Leopard 2 variant with a 140 mm cannon and a T-80 variant with a 152 mm gun. Both of these exceeded the practical abilities of human loaders and were fitted with autoloaders -- much like modern 152-155 mm artillery, which uses at least partially mechanized loading instead of ''two'' loaders per gun. The second element of prospective [[RussiansWithRustingRockets Russian]] tanks is removing the crew from the turret altogether, settling the issue completely by using [[NighInvulnerability a front-mounted capsule tough enough to survive the destruction of the rest of the vehicle]] -- while even further reducing the size of the turret.

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** The [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet school of design]] was informed heavily by [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo WWII]] experience: although the [[UsefulNotes/NazisWithGnarlyWeapons German Überpanzer like the Panther and the Tiger]] could [[CurbStompBattle snipe Soviet tanks at extreme ranges]], they were notoriously unreliable and [[EliteArmy few in number]], owing to [[AwesomeButImpractical their bloated size and mass]] - the "medium" Panther was larger (and heavier) than the Soviet IS-2 heavy tank - and so the bulk of Heer armour was made of [[MookMobile Panzer IV]] and [[TanksButNoTanks StuG III]], which were nothing to write home about. This meant that the Soviets would keep capitalizing on the advantages of the T-34-85 (a fast and cheap JackOfAllStats) and then apply the same logic to NATO armour, expecting to counter their super-duper machines with [[ZergRush quantity]], [[ConfusionFu surprise, speed]], [[DeathFromAbove combined arms]] and [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs deep operations]], denying them [[HollywoodTactics a head-on engagement]] in which NATO armour would exploit its advantages. Not that it had that many -- a Soviet tank of the [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Cold War]] was armed with a [[{{BFG}} bigger gun]] and equally thick armour compared to a NATO design of the same [[TechnologyLevels generation]], while being [[LightningBruiser lighter]] (modern Western [=MBTs=] are approaching 70 t; [=ComBlock=] designs are no heavier than 45 t) and hence more agile and economically and logistically affordable. The sole reason for this was because, as it became apparent in WWII, the Soviets ruthlessly cut down on interior volume -- while Western tanks are cramped, they seem [[UnnecessarilyLargeInterior ludicrously roomy]] in comparison with Soviet-school vehicles that are near ClownCar levels, which means that the crew, naturally, sit on top of ammo and fuel, and have by regulation to be shorter than 185 cm (which means that someone around 170 cm is actually comfortable). An autoloader does not worsen the safety situation, but helps shrink mass and size further by eliminating another member of the crew, and it was the Soviet mantra that the best protection is not being hit at all; also, the human loader would eventually get tired, and was a lot less effective in the more confined interior, as the pre-autoloader but equally small T-55 and T-62 show. Furthermore, Soviet tanks were expected to actively maneuver rather than snipe targets from hull-down positions (as NATO tanks were likely to be doing), and had poorer suspension; it is considerably harder to load the gun manually when the vertical stabilizer keeps thrusting the breech up and down. Additionally, the later-pattern autoloader on the T-72 is significantly less vulnerable: the shells are arranged not in a cylinder under the turret ring, but in a circle of the floor, and hidden at the very bottom of the vehicle behind an extra layer of armor - hence [[NoKillLikeOverkill anything capable of triggering a magazine detonation likely destroys the tank anyway]]. As to the spare shell lockers, the [[UsefulNotes/RussiansWithRustingRockets new T-90 variants]] do move them into a bustle storage compartment - and Hatedom run afoul of the [[{{Hatedom}} bustle haters]], who believe that any large turret bustle is extremely likely to get hit in combat, whereas the baseline T-90 has a compact (short and broad) turret, and [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe it is impossible to hit anything but the heavily-protected front from a sector of 60°]]. Also, many Abrams loaders jam the doors open, [[WhatAnIdiot completely nullifying the protective qualities of the system]] - to [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique keep the rate of fire up]]. Finally, autoloaders are believed to be more usable in future tanks for two aspects: firstly, as the LensmanArmsRace is liable to continue, [[{{BFG}} tank guns]] will likely get [[UpToEleven even bigger]]: as of 1990, there were prototypes of prototypes a Leopard 2 variant with a 140 mm cannon and a T-80 variant with a 152 mm gun. Both of these exceeded the practical abilities of human loaders and were fitted with autoloaders -- much like modern 152-155 mm artillery, which uses at least partially mechanized loading instead of ''two'' loaders per gun. The second element of prospective [[RussiansWithRustingRockets [[UsefulNotes/RussiansWithRustingRockets Russian]] tanks is removing the crew from the turret altogether, settling the issue completely by using [[NighInvulnerability a front-mounted capsule tough enough to survive the destruction of the rest of the vehicle]] -- while even further reducing the size of the turret.
12th Jan '18 6:30:34 PM nombretomado
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* The Goa'uld of ''Series/StargateSG1'' love sending pickaxe-equipped slaves to their [[{{Unobtainium}} Naquadah]] mines, but this is [[JustifyingEdit partially]] [[JustifiedTrope justified]]: The Goa'uld may have access to advanced technology, but they also really, ''really'' like ordering people around and being worshipped. Also, they are largely unconcerned with doing things efficiently, instead preferring to do things [[CoolButInefficient impressively]], or ForTheEvulz. This is explicitly said to provide the Good Guys with one of their main advantages against the Goa'uld. It should be noted that the Goa'uld quite logically did ''not'' want to provide advanced technology to their slaves, so while they themselves rode around in fancy starships, their servants largely lived on [[TheDungAges dung age]] planets. And it's stated a few times on the show that the Goa'uld are parasites by mentality as well as by nature. They don't innovate, they steal technology (like the eponymous gates) from other civilizations. It's possible they never came across anyone using robots to steal from them. That said, there were earlier instances of Goa'uld using some automation. One pre-Anubis episode featured a Goa'uld robotic probe that was seen exploring a planet on its own, and Teal'c believed this was a brand-new development -- the task might have previously been assigned to bands of Jaffa warriors. However, remember the Goa'uld were not interested in power for some pragmatic purpose, but in power ''itself''. They saw themselves as ''gods'', after all, and competed through showmanship and intimidation as much as through things like production and military efficiency. An inefficient army of terrified slaves might impress a Goa'uld's rivals far more than an efficient machine doing the same job in half the time. The show frequently acknowledged this as the Goa'uld's key weakness. The Ori continued the trend. Even with all the knowledge of ascended beings, their ships are still built by their primitive human worshippers.

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* The Goa'uld of ''Series/StargateSG1'' love sending pickaxe-equipped slaves to their [[{{Unobtainium}} Naquadah]] mines, but this is [[JustifyingEdit [[Administrivia/JustifyingEdit partially]] [[JustifiedTrope justified]]: The Goa'uld may have access to advanced technology, but they also really, ''really'' like ordering people around and being worshipped. Also, they are largely unconcerned with doing things efficiently, instead preferring to do things [[CoolButInefficient impressively]], or ForTheEvulz. This is explicitly said to provide the Good Guys with one of their main advantages against the Goa'uld. It should be noted that the Goa'uld quite logically did ''not'' want to provide advanced technology to their slaves, so while they themselves rode around in fancy starships, their servants largely lived on [[TheDungAges dung age]] planets. And it's stated a few times on the show that the Goa'uld are parasites by mentality as well as by nature. They don't innovate, they steal technology (like the eponymous gates) from other civilizations. It's possible they never came across anyone using robots to steal from them. That said, there were earlier instances of Goa'uld using some automation. One pre-Anubis episode featured a Goa'uld robotic probe that was seen exploring a planet on its own, and Teal'c believed this was a brand-new development -- the task might have previously been assigned to bands of Jaffa warriors. However, remember the Goa'uld were not interested in power for some pragmatic purpose, but in power ''itself''. They saw themselves as ''gods'', after all, and competed through showmanship and intimidation as much as through things like production and military efficiency. An inefficient army of terrified slaves might impress a Goa'uld's rivals far more than an efficient machine doing the same job in half the time. The show frequently acknowledged this as the Goa'uld's key weakness. The Ori continued the trend. Even with all the knowledge of ascended beings, their ships are still built by their primitive human worshippers.
9th Jan '18 5:16:49 PM zarpaulus
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* In Creator/DavidDrake's ''Literature/RanksOfBronze'' the Galactic Federation's trade guilds regularly make use of slaves from primitive planets. Though mostly they're seen as Sex Slaves or BattleThralls used against other primitive planets where the Federation doesn't allow guilds to use advanced weaponry on the locals.
23rd Dec '17 9:45:35 AM CheeseDogX
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* The Goa'uld of ''Series/StargateSG1'' love sending pickaxe-equipped slaves to their [[{{Unobtainium}} Naquadah]] mines, but this is [[JustifyingEdit partially]] [[JustifiedTrope justified]]: The Goa'uld may have access to advanced technology, but they also really, ''really'' like ordering people around and being worshipped. Also, they are largely unconcerned with doing things efficiently, instead preferring to do things [[CoolButInefficient impressively]], or ForTheEvulz. This is explicitly said to provide the Good Guys with one of their main advantages against the Goa'uld. It should be noted that the Goa'uld quite logically did ''not'' want to provide advanced technology to their slaves, so while they themselves rode around in fancy starships, their servants largely lived on [[TheDungAges dung age]] planets. That said, there were earlier instances of Goa'uld using some automation. One pre-Anubis episode featured a Goa'uld robotic probe that was seen exploring a planet on its own, and Teal'c believed this was a brand-new development -- the task might have previously been assigned to bands of Jaffa warriors. However, remember the Goa'uld were not interested in power for some pragmatic purpose, but in power ''itself''. They saw themselves as ''gods'', after all, and competed through showmanship and intimidation as much as through things like production and military efficiency. An inefficient army of terrified slaves might impress a Goa'uld's rivals far more than an efficient machine doing the same job in half the time. The show frequently acknowledged this as the Goa'uld's key weakness. The Ori continued the trend. Even with all the knowledge of ascended beings, their ships are still built by their primitive human worshippers.

to:

* The Goa'uld of ''Series/StargateSG1'' love sending pickaxe-equipped slaves to their [[{{Unobtainium}} Naquadah]] mines, but this is [[JustifyingEdit partially]] [[JustifiedTrope justified]]: The Goa'uld may have access to advanced technology, but they also really, ''really'' like ordering people around and being worshipped. Also, they are largely unconcerned with doing things efficiently, instead preferring to do things [[CoolButInefficient impressively]], or ForTheEvulz. This is explicitly said to provide the Good Guys with one of their main advantages against the Goa'uld. It should be noted that the Goa'uld quite logically did ''not'' want to provide advanced technology to their slaves, so while they themselves rode around in fancy starships, their servants largely lived on [[TheDungAges dung age]] planets. And it's stated a few times on the show that the Goa'uld are parasites by mentality as well as by nature. They don't innovate, they steal technology (like the eponymous gates) from other civilizations. It's possible they never came across anyone using robots to steal from them. That said, there were earlier instances of Goa'uld using some automation. One pre-Anubis episode featured a Goa'uld robotic probe that was seen exploring a planet on its own, and Teal'c believed this was a brand-new development -- the task might have previously been assigned to bands of Jaffa warriors. However, remember the Goa'uld were not interested in power for some pragmatic purpose, but in power ''itself''. They saw themselves as ''gods'', after all, and competed through showmanship and intimidation as much as through things like production and military efficiency. An inefficient army of terrified slaves might impress a Goa'uld's rivals far more than an efficient machine doing the same job in half the time. The show frequently acknowledged this as the Goa'uld's key weakness. The Ori continued the trend. Even with all the knowledge of ascended beings, their ships are still built by their primitive human worshippers.
28th Nov '17 6:35:39 PM Divra
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* ''Series/RedDwarf:'' PlayedForLaughs. The only reason Rimmer and Lister have jobs to begin with is that repairing vending machines is considered ''too menial'' for the service robots. Lister states that the only reason they have humans repairing the vending machines is that the service robots have a better union than the human workers.
16th Oct '17 1:11:00 PM Fireblood
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* In an episode of "The Simpsons", men are toiling in caves deep below the nuclear power plant walking in circles turning a wheel. We follow the crankshaft higher and higher through a series of smaller rods and complicated gears until we reach the cafeteria where all that effort is turning the dessert display.

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* In an episode of "The Simpsons", ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', men are toiling in caves deep below the nuclear power plant walking in circles turning a wheel. We follow the crankshaft higher and higher through a series of smaller rods and complicated gears until we reach the cafeteria where all that effort is turning the dessert display.
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