History Main / WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture

25th May '17 6:13:02 PM Sharper
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If the manual workers are not slaves but the normal population of a civilization, one fictional reason sometimes given is the ethics of dignity of work. There are very few places there a human is mandatory to do work. Generations of Luddites argue that if too much is automated, most people are unemployed. This is a reason why some people oppose industrialization. The consensus of actual economists is that while automation may displace some specific workers temporarily, in the long run it simply frees them up to perform more productive work, or else spend more time enjoying the additional wealth created by automation. Thus in the Star Trek Federation, the replicator doesn't make people totally obsolete, but instead allows them to spend their time doing something more productive or more fun than manufacturing common goods.

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If the manual workers are not slaves but the normal population of a civilization, one fictional reason sometimes given is the ethics of dignity of work. There are very few places there a human is mandatory to do work. Generations of Luddites the EvilLuddite argue that if too much is automated, most people are unemployed. This is a reason why some people oppose industrialization. The consensus of actual economists is that while automation may displace some specific workers temporarily, in the long run it simply frees them up to perform more productive work, or else spend more time enjoying the additional wealth created by automation. Thus in the Star Trek Federation, the replicator doesn't make people totally obsolete, but instead allows them to spend their time doing something more productive or more fun than manufacturing common goods.
25th May '17 6:07:22 PM Sharper
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If the manual workers are not slaves but the normal population of a civilisation, a good reason for it is simply ethics. There are very few places there a human is mandatory to do the work. If too much is automated, most people are unemployed. This is actually a problem in many countries in the present (and even in the past two centuries) and a big reason why many people oppose industrialisation.

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If the manual workers are not slaves but the normal population of a civilisation, a good civilization, one fictional reason for it sometimes given is simply ethics. the ethics of dignity of work. There are very few places there a human is mandatory to do the work. If Generations of Luddites argue that if too much is automated, most people are unemployed. This is actually a problem in many countries in the present (and even in the past two centuries) and a big reason why many some people oppose industrialisation.
industrialization. The consensus of actual economists is that while automation may displace some specific workers temporarily, in the long run it simply frees them up to perform more productive work, or else spend more time enjoying the additional wealth created by automation. Thus in the Star Trek Federation, the replicator doesn't make people totally obsolete, but instead allows them to spend their time doing something more productive or more fun than manufacturing common goods.
14th May '17 5:19:33 PM nombretomado
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* Slave traffic is mentioned in ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}''. It is illegal in the Imperium, though the Sword Worlds have a judicial slavery as punishment for murder, treason, and other heinous crimes (which makes one amused at the {{Irony}} of the fate of a SpacePirate caught while trying to sell off his captives). It is not always made clear what the slaves are expected to do. However the SchizoTech of {{Traveller}} at least sort of justifies it.

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* Slave traffic is mentioned in ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}''. It is illegal in the Imperium, though the Sword Worlds have a judicial slavery as punishment for murder, treason, and other heinous crimes (which makes one amused at the {{Irony}} of the fate of a SpacePirate caught while trying to sell off his captives). It is not always made clear what the slaves are expected to do. However the SchizoTech of {{Traveller}} ''Traveller'' at least sort of justifies it.
16th Apr '17 3:07:52 PM nombretomado
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* In William King's ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' SpaceWolf novel ''Ragnar's Claw'', a spaceship operated by the Inquisition is tended by enslaved criminals, who are kept chained to the machines they work, and starved or [[ColdBloodedTorture tortured]] for disobedience. The next book's narrator contrasts it directly with a ship operated by the SpaceMarine chapter itself, which has an all-volunteer crew drawn from Space Wolf-protected planets.

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* In William King's ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' SpaceWolf Literature/SpaceWolf novel ''Ragnar's Claw'', a spaceship operated by the Inquisition is tended by enslaved criminals, who are kept chained to the machines they work, and starved or [[ColdBloodedTorture tortured]] for disobedience. The next book's narrator contrasts it directly with a ship operated by the SpaceMarine chapter itself, which has an all-volunteer crew drawn from Space Wolf-protected planets.
7th Apr '17 3:16:33 PM Codefreak5
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}'' Collectivist and/or Xenophobic empires can legalize slavery. Enslaved population units have a bonus to farming and mining but a penalty to research.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}'' Collectivist Authoritarian and/or Xenophobic empires can legalize slavery. Enslaved population units have a bonus to farming and mining but a penalty to research.
13th Mar '17 4:19:40 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'' have robots and automated gizmos coming out their ears, but George Jetson still has to go into the office to push a button repeatedly. (Jane and the kids occasionally complain about housework or chores, also done by pressing a button.) Granted this is kinda PlayedForLaughs, but it does seem that if any job could be done by a robot this would be it. Since we're never shown any real details, it's possible that the ''timing'' of pushing the button requires human discretion.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'' have robots and automated gizmos coming out their ears, but George Jetson still has to go into the office to push a button repeatedly. (Jane and the kids occasionally complain about housework or chores, also done by pressing a button.) Granted this is kinda PlayedForLaughs, but it does seem that if any job could be done by a robot this would be it. Since we're never shown any real details, it's possible that the ''timing'' of pushing the button requires human discretion. It's heavily implied that this is a deliberate effort to keep humans working, even though the machines can run themselves.
12th Mar '17 2:57:18 PM StFan
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->'''Rygel XVI''': As long as I get to keep my slaves.\\
'''Bobby Crichton''': They're servants. They get paid. You don't own them.\\
'''Rygel''': What? You're kidding. They come running when I call.\\
'''Bobby''': The government wants you to feel at home.\\
'''Rygel''': Then give me slaves.

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->'''Rygel XVI''': XVI:''' As long as I get to keep my slaves.\\
'''Bobby Crichton''': Crichton:''' They're servants. They get paid. You don't own them.\\
'''Rygel''': '''Rygel:''' What? You're kidding. They come running when I call.\\
'''Bobby''': '''Bobby:''' The government wants you to feel at home.\\
'''Rygel''': '''Rygel:''' Then give me slaves.






!!Examples

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!!Examples
!!Examples:



[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



* In an issue of DC's post-''Zero Hour'' ''Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'', Magno, a character from a world where - as his name implies - [[PlanetOfHats almost everyone has powers over magnetism]], observes that on his world mining is still done by sapients because nothing else can replicate the flexibility of their powers. On most all other worlds, such work is done by robots, although in the same continuity the planet of Orando is governed by a ruling class of giant snake people and labor is done by a second-class citizenry of raccoon people.
* In the MarvelUniverse, one of the most valuable materials in the world ''must'' be mined by hand. Antarctic Vibranium breaks down the structure of metals (indeed, this is the main reason it ''is'' so valuable), so mining machines are simply too expensive to be practical.
* In the Creator/DarkHorseComics adaptation of ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'', Skynet initially puts surviving humans into labor camps. As with Film/TheMatrix, one might [[{{WMG}} assume]] that this is done mainly for vengeful rather than practical reasons.

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* In an issue of DC's post-''Zero Hour'' ''Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'', Magno, a character from a world where - -- as his name implies - -- [[PlanetOfHats almost everyone has powers over magnetism]], observes that on his world mining is still done by sapients because nothing else can replicate the flexibility of their powers. On most all other worlds, such work is done by robots, although in the same continuity the planet of Orando is governed by a ruling class of giant snake people and labor is done by a second-class citizenry of raccoon people.
* In the MarvelUniverse, Franchise/MarvelUniverse, one of the most valuable materials in the world ''must'' be mined by hand. Antarctic Vibranium breaks down the structure of metals (indeed, this is the main reason it ''is'' so valuable), so mining machines are simply too expensive to be practical.
* In the Creator/DarkHorseComics adaptation of ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'', Skynet initially puts surviving humans into labor camps. As with Film/TheMatrix, ''Film/TheMatrix'', one might [[{{WMG}} assume]] that this is done mainly for vengeful rather than practical reasons.



[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/StarWars'': Wookiees and Mon Calamari are enslaved by the Empire, but given the Empire's formidable military-industrial infrastructure, the omnipresence of droids, and the latter species' unusual physiology, alien slavery in the Empire makes little practical sense. (Droid slavery, on the other hand...) It seems slavery in the Star Wars verse is largely a policy intended to [[ForTheEvulz humiliate and degrade acceptable targets]], when it isn't a cover for genocide (any [[PuttingOnTheReich parallels with Nazi Germany]] are probably intentional). Organic slaves are also seen a status symbol, but that's more for, er, ''[[GoGoEnslavement personal]]'' [[GoGoEnslavement needs]]. In particular, the, er, export of female Twi'leks from Ryloth is one of their most important industries. The resulting decline in the planetary population is the entire point; the Twi'leks essentially sold themselves into slavery to get *off* Ryloth. Evolution does not proceed to a perfect adaptation, only a reproductively sufficient one. The Twi'leks found the sufficiency of their adaptation extremely marginal.
** Wookiees and Mon Calamari are described as being favoured for slave labour due to their strength, dexterity, creativity, and intuitive understanding of mechanics and electronics, making them ideal for engineering work. In addition, the prequels reveal that the Wookiees helped Yoda escape Kashyyyk; Palpatine might have decided to enslave them as punishment. It is also implied that the main customers of the slave trade are from worlds which ''don't'' have access to advanced technologies (Ryloth is a TidallyLockedPlanet only inhabitable on a narrow strip between its permanent "day" and "night" sides, limiting their economy).

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[[folder:Film]]
[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* In ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', slavery is common in the less-pleasant nations of Mongo. In the [[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon1979 1970s Filmation cartoon series]], it seemed like Flash got captured, enslaved, and then led a slave revolt about once a month.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''Film/StarWars'': Wookiees and Mon Calamari are enslaved by the Empire, but given the Empire's formidable military-industrial infrastructure, the omnipresence of droids, and the latter species' unusual physiology, alien slavery in the Empire makes little practical sense. (Droid slavery, on the other hand...) It seems slavery in the Star Wars ''Star Wars'' verse is largely a policy intended to [[ForTheEvulz humiliate and degrade acceptable targets]], when it isn't a cover for genocide (any [[PuttingOnTheReich parallels with Nazi Germany]] are probably intentional). Organic slaves are also seen a status symbol, but that's more for, er, ''[[GoGoEnslavement personal]]'' [[GoGoEnslavement needs]]. In particular, the, er, export of female Twi'leks from Ryloth is one of their most important industries. The resulting decline in the planetary population is the entire point; the Twi'leks essentially sold themselves into slavery to get *off* Ryloth. Evolution does not proceed to a perfect adaptation, only a reproductively sufficient one. The Twi'leks found the sufficiency of their adaptation extremely marginal.
** Wookiees and Mon Calamari are described as being favoured favored for slave labour due to their strength, dexterity, creativity, and intuitive understanding of mechanics and electronics, making them ideal for engineering work. In addition, the prequels reveal that the Wookiees helped Yoda escape Kashyyyk; Palpatine might have decided to enslave them as punishment. It is also implied that the main customers of the slave trade are from worlds which ''don't'' have access to advanced technologies (Ryloth is a TidallyLockedPlanet only inhabitable on a narrow strip between its permanent "day" and "night" sides, limiting their economy).



* In William King's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' SpaceWolf novel ''Ragnar's Claw'', a spaceship operated by the Inquisition is tended by enslaved criminals, who are kept chained to the machines they work, and starved or [[ColdBloodedTorture tortured]] for disobedience. The next book's narrator contrasts it directly with a ship operated by the SpaceMarine chapter itself, which has an all-volunteer crew drawn from Space Wolf-protected planets.

to:

* In William King's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' SpaceWolf novel ''Ragnar's Claw'', a spaceship operated by the Inquisition is tended by enslaved criminals, who are kept chained to the machines they work, and starved or [[ColdBloodedTorture tortured]] for disobedience. The next book's narrator contrasts it directly with a ship operated by the SpaceMarine chapter itself, which has an all-volunteer crew drawn from Space Wolf-protected planets.



* Conflict between the ruling class and large populations of essentially slave labor is central to the setting of ''TheHungerGames''. At the same time, said rulers possess technology to among other things control weather (at least on a local scale) and piece together human corpses into living monstrous doglike creatures.

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* Conflict between the ruling class and large populations of essentially slave labor is central to the setting of ''TheHungerGames''.''Literature/TheHungerGames''. At the same time, said rulers possess technology to among other things control weather (at least on a local scale) and piece together human corpses into living monstrous doglike creatures.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* In ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', slavery is common in the less-pleasant nations of Mongo. In the [[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon1979 1970s Filmation cartoon series]], it seemed like Flash got captured, enslaved, and then led a slave revolt about once a month.
[[/folder]]



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'':

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'':''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'':



[[folder:Webcomics]]

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[[folder:Webcomics]][[folder:Web Comics]]



* Autoloaders vs human loaders in [[TankGoodness tanks]] - a subject of [[BrokenBase heated debate]]. As the choice between them is a matter of OpposingCombatPhilosophies, they're also a FlameBait for [[YouTubeWarExpert Youtube War "Experts"]] of every shade[[note]]A garden-variety YouTubeWarExpert by definition denies the existence of viable OpposingCombatPhilosophies, since they extoll either one quality and/or one national school of design[[/note]]. To list the points of both sides:

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* Autoloaders vs human loaders in [[TankGoodness tanks]] - -- a subject of [[BrokenBase heated debate]]. As the choice between them is a matter of OpposingCombatPhilosophies, they're also a FlameBait for [[YouTubeWarExpert Youtube War "Experts"]] of every shade[[note]]A garden-variety YouTubeWarExpert by definition denies the existence of viable OpposingCombatPhilosophies, since they extoll either one quality and/or one national school of design[[/note]]. To list the points of both sides:



** The [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet school of design]] was informed heavily by [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo WWII]] experience: although the [[UsefulNotes/NazisWithGnarlyWeapons German Überpanzer like the Panther and the Tiger]] could [[CurbStompBattle snipe Soviet tanks at extreme ranges]], they were notoriously unreliable and [[EliteArmy few in number]], owing to [[AwesomeButImpractical their bloated size and mass]] - the "medium" Panther was larger (and heavier) than the Soviet IS-2 heavy tank - and so the bulk of Heer armour was made of [[MookMobile Panzer IV]] and [[TanksButNoTanks StuG III]], which were nothing to write home about. This meant that the Soviets would keep capitalizing on the advantages of the T-34-85 (a fast and cheap JackOfAllStats) and then apply the same logic to NATO armour, expecting to counter their super-duper machines with [[ZergRush quantity]], [[ConfusionFu surprise, speed]], [[DeathFromAbove combined arms]] and [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs deep operations]], denying them [[HollywoodTactics a head-on engagement]] in which NATO armour would exploit its advantages. Not that it had that many - a Soviet tank of the [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Cold War]] was armed with a [[{{BFG}} bigger gun]] and equally thick armour compared to a NATO design of the same [[TechnologyLevels generation]], while being [[LightningBruiser lighter]] (modern Western [=MBTs=] are approaching 70 t; [=ComBlock=] designs are no heavier than 45 t) and hence more agile and economically and logistically affordable. The sole reason for this was because, as it became apparent in WWII, the Soviets ruthlessly cut down on interior volume - while Western tanks are cramped, they seem [[UnnecessarilyLargeInterior ludicrously roomy]] in comparison with Soviet-school vehicles that are near ClownCar levels, which means that the crew, naturally, sit on top of ammo and fuel, and have by regulation to be shorter than 185 cm (which means that someone around 170 cm is actually comfortable). An autoloader does not worsen the safety situation, but helps shrink mass and size further by eliminating another member of the crew, and it was the Soviet mantra that the best protection is not being hit at all; also, the human loader would eventually get tired, and was a lot less effective in the more confined interior, as the pre-autoloader but equally small T-55 and T-62 show. Furthermore, Soviet tanks were expected to actively maneuver rather than snipe targets from hull-down positions (as NATO tanks were likely to be doing), and had poorer suspension; it is considerably harder to load the gun manually when the vertical stabilizer keeps thrusting the breech up and down. Additionally, the later-pattern autoloader on the T-72 is significantly less vulnerable: the shells are arranged not in a cylinder under the turret ring, but in a circle of the floor, and hidden at the very bottom of the vehicle behind an extra layer of armor - hence [[NoKillLikeOverkill anything capable of triggering a magazine detonation likely destroys the tank anyway]]. As to the spare shell lockers, the [[UsefulNotes/RussiansWithRustingRockets new T-90 variants]] do move them into a bustle storage compartment - and Hatedom run afoul of the [[{{Hatedom}} bustle haters]], who believe that any large turret bustle is extremely likely to get hit in combat, whereas the baseline T-90 has a compact (short and broad) turret, and [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe it is impossible to hit anything but the heavily-protected front from a sector of 60°]]. Also, many Abrams loaders jam the doors open, [[WhatAnIdiot completely nullifying the protective qualities of the system]] - to [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique keep the rate of fire up]]. Finally, autoloaders are believed to be more usable in future tanks for two aspects: firstly, as the LensmanArmsRace is liable to continue, [[{{BFG}} tank guns]] will likely get [[UpToEleven even bigger]]: as of 1990, there were prototypes of prototypes a Leopard 2 variant with a 140 mm cannon and a T-80 variant with a 152 mm gun. Both of these exceeded the practical abilities of human loaders and were fitted with autoloaders - much like modern 152-155 mm artillery, which uses at least partially mechanized loading instead of ''two'' loaders per gun. The second element of prospective [[RussiansWithRustingRockets Russian]] tanks is removing the crew from the turret altogether, settling the issue completely by using [[NighInvulnerability a front-mounted capsule tough enough to survive the destruction of the rest of the vehicle]] - while even further reducing the size of the turret.

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** The [[UsefulNotes/RedsWithRockets Soviet school of design]] was informed heavily by [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo WWII]] experience: although the [[UsefulNotes/NazisWithGnarlyWeapons German Überpanzer like the Panther and the Tiger]] could [[CurbStompBattle snipe Soviet tanks at extreme ranges]], they were notoriously unreliable and [[EliteArmy few in number]], owing to [[AwesomeButImpractical their bloated size and mass]] - the "medium" Panther was larger (and heavier) than the Soviet IS-2 heavy tank - and so the bulk of Heer armour was made of [[MookMobile Panzer IV]] and [[TanksButNoTanks StuG III]], which were nothing to write home about. This meant that the Soviets would keep capitalizing on the advantages of the T-34-85 (a fast and cheap JackOfAllStats) and then apply the same logic to NATO armour, expecting to counter their super-duper machines with [[ZergRush quantity]], [[ConfusionFu surprise, speed]], [[DeathFromAbove combined arms]] and [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs deep operations]], denying them [[HollywoodTactics a head-on engagement]] in which NATO armour would exploit its advantages. Not that it had that many - -- a Soviet tank of the [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar Cold War]] was armed with a [[{{BFG}} bigger gun]] and equally thick armour compared to a NATO design of the same [[TechnologyLevels generation]], while being [[LightningBruiser lighter]] (modern Western [=MBTs=] are approaching 70 t; [=ComBlock=] designs are no heavier than 45 t) and hence more agile and economically and logistically affordable. The sole reason for this was because, as it became apparent in WWII, the Soviets ruthlessly cut down on interior volume - -- while Western tanks are cramped, they seem [[UnnecessarilyLargeInterior ludicrously roomy]] in comparison with Soviet-school vehicles that are near ClownCar levels, which means that the crew, naturally, sit on top of ammo and fuel, and have by regulation to be shorter than 185 cm (which means that someone around 170 cm is actually comfortable). An autoloader does not worsen the safety situation, but helps shrink mass and size further by eliminating another member of the crew, and it was the Soviet mantra that the best protection is not being hit at all; also, the human loader would eventually get tired, and was a lot less effective in the more confined interior, as the pre-autoloader but equally small T-55 and T-62 show. Furthermore, Soviet tanks were expected to actively maneuver rather than snipe targets from hull-down positions (as NATO tanks were likely to be doing), and had poorer suspension; it is considerably harder to load the gun manually when the vertical stabilizer keeps thrusting the breech up and down. Additionally, the later-pattern autoloader on the T-72 is significantly less vulnerable: the shells are arranged not in a cylinder under the turret ring, but in a circle of the floor, and hidden at the very bottom of the vehicle behind an extra layer of armor - hence [[NoKillLikeOverkill anything capable of triggering a magazine detonation likely destroys the tank anyway]]. As to the spare shell lockers, the [[UsefulNotes/RussiansWithRustingRockets new T-90 variants]] do move them into a bustle storage compartment - and Hatedom run afoul of the [[{{Hatedom}} bustle haters]], who believe that any large turret bustle is extremely likely to get hit in combat, whereas the baseline T-90 has a compact (short and broad) turret, and [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe it is impossible to hit anything but the heavily-protected front from a sector of 60°]]. Also, many Abrams loaders jam the doors open, [[WhatAnIdiot completely nullifying the protective qualities of the system]] - to [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique keep the rate of fire up]]. Finally, autoloaders are believed to be more usable in future tanks for two aspects: firstly, as the LensmanArmsRace is liable to continue, [[{{BFG}} tank guns]] will likely get [[UpToEleven even bigger]]: as of 1990, there were prototypes of prototypes a Leopard 2 variant with a 140 mm cannon and a T-80 variant with a 152 mm gun. Both of these exceeded the practical abilities of human loaders and were fitted with autoloaders - -- much like modern 152-155 mm artillery, which uses at least partially mechanized loading instead of ''two'' loaders per gun. The second element of prospective [[RussiansWithRustingRockets Russian]] tanks is removing the crew from the turret altogether, settling the issue completely by using [[NighInvulnerability a front-mounted capsule tough enough to survive the destruction of the rest of the vehicle]] - -- while even further reducing the size of the turret.



Break time's over! Back to the spice mines, worm!

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Break ->Break time's over! Back to the spice mines, worm!worm!
----
2nd Feb '17 6:00:23 PM DastardlyDemolition
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Added DiffLines:

* In "The Second Renaissance: Part I" segment of ''Anime/TheAnimatrix'' it shown that in mid-21st century humans used (fully sapient, mind you) robots to perform manual labor. It's not just butlers and maids either, vast armies of robots are used as slave labor to haul vast building materials as a robot foreman beats on a drum to keep the workers in time. The Machines in 01 have production lines to build various items for both internal use and export. The main factor in this story is that it comes from the Zion archives and told by The Instructor, a program who interprets the archive's knowledge, so much of the knowledge of the past is to be taken with a grain of salt.
29th Jan '17 12:59:06 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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As well, beware of TechnologyLevels; just because a civilization can travel in space [[IfJesusThenAliens doesn't mean]] they actually ''have'' servitor robots. But the series that have already shown automation yet refuse to use it in the obvious places don't have any excuse. This is perhaps the ultimate extension of SchizoTech. Compare with IWantMyJetPack, and compare ''and'' contrast JobStealingRobot.[[note]][[Aversions of this trope]] may fit better there as well.[[/note]]

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As well, beware of TechnologyLevels; just because a civilization can travel in space [[IfJesusThenAliens doesn't mean]] they actually ''have'' servitor robots. But the series that have already shown automation yet refuse to use it in the obvious places don't have any excuse. This is perhaps the ultimate extension of SchizoTech. Compare with IWantMyJetPack, and compare ''and'' contrast JobStealingRobot.[[note]][[Aversions [[note]]Aversions of this trope]] trope may fit better there as well.[[/note]]
26th Dec '16 5:59:51 PM PaulA
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* In ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', slavery is common in the less-pleasant nations of Mongo. In the [[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon 1970s Filmation cartoon series]], it seemed like Flash got captured, enslaved, and then led a slave revolt about once a month.

to:

* In ''ComicStrip/FlashGordon'', slavery is common in the less-pleasant nations of Mongo. In the [[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon [[WesternAnimation/FlashGordon1979 1970s Filmation cartoon series]], it seemed like Flash got captured, enslaved, and then led a slave revolt about once a month.
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