History Main / WeHAveReserves

16th May '18 1:03:29 PM ironballs16
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** Robb Stark's first major battle is won after he lures Tywin Lannister away with a tenth of his force knowing that this tenth is certain to be slaughtered. Robb does this because he knows that with Tywin's army distracted he can overwhelm the smaller army led by Tywin's son Jaime.

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** Robb Stark's first major battle is won after he lures Tywin Lannister away with a tenth of his force knowing that this tenth is certain to be slaughtered. [[TrialByFriendlyFire Robb does this because he knows knows]] that with Tywin's army distracted he can overwhelm the smaller army led by Tywin's son Jaime.
28th Apr '18 10:49:26 AM nighttrainfm
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* In ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'', as the heroes and the Children of Thanos stand off in Wakanda, Black Panther says that the latter will get nothing but "dust and blood". One of them promptly replies by saying "we have plenty of blood to give", releasing armies of rabid alien Outriders.

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* In ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'', as the heroes and the Children of Thanos stand off in Wakanda, Black Panther says that the latter will get nothing but "dust and blood". One of them Proxima Midngiht promptly replies by saying "we that "We have plenty of blood to give", spare", releasing armies of rabid alien Outriders.
27th Apr '18 10:14:22 PM TheWanderer
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* The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en mass into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffeired severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.

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* The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en mass into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffeired suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern Southern and eastern Eastern Europe throughout the war.
27th Apr '18 7:42:37 PM kouta
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** There were also the surviving American battleships. The USS Texas was built before WWI and quite slow when compared to the newer fast battleships. She did quite well and is now a museum ship and the only pre-WWI dreadnaught still afloat.



* The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en mass into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.

to:

* The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en mass into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered suffeired severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
27th Apr '18 10:33:48 AM anza_sb
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* In ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'', as the heroes and the Children of Thanos stand off in Wakanda, Black Panther says that the latter will get nothing but "dust and blood". One of them promptly replies by saying "we have plenty of blood to give", releasing armies of rabid alien Outriders.
6th Apr '18 4:12:09 AM Caswin
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* In Creator/TeamFourStar's abridgment of the ''Anime/HellsingUltimate'' OVA, the Major laughs off hearing that his forces are getting eaten up, ''because they're Nazis.''
17th Mar '18 10:29:00 PM stupac85
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** While this approach can be used by the player's side, it's not a very good idea since your forces are typically comprised of a very limited number of units (who are only rarely backed up by an AI-controlled RedShirtArmy) in a game series that features permanent death for playable units that fall in battle. However, the enemy armies will very frequently employ such tactics against you since their forces usually consist of a single named character (who serves as the boss for the given mission) accompanied by dozens of nameless {{Mooks}} who show little or no regard for their own survival while [[ZergRush charging headlong into your path]].
14th Mar '18 11:27:46 AM TheWanderer
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* In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost many of its best pilots trying to defend its skies, while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.

to:

* In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost many of its best pilots trying to defend its skies, while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time. Then just a few years after the war ended Russia successfully developed nuclear weapons and suddenly there were very good reasons why neither the US or USSR wanted to directly fight each other.
13th Mar '18 1:02:23 PM TroperBeDoper
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** Lets just say there's a reason WH40K has its own section on the Quotes page for the trope.
7th Mar '18 10:18:07 AM dlchen145
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* In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.

to:

* In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain trying to defend its skies, while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
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