History Main / WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou

17th Aug '16 6:24:22 PM TheRoguePenguin
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* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if lose if your main character died, though the game provides a short time for your party members to resurrect you if they can. Unfortunately, the AI doesn't consider things like magic and tech resistance, so your party members with magic-based redirects will pointlessly use them unless they have a tech-based redirect in their inventory (and it has to be theirs, they can't loot you for one you're carrying). You can exploit this in one sidequest where any violence results in immediate death, and in another your party has to be able to resurrect you to get the ultimate blessing of the TopGod if your character is a technologist.

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* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if you lose if your main character died, dies, though the game provides a short time for your party members to resurrect you if they can. Unfortunately, the AI doesn't consider things like magic and tech resistance, so your party members with magic-based redirects resurrects will pointlessly use them on a 100% magic-resistant character unless they have a tech-based redirect in their inventory (and it has to be theirs, they can't loot you for one you're carrying). You can exploit this in one sidequest where any violence results in immediate death, and in another your party has to be able to resurrect you to get the ultimate blessing of the TopGod if your character is a technologist.
14th Aug '16 6:36:29 PM TheRoguePenguin
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* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if lose if your main character died, though the game provides a short time for your party members to resurrect you if they can. Unfortunately, the AI doesn't consider things like magic and tech resistance, so your party members with magic-based redirects will pointlessly use them unless they have a tech-based redirect in their inventory (and it has to be theirs, they can't loot you for one you're carrying). You can exploit this in one sidequest where any violence results in immediate death, and in another your party has to be able to resurrect you to get the ultimate blessing of the TopGod.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if lose if your main character died, though the game provides a short time for your party members to resurrect you if they can. Unfortunately, the AI doesn't consider things like magic and tech resistance, so your party members with magic-based redirects will pointlessly use them unless they have a tech-based redirect in their inventory (and it has to be theirs, they can't loot you for one you're carrying). You can exploit this in one sidequest where any violence results in immediate death, and in another your party has to be able to resurrect you to get the ultimate blessing of the TopGod.TopGod if your character is a technologist.
14th Aug '16 6:33:16 PM TheRoguePenguin
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* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if your main character died, the game would remain active for a short time while your followers attempted to resurrect you. Of course, they weren't very smart about how they went about it and would frequently try to use methods that wouldn't work (i.e. use resurrection spell on a technological character or technological resurrection on a mage). One side quest actually required that you do this.

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* In ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'', if lose if your main character died, though the game would remain active for provides a short time while for your followers attempted party members to resurrect you. Of course, you if they weren't very smart about how can. Unfortunately, the AI doesn't consider things like magic and tech resistance, so your party members with magic-based redirects will pointlessly use them unless they went about have a tech-based redirect in their inventory (and it has to be theirs, they can't loot you for one you're carrying). You can exploit this in one sidequest where any violence results in immediate death, and would frequently try in another your party has to use methods that wouldn't work (i.e. use resurrection spell on a technological character or technological resurrection on a mage). One side quest actually required that be able to resurrect you do this.to get the ultimate blessing of the TopGod.
13th Aug '16 12:23:19 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'': "Without the Captain, the Covenant have already won". Averted in 2 and 3, where major [=NPCs=] are given GameplayAllyImmortality, and only die when the plot requires it.
** Friendly [=NPCs=] sometimes reference this trope by name whenever the Chief dies during gameplay.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'': "Without the Captain, the Covenant have already won". Averted in 2 and 3, where major [=NPCs=] are given GameplayAllyImmortality, and only die when the plot requires it.
**
''Franchise/{{Halo}}'': Friendly [=NPCs=] sometimes reference this trope by name whenever the Chief dies during gameplay.
18th Jul '16 12:35:35 PM SergeBernhardt
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** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!

to:

** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even just ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
18th Jul '16 12:34:21 PM SergeBernhardt
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*** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
*** VideoGame/FireEmblemFates keeps the tradition, where the [[PlayerCharacter Ava]][[TheHero tar's]] defeat equals game over, but only in Classic Mode; for the first time in the series, the new [[EasierThanEasy Phoenix mode]] (where allies come back the next turn after dying) completely averts this trope, as even if you lose the Avatar, he'll just come back the next turn after being defeat, and thus, the only way to lose is to lose all units in the same turn. ''Fates''' Casual mode, unlike the ones from ''New Mystery of the Emblem'' and ''Awakening'' also averts this trope, but unlike Phoenix mode, [[DoubleSubversion this isn't always the case,]] since some maps end if you lose the Avatar anyway, like Chapter 5 probably because they're the only major source of damage in that chapter, and clearing it without them would be impossible.

to:

*** ** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
*** ** VideoGame/FireEmblemFates keeps the tradition, where the [[PlayerCharacter Ava]][[TheHero tar's]] defeat equals game over, but only in Classic Mode; for the first time in the series, the new [[EasierThanEasy Phoenix mode]] (where allies come back the next turn after dying) completely averts this trope, as even if you lose the Avatar, he'll just come back the next turn after being defeat, and thus, the only way to lose is to lose all units in the same turn. ''Fates''' Casual mode, unlike the ones from ''New Mystery of the Emblem'' and ''Awakening'' also averts this trope, but unlike Phoenix mode, [[DoubleSubversion this isn't always the case,]] since some maps end if you lose the Avatar anyway, like Chapter 5 probably because they're the only major source of damage in that chapter, and clearing it without them would be impossible.
16th Jul '16 1:53:10 PM SergeBernhardt
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** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
** VideoGame/FireEmblemFates keeps the tradition, where the [[PlayerCharacter Ava]][[TheHero tar's]] defeat equals game over, but only in Classic Mode; for the first time in the series, the new [[EasierThanEasy Phoenix mode]] (where allies come back the next turn after dying) completely averts this trope, as even if you lose the Avatar, he'll just come back the next turn after being defeat, and thus, the only way to lose is to lose all units in the same turn. ''Fates''' Casual mode, unlike the ones from ''New Mystery of the Emblem'' and ''Awakening'' also averts this trope, but unlike Phoenix mode, [[DoubleSubversion this isn't always the case,]] since some maps end if you lose the Avatar anyway, like Chapter 5 probably because they're the only major source of damage in that chapter, and clearing it without them would be impossible.

to:

** *** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
** *** VideoGame/FireEmblemFates keeps the tradition, where the [[PlayerCharacter Ava]][[TheHero tar's]] defeat equals game over, but only in Classic Mode; for the first time in the series, the new [[EasierThanEasy Phoenix mode]] (where allies come back the next turn after dying) completely averts this trope, as even if you lose the Avatar, he'll just come back the next turn after being defeat, and thus, the only way to lose is to lose all units in the same turn. ''Fates''' Casual mode, unlike the ones from ''New Mystery of the Emblem'' and ''Awakening'' also averts this trope, but unlike Phoenix mode, [[DoubleSubversion this isn't always the case,]] since some maps end if you lose the Avatar anyway, like Chapter 5 probably because they're the only major source of damage in that chapter, and clearing it without them would be impossible.
16th Jul '16 12:59:07 PM SergeBernhardt
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Added DiffLines:

** [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]] in particular takes this trope UpToEleven. Unlike previous entries (with the exception of ''Gaiden''), there's no traditional Lord class in the game, but instead there are several viewpoint characters such as Micaiah and Ike (the main character in ''Path of Radiance'' which, funnily enough, had the Lord as his promoted class) which, much like the Lord, if you lose them in any chapter they're playable, you lose the game. However, since the objectives vary greatly and this game is [[SequelDifficultySpike much harder than most previous games,]] the game can end even by losing even ''one'' unit. Example? In the ''first'' few chapters, losing ''any'' ally means that you ''lose the game''. NintendoHard indeed!
** VideoGame/FireEmblemFates keeps the tradition, where the [[PlayerCharacter Ava]][[TheHero tar's]] defeat equals game over, but only in Classic Mode; for the first time in the series, the new [[EasierThanEasy Phoenix mode]] (where allies come back the next turn after dying) completely averts this trope, as even if you lose the Avatar, he'll just come back the next turn after being defeat, and thus, the only way to lose is to lose all units in the same turn. ''Fates''' Casual mode, unlike the ones from ''New Mystery of the Emblem'' and ''Awakening'' also averts this trope, but unlike Phoenix mode, [[DoubleSubversion this isn't always the case,]] since some maps end if you lose the Avatar anyway, like Chapter 5 probably because they're the only major source of damage in that chapter, and clearing it without them would be impossible.
13th Jul '16 11:10:21 AM REV6Pilot
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** ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' uses this. If there are computer players in the game, the game ends when all human players are dead, regardless if the AI characters are alive and despite the player respawning later in the level. Through the use of some console commands (PC only), you can override this condition and have the bots finish the level if you and your friends are dead, possibly respawning in a closet if the bots can make it that far. VS mode makes this trope extremely annoying if there any survivor bots on the team. If all human-controlled survivors are killed, the round ends, despite any survivor bots being alive. Infected players who know of this exploit will focus their attacks only on the human controlled survivors. Thankfully, as with pretty much any Valve game, {{Game Mod}}s can fix this.

to:

** ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' uses this. If there are computer players in the game, the game ends when all human players are dead, regardless if the AI characters are alive and despite the player respawning later in the level. Through the use of some console commands (PC only), you can override this condition and have the bots finish the level if you and your friends are dead, possibly respawning in a closet if the bots can make it that far. VS mode makes this trope extremely annoying if there any survivor bots on the team. If all human-controlled survivors are killed, the round ends, despite any survivor bots being alive. Infected players who know of this exploit will focus their attacks only on the human controlled survivors. Thankfully, as with pretty much any Valve game, {{Game Mod}}s can fix this.this, in this case by overriding the condition and have the bots finish the level if you and your friends are dead, possibly respawning in a closet if the bots can make it that far...and surprisingly, when they are by themselves, [[ArtificialBrilliance they usually manage]].
25th Jun '16 11:53:57 AM nombretomado
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* In most scenarios in the open-source strategy game ''BattleForWesnoth'', the death of your 'leader' (commander unit) will lose you the scenario. Somewhat justified in that the leader is the only one who can recruit new units. Also justified in that there's no resurrection option for any character: Death is very, very final. Played straight with several minor characters in many scenarios.

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* In most scenarios in the open-source strategy game ''BattleForWesnoth'', ''VideoGame/BattleForWesnoth'', the death of your 'leader' (commander unit) will lose you the scenario. Somewhat justified in that the leader is the only one who can recruit new units. Also justified in that there's no resurrection option for any character: Death is very, very final. Played straight with several minor characters in many scenarios.
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