History Main / WeBuyAnything

20th Jul '17 3:42:09 PM Materioptikon
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* Enforced in ''VideoGame/EtrianOdyssey''. The shop initially carries very few items (in some cases, they can even run out of basic medicine) and require the services of your guild to venture into the various Labyrinths to farm the necessary materials to expand their product line. The more giblets, minerals and flowers you sell them, the more armor, weapons and medicine they offer.
4th May '17 1:20:46 PM Golondrina
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* ''SpellForce'' is particularly egregious. You pick up an absurd amount of loot in this game, the majority of it totally worthless to you until you take it to a merchant. Irrespective of what he sells, he'll give you a price for it. After a couple of levels, currency becomes literally completely worthless as you have more money than God. It's less frustrating than having to find the relevant merchant (considering not everywhere has them, and Greyfall has like ''fifteen'' merchants, all selling slightly different flavours of the same worthless trash (which is worthless almost before you leave the town).

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* ''SpellForce'' ''VideoGame/SpellForce'' is particularly egregious. You pick up an absurd amount of loot in this game, the majority of it totally worthless to you until you take it to a merchant. Irrespective of what he sells, he'll give you a price for it. After a couple of levels, currency becomes literally completely worthless as you have more money than God. It's less frustrating than having to find the relevant merchant (considering not everywhere has them, and Greyfall has like ''fifteen'' merchants, all selling slightly different flavours of the same worthless trash (which is worthless almost before you leave the town).
20th Apr '17 3:33:52 PM ExeloMinish
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** Iwai, their successor from ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'', continues the trend of buying all your crap. Though his role is expanded compared to the previous ones, due to him being a Confidant (''5'' equivalent to Social Links). He's even acknowledged in story as buying anything, and is a rather shady guy with a lot of connections [[spoiler: and also ex-{{Yakuza}}]].
11th Apr '17 5:51:46 PM nombretomado
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* Lampshaded in ''ShiningForce''. If you sell something to a shopkeeper that he doesn't sell in his store, he'll say "Thanks. I don't sell this, but I know someone who does!"

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* Lampshaded in ''ShiningForce''.''VideoGame/ShiningForce''. If you sell something to a shopkeeper that he doesn't sell in his store, he'll say "Thanks. I don't sell this, but I know someone who does!"
27th Mar '17 11:23:39 AM BeerBaron
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' completely avoids this trope. Characters have limited and finite amounts of gold on them, after which they will not be able to purchase anything until the player purchases items from them or time passes. Likewise, they will largely refuse to purchase items that are too different from their normal wares -- a fine clothing store won't buy armor, a jewelry shop has no use for weapons or magic scrolls, and most merchants won't touch any of your goods if you're carrying the potent drugs skooma or moon sugar. There are two exclusions, however, in a talking mudcrab and a talking scamp, both of whom will purchase nearly everything and have ''vast'' supplies of currency.
*** Their supplies of currency are not particularly vast, which becomes evident once one tries to sell them artifacts. These things tend to cost a few times over their monthly allowance. It is still possible to sell them artifacts with the help of bartering, but that might be considered a puzzle of itself.
*** And also, though the mudcrab has more money, it is also out in the middle of nowhere which makes it much less practical. Meaning that most players use the scamp, which has half the mudcrab's amount of money, which means selling anything you get at higher levels takes several in-game days and a very good knowledge of math. This begins to get absurd once you start trying to sell stuff worth over 100,000 gold to a scamp which only has 5000 gold and all the junk you sold to it before.
*** This is precisely why the easiest way to play the game is with a thief-ish character who has Alchemy as a major skill. Thief so you can have a near-inexpendable supply of ingredients, Alchemy so you can turn those ingredients into semi-valuable and rather light-weight potions. When you start off, you'll generate a glut of potions for restoring fatigue, poison, etc... and then you'll pretty much only use them for trading.
*** Another notable aspect of the aversion is that things sold to merchants are not lost forever, but rather enter the merchant's inventory unless the merchant ''decides to equip the item and wear it'' (thus forcing you to kill said merchant if you ever want it back). This is particularly jarring when you sell, say, a set of Dark Brotherhood armor to a merchant, who promptly dons it and then resumes business as normal [[HighlyVisibleNinja while dressed as a stealth assassin]]. It's also rather amusing to see poor pawnbrokers pimped out in full glass/daedric gear.
*** Merchants also kept the money you payed them with. This could come in handy when you went have a mage make a particularly expensive magical item for you. After paying, you could sell the mage who now had 300.000 coins a stack of the Daedric {{Infinity Plus One Sword}}s that had been clogging up your inventory, and get all your cash back.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' has this to a degree. Initially vendors will only buy and sell whatever category of items they specialise in. If the player has sufficient "Mercantile" skill, they will begin accepting other kinds of items. Additionally, there is a curious limit on the amount of cash they will pay for a single item. The highest limit in the standard game is 1200 gold, so if one tries to sell an item estimated to be worth 2000 gold, one will only get 1200 in the best case. Yet if one has two such items and sell them separately, one will get 1200 each time. Effectively, merchants have unlimited cash, but only part with it in rather limited chunks. A fact of much debate among some players is that several of the downloadable content packs for the game introduce vendors who have a cap of 2000 gold.
*** There are a number of stores, such as Jensine's in Imperial City, that will buy anything except illegal goods. Some vendors will buy even those, but you need to be a thief to find them.

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' Morrowind]]'':
*** Almost
completely avoids averts this trope. Characters The majority of shops only buy and sell in one type of product, so a jeweller won't buy armor and a book seller won't but weapons. They also only have a limited and finite amounts supply of gold on them, to barter with after which they will not be able to purchase anything until the player purchases items from them or time 24 hours passes. Likewise, they will largely refuse to purchase items that are too different from their normal wares -- a fine clothing store won't buy armor, a jewelry shop has no use for weapons or magic scrolls, and most merchants won't touch any of your goods if you're carrying the potent drugs skooma or moon sugar. There are a few general traders and pawnbrokers who will buy and sell in nearly anything, but they often have significantly less gold to barter with.
*** The
two exclusions, however, in a major exceptions are the talking mudcrab Mudcrab Merchant and a the talking scamp, both of whom Scamp, Creeper. They have 10,000 and 5000 gold respectively, and will purchase nearly everything and have ''vast'' supplies of currency.
*** Their supplies of currency are not particularly vast, which becomes evident once one tries to sell them artifacts. These things tend to cost a few times over their monthly allowance. It is still possible to sell them artifacts with the help of bartering, but that might be considered a puzzle of itself.
*** And also, though the mudcrab has more money, it is also out in the middle of nowhere which makes it much less practical. Meaning that most players use the scamp, which has half the mudcrab's amount of money, which means selling
buy almost anything you attempt to sell them. (For comparison, the next richest merchant in the vanilla game has 3000 and is an alchemist, so she'll only buy/sell ingredients and potions.) [[DownplayedTrope Still]], these amounts of money are well below the cost of the game's most valuable items, so it will take some creative bartering to get at higher levels anywhere close to full value for them. (For example, it takes several in-game days and a very good knowledge of math. math to sell and barter for anything extremely valuable. This begins to get absurd once you start trying to sell stuff worth over 100,000 gold to a scamp which who only has 5000 gold and all the junk you sold to it before.
*** This is precisely why
before.) Also, while the easiest way to play Mudcrab Merchant has more gold, he's on a remote island in the game middle of nowhere. Creeper is with a thief-ish character who has Alchemy as a major skill. Thief so you can have a near-inexpendable supply of ingredients, Alchemy so you can turn those ingredients into semi-valuable and rather light-weight potions. When you start off, you'll generate a glut of potions for restoring fatigue, poison, etc... and then you'll pretty much only use them for trading.
more practical, being in a city that is part of the Mages Guild teleportation network.
*** Another notable aspect of the aversion is that things sold to merchants are not lost forever, but rather enter the merchant's inventory unless the merchant ''decides to equip the item and wear it'' (thus forcing you to kill said merchant if you ever want it back). This is particularly jarring when you sell, say, a set of Dark Brotherhood armor to a merchant, who promptly dons it and then resumes business as normal [[HighlyVisibleNinja while dressed as a stealth assassin]]. It's also rather amusing to see poor pawnbrokers pimped out in full glass/daedric gear.
***
Glass/Daedric gear. Merchants also kept keep the money you payed pay them with. This could come comes in handy when you went have a mage an Enchanter make a particularly expensive magical item for you. After paying, you could can sell the mage Enchanter, who now had 300.000 300,000+ coins a stack of the Daedric {{Infinity Plus One Sword}}s that had been clogging up your inventory, and get all your cash back.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' has this to a degree. Initially vendors will only buy and sell whatever category of items they specialise in. If the player has sufficient "Mercantile" skill, they will begin accepting other kinds of items. Additionally, there is a curious limit on the amount of cash they will pay for a single item. The highest limit in the standard game is 1200 gold, so if one tries to sell an item estimated to be worth 2000 gold, one will only get 1200 in the best case. Yet if one has two such items and sell them separately, one will get 1200 each time. Effectively, merchants have unlimited cash, but only part with it in rather limited chunks. A fact of much debate among some players is that several of the downloadable content packs for the game introduce vendors who have a cap of 2000 gold.
***
gold. There are a number of stores, such as Jensine's in Imperial City, that will buy anything except illegal goods. Some vendors will buy even those, but you need to be a thief to find them.
12th Feb '17 10:02:03 AM Gosicrystal
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That's right, a bread baker in a poor village will gladly pay you for anything from VendorTrash to the InfinityPlusOneSword, as will a renowned shield crafter in a capital city. What exactly they do with these items depends on the game. If you're lucky, the same vendor will offer them for sale at triple the price (even if it has nothing to do with the items they usually sell); otherwise, they will vanish without a trace and be [[LostForever gone forever]].

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That's right, a bread baker in a poor village will gladly pay you for anything from VendorTrash to the InfinityPlusOneSword, as will a renowned shield crafter in a capital city. What exactly they do with these items depends on the game. If you're lucky, the same vendor will offer them for sale at triple the price (even if it has nothing to do with the items they usually sell); otherwise, they will vanish without a trace and be [[LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent gone forever]].



* Quasi-inverted in ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' for the GameBoy, a JRPG with an environmental slant, where shops ''recycle'' (it's still LostForever) your equipment and any of the useless flavor items (like that [[PimpedOutDress fancy dress]]). This is also the '''''only''''' way for you to get rid of any [[StuckItems TRASH]] you picked up in a [[InexplicableTreasureChests random chest]], and thus free up your very limited inventory for something useful. All you have to do is pay a sizable fee. (Since you don't have a portable [[BagOfHolding garbage dimension]], you cannot leave Trash alongside a road -- unlike your heal potion or dentures. It also comes off as ''[[{{Greed}} the stores are penalizing you for recycling]]''.)

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* Quasi-inverted in ''VideoGame/GreatGreed'' for the GameBoy, a JRPG with an environmental slant, where shops ''recycle'' (it's still LostForever) [[PermanentlyMissableContent gone for good]]) your equipment and any of the useless flavor items (like that [[PimpedOutDress fancy dress]]). This is also the '''''only''''' way for you to get rid of any [[StuckItems TRASH]] you picked up in a [[InexplicableTreasureChests random chest]], and thus free up your very limited inventory for something useful. All you have to do is pay a sizable fee. (Since you don't have a portable [[BagOfHolding garbage dimension]], you cannot leave Trash alongside a road -- unlike your heal potion or dentures. It also comes off as ''[[{{Greed}} the stores are penalizing you for recycling]]''.)
14th Jan '17 7:22:30 PM nombretomado
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* While the SNES ''{{Lufia}}'' games obey this trope as far as all vendors buying what you sell without exception, they do provide an explanation to what happens to sold items: they are shipped to Forfeit Island, an island that sells exclusively merchandise you have sold in shops elsewhere in the world.

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* While the SNES ''{{Lufia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Lufia}}'' games obey this trope as far as all vendors buying what you sell without exception, they do provide an explanation to what happens to sold items: they are shipped to Forfeit Island, an island that sells exclusively merchandise you have sold in shops elsewhere in the world.
29th Jul '16 10:52:22 AM Morgenthaler
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* Partially averted in ''LandsOfLore: The Throne of Chaos''. Blacksmiths and fletchers will buy any unwanted equipment you care to sell them, but fletchers will pay more for bows and other ranged weapons than blacksmiths will, and blacksmiths will pay more for melee weapons and armor.

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* Partially averted in ''LandsOfLore: ''VideoGame/LandsOfLore: The Throne of Chaos''. Blacksmiths and fletchers will buy any unwanted equipment you care to sell them, but fletchers will pay more for bows and other ranged weapons than blacksmiths will, and blacksmiths will pay more for melee weapons and armor.
8th Jul '16 6:03:30 PM Malady
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* In ''VideoGame/LuxarenAllure'', any store that sells anything will buy everything in your inventory, except for key items.
29th Jun '16 8:55:50 AM StFan
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* ''{{Achaea}}'' has almost no VendorTrash, and the only opportunities to sell items come during quests or when trading with other players. Quest {{NPC}}s are only interested in the particular item they asked you for in the first place, but do seem to have infinite gold.
* While shops in ''{{Flyff}}'' will buy most of the stuff you pick up, there's quite a bit of VendorTrash - certificates, maps and letters for example - that they won't touch. Wandering sellers don't buy anything from you. Shows they're not complete idiots.
* Although merchants in ''GuildWars'' will buy pretty much anything, most of them pay only a trifle unless you bring them something of the type they specialize in, in which case they pay market value, based on the supply and demand of other players buying and selling the same item. (The items still cost more if you're buying than if you're selling, though.)

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* ''{{Achaea}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Achaea}}'' has almost no VendorTrash, and the only opportunities to sell items come during quests or when trading with other players. Quest {{NPC}}s are only interested in the particular item they asked you for in the first place, but do seem to have infinite gold.
* While shops in ''{{Flyff}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Flyff}}'' will buy most of the stuff you pick up, there's quite a bit of VendorTrash - certificates, maps and letters for example - -- that they won't touch. Wandering sellers don't buy anything from you. Shows they're not complete idiots.
* Although merchants in ''GuildWars'' ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' will buy pretty much anything, most of them pay only a trifle unless you bring them something of the type they specialize in, in which case they pay market value, based on the supply and demand of other players buying and selling the same item. (The items still cost more if you're buying than if you're selling, though.)



[[folder:Real Time Strategy]]
* While not an RPG ''VictoriaAnEmpireUnderTheSun'' averts this: If you want to sell something, someone has to be willing to buy it. Usually this is not a problem, but it is possible to start producing say, cars or airplanes before POP's start demanding them.

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[[folder:Real Time [[folder:Real-Time Strategy]]
* While not an RPG ''VictoriaAnEmpireUnderTheSun'' ''VideoGame/VictoriaAnEmpireUnderTheSun'' averts this: If you want to sell something, someone has to be willing to buy it. Usually this is not a problem, but it is possible to start producing say, cars or airplanes before POP's start demanding them.
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