History Main / WarpWhistle

22nd Apr '17 2:31:52 PM nombretomado
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* In {{Suikoden}} Viki and the Blinking Mirror acts as a warp Whistle, instantly teleporting the characters to any town or major area in the game. A godsend with the game's awkward/slow overland travel.

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* In {{Suikoden}} ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' Viki and the Blinking Mirror acts as a warp Whistle, instantly teleporting the characters to any town or major area in the game. A godsend with the game's awkward/slow overland travel.
22nd Apr '17 11:27:32 AM Galacton
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A quick shortcut to enable rapid travel in an open-world setting. Most often, it allows travel between a set of fixed points, or to those points from anywhere in the game world. In a lot of games, these points are co-located with {{Save Point}}s. In some cases, using the Warp Whistle is the only way to reach certain areas.

In most cases, destinations become unlocked when the player visits them the old-fashioned way first. Why this happens sometimes is justified; when you get there, you do something like opening a portal or activating a teleport machine, allowing you to get back there easily. Sometimes, however, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation it's never explained why the traveling method only works if you have been there already]]. It's often necessary to gameplay, as if you could teleport to anywhere in the world from the beginning of the game, you could simply teleport to the villain's lair and there would be no need for all this quest.

There is sometimes a monetary charge for the trip.

Compare and contrast GlobalAirship. While the Global Airship is awarded late in the game, it has wide-ranging freedom of movement. The Warp Whistle has very fixed destinations, more of which become unlocked in play, but it is generally available at an early point. A helpful comparison: The airship is a private helicopter, and the Warp Whistle is a subway pass.

If the WarpWhistle is available as an item, it may be restricted to usage in "overworld" locations only (outdoor settings like towns or the world map), and fail to do anything if the player attempts to use it during DungeonCrawling. Its in-dungeon counterpart would be the EscapeRope, whose function is limited to teleporting the player out of the dungeon in question (after which, the player may use the WarpWhistle).

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A quick shortcut to enable rapid travel An item or ability in an open-world setting. Most often, it allows a video game that enables fast travel between a set of fixed points, or to those points from anywhere in the game world. an open-world setting. In a lot of games, these points are co-located with {{Save Point}}s.marked by a special monument or landmark to designate them as such. This cuts down on potentially annoying backtracking and allows the player to save time getting back to areas of interest. In some cases, using the Warp Whistle is the only way to reach certain areas.

Travel can be limited to between these set of fixed points, or to those points from anywhere in the game world. In most cases, destinations only become unlocked when after the player visits them the old-fashioned way first. Why this happens This [[NecessaryDrawback limitation]] is sometimes is justified; when you get there, justified by having you do something like opening a portal or activating a teleport machine, machine when you get there, allowing you to get back there easily. Sometimes, Most of the time, however, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation it's never explained why the traveling method only works if you have been there already]]. It's often necessary to gameplay, as explained from a gameplay standpoint, since if you could teleport to anywhere in the world from the beginning of the game, you could simply teleport to the villain's lair and there would be no need never have to overcome any of the obstacles the game designers put between you and your destination and the REAL reason for all this quest.

the Warp Whistle is so you don't have to do it again everytime you want to visit an area.

There is sometimes a monetary charge for the trip.

trip, especially if the warp whistle takes the form of a paid service like an airport or subway.

Compare and contrast GlobalAirship. While the Global Airship is awarded late in the game, it has wide-ranging freedom of movement. The Warp Whistle has very fixed destinations, more of which become unlocked in play, but it is generally available at an early point. A helpful [[TruthInTelevision real-life]] comparison: The airship is a private helicopter, and the Warp Whistle is a subway pass.

If the WarpWhistle is available as an item, it may be restricted to usage in "overworld" locations only (outdoor settings like towns or the world map), and fail to do anything work if the player attempts to use it during DungeonCrawling. in an enclosed area such as a [[DungeonCrawling cave or dungeon]]. Its in-dungeon counterpart would be the EscapeRope, whose function is limited to teleporting the player out of the dungeon in question (after which, the player may use the WarpWhistle).
WarpWhistle properly).
8th Apr '17 8:37:15 PM shawnvw
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Added DiffLines:

** A quest chain for a group called the Gatekeepers begins in the Hall of Heroes. The NPC there will teleport you to any of the three city zones where the quests take place; when you're done, an NPC in that zone will teleport you back to the Hall. However, they'll teleport anyone; you don't actually have to be doing the quests. That makes the four NPCs an additional teleport network.
27th Mar '17 10:49:30 AM BeerBaron
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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features intercity travel by silt strider -- a giant insect, lobotomized and "driven" by manipulating exposed muscle tendons. Passengers ride in the beast's hollowed-out shell. which is just a Tamriel version of public transit.
** In addition to warps in the form of guild guides (transport to any other guild), Propylon Chambers (each one to two other strongholds, of which there are several - you need an item in order to use these), and mark and recall (if put into an item, a literal warp whistle). And boats. And Intervention spells, which would lead you to one of two types of temple. Not to mention the mods that add insta-teleportation items or teleporting houses or whathaveyou. ''Morrowind'' is the most [[WarpWhistle Warp Whistley]] game ever.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' on the other hand simply gives you a map with markers on it, which at the beginning only has major cities marked, and a marker is added the first time you visit a place. You can then fast travel to that location anytime, although for all intents and purposes the game assumes you walked/rode your horse there and a certain amount of time has passed (though this is a moot point, since none of the player's objectives have a time limit).
** Daggerfall had a map system, where cities were marked from the start but the player is ''not'' limited to travelling to marked locations. Of course, given the sheer size of the map, ''not'' using it was rather impractical, so the de facto warp whistles were the various ways to go faster (the time passed mattered in Daggerfall, thanks to time limits for quests) - Recall spells, buying horses, sleeping at inns[[note]]As an option on the map screen, it costs money but cuts down on travel-times[[/note]], going by boat (bought or voyage paid for) or using the Mages Guild' Teleporter service (like the Guild Guides of Morrowind, only a) free, b) requiring a high rank in the Guild, c) teleporting you to any location on the map rather than to another Guild Guide).
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' uses the same system as Oblivion, except that the player cannot fast-travel to major cities immediately. However, they can rent rides between these cities on a horse and cart for a price that feels expensive in the first couple of hours, but [[MoneyForNothing quickly becomes nominal]]. Once the cities have been discovered, the player can fast-travel to them like any other location. This seems to have two mild benefits: it makes the player feel they have to "earn" the right to visit each location, either through effort or coin, and it allows players following a [[SelfImposedChallenge "no fast-travel" rule]] to move between cities without spending about an hour on the journey.

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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' features intercity ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' has a map system with cities marked from the start. However, you're not limited to traveling to just the marked locations. Given the sheer size of the game world, ''not'' using it is extremely impractical. So the de facto warp whistles were the various ways to go faster (the time passed mattered in Daggerfall, thanks to time limits for quests) - Recall spells, buying horses, sleeping at inns[[note]]As an option on the map screen, it costs money but cuts down on travel-times[[/note]], going by boat (bought or voyage paid for) or using the Mages Guild' Teleporter service (like the Guild Guides of Morrowind, only a) free, b) requiring a high rank in the Guild, c) teleporting you to any location on the map rather than to another Guild Guide).
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' is the only game in the main series lacking standard fast
travel by between cities. Instead, one can use silt strider -- a giant insect, striders (giant insects which have been lobotomized and are "driven" by manipulating exposed muscle tendons. Passengers ride in the beast's hollowed-out shell. which is just a Tamriel version of public transit.
** In addition to warps in
shell), boats along the form of guild guides (transport to any other guild), Propylon Chambers (each one to two other strongholds, of which there are several - you need an item in order to use these), coasts, and mark by the Mages Guild "Guild Guide" service (instant teleportation between Mages Guild halls). Additionally, the spells "Divine Intervention" and recall (if put into an item, a literal warp whistle). And boats. And Intervention spells, which would lead "Almsivi Intervention" will teleport you to one of two types of temple. Not to mention the mods nearest Imperial shrine and Tribunal temple, respectively. The Mark and Recall spells are similar, allowing you to set a "Mark" and then "Recall" to that add insta-teleportation items spot. Useful for traveling long distances when no fast travel is available, getting out of a sticky situation in a hurry, or teleporting houses or whathaveyou. ''Morrowind'' is the most [[WarpWhistle Warp Whistley]] game ever.
for transporting more loot than you could carry on foot.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' on the other hand simply gives you a map with markers on it, which at the beginning only has major cities marked, and a marker is added the first time you visit a place. You can then fast travel to that location anytime, although for all intents and purposes the game assumes you walked/rode your horse there and a certain amount of time has passed (though this is a moot point, since none of the player's objectives have a time limit).
** Daggerfall had a map system, where cities were marked from the start but the player is ''not'' limited to travelling to marked locations. Of course, given the sheer size of the map, ''not'' using it was rather impractical, so the de facto warp whistles were the various ways to go faster (the time passed mattered in Daggerfall, thanks to time limits for quests) - Recall spells, buying horses, sleeping at inns[[note]]As an option on the map screen, it costs money but cuts down on travel-times[[/note]], going by boat (bought or voyage paid for) or using the Mages Guild' Teleporter service (like the Guild Guides of Morrowind, only a) free, b) requiring a high rank in the Guild, c) teleporting you to any location on the map rather than to another Guild Guide).
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim''
''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' uses the same system as Oblivion, ''Oblivion'', except that the player cannot fast-travel to major cities immediately. However, they can rent rides between these cities on a horse and cart for a price that feels expensive in the first couple of hours, but [[MoneyForNothing quickly becomes nominal]]. Once the cities have been discovered, the player can fast-travel to them like any other location. This seems to have two mild benefits: it makes the player feel they have to "earn" the right to visit each location, either through effort or coin, and it allows players following a [[SelfImposedChallenge "no fast-travel" rule]] to move between cities without spending about an hour on the journey.
27th Mar '17 10:31:03 AM crazysamaritan
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** The late-game Teleport-Psynergy in the second game, which teleports you between the towns when on the world map and lets you access {{Bonus Dungeon}}s. There's also Retreat, a power the hero has by default, allowing you to warp back to the beginning of any dungeon [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything unless there's a plot point otherwise]].

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** The late-game Teleport-Psynergy in the second game, which teleports you between the towns when on the world map and lets you access {{Bonus Dungeon}}s. There's also Retreat, a power the hero has by default, allowing you to warp back to the beginning of any dungeon [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything unless there's a plot point otherwise]].otherwise.
26th Mar '17 5:22:09 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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Added DiffLines:

*** Later in the game, Groose will also offer to use his Groosenator to launch Link to the locations of various minigames across the sky and the surface, which can serve as a faster alternative to flying if you happen to be near the Sealed Grounds. [[AwesomeButImpractical It's not as useful as it sounds, though]], since this only becomes available once you've learned all four parts of the Song of the Hero, at which point there shouldn't be much left to accomplish in the way of the main story or sidequests, and [[spoiler: the Goddess Statue destroys the Groosenator's rails once it falls back to the surface, so you'll only be able to use it up until the Sky Keep is completed.]]
11th Mar '17 12:30:21 PM billybobfred
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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' features a more refined implementation of the Telecrystal/Waypoint systems in ''XI,'' with the Aetheryte network. Once one has acquired the Teleport and Return spells, various large Aetheryte crystals spread around the world (typically one or two per zone, barring few exceptions) can be attuned to and traveled to at any time for a nominal fee. One crystal can be designated a home point and returned to for free, either with the Return spell ''or'' upon an in-game KO, assuming no revive is incoming. Three other crystals may be designated as favorites, with much-reduced costs to travel to them using the Teleport spell.

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' features a more refined implementation of the Telecrystal/Waypoint systems in ''XI,'' with the Aetheryte network. Once one has acquired the Teleport and Return spells, various large Aetheryte crystals spread around the world (typically one or two per zone, barring few exceptions) can be attuned to and traveled to at any time for a nominal fee. One crystal can be designated a home point and returned to for free, either with the Return spell ''or'' upon an in-game KO, assuming no revive is incoming. Three other crystals may be designated as favorites, with much-reduced costs to travel to them using the Teleport spell. If you set up two-factor authentication, you can also designate one crystal as a "free destination", and Teleport to it for no cost whatsoever.
8th Mar '17 4:11:20 PM nombretomado
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* Most ''Mega Man'' games of the classic mold have a set of discrete stages, but the ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' and ''[[MegaManZX ZX]]'' series on the GBA and DS have an [[{{Metroidvania}} open world]], where any area can be walked to eventually from any other, with some exceptions. In these games, Trans Servers serve as {{Save Point}}s and a method of getting around faster. In ''ZX'', there are also consoles without transport functionality, used exclusively to save and access missions.

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* Most ''Mega Man'' games of the classic mold have a set of discrete stages, but the ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'' and ''[[MegaManZX ''[[VideoGame/MegaManZX ZX]]'' series on the GBA and DS have an [[{{Metroidvania}} open world]], where any area can be walked to eventually from any other, with some exceptions. In these games, Trans Servers serve as {{Save Point}}s and a method of getting around faster. In ''ZX'', there are also consoles without transport functionality, used exclusively to save and access missions.
17th Feb '17 10:59:36 AM cartoonfan945
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* The pianos provided by the Amalgamated Do-Gooding Fairies in ''WesternAnimation/PontoffelPockWhereAreYou'' can take you anywhere in the world by pressing any of the colored buttons. If the person wants to get back home, there's a Homing Pigeon Switch you can flick.






14th Jan '17 7:22:49 PM nombretomado
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** The ''{{Lufia}}'' series.

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** The ''{{Lufia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Lufia}}'' series.
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