History Main / Wargaming

20th Feb '18 9:27:20 PM Jagger
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The {{Ur Example}} are TabletopGame/{{Chess}} (invented in ancient India) and TabletopGame/{{Go}} (invented in ancient China), which laid the foundations for wargaming. The TropeMaker is possibly ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kriegsspiel_%28wargame%29 Kriegsspiel]]'' (1812), literally, "War Game," which was created by two UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n officers, Lieutenant Georg Leopold von Reiswitz and his son Georg Heinrich Rudolf von Reiswitz. The game, intended to be a more modern realistic adaptation of Chess, was widely played by the Prussian officers of the 19th Century, and after some stunning Prussian victories, military officers around Europe. It was SeriousBusiness from the very beginning; ''Kriegsspiel'' was endorsed by the General Staff of Prussia as an invaluable teaching aid. ''Kriegsspiel'' was the TropeCodifier for a lot of conventions used by current military thinkers, military historians, war gamers, and table top role players. It codified the use of [[ColorCodedArmies the colors red and blue]] for enemy and friendly forces, respectively, the use of maps and miniaturised scale terrain, detailed movement rules and [[TurnBasedCombat turns]], referees and game masters, specialized dice, the block symbols for units, table quarters, LoadsAndLoadsOfRules, the RandomNumberGod, the core rulebook, RuleZero, and so on. It was so influential that it is still [[http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/16957/kriegsspiel available today.]] A great many of the concepts used to create training simulations for modern officers and table top wargames today would seem completely familiar to the Reiswitzes, even despite technology they could never have imagined. The eminent author Creator/HGWells was also responsible for several more light-hearted and simplified sets of rule conventions for wargame simulations --''Floor Games'' (1911) and ''Little Wars'' (1913)-- which were popular in Great Britain before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and which had a strong influence on the later development of the wargaming hobby in the UK.

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The {{Ur Example}} Example}}s are TabletopGame/{{Chess}} (invented in ancient India) and TabletopGame/{{Go}} (invented in ancient China), which laid the foundations for wargaming. The TropeMaker is possibly ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kriegsspiel_%28wargame%29 Kriegsspiel]]'' (1812), literally, "War Game," which was created by two UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n officers, Lieutenant Georg Leopold von Reiswitz and his son Georg Heinrich Rudolf von Reiswitz. The game, intended to be a more modern realistic adaptation of Chess, was widely played by the Prussian officers of the 19th Century, and after some stunning Prussian victories, military officers around Europe. It was SeriousBusiness from the very beginning; ''Kriegsspiel'' was endorsed by the General Staff of Prussia as an invaluable teaching aid. ''Kriegsspiel'' was the TropeCodifier for a lot of conventions used by current military thinkers, military historians, war gamers, and table top role players. It codified the use of [[ColorCodedArmies the colors red and blue]] for enemy and friendly forces, respectively, the use of maps and miniaturised scale terrain, detailed movement rules and [[TurnBasedCombat turns]], referees and game masters, specialized dice, the block symbols for units, table quarters, LoadsAndLoadsOfRules, the RandomNumberGod, the core rulebook, RuleZero, and so on. It was so influential that it is still [[http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/16957/kriegsspiel available today.]] A great many of the concepts used to create training simulations for modern officers and table top wargames today would seem completely familiar to the Reiswitzes, even despite technology they could never have imagined. The eminent author Creator/HGWells was also responsible for several more light-hearted and simplified sets of rule conventions for wargame simulations --''Floor Games'' (1911) and ''Little Wars'' (1913)-- which were popular in Great Britain before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and which had a strong influence on the later development of the wargaming hobby in the UK.
20th Feb '18 9:27:09 PM Jagger
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The UrExample is probably ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kriegsspiel_%28wargame%29 Kriegsspiel]]'' (1812), literally, "War Game," which was created by two UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n officers, Lieutenant Georg Leopold von Reiswitz and his son Georg Heinrich Rudolf von Reiswitz. The game was widely played by the Prussian officers of the 19th Century, and after some stunning Prussian victories, military officers around Europe. It was SeriousBusiness from the very beginning; ''Kriegsspiel'' was endorsed by the General Staff of Prussia as an invaluable teaching aid. ''Kriegsspiel'' was the TropeCodifier for a lot of conventions used by current military thinkers, military historians, war gamers, and table top role players. It codified the use of [[ColorCodedArmies the colors red and blue]] for enemy and friendly forces, respectively, the use of maps and miniaturised scale terrain, detailed movement rules and [[TurnBasedCombat turns]], referees and game masters, specialized dice, the block symbols for units, table quarters, LoadsAndLoadsOfRules, the RandomNumberGod, the core rulebook, RuleZero, and so on. It was so influential that it is still [[http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/16957/kriegsspiel available today.]] A great many of the concepts used to create training simulations for modern officers and table top wargames today would seem completely familiar to the Reiswitzes, even despite technology they could never have imagined. The eminent author Creator/HGWells was also responsible for several more light-hearted and simplified sets of rule conventions for wargame simulations --''Floor Games'' (1911) and ''Little Wars'' (1913)-- which were popular in Great Britain before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and which had a strong influence on the later development of the wargaming hobby in the UK.

to:

The UrExample {{Ur Example}} are TabletopGame/{{Chess}} (invented in ancient India) and TabletopGame/{{Go}} (invented in ancient China), which laid the foundations for wargaming. The TropeMaker is probably possibly ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kriegsspiel_%28wargame%29 Kriegsspiel]]'' (1812), literally, "War Game," which was created by two UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}n officers, Lieutenant Georg Leopold von Reiswitz and his son Georg Heinrich Rudolf von Reiswitz. The game game, intended to be a more modern realistic adaptation of Chess, was widely played by the Prussian officers of the 19th Century, and after some stunning Prussian victories, military officers around Europe. It was SeriousBusiness from the very beginning; ''Kriegsspiel'' was endorsed by the General Staff of Prussia as an invaluable teaching aid. ''Kriegsspiel'' was the TropeCodifier for a lot of conventions used by current military thinkers, military historians, war gamers, and table top role players. It codified the use of [[ColorCodedArmies the colors red and blue]] for enemy and friendly forces, respectively, the use of maps and miniaturised scale terrain, detailed movement rules and [[TurnBasedCombat turns]], referees and game masters, specialized dice, the block symbols for units, table quarters, LoadsAndLoadsOfRules, the RandomNumberGod, the core rulebook, RuleZero, and so on. It was so influential that it is still [[http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/16957/kriegsspiel available today.]] A great many of the concepts used to create training simulations for modern officers and table top wargames today would seem completely familiar to the Reiswitzes, even despite technology they could never have imagined. The eminent author Creator/HGWells was also responsible for several more light-hearted and simplified sets of rule conventions for wargame simulations --''Floor Games'' (1911) and ''Little Wars'' (1913)-- which were popular in Great Britain before UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and which had a strong influence on the later development of the wargaming hobby in the UK.
9th Feb '18 11:12:43 AM Ninamarie124
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7th Nov '17 10:58:18 AM Naresh
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* ''Warmachine/Hordes''
4th Nov '17 12:44:12 PM Rhodes7
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* ''TabletopGame/Recon'' (borders with RPG, individual characters controlled, but general Wargame mechanics)

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* ''TabletopGame/Recon'' ''TabletopGame/{{Recon}}'' (borders with RPG, individual characters controlled, but general Wargame mechanics)
4th Nov '17 12:43:25 PM Rhodes7
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Added DiffLines:

* ''TabletopGame/Recon'' (borders with RPG, individual characters controlled, but general Wargame mechanics)
24th Jul '17 2:23:25 AM WanderingBrowser
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Chainmail}}''
23rd Jul '17 3:47:35 PM nombretomado
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Proving that older ideas recycle, the Nottingham-based company ''Creator/GamesWorkshop'' began operations in the early 1980s selling fantasy and sci-fi wargaming from its dedicated shop outlets around the country. Despite computer games and map-and-counter-based games still having a foothold, and despite the dominant trend in the tabletop wargaming-with-figures hobby being historical gaming (Napoleonics and WW2 still dominate), GW carved out its own little empire, securing the alliegience and pocket-money of adolescent boys, who are the next generation of the hobby. In a time where traditional model and figure makers such as Airfix repeatedly went bust, GW have gone from strength to strength. And GW's other innovation stuck. "Traditional" wargaming with figures revolves around two scales: 20-25mm (1:76 to 1:72) or the older 1:35 (54mm), GW chose the intermediate 28mm (1:57 scale). This has proven very popular and has been taken up by many other figure manufacturers. The figures do not take up anything like as much table space as the comparatively huge 54mm's. They are also large enough to carry a lot of fine detail which a skilled artist can bring out. While 20 and 15 mm figures can provide an impressive spectacle ''en masse'', the observer has often got to squint to make out individual detail. This is not an issue in 28mm.

to:

Proving that older ideas recycle, the Nottingham-based company ''Creator/GamesWorkshop'' began operations in the early 1980s selling fantasy and sci-fi wargaming from its dedicated shop outlets around the country. Despite computer games and map-and-counter-based games still having a foothold, and despite the dominant trend in the tabletop wargaming-with-figures hobby being historical gaming (Napoleonics and WW2 [=WW2=] still dominate), GW carved out its own little empire, securing the alliegience and pocket-money of adolescent boys, who are the next generation of the hobby. In a time where traditional model and figure makers such as Airfix repeatedly went bust, GW have gone from strength to strength. And GW's other innovation stuck. "Traditional" wargaming with figures revolves around two scales: 20-25mm (1:76 to 1:72) or the older 1:35 (54mm), GW chose the intermediate 28mm (1:57 scale). This has proven very popular and has been taken up by many other figure manufacturers. The figures do not take up anything like as much table space as the comparatively huge 54mm's. They are also large enough to carry a lot of fine detail which a skilled artist can bring out. While 20 and 15 mm figures can provide an impressive spectacle ''en masse'', the observer has often got to squint to make out individual detail. This is not an issue in 28mm.
20th Jul '17 12:53:09 AM justanid
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Added DiffLines:

* ''TabletopGame/TheHyborianCampaign''


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* ''TabletopGame/{{Malifaux}}''


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* ''TabletopGame/StarGruntII''


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** ''TabletopGame/WarhammerTheEndTimes''
13th Jul '17 7:50:37 PM justanid
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* ''TabletopGame/DarkFuture''



* ''TabletopGame/DystopianWars''



* ''TabletopGame/FirestormArmada''



* ''[[TabletopGame/IronKingdoms Hordes & Warmachine]]''


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* ''TabletopGame/{{Infinity}}''
* ''[[TabletopGame/IronKingdoms Hordes & Warmachine]]''
* ''TabletopGame/KingsOfWar''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Wargaming