History Main / ViolenceReallyIstheAnswer

30th Oct '16 5:44:32 PM trixus
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* Franchise/{{Batman}}, despite his usual ThouShaltNotKill rule has resorted to this on a few occasions when the villain he's fighting can't be safely contained. Not counting several EarlyInstallmentWeirdness stories from UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age|of Comic Books}} where he killed several villains, the modern era has his original encounter with [=KGBeast=] whom he leaves to drown in the sewers (this is later retconned with the GCPD saving him), enraging Deacon Blackfire's followers into killing him in ''ComicBook/BatmanTheCult'', and him shooting Darkseid during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis''.

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* Franchise/{{Batman}}, despite his usual ThouShaltNotKill rule has resorted to this on a few occasions when the villain he's fighting can't be safely contained. Not counting several EarlyInstallmentWeirdness stories from UsefulNotes/{{the Golden Age|of Comic Books}} where he killed several villains, the modern era has his original encounter with [=KGBeast=] whom he leaves to drown in the sewers (this is later retconned with the GCPD saving him), enraging Deacon Blackfire's followers into killing him in ''ComicBook/BatmanTheCult'', and him shooting Darkseid during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis''. Also while he doesn't kill he still use plenty of violence, leaving criminals with broken bones for the police to pick up, apparently he doesn't lie carrying his batcuffs all the time so beaten unconscious it is.
30th Oct '16 4:48:15 PM nombretomado
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* The ''Franchise/HeroFactory: Invasion from Below'' special seems to at first play the "violence is bad" moral straight when Breez calms down the beast queen by offering peace. But, due to a misunderstanding, the beasts attack again, and this time the Heroes have no option but to beat them up, [[spoiler:indirectly killing them]].

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* The ''Franchise/HeroFactory: ''Toys/HeroFactory: Invasion from Below'' special seems to at first play the "violence is bad" moral straight when Breez calms down the beast queen by offering peace. But, due to a misunderstanding, the beasts attack again, and this time the Heroes have no option but to beat them up, [[spoiler:indirectly killing them]].
24th Oct '16 12:05:26 PM Stranrep
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22nd Oct '16 6:01:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* The entire plot of the film ''Billy Jack''. Becomes a bit of a BrokenAesop when the film keeps trying to insist that the peaceful, nonviolent hippies are in the right, but Billy Jack's freely-dispensed asskickings are the only thing keeping them from being repeatedly victimized by the town bullies.

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* The entire plot of the film ''Billy Jack''.''Film/BillyJack''. Becomes a bit of a BrokenAesop when the film keeps trying to insist that the peaceful, nonviolent hippies are in the right, but Billy Jack's freely-dispensed asskickings are the only thing keeping them from being repeatedly victimized by the town bullies.
22nd Oct '16 5:48:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* MaoZedong: "Political Power grows out of the barrel of a gun". He should know: his generals fought a four-year Civil War (in which ten million died) for it.

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* MaoZedong: UsefulNotes/MaoZedong: "Political Power grows out of the barrel of a gun". He should know: his generals fought a four-year Civil War (in which ten million died) for it.
17th Oct '16 5:20:31 PM BillyMT
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* Used in ''TheTwoTowers'', both book and movie. In the movie, the Ents initially decide to not fight, but they change their minds after finding that Sauruman had clear-cut a large section of the forest. It received lots of complaints about being pro-war. It was more subtle in the book, with Treebeard's line, "It is likely that we march to our doom, but if we stayed home and did nothing, doom would find us anyway."\\\
Note that Tolkien was writing this during World War II, a war pretty much universally declared to be completely justified, in stark contrast to World War I in which Tolkien himself had fought. It's likely his intended message was that fighting is okay, if it's in a cause as justified as stopping the Nazis.

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* Used in ''TheTwoTowers'', both book and movie. In the movie, the Ents initially decide to not fight, but they change their minds after finding that Sauruman had clear-cut a large section of the forest. It received lots of complaints about being pro-war. It was more subtle in the book, with Treebeard's line, "It is likely that we march to our doom, but if we stayed home and did nothing, doom would find us anyway."\\\
"
**
Note that Tolkien was writing this during World War II, a war pretty much universally declared to be completely justified, in stark contrast to World War I in which Tolkien himself had fought. It's likely his intended message was that fighting is okay, if it's in a cause as justified as stopping the Nazis.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' did this in the episode ''Bully for Skippy''. Slappy Squirrel's nephew is being horribly bullied at school, and his counselor keeps suggesting all the "solutions" RealLife counselors give: ignore the bully, try to befriend them, inform the bully that they've hurt your feelings, etc. Skippy just gets beat up worse and worse until he teams up with Aunt Slappy and breaks out the Cartoon Violence and dynamite... which oddly reforms the bully into a good citizen.\\\
It seems people agree that this may be TruthInTelevision, since most of the Website/YouTube comments (prior to the video being taken down) say that the counselor's offered approaches rarely work and often only make the bully worse, as seen in the cartoon. For those who haven't seen the particular episode, the solutions, such as "Ignore the bully," "Be a friend to the bully," and "Try to invoke the bully's empathy," are based mostly in quite discredited {{Freudian Excuse}}s used to explain bullying, such as low self-esteem. Bullies actually tend to have high self-esteem.

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* ** ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' did this in the episode ''Bully for Skippy''. Slappy Squirrel's nephew is being horribly bullied at school, and his counselor keeps suggesting all the "solutions" RealLife counselors give: ignore the bully, try to befriend them, inform the bully that they've hurt your feelings, etc. Skippy just gets beat up worse and worse until he teams up with Aunt Slappy and breaks out the Cartoon Violence and dynamite... which oddly reforms the bully into a good citizen.\\\
citizen.
**
It seems people agree that this may be TruthInTelevision, since most of the Website/YouTube comments (prior to the video being taken down) say that the counselor's offered approaches rarely work and often only make the bully worse, as seen in the cartoon. For those who haven't seen the particular episode, the solutions, such as "Ignore the bully," "Be a friend to the bully," and "Try to invoke the bully's empathy," are based mostly in quite discredited {{Freudian Excuse}}s used to explain bullying, such as low self-esteem. Bullies actually tend to have high self-esteem.
17th Oct '16 5:12:17 PM BillyMT
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* VideoGame/MegaManX had always tried to be a pacifist, but he quickly concluded (or at least, decided before the first game) that fighting was necessary to bring about peace, to the point that he states that he is not afraid to fight [[spoiler:his best friend Zero to stop him from getting corrupted in ''X5'', and his enemy Sigma if he keeps showing up to stop the reconstruction of the world in ''X6''.]] Then he suddenly made a decision to become an ActualPacifist in ''X7'', and players were [[ReplacementScrappy given Axl as a result]]) Once you save enough Reploids or beat all 8 Mavericks however, X decides (again), that yes, violence is necessary. [[GameBreaker Then he becomes playable.]]\\\
His reasoning is somewhat sound: he doesn't want to fight anymore because he's tired of killing (he's spent four of the last six games fighting without any direct correlation to helping people that he can see). Given his power, he's very ''good'' at killing, and he decides that his abilities and hesitance are better used in more of a leadership role (where he plays the devil's advocate more often than not, arguing that violence is not the answer). After you rescue enough Reploids, he realizes there are a lot of people in the line of fire in what's essentially a custody dispute gone nuclear, and decides to fight to save them, not to stop the fighting (that's incidental).

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* VideoGame/MegaManX had always tried to be a pacifist, but he quickly concluded (or at least, decided before the first game) that fighting was necessary to bring about peace, to the point that he states that he is not afraid to fight [[spoiler:his best friend Zero to stop him from getting corrupted in ''X5'', and his enemy Sigma if he keeps showing up to stop the reconstruction of the world in ''X6''.]] Then he suddenly made a decision to become an ActualPacifist in ''X7'', and players were [[ReplacementScrappy given Axl as a result]]) Once you save enough Reploids or beat all 8 Mavericks however, X decides (again), that yes, violence is necessary. [[GameBreaker Then he becomes playable.]]\\\
]]
**
His reasoning is somewhat sound: he doesn't want to fight anymore because he's tired of killing (he's spent four of the last six games fighting without any direct correlation to helping people that he can see). Given his power, he's very ''good'' at killing, and he decides that his abilities and hesitance are better used in more of a leadership role (where he plays the devil's advocate more often than not, arguing that violence is not the answer). After you rescue enough Reploids, he realizes there are a lot of people in the line of fire in what's essentially a custody dispute gone nuclear, and decides to fight to save them, not to stop the fighting (that's incidental).
14th Oct '16 1:42:18 AM Ganondox
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[[folder:Religion]]
* In the Book of Mormon, the Anti-Nephi-Lehi's swore an oath of nonviolence, which results in them being slaughtered by other Lamanites until other Lamanites defend them. Later their children, who did not take the oath, fight in their behave.
9th Oct '16 11:50:35 AM azul120
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* Handled really strangely in ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes''. Dr. Henry Pym, the hero Ant-Man, is a strong believer in the ideals of being a pacifist and makes it very clear that he hates being a superhero because it means he not only cannot indulge his truest love, scientific research, but he is forced to fight super-villains, whom he would much rather focus on trying to rehabilitate after they are captured. In contrast, the rest of the Avengers have no qualms about fighting supervillains, viewing it as an immediate solution to the immediate problem of "this guy is trying to blow up the city". Things come to a header in the Ultron storyarc of the first season, where Dr. Pym tries desperately to stop a fight between the Avengers and the Serpent Society in the middle of a hostage situation; the end result is that Hawkeye gets hurt and several of the Avengers get mad at him--his LoveInterest, Janet Dyne, The Wasp, outright chews him out for it. In response, he quits the team. Team leader Tony Stark, Iron Man, views it for the best, but he does not condemn Dr. Pym's decision, noting that he has never truly been happy with the life of the superhero and that it simply isn't a calling for him. In the second season, Dr. Pym temporarily returns as the far more violent vigilante Yellowjacket, having [[TookALevelInJerkass taken a severe level in bad attitude whilst he was gone]].

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* Handled really strangely in ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes''. Dr. Henry Pym, the hero Ant-Man, is a strong believer in the ideals of being a pacifist and makes it very clear that he hates being a superhero because it means he not only cannot indulge his truest love, scientific research, but he is forced to fight super-villains, whom he would much rather focus on trying to rehabilitate after they are captured. In contrast, the rest of the Avengers have no qualms about fighting supervillains, viewing it as an immediate solution to the immediate problem of "this guy is trying to blow up the city". Things come to a header in the Ultron storyarc of the first season, where Dr. Pym tries desperately to stop a fight between the Avengers and the Serpent Society in the middle of a hostage situation; the end result is that Hawkeye gets hurt and several of the Avengers get mad at him--his LoveInterest, Janet Dyne, The Wasp, outright chews him out for it. In response, he quits the team. Team leader Tony Stark, Iron Man, views it for the best, but he does not condemn Dr. Pym's decision, noting that he has never truly been happy with the life of the superhero and that it simply isn't a calling for him. In the second season, Dr. Pym temporarily returns as the far more violent vigilante Yellowjacket, having [[TookALevelInJerkass [[JerkassBall taken a severe level shift in bad attitude whilst he was gone]].
6th Oct '16 2:05:08 AM Underachiever
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* The current page quote from ''ComicBook/GoldDigger'' actually subverts the trope in context. Gothwrain is egging Theodore Diggers on to try to kill him on purpose in order to [[spoiler:enable his own ThanatosGambit that he's been plotting for at least years]]; violence is exactly the answer he ''wants''.
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