History Main / VindicatedByHistory

18th Nov '16 3:23:17 AM RezaMaulana98
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* The Daewoo Nubira was criticized at the time of launch (June 1997), but and by 2003 at launch it got a slightly better reception. Its replacement, the Lacetti/Nubira, in 2002, got a better reception but was still seen as inferior to the [[TheMinnesotaFats Opel Astra]]. Now its replacement, the Chevrolet Cruze (or the [[MarketBasedTitle Daewoo Lacetti Premiere]] in Asia and Oceania) has been criticised for being somewhat anodyne, the vehicle appears to have been VindicatedByHistory to a degree. So much so it's become an unlikely CoolCar.

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* The Daewoo Nubira was criticized at the time of launch (June 1997), but and by 2003 at launch it got a slightly better reception. Its replacement, the Lacetti/Nubira, in 2002, got a better reception but was still seen as inferior to the [[TheMinnesotaFats Opel Astra]]. Now its replacement, the Chevrolet Cruze (or the [[MarketBasedTitle Daewoo Lacetti Premiere]] in Asia and Oceania) has been criticised for being somewhat anodyne, the vehicle appears to have been VindicatedByHistory to a degree. So much so it's become an unlikely CoolCar. It probably helps that the Lacetti appeared in ''Series/TopGear'' as their second car used in the Star in a Reasonably Priced Car segments.
12th Nov '16 3:27:23 PM Jake
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* The graphical user interface until the early [=90s=], because it ate up precious resources and required extra hardware (oh noes, a mouse!).

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* The graphical user interface until the early [=90s=], because it ate up precious used significant system resources for the time and required extra hardware (oh noes, additional hardware; the appeal of a mouse!).mouse was somewhat more limited when they cost $50 or more to buy and required a fiddly installation process, to say nothing of the hassle involved in getting an aftermarket video card to work. And even then, it wasn't until just before the turn of the millenium that doing ''everything'' from the GUI and only using a command line for troubleshooting or "power user"-type tasks became the default.
9th Nov '16 5:21:55 PM Carls493
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* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh, by the way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it, people like to see the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school and friends, and people didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, so can I put my little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history.

to:

* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh, by the way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it, people like to see the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school and friends, and people didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, so can I put my little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history.history in what we know to this day as ''Franchise/SpiderMan''.
9th Nov '16 12:41:30 PM Taskmaster123
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Added DiffLines:

* Back in the early 1960's, Creator/StanLee at Marvel Comics wanted to do a story about a superhero that went directly against the grain of everything that had been done before. The hero would be young enough to qualify as a teenage sidekick, would lose more often than he won, face problems that all teenagers face, get no respect, and oh, by the way, his powers would be those of a...''spider''. His publisher replied that no one would buy it, people like to see the heroes win, no one would want to read a comic that had some kid struggling with school and friends, and people didn't like spiders. Lee replied well, we have a comic with weird, off-beat stories that we are getting ready to cancel anyway, so can I put my little story in the last issue just to get it out of my system? The publisher was agreed, the character was featured in the last issue of Amazing Fantasy (issue number 15, in case you're wondering). A few months later, it was noticed that sales for that issue went completely through the roof. Marvel realized that maybe that little story had something to do with it, and the rest is comics history.
29th Oct '16 8:48:42 PM comicwriter
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* '' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':

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* '' *'' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':



** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WordBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.

to:

** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WordBuilding WorldBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
29th Oct '16 8:48:00 PM comicwriter
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* '' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':

to:

* '' *'' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':



** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WordBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.

to:

** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor]'s [=McGregor=]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WordBuilding for Wakanda and flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
29th Oct '16 8:47:31 PM comicwriter
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* Comicbook/{{Christopher Priest|Comics}}'s ''ComicBook/BlackPanther'' run didn't sell well at the time, but today, it's regarded as one of the best Marvel books of the 90's. Many fans even argue that Priest has earned MyRealDaddy status over the character at this point, and his depiction is often considered to be the definitive take on Black Panther.
** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding for Wakanda and give T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.

to:

* *'' Comicbook/BlackPanther'':
**
Comicbook/{{Christopher Priest|Comics}}'s ''ComicBook/BlackPanther'' run didn't sell well at the time, but today, it's regarded as one of the best Marvel books of the 90's. Many fans even argue that Priest has earned MyRealDaddy status over the character at this point, and his depiction is often considered to be the definitive take on Black Panther.
** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding WordBuilding for Wakanda and give flesh out T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
29th Oct '16 8:45:13 PM comicwriter
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Added DiffLines:

** Likewise, while it didn't sell very well at the time, Don [=McGregor]'s ''Jungle Action'' run ended up having a major impact on the character. It was the first series to actually do serious WorldBuilding for Wakanda and give T'Challa a supporting cast, and it also introduced Erik Killmonger, who would later become one of his most prominent foes. It was also one of the first mainstream comics to have a self-contained, multi-issue arc, with some critics calling the "Panther's Rage" storyline Marvel's first graphic novel.
25th Oct '16 12:04:39 PM bt8257
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* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made just for the machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and indeed, ''High Roller Casino'' was added in 2014.
* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans that it may be hard to believe that it was not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' priviledges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and ruthless difficulty, that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.
* ''Pinball/IronMan'' was a rather rapid case of this. Released in 2009, this was Creator/SternPinball's opposite of ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'': coming off a series of mediocre releases like ''Pinball/{{NBA}}'' and ''24'', people did not think too highly of the straightforward playfield layout of ''Iron Man'', which made operators and home buyers alike hesitant to buy ''Iron Man''. It didn't help that the build quality was so poor that the screws would come loose in as little as six months. However, eventually, people modded their ''Iron Man'' machines for increased sturdiness and found that its rules complemented its playfield very well, and the game eventually became popular enough for Stern to issue a re-release in 2014.

to:

* ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'' came out a year after the well-liked ''Pinball/StarWarsEpisodeI'' and fell into obscurity as victim of a ToughActToFollow. Whereas ''Star Wars: Episode I'' used a monitor, was full of voice clips, displayed live-action footage made just for the machine, and a rather complicated set of rules, ''High Roller Casino'' used an old-fashioned dot-matrix display, the rules were seen as overly simplistic, and the miniature slot machine was unimpressive. On top of that, ''High Roller Casino'' was released in 2001, right at the nadir of modern pinball's popularity, so despite its lower price, few people were interested in putting it up for public display and thus few people had even heard of it. ''High Roller Casino'' machines were then used in competitions in 2013, where it gained new popularity now that the machine can stand on its own merits (as well as pinball players learning the machine exists) and that its rules are not so much simplistic as they are uncluttered. Much demand now exists for ''High Roller Casino'' to be included in the compilation video game ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade'', and indeed, ''High Roller Casino'' it was indeed added in 2014.
* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans that it may be hard to believe that it was not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' priviledges privileges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and [[NintendoHard ruthless difficulty, difficulty]], that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.
* ''Pinball/IronMan'' was a rather rapid case of this. Released in 2009, this was Creator/SternPinball's opposite of ''Pinball/HighRollerCasino'': coming off a series of mediocre releases like ''Pinball/{{NBA}}'' and ''24'', people did not think too highly of the straightforward playfield layout of ''Iron Man'', which made operators and home buyers alike hesitant to buy ''Iron Man''. It didn't help that the build quality was so poor that the screws would come loose in as little as six months. However, eventually, people modded their ''Iron Man'' machines for increased sturdiness and found that its rules complemented its playfield play-field very well, and the game eventually became popular enough for Stern to issue a re-release in 2014.
25th Oct '16 9:19:04 AM bt8257
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans that it may be hard to believe that it was not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' privileges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and ruthless difficulty, that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.

to:

* ''Pinball/TheTwilightZone'' is so well-liked among pinball fans that it may be hard to believe that it was not that popular when it was new. It currently ranks at or near the top of lists on various pinball sites. The result of Creator/PatLawlor getting ''carte blanche'' privileges priviledges after the success of ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the machine is crammed full of things and has among the most complicated sets of rules to have ever been in a pinball game, even compared to today's digital pinball. It was this complicatedness, and ruthless difficulty, that scared passers-by away from playing more than a few games before swearing it off. In addition, because it had so many parts, it broke down easily and frequently, the game designed in such a way that if even one thing is slightly below maximum capacity, the game was rendered barely playable. ''The Twilight Zone'' only started getting respect when large amounts of them started entering private use. As the player can play it as much as he or she wishes, the complicated rules go from intimidating to a source of tremendous ReplayValue, and if it ever breaks, the owner is always on hand to act upon it.



* After the Brawl For All, it seemed that Wrestling/DrDeathSteveWilliams had faded into obscurity, [[NeverLiveItDown never living down]] the moment when he got knocked out by Bart Gunn. Until he got cancer, rebuilt his friendship with Wrestling/JimRoss that fell apart after Doc's WWF run and became [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments Dr Life.]] As a result, Steve Williams is still considered one of the toughest wrestlers that ever walked ''despite'' The Brawl For All.
* Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield. When Bradshaw shifted into his wealthy tycoon gimmick in 2004, the backlash was fast and furious for numerous reasons, not the least of which was that Bradshaw had ''rarely'' been seen as a future main eventer up till that time. As JBL, however, while fans still agreed he was never the greatest in the ring, he did reveal a knack for getting under the skin of fans just by being a [[LargeHam gleefully hammy,]] PoliticallyIncorrectVillain - in fact, he quickly became one of the best promos in the business. He cemented this reputation during his stint as a color commentator with Wrestling/MichaelCole, with the bonus of an encyclopedic knowledge of old school wrestling. Now that he's retired, fans who previously decried him for being unworthy of his push now miss him for his memorable (if sometimes [[CrossingTheLineTwice off-color]]) promo work.

to:

* After the Brawl For All, it seemed that Wrestling/DrDeathSteveWilliams had faded into obscurity, [[NeverLiveItDown never living down]] the moment when he got knocked out by Bart Gunn. Until he got cancer, rebuilt his friendship with Wrestling/JimRoss that fell apart after Doc's WWF run and became [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments Dr Dr. Life.]] As a result, Steve Williams is still considered one of the toughest wrestlers that ever walked ''despite'' The Brawl For All.
* Wrestling/JohnBradshawLayfield. When Bradshaw shifted into his wealthy tycoon gimmick in 2004, the backlash was fast and furious for numerous reasons, not the least of which was that Bradshaw had ''rarely'' been seen as a future main eventer up till until that time. As JBL, however, while fans still agreed he was never the greatest in the ring, he did reveal a knack for getting under the skin of fans just by being a [[LargeHam gleefully hammy,]] PoliticallyIncorrectVillain - in fact, he quickly became one of the best promos in the business. He cemented this reputation during his stint as a color commentator with Wrestling/MichaelCole, with the bonus of an encyclopedic knowledge of old school wrestling. Now that he's retired, fans who previously decried him for being unworthy of his push now miss him for his memorable (if sometimes [[CrossingTheLineTwice [[CrossesTheLineTwice off-color]]) promo work.



* Wrestling/SamoaJoe. Turning Point 2007. Scott Hall no-showed the event and Joe, given a live mic to announce his replacement in the match, used the oppurtunity to shoot on his frustration of how "superstars" are starting to flood into the promotion and take away the spotlight from the homegrown talent. At the time he was denounced as a whiner. Today, fans who look back on it see it as one of the forewarnings of the major problems TNA would have later on, which would reach its zenith at the start of the Hogan-Bischoff era, where ''everyone'' got shoved down the card to make room for their buddies and ex-WWE and WCW wrestlers. Joe is now seen in a much more sympathetic light, especially as his TNA career slowed down to midcard hell.
* Wrestling/JohnCena spent ''years'' vilified by the smarks and hardcore fans for his stale, kiddy-pandering "Superman" gimmick. However, when Cena began to transition into a part-timer role and do other things, Wrestling/RomanReigns effectively got booked into his place with the same character. It didn't fit him. Reigns' push as the new face of the company has gone so terribly that many began to look at Cena and ''his'' push to the top more objectively. Cena was called up as part of the famous OVW class of 2002 (Lesnar, Orton, Batista, and Cena), and out of all his class, he's the one who had the least amount of help from the company. Orton and Batista joined Wrestling/{{Evolution}} with Wrestling/TripleH and Wrestling/RicFlair, while Lesnar got Wrestling/PaulHeyman and was hotshotted to the main event in his first year. Cena was left on his own, floundered, and if it hadn't been for Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon hearing him rap, might have gotten fired. Then he developed the "Doctor of Thuganomics" gimmick and spent time as a midcard heel, who became more and more popular to the point they had no choice but to turn him face and push him to the moon, especially after Lesnar left and Orton's initial face push didn't pan out well. Case in point, Cena got over organically -- it was his booking after he won his first world title that ruined him for many fans, and even then it was a testament to his talent as a performer that he managed to make such a terrible gimmick bearable and watchable for ''eight years''. When Reigns, with his manufactured push (he was the well-protected "hot tag" guy in Wrestling/TheShield, to build up his popularity) and much more inferior mic skills, got booked in his place as the chosen new face of the company, the fans shunned him to the point that they began to pine for ''Cena'', and realized that Cena was a much more talented performer than they ever gave him credit for.

to:

* Wrestling/SamoaJoe. Turning Point 2007. Scott Hall no-showed the event and Joe, given a live mic to announce his replacement in the match, used the oppurtunity to shoot on his frustration of how "superstars" are starting to flood into the promotion and take away the spotlight from the homegrown talent. At the time he was denounced as a whiner. Today, fans who look back on it see it as one of the forewarnings of the major problems TNA would have had later on, which would reach its zenith at the start of the Hogan-Bischoff era, where ''everyone'' got shoved down the card to make room for their buddies and ex-WWE and WCW wrestlers. Joe is now seen in a much more sympathetic light, especially as his TNA career slowed down to midcard hell.
* Wrestling/JohnCena spent ''years'' vilified by the smarks and hardcore fans for his stale, kiddy-pandering "Superman" gimmick. However, when Cena began to transition into a part-timer role and do other things, Wrestling/RomanReigns effectively got booked into his place with the same character. It didn't fit him. Reigns' push as the new face of the company has gone so terribly that many began to look at Cena and ''his'' push to the top more objectively. Cena was called up as part of the famous OVW class of 2002 (Lesnar, Orton, Batista, and Cena), and out of all his class, he's the one who had the least amount of help from the company. Orton and Batista joined Wrestling/{{Evolution}} with Wrestling/TripleH and Wrestling/RicFlair, while Lesnar got Wrestling/PaulHeyman and was hotshotted to the main event in his first year. Cena was left on his own, floundered, and if it hadn't been for Wrestling/StephanieMcMahon hearing him rap, might have gotten fired. Then he developed the "Doctor of Thuganomics" gimmick and spent time as a midcard heel, who became more and more popular to the point they had no choice but to turn him face and push him to the moon, especially after Lesnar left and Orton's initial face push didn't pan out well. Case in point, Cena got over organically ''organically'' -- it was his booking after he won his first world title that ruined him for many fans, and even then it was a testament to his talent as a performer that he managed to make such a terrible gimmick bearable and watchable for ''eight ''8 years''. When Reigns, with his manufactured push (he was the well-protected "hot tag" guy in Wrestling/TheShield, to build up his popularity) and much more inferior mic skills, got booked in his place as the chosen new face of the company, the fans shunned him to the point that they began to pine for ''Cena'', and realized that Cena was a much more talented performer than they ever gave him credit for.
This list shows the last 10 events of 388. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VindicatedByHistory