History Main / VigilanteMan

31st Jan '16 4:50:48 AM bwehehehe
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** Played with in the Season Ten episode "Protection," while the killer acts like one, [[spoiler: a witness account reveals that the killer was having delusions of crimes being committed. He killed the boyfriend of the witness, who was making out with her, due to the fact that the killer was deluded into thinking that the witness was being raped ]]
20th Jan '16 11:54:48 PM storymasterb
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* In the backstory of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', the Primarch of the Night Lords, Konrad Curze, was this. The planet he arrived on after the scattering of the Primarchs was a crime-ridden WretchedHive named Nostramo, and ultimately Curze decided to bring justice in the most brutal, unforgiving manner possible, essentially acting as a grimdark Franchise/{{Batman}} whose body count left the sewers choked with corpses. He was so successful that he was made the planet's ruler and the entire populace towed the line out of fear that he would kill anyone who broke the law.
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* In the backstory of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', the Primarch of the Night Lords, Konrad Curze, was this. The planet he arrived on after the scattering of the Primarchs was a crime-ridden WretchedHive named Nostramo, and ultimately Curze decided to bring justice in the most brutal, unforgiving manner possible, essentially acting as a grimdark Franchise/{{Batman}} whose body count left the sewers choked with corpses. He was so successful that he was made the planet's ruler and the entire populace towed the line out of fear that he would kill anyone who broke the law. His story also shows the logical problem with such methods: because the only thing keeping the population in line was fear of Curze, once he leaves to join the Great Crusade, Nostramo slips right back into its old ways.
18th Jan '16 8:08:33 AM H2SO4
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* Lin Beifong from ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' drops her job as DaChief and goes vigilante in order to fight [[BigBad Amon]]. Though she's still a policewoman at her core and doesn't kill anyone. Korra herself gets into some trouble early on with the police when she tries to hunt down criminals: she feels she's justified in that she's the Avatar, while the police are annoyed at some naive civilian girl interfering in their work. As the show goes on and Korra gets some CharacterDevelopment, she begins to learn to cooperate and work with the police, rather than just blindly charging in on her own.
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* Lin Beifong from ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' drops her job as DaChief and goes vigilante in order to fight [[BigBad Amon]]. Though she's still a policewoman at her core and doesn't kill anyone. Korra herself gets into some trouble early on with the police when she tries to hunt down criminals: she feels she's justified in that she's the Avatar, while the police are annoyed at some naive civilian girl interfering in their work. As the show goes on and Korra gets some CharacterDevelopment, she begins to learn to cooperate and work with the police, rather than just blindly charging in on her own. More often than not though, the police and government are willing to let Korra deal with the situation as she sees fit.
8th Jan '16 4:35:18 PM Morgenthaler
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The Vigilante Man's favorite method of execution is (obviously) the VigilanteExecution. If he's also a police officer, this makes him a vigilante-driven version of the KillerCop.
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The Vigilante Man's favorite method of execution is (obviously) the VigilanteExecution. If he's also a police officer, this makes him a vigilante-driven version of the KillerCop. KillerCop. A cop whose method towards disposing criminals is just as final but who does operate within the law goes under JudgeJuryAndExecutioner.
19th Dec '15 7:53:37 PM nombretomado
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* The TV series ''TheShield'' is about a cop who is a Vigilante Man. Interestingly, the series constantly shows that Mackey's vigilantism is a bad thing, always for his own self-interest, and never in the interests of justice. ''Then'', it goes on to show his CowboyCop side, where he bends or outright breaks the law to serve the greater good (a criminal will go free, but the young girl he kidnapped will be saved from being raped and murdered). Notably, the series never specifically casts judgment on Mackey's karma directly, leaving it to the viewer to decide whether he has overall good karma or bad.
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* The TV series ''TheShield'' ''Series/TheShield'' is about a cop who is a Vigilante Man. Interestingly, the series constantly shows that Mackey's vigilantism is a bad thing, always for his own self-interest, and never in the interests of justice. ''Then'', it goes on to show his CowboyCop side, where he bends or outright breaks the law to serve the greater good (a criminal will go free, but the young girl he kidnapped will be saved from being raped and murdered). Notably, the series never specifically casts judgment on Mackey's karma directly, leaving it to the viewer to decide whether he has overall good karma or bad.
15th Dec '15 3:28:59 AM Morgenthaler
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* The title character of ''AnakshaFemaleAssassin'' is a vigilante assassin who has taken it upon herself to clean up the streets of Santa Lina, one scumbag at a time.
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* The title character of ''AnakshaFemaleAssassin'' ''VideoGame/AnakshaFemaleAssassin'' is a vigilante assassin who has taken it upon herself to clean up the streets of Santa Lina, one scumbag at a time.
3rd Dec '15 1:33:06 AM CrypticMirror
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* ''Website/TLFTravelAlerts'': The [[https://twitter.com/TlfTravelAlerts/status/672332636296192000 Signals at Earls Court]] are not going to play by your rules, but they are going to get results! Delays.
4th Nov '15 8:56:52 AM erforce
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* The ''Film/DeathWish'' movies. Paul Kersey becomes a vigilante after his wife is murdered and his daughter is sexually assaulted by muggers. Also an UnbuiltTrope as the film pioneered the urban vigilante concept, but it also showed how dangerous it would be. By the time of the third sequel, Kersey is infamous for harrying the police, who are powerless to pin any charges on him (but are happy to take credit for his crime-fighting accomplishments). Police Chief Richard [[PunnyName Shirker]] tries to contain him, but ends up joining the fray when Kersey is ambushed by gangsters.
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* The ''Film/DeathWish'' movies. Paul Kersey becomes a vigilante after his wife is murdered and his daughter is sexually assaulted by muggers. Also an UnbuiltTrope as the film pioneered the urban vigilante concept, but it also showed how dangerous it would be. By the time of the third sequel, ''Film/DeathWish3'', Kersey is infamous for harrying the police, who are powerless to pin any charges on him (but are happy to take credit for his crime-fighting accomplishments). Police Chief Richard [[PunnyName Shirker]] tries to contain him, but ends up joining the fray when Kersey is ambushed by gangsters.

* Preacher in the movie ''Film/PaleRider''.
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* %%* Preacher in the movie ''Film/PaleRider''.

* ''Film/TheBoondockSaints''. Especially in the courtroom climax.
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* %%* ''Film/TheBoondockSaints''. Especially in the courtroom climax.

* The Michael Caine movie ''Film/HarryBrown''. * Jigsaw, Amanda and Hoffman in ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'' are a twisted, ''twisted'' version of this.
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* %%* The Michael Caine movie ''Film/HarryBrown''. * %%* Jigsaw, Amanda and Hoffman in ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'' are a twisted, ''twisted'' version of this.

* The Hobo in ''Film/HoboWithAShotgun.''
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* %%* The Hobo in ''Film/HoboWithAShotgun.''
12th Oct '15 12:58:42 PM rafi
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* The SociopathicHero of the manga ''Manga/{{Akumetsu}}'' is one of these, although rather than just targeting criminals, he goes after anyone he considers bringing evil to Japan. Disturbingly, although the stories have a forward stating that the character [[MisaimedFandom should not be considered a role model]], his frequent [[CharacterFilibuster rants on what's wrong with Japanese society]] give an impression [[AuthorTract otherwise]]. * Lelouch in ''Anime/CodeGeass'', in creating the terrorist group the Black Knights, is trying to overthrow Brittania's racist, SocialDarwinist regime, so as to create his sister Nunnally's longed-for "beautiful world."

* Lelouch in ''Anime/CodeGeass'', in creating the terrorist group the Black Knights, is trying to overthrow Brittania's racist, SocialDarwinist regime, so as to create his sister Nunnally's longed-for "beautiful world."
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* Lelouch [[spoiler:Jellal]] becomes this in ''Anime/CodeGeass'', in creating ''Manga/FairyTail'', forming a small independent guild that hunts down dark guilds, something the terrorist group Council doesn't allow of the Black Knights, guilds in it's jurisdiction, as it counts as illegal warring between guilds. * In ''Manga/FutureDiary'', the Twelfth is a vigilante whose heart seems to be in the right place: his goal is usually just to ''capture'' criminals to help the police, not kill them outright. However, he dresses and acts so creepily that the people he's trying to overthrow Brittania's racist, SocialDarwinist regime, so as to create help often beat him up or arrest him. [[spoiler:Then he gets involved in the Diary Game and starts killing with no remorse, since he feels that "Justice" is on his sister Nunnally's longed-for "beautiful world."side.]] * In ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'', Section 9 is frequently doing some work "off the record". But [[CrapsackWorld unlike most other law enforcement agencies]], they don't do it for their own gain. * Hibari Kyouya from ''Manga/KatekyoHitmanReborn''. He rules Nanimori with an iron fist and does whatever he pleases since people are too afraid to call him out on it, but god help you if you so much as look at his hometown the wrong way.

* Lelouch in ''Anime/CodeGeass'', in creating The ''Manga/SamuraiGun'' exist to avenge the terrorist group evils of the Black Knights, is trying Shogunate, though in practise this means avenging the deaths of [[{{Fanservice}} large-breasted women]]. * Lunatic in ''Anime/TigerAndBunny''. As opposed to overthrow Brittania's racist, SocialDarwinist regime, so as Heroes who take part in [=HeroTV=] who only seek to create his sister Nunnally's longed-for "beautiful world."arrest criminals, Lunatic actually ''[[VigilanteExecution kills]]'' them. Though he tends to save this for people who REALLY deserve it.

* The SociopathicHero of the manga ''{{Akumetsu}}'' is one of these, although rather than just targeting criminals, he goes after anyone he considers bringing evil to Japan. Disturbingly, although the stories have a forward stating that the character [[MisaimedFandom should not be considered a role model]], his frequent [[CharacterFilibuster rants on what's wrong with Japanese society]] give an impression [[AuthorTract otherwise]]. * The ''Manga/SamuraiGun'' exist to avenge the evils of the Shogunate, though in practise this means avenging the deaths of [[{{Fanservice}} large-breasted women]]. * Hibari Kyouya from ''Manga/KatekyoHitmanReborn''. He rules Nanimori with an iron fist and does whatever he pleases since people are too afraid to call him out on it, but god help you if you so much as look at his hometown the wrong way.

* Lunatic in ''Anime/TigerAndBunny''. As opposed to Heroes who take part in [=HeroTV=] who only seek to arrest criminals, Lunatic actually ''[[VigilanteExecution kills]]'' them. Though he tends to save this for people who REALLY deserve it. * [[spoiler:Jellal]] becomes this in ''Manga/FairyTail'', forming a small independent guild that hunts down dark guilds, something the Council doesn't allow of the guilds in it's jurisdiction, as it counts as illegal warring between guilds. * In ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'', Section 9 is frequently doing some work "off the record". But [[CrapsackWorld unlike most other law enforcement agencies]], they don't do it for their own gain. * In ''Manga/FutureDiary'', the Twelfth is a vigilante whose heart seems to be in the right place: his goal is usually just to ''capture'' criminals to help the police, not kill them outright. However, he dresses and acts so creepily that the people he's trying to help often beat him up or arrest him. [[spoiler:Then he gets involved in the Diary Game and starts killing with no remorse, since he feels that "Justice" is on his side.]]

* V from ''ComicBook/VForVendetta''. While throughout the series he's seen as more of a... vengeful terrorist, he does show some (although few) signs that he started out as one of these and simply got tired of not making progress. * Comicbook/ThePunisher (Frank Castle) is a vigilante and AntiHero in the MarvelUniverse.
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* V from ''ComicBook/VForVendetta''. While throughout the series he's seen as more of a... vengeful terrorist, he does show some (although few) signs that he started out as one of these and simply got tired of not making progress. * Comicbook/ThePunisher (Frank Castle) is a vigilante and AntiHero in the MarvelUniverse.!!DC

* ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'': ** Rorschach is a {{deconstruction}} of this trope, as well as the AntiHero in general. He is not presented as a good person and the police disdain him -- in fact, they hate him almost as much as the criminals do. ** Likewise Edward 'The Comedian'' Blake, who embodied the SociopathicHero variant and is arguably even more of a deconstruction than WellIntentionedExtremist Rorschach; he was portrayed as a dangerous nutcase corrupted by the power to dispense KarmicDeath, who knew damn well he'd passed any sane person's MoralEventHorizon and didn't give a damn. * Creator/DCComics' Adrian Chase--a district attorney, and later judge, who hunted down and killed crooks who got off--was named simply The Vigilante, though Chase eventually became a {{Deconstruction}} of vigilante justice, and ended up committing suicide due to his guilt over the increasing violence of his methods and actions. * Also from DC is federal prosecutor Kate Spencer, who became the vigilante assassin Comicbook/{{Manhunter}} after she got tired of criminals dodging legal justice.

* The ComicBook/{{Huntress}} in Creator/DCComics became a vigilante after her family was murdered by rival mafiosi. * Casey Jones from the original ''[[Comicbook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]]'' comics. * The Paladin, who appeared in a ''JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' story where Anansi was changing all the heroes' stories, is an alternate Bruce Wayne who picked up Joe Chill's gun while he was running off, and shot him. He became a gun-toting vigilante in a cowboy hat, whose story (until Vixen interferes) ends with him and Commissioner Gordon in a MexicanStandoff. * Wild Dog in DCComics is a largely unknown vigilante. He's basically per his creator Max Allan Collins in Amazing Heroes#119, a modern version of the Shadow, Zorro, the Lone Ranger, and the Green Hornet. * The Blue Knight in ''ComicBook/AstroCity''. * John Dusk, the protagonist of ''ComicBook/{{Absolution}}''. He's a superhero in a setting where the superheroes are all legitimate law enforcement officers, which means they have to observe due process and other pesky legal restrictions. One day, he gets fed up with having his hands tied, and starts killing. * Eric Draven in ''Film/TheCrow''. Although, since he's already died and has resurrected as an unkillable zombie, he's technically a Vigilante ''Thing''.
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* The ComicBook/{{Huntress}} in Creator/DCComics became a vigilante after her family was murdered by rival mafiosi. * Casey Jones from the original ''[[Comicbook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]]'' comics. * The Paladin, who appeared in a ''JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' story where Anansi was changing all the heroes' stories, is an alternate Bruce Wayne who picked up Joe Chill's gun while he was running off, and shot him. He became a gun-toting vigilante in a cowboy hat, whose story (until Vixen interferes) ends with him and Commissioner Gordon in a MexicanStandoff. * Wild Dog in DCComics is a largely unknown vigilante. He's basically per his creator Max Allan Collins in Amazing Heroes#119, a modern version of the Shadow, Zorro, the Lone Ranger, and the Green Hornet. * The Blue Knight in ''ComicBook/AstroCity''. * John Dusk, federal prosecutor Kate Spencer, who became the protagonist vigilante assassin Comicbook/{{Manhunter}} after she got tired of ''ComicBook/{{Absolution}}''. He's a superhero in a setting where the superheroes are all legitimate law enforcement officers, which means they have to observe due process and other pesky criminals dodging legal restrictions. One day, he gets fed up with having his hands tied, and starts killing. * Eric Draven in ''Film/TheCrow''. Although, since he's already died and has resurrected as an unkillable zombie, he's technically a Vigilante ''Thing''.justice.

* Find a hero who '''doesn't''' fit this trope in ''SinCity''. * John Tensen from ComicBook/TheNewUniverse title ''Justice''. In early issues, when he thinks he's a warrior from a MagicalLand, he goes after criminals in general. After a {{Retcon}} reveals that he's actually a paranormal, he devotes himself to policing his brethren, punishing the ones who use their powers for evil. * Victor Ray from ''ComicBook/OneHundredBullets'' kills criminals in his spare time to balance out the awful things he does on behalf of Agent Graves * ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'': [[DependingOnTheWriter Depending on the story]], Paperinik (WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck's superhero alter ego in some Italian stories) may have this as his reason to hunt down criminals: Duckburg has a serious criminality problem (seriously, how is that the Beagle Boys manage to get free in a lawful way?!), and an unstoppable sadistic superhero going to extreme lengths to humiliate and beat you up after catching you in the act or getting proof and a confession ({{justif|iedTrope}}ying the fact his victims are always guilty: he makes sure, and those times he was wrong he found out before beating up the supposed criminal) tend to keep the problem manageable. In those stories he's also a wanted criminal due various spectacular thefts he committed at the start of his career to punish Donald's bullies (the very first being the money-filled bed Scrooge was sleeping on: the sacks of money were ''too easy'' for him), but most of the police doesn't want to arrest him due to a combination of him catching an insane amount of criminals and leaving them on their step and mercilessly humiliating the ones who actually try and arrest him (one memorable occasion had him fooling two cops into breaking into the bedroom of the chief of the police. HilarityEnsued).

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* Find a hero Creator/DCComics' Adrian Chase--a district attorney, and later judge, who '''doesn't''' fit this trope hunted down and killed crooks who got off--was named simply The Vigilante, though Chase eventually became a {{Deconstruction}} of vigilante justice, and ended up committing suicide due to his guilt over the increasing violence of his methods and actions. * Wild Dog is a largely unknown vigilante. He's basically per his creator Max Allan Collins in ''SinCity''. Amazing Heroes#119, a modern version of the Shadow, Zorro, the Lone Ranger, and the Green Hornet. !!Other * Victor Ray from ''ComicBook/OneHundredBullets'' kills criminals in his spare time to balance out the awful things he does on behalf of Agent Graves * John Dusk, the protagonist of ''ComicBook/{{Absolution}}''. He's a superhero in a setting where the superheroes are all legitimate law enforcement officers, which means they have to observe due process and other pesky legal restrictions. One day, he gets fed up with having his hands tied, and starts killing. * The Blue Knight in ''ComicBook/AstroCity''. * Eric Draven in ''Film/TheCrow''. Although, since he's already died and has resurrected as an unkillable zombie, he's technically a Vigilante ''Thing''. * John Tensen from ComicBook/TheNewUniverse title ''Justice''. In early issues, when he thinks he's a warrior from a MagicalLand, he goes after criminals in general. After a {{Retcon}} reveals that he's actually a paranormal, he devotes himself to policing his brethren, punishing the ones who use their powers for evil. * Victor Ray from ''ComicBook/OneHundredBullets'' kills criminals in his spare time to balance out the awful things he does on behalf of Agent Graves * ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'': [[DependingOnTheWriter Depending on In the story]], early stories, Paperinik (WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck's superhero alter ego in some Italian stories) may have was not actually a superhero, but an anti-hero vindicator inspired by Diabolik and Fantômas that punish bad people with terror and humiliations. The writers toned this as his reason to hunt aspect down criminals: Duckburg has later and turned him into a serious criminality problem (seriously, how is that Batman-style heroic avenger instead, and he started targeting the criminal population of Duckburg, in particular the Beagle Boys manage to get free in Boys. * Comicbook/ThePunisher (Frank Castle) is a lawful way?!), vigilante and an unstoppable sadistic superhero going to extreme lengths to humiliate and beat you up after catching you AntiHero in the act or getting proof and MarvelUniverse. * Find a confession ({{justif|iedTrope}}ying hero who '''doesn't''' fit this trope in ''Comicbook/SinCity''. * Casey Jones from the fact his victims are always guilty: he makes sure, and those times he was wrong he found out before beating up original ''[[Comicbook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]]'' comics. * V from ''ComicBook/VForVendetta''. While throughout the supposed criminal) tend to keep the problem manageable. In those stories series he's also a wanted criminal due various spectacular thefts seen as more of a... vengeful terrorist, he committed at does show some (although few) signs that he started out as one of these and simply got tired of not making progress. * ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'': ** Rorschach is a {{deconstruction}} of this trope, as well as the start of his career to punish Donald's bullies (the very first being the money-filled bed Scrooge was sleeping on: the sacks of money were ''too easy'' for him), but most of AntiHero in general. He is not presented as a good person and the police doesn't want to arrest disdain him due to a combination of -- in fact, they hate him catching an insane amount of almost as much as the criminals do. ** Likewise Edward 'The Comedian'' Blake, who embodied the SociopathicHero variant and leaving them on their step is arguably even more of a deconstruction than WellIntentionedExtremist Rorschach; he was portrayed as a dangerous nutcase corrupted by the power to dispense KarmicDeath, who knew damn well he'd passed any sane person's MoralEventHorizon and mercilessly humiliating the ones who actually try and arrest him (one memorable occasion had him fooling two cops into breaking into the bedroom of the chief of the police. HilarityEnsued).didn't give a damn.
24th Sep '15 4:22:25 PM TheInimitableECypher
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* Creator/LeeChild's Jack Reacher has no problem killing the villains of each boook. He doesn't even make a token attempt to call in the law. As with many of the classic Vigilante Men, he only kills those he's positive are guilty, and he does his best to avoid harming innocents. By the fifteenth book in the series, ''Worth Dying For'', there are strong implications that various law enforcement agencies know who he is and what he does, and may be subtly guiding him to situations that they can't touch.
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* Creator/LeeChild's Jack Reacher has no problem killing the villains of each boook.book. He doesn't even make a token attempt to call in the law. As with many of the classic Vigilante Men, he only kills those he's positive are guilty, and he does his best to avoid harming innocents. By the fifteenth book in the series, ''Worth Dying For'', there are strong implications that various law enforcement agencies know who he is and what he does, and may be subtly guiding him to situations that they can't touch.

* ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' has Archangel, who turns out to be a CowboyCop frustrated by being hindered by ineffectual bureaucracy. Nicknamed "Space Franchise/{{Batman}}" [[FanNickname by the players,]] though he's much closer to Space Punisher as he has no problem killing criminals. He's so good at it that three rival mercenary groups that hate each others' guts team up to take him down. He also isn't above cruel punishments, like killing criminals by sabotaging the air supply of their space suits or infecting them with their own bioweapons. There's some {{Deconstruction}} later on; his loyalty mission involves hunting down a guy who set him up to dole out some vigilante justice, but if you take the paragon route and convince Archangel that [[CruelMercy letting him live is punishment enough]], he comments on how GreyAndGrayMorality doesn't have a lot of place for this, and that he prefers to see things as [[BlackAndWhiteMorality black and white]] because it makes things easier.
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* ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' has Archangel, who turns out to be a CowboyCop frustrated by being hindered by ineffectual bureaucracy. Nicknamed "Space Franchise/{{Batman}}" [[FanNickname by the players,]] though he's much closer to Space Punisher as he has no problem killing criminals. He's so good at it that three rival mercenary groups that hate each others' guts team up to take him down. He also isn't above cruel punishments, like killing criminals by sabotaging the air supply of their space suits or infecting them with their own bioweapons.bio-weapons. There's some {{Deconstruction}} later on; his loyalty mission involves hunting down a guy who set him up to dole out some vigilante justice, but if you take the paragon route and convince Archangel that [[CruelMercy letting him live is punishment enough]], he comments on how GreyAndGrayMorality doesn't have a lot of place for this, and that he prefers to see things as [[BlackAndWhiteMorality black and white]] because it makes things easier.
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