History Main / VigilanteMan

26th Feb '17 6:50:18 PM Mhazard
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The Vigilante Man is a man who brings criminals to justice by any means necessary, even if it means killing the criminals outright. Although he is breaking the law, he is presented as the good guy. If the police are after him, expect them to secretly sympathize with his goals. Occasionally, [[InspectorJavert one officer]] is determined to catch the Vigilante Man, but you can be sure that his fellow officers aren't working very hard to help him. The "good" Vigilante Man [[WouldNotShootAGoodGuy refuses to fight the police, and if confronted, will either surrender or die before harming them]]. The "bad" Vigilante Man is willing to kill anyone who tries to stop him.

to:

The Vigilante Man is a man who brings criminals to justice by any means necessary, even if it means killing the criminals outright. Although he is breaking the law, he is presented as the good guy. If the police are after him, expect them to secretly sympathize with his goals. Occasionally, [[InspectorJavert one officer]] is determined to catch the Vigilante Man, but you can be sure that his fellow officers aren't working very hard to help him. The "good" Vigilante Man [[WouldNotShootAGoodGuy refuses to fight the police, and if confronted, will either surrender or die before harming them]]. The "bad" Vigilante Man is [[TheUnfettered willing to kill anyone who tries to stop him.
him]].
22nd Jan '17 7:35:52 PM LordDynasmon
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* [[spoiler:Jellal]] becomes this in ''Manga/FairyTail'', forming a small independent guild that hunts down dark guilds, something the Council doesn't allow of the guilds in it's jurisdiction, as it counts as illegal warring between guilds.

to:

* [[spoiler:Jellal]] becomes this in ''Manga/FairyTail'', forming a small independent guild that hunts down dark guilds, something the Council doesn't allow of the guilds in it's its jurisdiction, as it counts as illegal warring between guilds.
20th Jan '17 3:57:34 PM RAraya
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* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between the 1970s and the very early 1990s mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption (and racism in the case of blaxploitation fils) led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.

to:

* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between the 1970s and the very early 1990s mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption (and racism in the case of blaxploitation fils) films) led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.
12th Jan '17 11:01:44 AM RAraya
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* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between 1970s and 1990s mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.

to:

* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between the 1970s and the very early 1990s mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption (and racism in the case of blaxploitation fils) led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.



* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.



* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.
10th Jan '17 9:00:20 PM WoozyJack
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* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between 1975 and 1993 mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.

to:

* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between 1975 1970s and 1993 1990s mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.



* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.
7th Jan '17 7:26:36 PM RAraya
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* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies between 1970 and around 1993 mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.

to:

* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies roughly between 1970 1975 and around 1993 mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.



* In ''Film/ManOnFire'', John Creasy takes it upon himself to track down and kill the people responsible for kidnapping and murdering a girl while he was working for her family as a bodyguard.

to:

* In ''Film/ManOnFire'', John Creasy takes it upon ''Contract on Cherry Street'' (1977) has Music/FrankSinatra as the leader of a team of NYPD detectives who turn vigilante on TheMafia after one of them is killed.
* ''Film/TheStarChamber'' (1983) is about a judge who decides to join a secret 'court' of judges who hire a contract killer to carry out their 'sentences' of accused criminals in death penalty cases who get OffOnATechnicality. However when two drug dealers are judged guilty of a child murder, then later turn out to be innocent of that particular crime, the protagonist finds
himself in a dilemma.
* ''Film/SavageStreets'' (1984) has Linda Blair as a tough high school girl who turns vigilante after a vicious gang called the Scars rape her deaf-mute sister and murder her best friend.
* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]]
to track down their killers who've fled the country.
* Joey Rosso from ''Film/RollingVengeance'' (1987). His weapon of choice happens to be a Monster Truck.
* Some of the ''Dirty Harry'' films feature vigilantes:
** In ''Film/MagnumForce'', Dirty Harry finds he is actually on the opposite side of some vigilante men. It might be considered impossible that he would object, but when the vigilante men kill a police officer, [[MotiveDecay we can guess even Harry figures they went too far]]. This movie actually explains the difference between CowboyCop (Harry) and Vigilante Man (the vigilante policemen). Dirty Harry uses excessive force when fighting criminals who forcefully resist arrest or directly endanger innocents (his iconic ''do I feel lucky?'' speech actually taunts the criminals to give him reason to use lethal force). He doesn't hunt
and kill unsuspecting criminals (when Scorpio is released on a technicality, Harry tries to scare him; when Ricca is acquitted on legal loophole, vigilante cops immediately kill him, his lawyer and even his driver).
** In ''Film/SuddenImpact'': Jennifer Spencer tracks down and murders
the people responsible for kidnapping brutally gang raping her several years before. Oddly enough, Dirty Harry doesn't arrest her once he discovers the truth, a significant change from his actions and murdering a girl while he was working for her family as a bodyguard. attitude in ''Film/MagnumForce''.



%%* Preacher in the movie ''Film/PaleRider''.

to:

%%* Preacher * Inverted in the Western movie ''Film/PaleRider''.''Film/HangEmHigh''. Creator/ClintEastwood is the innocent victim of vigilantes who mistake him for a murderer/cattle thief (he unknowingly bought the cattle off the real killer). He then becomes a deputy to bring them to justice, and must resist pressure both situational and personal to take the law into his own hands.



* Creator/JodieFoster in ''Film/TheBraveOne'' plays a liberal, ''female'' vigilante, in a meditation on the paranoia and isolation the life of the Vigilante Man (or Woman) would entail, especially if they used to be a "normal" person. Interesting callback to the first ''Film/DeathWish'' in her chosen method too.
* In ''Pyrokinesis'', the protagonist is a female example, killing criminals with the title [[PlayingWithFire psychic power]]. She manages to stay a good guy despite fighting against the police, because [[spoiler: the chief of police is also the head of the snuff ring she's been targeting.]]
* The Sally Field movie ''Film/EyeForAnEye'' has Field's character lose her daughter to a serial killer, and stumble onto a conspiracy of Vigilante Men at a support group. They have very specific requirements: They only target killers whose guilt is obvious yet get OffOnATechnicality, and they won't make the kill for someone else. Instead, they teach newcomers how to make the hit themselves. Something of a strawman case; [[spoiler:the FBI has recognized a pattern of suspicious deaths among acquitted killers and has planted spies in support groups to ''protect those killers.'' Fields discovers the spy in time to keep from incriminating herself seriously, but the agent still threatens Fields with life in prison despite being fully aware that the killer she's after has killed again. Ultimately, the FBI is powerless to protect the killer, as Field pulls off the conspiracy's plan ''perfectly'' - make herself the killer's next target, then kill him in self-defense.]]
* ''Film/HardCandy'': Hayley may qualify as one due to her crusade against pedophile rapists. That or she may be a budding SerialKiller.
* In ''Film/ManOnFire'', John Creasy takes it upon himself to track down and kill the people responsible for kidnapping and murdering a girl while he was working for her family as a bodyguard.
* In the movie ''Film/PunisherWarZone'', the "victims are always guilty" rule was notably averted: near the beginning of the movie, he discovers that one of the people he killed was actually an undercover FBI agent with a family. He feels so guilty about it that he offers the agent's widow a bag full of mafia money, as well as the chance to shoot him.
* The titular ''John Doe: Vigilante''. True to form, his victims are all [[AssholeVictim Asshole Victims]]--child molesters, abusive husbands, culminating in the guy who killed his wife and daughter.
* In ''Film/MurdersAmongUs'', Hans Mertens [[spoiler:almost becomes this, but instead decides not to kill Bruckner at the insistence of Suzanne]].
* Vigilantism is attacked in the 1943 western ''Film/TheOxBowIncident'', wherein three obviously innocent men are persecuted and ultimately murdered by a [[TorchesAndPitchforks lynch mob]].
* Seemingly deconstructed in ''Film/LawAbidingCitizen'', with Clyde Shelton JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope. On the other hand, it also seems to portray the criminal justice system as ineffectual.
* {{Deconstructed|Trope}} with Keller Dover in ''Film/{{Prisoners}}'', who nails the wrong man for kidnapping his daughter, crosses the MoralEventHorizon as a result, [[spoiler:and is left to die in a pit by the ''real'' kidnapper for his trouble. The ending leaves it ambiguous whether or not he will be rescued.]]



* In ''Film/MagnumForce'', Dirty Harry finds he is actually on the opposite side of some vigilante men. It might be considered impossible that he would object, but when the vigilante men kill a police officer, [[MotiveDecay I guess even Harry figures they went too far]]. This movie actually explains the difference between CowboyCop (Harry) and Vigilante Man (the vigilante policemen). Dirty Harry uses excessive force when fighting criminals who forcefully resist arrest or directly endanger innocents (his iconic ''do I feel lucky?'' speech actually taunts the criminals to give him reason to use lethal force). He doesn't hunt and kill unsuspecting criminals (when Scorpio is released on a technicality, Harry tries to scare him; when Ricca is acquitted on legal loophole, vigilante cops immediately kill him, his lawyer and even his driver).
* In ''Film/SuddenImpact'': Jennifer Spencer tracks down and murders the people responsible for brutally gang raping her several years before. Oddly enough, Dirty Harry doesn't arrest her once he discovers the truth, a significant change from his actions and attitude in ''Film/MagnumForce''.
* Deconstructed in ''Film/TaxiDriver''. The main character is a gun-toting vigilante who does end up becoming a local hero after rescuing a young girl from her pimp, but he also happens to be an antisocial, homicidal loner who only ends up taking out his bottled-up rage [[AssholeVictim on criminals]] and being heralded for it after he fails to assassinate a presidential candidate at a campaign rally.
* ''Film/TheStarChamber'' is about a judge who decides to join a secret 'court' of judges who hire a contract killer to carry out their 'sentences' of accused criminals in death penalty cases who get OffOnATechnicality. However when two drug dealers are judged guilty of a child murder, then later turn out to be innocent of that particular crime, the protagonist finds himself in a dilemma.
* Creator/JodieFoster in ''Film/TheBraveOne'' plays a ''female'' vigilante, in a meditation on the paranoia and isolation the life of the Vigilante Man (or Woman) would entail, especially if they used to be a "normal" person. Interesting callback to the first ''Film/DeathWish'' in her chosen method too.
* Inverted in the Western movie ''Film/HangEmHigh''. Creator/ClintEastwood is the innocent victim of vigilantes who mistake him for a murderer/cattle thief (he unknowingly bought the cattle off the real killer). He then becomes a deputy to bring them to justice, and must resist pressure both situational and personal to take the law into his own hands.
* ''Contract on Cherry Street'' (1977) has Music/FrankSinatra as the leader of a team of NYPD detectives who turn vigilante on TheMafia after one of them is killed.
* ''Film/SavageStreets'' (1984) has Linda Blair as a tough high school girl who turns vigilante after a vicious gang called the Scars rape her deaf-mute sister and murder her best friend.
* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.

to:

* In ''Film/MagnumForce'', Dirty Harry finds he is actually on the opposite side of some vigilante men. It might be considered impossible that he would object, but when the vigilante men kill a police officer, [[MotiveDecay I guess even Harry figures they went too far]]. This movie actually explains the difference between CowboyCop (Harry) and Vigilante Man (the vigilante policemen). Dirty Harry uses excessive force when fighting criminals who forcefully resist arrest or directly endanger innocents (his iconic ''do I feel lucky?'' speech actually taunts the criminals to give him reason to use lethal force). He doesn't hunt and kill unsuspecting criminals (when Scorpio is released on a technicality, Harry tries to scare him; when Ricca is acquitted on legal loophole, vigilante cops immediately kill him, his lawyer and even his driver).
* In ''Film/SuddenImpact'': Jennifer Spencer tracks down and murders the people responsible for brutally gang raping her several years before. Oddly enough, Dirty Harry doesn't arrest her once he discovers the truth, a significant change from his actions and attitude in ''Film/MagnumForce''.
* Deconstructed in ''Film/TaxiDriver''. The main character is a gun-toting vigilante who does end up becoming a local hero after rescuing a young girl from her pimp, but he also happens to be an antisocial, homicidal loner who only ends up taking out his bottled-up rage [[AssholeVictim on criminals]] and being heralded for it after he fails to assassinate a presidential candidate at a campaign rally.
* ''Film/TheStarChamber'' is about a judge who decides to join a secret 'court' of judges who hire a contract killer to carry out their 'sentences' of accused criminals in death penalty cases who get OffOnATechnicality. However when two drug dealers are judged guilty of a child murder, then later turn out to be innocent of that particular crime, the protagonist finds himself in a dilemma.
* Creator/JodieFoster in ''Film/TheBraveOne'' plays a ''female'' vigilante, in a meditation on the paranoia and isolation the life of the Vigilante Man (or Woman) would entail, especially if they used to be a "normal" person. Interesting callback to the first ''Film/DeathWish'' in her chosen method too.
* Inverted
%%* Preacher in the Western movie ''Film/HangEmHigh''. Creator/ClintEastwood is the innocent victim of vigilantes who mistake him for a murderer/cattle thief (he unknowingly bought the cattle off the real killer). He then becomes a deputy to bring them to justice, and must resist pressure both situational and personal to take the law into his own hands.
* ''Contract on Cherry Street'' (1977) has Music/FrankSinatra as the leader of a team of NYPD detectives who turn vigilante on TheMafia after one of them is killed.
* ''Film/SavageStreets'' (1984) has Linda Blair as a tough high school girl who turns vigilante after a vicious gang called the Scars rape her deaf-mute sister and murder her best friend.
* ''Two Fathers Justice'' (1985). A newly married couple are killed by drug dealers, and their fathers [[TeethClenchedTeamwork reluctantly team up]] to track down their killers who've fled the country.
''Film/PaleRider''.



* Vigilantism is attacked in ''Film/TheOxBowIncident'', wherein three obviously innocent men are persecuted and ultimately murdered by a [[TorchesAndPitchforks lynch mob]].
* In ''Film/{{Pyrokinesis}}'', the protagonist is a female example, killing criminals with the title [[PlayingWithFire psychic power]]. She manages to stay a good guy despite fighting against the police, because [[spoiler: the chief of police is also the head of the snuff ring she's been targeting.]]



* In ''Film/MurdersAmongUs'', Hans Mertens [[spoiler:almost becomes this, but instead decides not to kill Bruckner at the insistence of Suzanne]].
* Seemingly deconstructed in ''Film/LawAbidingCitizen'', with Clyde Shelton JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope. On the other hand, it also seems to portray the criminal justice system as ineffectual.
* The Sally Field movie ''Film/EyeForAnEye'' has Field's character lose her daughter to a serial killer, and stumble onto a conspiracy of Vigilante Men at a support group. They have very specific requirements: They only target killers whose guilt is obvious yet get OffOnATechnicality, and they won't make the kill for someone else. Instead, they teach newcomers how to make the hit themselves. Something of a strawman case; [[spoiler:the FBI has recognized a pattern of suspicious deaths among acquitted killers and has planted spies in support groups to ''protect those killers.'' Fields discovers the spy in time to keep from incriminating herself seriously, but the agent still threatens Fields with life in prison despite being fully aware that the killer she's after has killed again. Ultimately, the FBI is powerless to protect the killer, as Field pulls off the conspiracy's plan ''perfectly'' - make herself the killer's next target, then kill him in self-defense.]]
* ''Film/HardCandy'': Hayley may qualify as one due to her crusade against pedophile rapists. That or she may be a budding SerialKiller.
* Joey Rosso from ''Film/RollingVengeance''. His weapon of choice happens to be a Monster Truck.
* {{Deconstructed|Trope}} with Keller Dover in ''Film/{{Prisoners}}'', who nails the wrong man for kidnapping his daughter, crosses the MoralEventHorizon as a result, [[spoiler:and is left to die in a pit by the ''real'' kidnapper for his trouble. The ending leaves it ambiguous whether or not he will be rescued.]]
* In the movie ''Film/PunisherWarZone'', the "victims are always guilty" rule was notably averted: near the beginning of the movie, he discovers that one of the people he killed was actually an undercover FBI agent with a family. He feels so guilty about it that he offers the agent's widow a bag full of mafia money, as well as the chance to shoot him.
* The titular ''John Doe: Vigilante''. True to form, his victims are all [[AssholeVictim Asshole Victims]]--child molesters, abusive husbands, culminating in the guy who killed his wife and daughter.

to:

* In ''Film/MurdersAmongUs'', Hans Mertens [[spoiler:almost becomes this, but instead decides not to kill Bruckner at the insistence of Suzanne]].
* Seemingly deconstructed in ''Film/LawAbidingCitizen'', with Clyde Shelton JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope. On the other hand, it also seems to portray the criminal justice system as ineffectual.
* The Sally Field movie ''Film/EyeForAnEye'' has Field's character lose her daughter to a serial killer, and stumble onto a conspiracy of Vigilante Men at a support group. They have very specific requirements: They only target killers whose guilt is obvious yet get OffOnATechnicality, and they won't make the kill for someone else. Instead, they teach newcomers how to make the hit themselves. Something of a strawman case; [[spoiler:the FBI has recognized a pattern of suspicious deaths among acquitted killers and has planted spies in support groups to ''protect those killers.'' Fields discovers the spy in time to keep from incriminating herself seriously, but the agent still threatens Fields with life in prison despite being fully aware that the killer she's after has killed again. Ultimately, the FBI is powerless to protect the killer, as Field pulls off the conspiracy's plan ''perfectly'' - make herself the killer's next target, then kill him in self-defense.]]
* ''Film/HardCandy'': Hayley may qualify as one due to her crusade against pedophile rapists. That or she may be a budding SerialKiller.
* Joey Rosso from ''Film/RollingVengeance''. His weapon of choice happens to be a Monster Truck.
* {{Deconstructed|Trope}} with Keller Dover in ''Film/{{Prisoners}}'', who nails the wrong man for kidnapping his daughter, crosses the MoralEventHorizon as a result, [[spoiler:and is left to die in a pit by the ''real'' kidnapper for his trouble. The ending leaves it ambiguous whether or not he will be rescued.]]
* In the movie ''Film/PunisherWarZone'', the "victims are always guilty" rule was notably averted: near the beginning of the movie, he discovers that one of the people he killed was actually an undercover FBI agent with a family. He feels so guilty about it that he offers the agent's widow a bag full of mafia money, as well as the chance to shoot him.
* The titular ''John Doe: Vigilante''. True to form, his victims are all [[AssholeVictim Asshole Victims]]--child molesters, abusive husbands, culminating in the guy who killed his wife and daughter.
7th Jan '17 6:57:12 PM RAraya
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* The "vigilante hero" subgenre became an staple of action movies between 1970 and around 1993 mainly as rising crime rates and increasing police corruption led people to lose faith in the long arm of the law and act for themselves instead.
* The ''Film/DeathWish'' movies. Paul Kersey becomes a vigilante after his wife is murdered and his daughter is sexually assaulted by muggers. Also an UnbuiltTrope as the film pioneered the urban vigilante concept, but it also showed how dangerous it would be. By the time of ''Film/DeathWish3'', Kersey is infamous for harrying the police, who are powerless to pin any charges on him (but are happy to take credit for his crime-fighting accomplishments). Police Chief Richard [[PunnyName Shirker]] tries to contain him, but ends up joining the fray when Kersey is ambushed by gangsters.
-->'''Kersey:''' ''You'' stuck your neck out for ''me''?\\
'''Shirker:''' ''(dying)'' It was [[BlackAndGrayMorality you or them]].



* The ''Film/DeathWish'' movies. Paul Kersey becomes a vigilante after his wife is murdered and his daughter is sexually assaulted by muggers. Also an UnbuiltTrope as the film pioneered the urban vigilante concept, but it also showed how dangerous it would be. By the time of ''Film/DeathWish3'', Kersey is infamous for harrying the police, who are powerless to pin any charges on him (but are happy to take credit for his crime-fighting accomplishments). Police Chief Richard [[PunnyName Shirker]] tries to contain him, but ends up joining the fray when Kersey is ambushed by gangsters.
-->'''Kersey:''' ''You'' stuck your neck out for ''me''?\\
'''Shirker:''' ''(dying)'' It was [[BlackAndGrayMorality you or them]].
10th Dec '16 2:47:15 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/SweetVicious'' features a college version of this with its protagonist, the sorority sister and rape survivor Jules, who dons a hoodie and ski mask to torment the sexual predators at her school since the campus' security force seems to not even care about the epidemic of rape at the university. She's joined by Ophelia, a rich kid hacker and weed dealer who runs into her at night when she's on the prowl and manages to figure out her identity.
8th Dec '16 5:06:23 PM Bartzv
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** Much like the Tim Burton Batman, ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' also features a Batman that kills criminals without batting an eye. He uses guns with no hesitation, runs over mooks with his batmobile, and brands criminals he deems particularly reprehensible, resulting in them getting killed in prison. He also wants to flat out murder Superman because he thinks Superman is a threat to the planet.

to:

** Much like the Tim Burton Batman, ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' also features a Batman that kills criminals without batting an eye. He uses guns with no hesitation, runs over mooks with his batmobile, and brands criminals he deems particularly reprehensible, resulting in them getting killed in prison. He also wants to flat out murder ''murder'' Superman because he thinks Superman is a threat to the planet.
8th Dec '16 4:41:03 PM Bartzv
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** Much like the Tim Burton Batman, ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' also features a Batman that kills several criminals without batting an eye and uses guns with no hesitation. He also wants to flat out kill Superman because he thinks Superman is a threat to the planet.

to:

** Much like the Tim Burton Batman, ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' also features a Batman that kills several criminals without batting an eye and eye. He uses guns with no hesitation. hesitation, runs over mooks with his batmobile, and brands criminals he deems particularly reprehensible, resulting in them getting killed in prison. He also wants to flat out kill murder Superman because he thinks Superman is a threat to the planet. planet.
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