History Main / ViewersAreGoldfish

26th May '17 5:53:13 PM candleeater
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* This is a frequent criticism of Wrestling/VinceRusso's booking. If Russo wrote ''Game of Thrones'', Ned would get killed, Jon Snow would attack Rob and the Red Wedding would happen all in the first episode.
25th May '17 4:19:59 AM Kadorhal
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* If a top or upper-midcard wrestler is injured for a substantial period of time, [[HeelFaceReturn he will ALWAYS come back as a Face]]. Even if he was the most despicable and dastardly of Heels at the time of his injury. Ironically, Wrestling/KurtAngle once vocally pointed this out upon Wrestling/TripleH's return from a nasty quad tear and was made out to be a huge jerk for doing so.
* ProfessionalWrestling subverts this trope. Wrestling/JimCornette declared the "Seven Year Rule", which states that after 7 years have passed it's safe to recycle a character, gimmick and/or storyline. For example, Wrestling/{{Carlito|Colon}} Caribbean Cool's gimmick had a substantial overlap with that of Razor Ramon, but because enough time had passed since Wrestling/ScottHall quit portraying Razor, Carlito got over.

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* If a top or upper-midcard wrestler is injured for a substantial period of time, [[HeelFaceReturn he will ALWAYS come back as a Face]]. Even if he was the most despicable and dastardly of Heels at the time of his injury. Ironically, Wrestling/KurtAngle once vocally pointed this out upon Wrestling/TripleH's return from a nasty quad tear tear, and was [[DesignatedVillain made out to be a huge jerk jerk]] for doing so.
* ProfessionalWrestling Professional wrestling subverts this trope. Wrestling/JimCornette declared the "Seven Year Rule", which states that after 7 years have passed it's safe to recycle a character, gimmick and/or storyline. For example, Wrestling/{{Carlito|Colon}} Caribbean Cool's gimmick had a substantial overlap with that of Razor Ramon, but because enough time had passed since Wrestling/ScottHall quit portraying Razor, Carlito got over.



* Also used in ''[[VideoGame/{{Siren}} Blood Curse: Siren]].'' The episodes are so short you wouldn't normally stop after just one, yet they remind you of what you just did twenty minutes ago. Now if you were playing the episodes as they came out, this was mildly helpful and made sense, but if you're playing the boxed console release today it can get annoying.

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* Also used in ''[[VideoGame/{{Siren}} ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}: Blood Curse: Siren]].'' Curse''. The episodes are so short you wouldn't normally stop after just one, yet they remind you of what you just did twenty minutes ago. Now if you were playing the episodes as they came out, this was mildly helpful and made sense, but if you're playing the boxed console release today it can get annoying.



* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series can sometimes be guilty of this. Snake ''[[ParrotExposition repeats everything everyone tells him, but in an inquisitive tone]].'' "The key is made of a shape-memory alloy!" "A ''shape-memory alloy''?!" "Yes! It changes based on the temperature!" "It changes based on the temperature, huh?" This actually becomes FridgeBrilliance when you realize Snake doesn't do this to benefit the player, since the player often has no use for the information anyway. He does it so he himself remembers what he is searching for. Not very effective when Snake does this when informed about something he should already know about, such as ''the sights on a freakin' rifle.'' Thanks, Nastasha!

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* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame//MetalGear'' series can sometimes be guilty of this. Snake ''[[ParrotExposition repeats everything everyone tells him, but in an inquisitive tone]].'' "The key is made of a shape-memory alloy!" "A ''shape-memory alloy''?!" "Yes! It changes based on the temperature!" "It changes based on the temperature, huh?" This actually becomes FridgeBrilliance when you realize Snake doesn't do this to benefit the player, since the player often has no use for the information anyway. He does it so he himself remembers what he is searching for. Not very effective when Snake does this when informed about something he should already know about, such as ''the sights on a freakin' rifle.'' Thanks, Nastasha!
19th May '17 9:54:23 PM nowaymanguy
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series plays this straight most times, but subversions are not unheard of. The games flash back to previous scenes many times, sometimes even to scenes from only minutes ago. However, it also expects the player to remember facts from quite a bit ago. Many contradictions require you to present evidence that doesn't have contradictory text/content in the evidence screen information. Rather you have to remember a specific detail that was stated about the evidence beforehand, yet that's not been put into the evidence information.

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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series plays this straight most times, a lot, but subversions are not unheard of.of either. The games flash back to previous scenes many times, sometimes even to scenes from only minutes ago. However, it also expects the player to remember facts from quite a bit ago. Many contradictions require you to present evidence that doesn't have contradictory text/content in the evidence screen information. Rather you have to remember a specific detail that was stated about the evidence beforehand, yet that's not been put into the evidence information.
24th Apr '17 3:30:44 PM Sabrewing
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* ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' has reminders about the game's magickal ElementalRockPaperScissors built into the scenery in nearly every chapter. Helpful when you're playing as Anthony[[note]]the first character to practice spellcasting[[/note]]); a bit on the condescending side by the time you're playing as Michael Edwards[[note]]The character directly preceding the end of the game[[/note]].

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* ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' has reminders about the game's magickal ElementalRockPaperScissors built into the scenery in nearly every chapter. Helpful when you're playing as Anthony[[note]]the first character to practice spellcasting[[/note]]); spellcasting[[/note]]; a bit on the condescending side by the time you're playing as Michael Edwards[[note]]The character directly preceding the end of the game[[/note]].
24th Apr '17 3:30:27 PM Sabrewing
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* ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'' has reminders about the game's magickal ElementalRockPaperScissors built into the scenery in nearly every chapter. Helpful when you're playing as Anthony[[note]]the first character to practice spellcasting[[/note]]); a bit on the condescending side by the time you're playing as Michael Edwards[[note]]The character directly preceding the end of the game[[/note]].
16th Apr '17 7:31:18 AM merotoker
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* ''Manga/{{Gintama}}'' mocks the tendency of [[{{Shonen}} shônen anime]] to do this mercilessly by, after recapping the basic, [[WidgetSeries Widgetish premise of the series]] in the first several episodes, Shinpachi inexplicably decides to do so once more... a hundred or so episodes later. Gintoki yells at him for it, and Shinpachi explains that viewers who've never tuned into ''Gintama'' before might be confused about [[ViewersAreGeniuses what the series was smoking up till that point]]. But 1) viewers who have never tuned into ''Gintama'' [[ArchivePanic probably shouldn't start trying to watch the series after a hundred or so episodes]] (though CommitmentAnxiety isn't entirely an issue), and 2) this entire scene was [[StockFootage likely repeated]] (with different dialogue) [[StockFootage to save up the anime's budget once again]]. ''Gintama'' pulls this trick often by having the voice actors speak over [[StockFootage a still of the Yorozuya apartment]], oftentimes {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing or directly stating that they were doing so in the same scene. Though when a serious plot arc comes around, they have a tendency to pull the same stunt other shônen anime do as well.

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* ''Manga/{{Gintama}}'' mocks the tendency of [[{{Shonen}} [[ShonenDemographic shônen anime]] to do this mercilessly by, after recapping the basic, [[WidgetSeries Widgetish premise of the series]] in the first several episodes, Shinpachi inexplicably decides to do so once more... a hundred or so episodes later. Gintoki yells at him for it, and Shinpachi explains that viewers who've never tuned into ''Gintama'' before might be confused about [[ViewersAreGeniuses what the series was smoking up till that point]]. But 1) viewers who have never tuned into ''Gintama'' [[ArchivePanic probably shouldn't start trying to watch the series after a hundred or so episodes]] (though CommitmentAnxiety isn't entirely an issue), and 2) this entire scene was [[StockFootage likely repeated]] (with different dialogue) [[StockFootage to save up the anime's budget once again]]. ''Gintama'' pulls this trick often by having the voice actors speak over [[StockFootage a still of the Yorozuya apartment]], oftentimes {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing or directly stating that they were doing so in the same scene. Though when a serious plot arc comes around, they have a tendency to pull the same stunt other shônen anime do as well.



** Actually works quite well after [[spoiler:Itach's death. Having a montage of all the good things he's done and finishing with a crying Sasuke (who up until that point, we haven't seen cry outside of a flashback of when he was a child) made a real TearJerker.]] Even if these same flashbacks were repeated numerous times.

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** Actually works quite well after [[spoiler:Itach's death. Having a montage of all the good things he's done and finishing with a crying Sasuke (who up until that point, we haven't seen cry outside of a flashback of when he was a child) made a real TearJerker.]] TearJerker]]. Even if these same flashbacks were repeated numerous times.



* ''Uncanny ComicBook/XMen'' #152 features a helpful sequence of flashback pages that explains how Kitty Pryde ended up in a car with (someone who appeared to be) her arch enemy Emma Frost... but the final panel of the flashback recalls an event that happened only a few pages earlier in the same issue.

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* ''Uncanny ComicBook/XMen'' ''ComicBook/UncannyXMen'' #152 features a helpful sequence of flashback pages that explains how Kitty Pryde ended up in a car with (someone who appeared to be) her arch enemy Emma Frost... but the final panel of the flashback recalls an event that happened only a few pages earlier in the same issue.



** The BMovie ''Film/FutureWar'' has a {{Montage}} of flashbacks, arranged chronologically, while the protagonist is in prison. By the end, the scenes being flashbacked had been shown less than five minutes ago. Mike and the bots did not let this go without comment.

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** The BMovie ''Film/FutureWar'' has a {{Montage}} {{Montage|s}} of flashbacks, arranged chronologically, while the protagonist is in prison. By the end, the scenes being flashbacked had been shown less than five minutes ago. Mike and the bots did not let this go without comment.



* In The Asylum's BMovie mockery ''Film/MegaSharkVsGiantOctopus'', a title card detailing the location of the marine base where the characters are located pops up multiple times, even when they haven't even left the base. The fact that the same shot of the soldiers is used repeatedly for these title cards does not help at all.

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* In The Asylum's Creator/TheAsylum's BMovie mockery ''Film/MegaSharkVsGiantOctopus'', a title card detailing the location of the marine base where the characters are located pops up multiple times, even when they haven't even left the base. The fact that the same shot of the soldiers is used repeatedly for these title cards does not help at all.



* ''Film/TheLastAirbender''. Even though he expected his viewers [[ViewersAreGeniuses to be fully versed in the television series]], M. Night Shyamalan decided that he had to repeat the same thing over and over again.

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* ''Film/TheLastAirbender''. Even though he expected his viewers [[ViewersAreGeniuses to be fully versed in the television series]], M. Night Shyamalan Creator/MNightShyamalan decided that he had to repeat the same thing over and over again.



* ''Series/GirlCode'': Between the opening that shows clips from throughout the show, commercial breaks that show multiple talking heads before each break, and a recap at the end of each episode, about half of each episode is shown twice.



* ''Series/HannahMontana'': Has done this before, in the ToBeContinued hour-long specials such as "Jakey Breaky Heart" and "Should I Neigh or Should I Go?" Justifiable, however, in one regular episode, because it was from the second or third season, and Miley was havin a flashback from the beginning of the first season.

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* ''Series/HannahMontana'': Has done this before, in the ToBeContinued hour-long specials such as "Jakey Breaky Heart" and "Should I Neigh or Should I Go?" Justifiable, however, in one regular episode, because it was from the second or third season, and Miley was havin having a flashback from the beginning of the first season.



* Lampshaded in the first episode of ''Series/JasonKing''. King is pitching his TV adaptation to an American network executive, who insists that he repeat an exposition scene (with the plot discussed by the heroes, then the villains) in case the audience didn't get it the first time.



** 'Series/DealOrNoDeal' triple-dips in this trope, starting off every episode with a flashback to the previous one, then stopping midway through to recap. Plus each contestant usually has some kind of sob story or noble intention for their winnings, which Howie Mandel will usually point towards the beginning and then harp on incessantly throughout the show.

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** 'Series/DealOrNoDeal' ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' triple-dips in this trope, starting off every episode with a flashback to the previous one, then stopping midway through to recap. Plus each contestant usually has some kind of sob story or noble intention for their winnings, which Howie Mandel will usually point towards the beginning and then harp on incessantly throughout the show.



** Done as a joke later on; J.D. is reminded of incidents that are not percieved as manly. The last flashback is him ordering an Appletini, which happened about fifteen seconds ago.

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** Done as a joke later on; J.D. is reminded of incidents that are not percieved perceived as manly. The last flashback is him ordering an Appletini, which happened about fifteen seconds ago.



* ''{{Superman}}'': Parodied in the 1975 musical TV special ''It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Superman'', where Doctor Sedgwick sings a song about how his sole motivation is to get revenge on Superman and Switzerland (for turning him down for the Nobel Prize 10 times). It then cuts out midverse and promises that after the commercial it will reveal what terrible thing the doctor wants to do before he dies, as though everyone just missed or forgot him singing a song about how he wants revenge. And tells everyone to stay tuned for Chapter 4: Sedgwick's Revenge.

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* ''{{Superman}}'': ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'': Parodied in the 1975 musical TV special ''It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Superman'', where Doctor Sedgwick sings a song about how his sole motivation is to get revenge on Superman and Switzerland (for turning him down for the Nobel Prize 10 times). It then cuts out midverse and promises that after the commercial it will reveal what terrible thing the doctor wants to do before he dies, as though everyone just missed or forgot him singing a song about how he wants revenge. And tells everyone to stay tuned for Chapter 4: Sedgwick's Revenge.



* WB: This dying network came with a PreviouslyOn stunt that recapped the first half-hour of hourly shows, apparently for the benefit of viewers who were watching other channels for the previous half-hour. Programs subjected to this included ''Series/GilmoreGirls''.

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* WB: Creator/TheWB: This dying network came with a PreviouslyOn stunt that recapped the first half-hour of hourly shows, apparently for the benefit of viewers who were watching other channels for the previous half-hour. Programs subjected to this included ''Series/GilmoreGirls''.



* ''Series/GirlCode'': Between the opening that shows clips from throughout the show, commercial breaks that show multiple talking heads before each break, and a recap at the end of each episode, about half of each episode is shown twice.
* Lampshaded in the first episode of ''Series/JasonKing''. King is pitching his TV adaptation to an American network executive, who insists that he repeat an exposition scene (with the plot discussed by the heroes, then the villains) in case the audience didn't get it the first time.



* It seems that most newspaper comics that follow a storyline do this a lot. Other offenders are ''Rex Morgan, M.D.'', ''Mary Worth'', and ''The Amazing Spider-Man'', all of which spent about two panels actually getting something new done and the rest recapping. Justified somewhat when you realize that many of the newspapers that carry ''Dick Tracy'', ''Rex Morgan'', etc., only carry it in their larger Sunday comics section -- the much smaller weekday comics section may not have room for it, therefore the writers create the Sunday episodes so they can be readable without the weekday episodes being available.

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* It seems that most newspaper comics that follow a storyline do this a lot. Other offenders are ''Rex Morgan, M.D.'', ''Mary Worth'', ''ComicStrip/RexMorganMD'', ''ComicStrip/MaryWorth'', and ''The Amazing Spider-Man'', all of which spent about two panels actually getting something new done and the rest recapping. Justified somewhat when you realize that many of the newspapers that carry ''Dick Tracy'', ''Rex Morgan'', etc., only carry it in their larger Sunday comics section -- the much smaller weekday comics section may not have room for it, therefore the writers create the Sunday episodes so they can be readable without the weekday episodes being available.



* Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s and Wrestling/{{TNA}}'s ProfessionalWrestling programs are absolutely peppered with "Moments Ago" replays, usually upon returning from commercial breaks. (In the case of RAW, which is shot live, this will usually be something that happened ''during'' the commercial break.)
** Also in the case where an angle([[InsistentTerminology storyline]]) and/or gimmick(character) is quickly chucked out and it's expected that people will simply not remember it or will be nice enough to overlook it. The IWC frequently does neither. You're supposed to give the fans three months before things can be dropped.
* If a top or upper-midcard wrestler is injured for a substantial period of time, he will ALWAYS come back as a Face. Even if he was the most despicable and dastardly of Heels at the time of his injury. Ironically, Kurt Angle once vocally pointed this out upon Triple H's return from a nasty quad tear and was made out to be a huge jerk for doing so.

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* Wrestling/{{WWE}}'s and Wrestling/{{TNA}}'s ProfessionalWrestling programs are absolutely peppered with "Moments Ago" replays, usually upon returning from commercial breaks. (In the case of RAW, which is shot live, this will usually be something that happened ''during'' the commercial break.)
**
) Also in the case where an angle([[InsistentTerminology angle ([[InsistentTerminology storyline]]) and/or gimmick(character) is quickly chucked out and it's expected that people will simply not remember it or will be nice enough to overlook it. The IWC frequently does neither. You're supposed to give the fans three months before things can be dropped.
* If a top or upper-midcard wrestler is injured for a substantial period of time, [[HeelFaceReturn he will ALWAYS come back as a Face.Face]]. Even if he was the most despicable and dastardly of Heels at the time of his injury. Ironically, Kurt Angle Wrestling/KurtAngle once vocally pointed this out upon Triple H's Wrestling/TripleH's return from a nasty quad tear and was made out to be a huge jerk for doing so.



* In ''VideoGame/EternalSonata'', Claves and Jazz have a talk about a traitor in the group. Immediately after, [[spoiler: Claves, the traitor, is killed by Rondo for not pinning the blame on another member. It would be somewhat sad if Claves didn't have a 20-minute musing on her life, including a flashback to the scene with Jazz that happened about 2 minutes ago.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/EternalSonata'', Claves and Jazz have a talk about a traitor in the group. Immediately after, [[spoiler: Claves, the traitor, is killed by Rondo for not pinning the blame on another member. It would be somewhat sad if Claves didn't have a 20-minute musing on her life, including a flashback to the scene with Jazz that happened about 2 minutes ago.]]ago]].



* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' usually averts this, not even bothering to show recaps of things that happened hours ago, even when they're set up to happen in the story. However, that doesn't stop ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' from having a somewhat lengthy flashback to a scene that happened one chapter ago near the end of Part I. The chapter in between is also a filler chapter.

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' usually averts this, not even bothering to show recaps of things that happened hours ago, even when they're set up to happen in the story. However, that doesn't stop ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' from having a somewhat lengthy flashback to a scene that happened one chapter ago near the end of Part I. The chapter in between is also a filler chapter.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': The reality TV version was parodied on the "Crippled Summer" episode, with title cards appearing constantly explaining things that had just happened. This includes explaining the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes-style humour of the B-plot in great detail.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'':
**
The reality TV version was parodied on the "Crippled Summer" episode, with title cards appearing constantly explaining things that had just happened. This includes explaining the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes-style humour of the B-plot in great detail.



* Creator/TheHub's cut of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls'' plays the scene where Twilight screams upon finding out she is a human twice, once before a commercial break and once after a commercial break.
* In-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicAdventuresOfMumfie''. In the "Sparks In The Dark" episode, Electric Eel says she hates pirates because they stuff them in jam jars. She repeats the same thing when approaching their ship a few minutes later.

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* Creator/TheHub's [[Creator/DiscoveryFamily The Hub's]] cut of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls'' plays the scene where Twilight screams upon finding out she is a human twice, once before a commercial break and once after a commercial break.
* In-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicAdventuresOfMumfie''.''WesternAnimation/MagicAdventuresOfMumfie''. In the "Sparks In The Dark" episode, Electric Eel says she hates pirates because they stuff them in jam jars. She repeats the same thing when approaching their ship a few minutes later.
7th Apr '17 9:35:23 AM erforce
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* ''[[Series/PowerRangersTurbo Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie]]'' was really bad about this. As one parody put it: "you'd think we were brain dead with the amount of exposition in this movie."

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* ''[[Series/PowerRangersTurbo Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie]]'' ''Film/TurboAPowerRangersMovie'' was really bad about this. As one parody put it: "you'd think we were brain dead with the amount of exposition in this movie."
24th Feb '17 3:43:11 AM JackG
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* Lampshaded in the first episode of ''Series/JasonKing''. King is pitching his TV adaptation to an American network executive, who insists that he repeat an exposition scene (with the plot discussed by the heroes, then the villains) in case the audience didn't get it the first time.
10th Feb '17 8:24:06 AM TheBigBopper
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Sort of like how executives think viewers are stupid, they also think you have [[ForgetfulJones the memory of a goldfish]], which, according to common legend, lasts about three seconds[[note]]real life goldfish have been proven to have longer memory; a study concluded a maximum limit of seven months. And, if you don't buy that, it's also been [[Series/MythBusters busted]][[/note]]. Because remembering what happens over the course of a ''whole thirty minutes'' or, god forbid, ''an hour'', is too difficult for [[ThisLoserIsYou your general media consumer,]] there is a handy little device called a {{Flashback}} that can be used to rewind, oh, five minutes or so to say, "Hey! This just happened, moron!" [[note]][[AdBreakDoubleTake It may also be the case that a viewer has tuned in partway through the program or series, and therefore has no memory of what happened even moments earlier.]][[/note]] It may also come from an ancient survey that stated that [[WeAllLiveInAmerica Americans]] change the channel 20 times every minute on average.[[note]]Though even if that is true, for the entertainment industry to base this whole trope around it only proves that they [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics have no idea how to properly interpret statistics]].[[/note]]

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Sort of like how executives think viewers are stupid, they also think you have [[ForgetfulJones the memory of a goldfish]], which, according to common an incorrect urban legend, lasts about three seconds[[note]]real life goldfish have been proven to have longer memory; a study concluded a maximum limit of seven months. And, if you don't buy that, it's also been [[Series/MythBusters busted]][[/note]]. Because remembering what happens over the course of a ''whole thirty minutes'' or, god forbid, ''an hour'', is too difficult for [[ThisLoserIsYou your general media consumer,]] there is a handy little device called a {{Flashback}} that can be used to rewind, oh, five minutes or so to say, "Hey! This just happened, moron!" [[note]][[AdBreakDoubleTake It may also be the case that a viewer has tuned in partway through the program or series, and therefore has no memory of what happened even moments earlier.]][[/note]] It may also come from an ancient survey that stated that [[WeAllLiveInAmerica Americans]] change the channel 20 times every minute on average.[[note]]Though even if that is true, for the entertainment industry to base this whole trope around it only proves that they [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics have no idea how to properly interpret statistics]].[[/note]]
3rd Feb '17 7:32:35 PM harotype
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* ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDDestiny'' is horribly, blatantly guilty of this, with six episodes dedicated entirely to recapping the series and its prequel, ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED'', and constant flashbacks to events that everyone knows have already taken place -- most notably the death of Uzumi Nara Athha, which happens almost every time Cagalli is on screen. Beyond the shadow of a doubt, ''SEED''[='s=] Crowning Moment of Flashback is the death of [[spoiler:Nichol Amalfi]], which gets ''at least'' one flashback every episode after it happens for the rest of the series. It even pops up a couple of times in ''Destiny'' despite being set two years later and not meaning all that much anymore.

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* ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDDestiny'' is horribly, blatantly guilty of this, with six episodes dedicated entirely to recapping the series and its prequel, ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED'', and constant flashbacks to events that everyone knows have already taken place -- most notably the death of Uzumi [[spoiler:Uzumi Nara Athha, Athha]], which happens almost every time Cagalli is on screen. Beyond the shadow of a doubt, ''SEED''[='s=] Crowning Moment of Flashback is the death of [[spoiler:Nichol [[spoiler:Nicol Amalfi]], which gets ''at least'' one flashback every episode after it happens for the rest of the series. It even pops up a couple of times in ''Destiny'' despite being set two years later and not meaning all being remotely as relevant.
** ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED SEED]]'' itself is really no better, and first earned director Fukuda his derisive "Flashback 'Em All" moniker from the fandom. There are flashbacks within nearly every episode, sometimes to things
that much anymore.have happened as recently as the last episode. In SEED's case it sometimes works quite well as a dramatic and sad device. Sometimes it's just cheap and annoying.
This list shows the last 10 events of 423. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ViewersAreGoldfish