History Main / ViewersAreGeniuses

12th Apr '18 2:24:06 PM bkitu
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* The Chess-centric [=YouTube=] channel WebVideo/{{agadmator}} operates under the assumption that anyone watching chess analysis of their own free will is smart enough and well-versed enough in the game to understand some very esoteric chess jargon, and uses such with cheerful abandon.

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* The Chess-centric [=YouTube=] channel WebVideo/{{agadmator}} ''WebVideo/{{agadmator}}'' operates under the assumption that anyone watching chess analysis of their own free will is smart enough and well-versed enough in the game to understand some very esoteric chess jargon, and uses such with cheerful abandon.
12th Apr '18 2:20:32 PM bkitu
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* The Chess-centric [=YouTube=] channel WebVideo/{{agadmator}} operates under the assumption that anyone watching chess analysis of their own free will is smart enough and well-versed enough in the game to understand some very esoteric chess jargon, and uses such with cheerful abandon.
12th Mar '18 3:40:20 PM Malady
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* It feels weird sticking a fanservice manga/anime here, but ''Manga/IkkiTousen'', to some extent. The series seems to take for granted that all of its audience has some basic awareness of the historical characters it's portraying, which... for the most part, particularly in the West, they don't. It's made worse because those who ''do'' know the cast of ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', either by having read the story or by being fans of ''DynastyWarriors'', most likely know them by their original ''Chinese'' names, but everyone in-series uses the names from the ''Japanese'' translation, making it very easy to miss the connection between, say, Sonsaku Hakufu and her counterpart Sun Ce.

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* It feels weird sticking a fanservice manga/anime here, but ''Manga/IkkiTousen'', to some extent. The series seems to take for granted that all of its audience has some basic awareness of the historical characters it's portraying, which... for the most part, particularly in the West, they don't. It's made worse because those who ''do'' know the cast of ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', either by having read the story or by being fans of ''DynastyWarriors'', ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'', most likely know them by their original ''Chinese'' names, but everyone in-series uses the names from the ''Japanese'' translation, making it very easy to miss the connection between, say, Sonsaku Hakufu and her counterpart Sun Ce.
5th Mar '18 5:01:11 PM nombretomado
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* Many stage musicals with music and lyrics by Creator/StephenSondheim have this criticism levelled at them. Sondheim and his collaborators avoid pat sentimentality and create complex works of art -- perhaps a setback when many audience members are expecting ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic''. Just a few examples:

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* Many stage musicals with music and lyrics by Creator/StephenSondheim Music/StephenSondheim have this criticism levelled at them. Sondheim and his collaborators avoid pat sentimentality and create complex works of art -- perhaps a setback when many audience members are expecting ''Theatre/TheSoundOfMusic''. Just a few examples:
5th Mar '18 7:33:48 AM lukeskylicker
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* ''WebComic/PolandBall'' requires a thorough knowledge of vexillogy to even know who is suppose to be who. The jokes are based around the international relations of rather obscure countries as they are the more famous ones.



* ''WebComic/PolandBall'' requires a thorough knowledge of vexillogy to even know who is suppose to be who. The jokes are based around the international relations of rather obscure countries as they are the more famous ones.
3rd Mar '18 10:08:47 PM Furozen
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* Among the reasons that ''Series/PoliceSquad'' only lasted was season was that ABC thought it was guilty of this trope. According to ABC, the show required the viewer to pay too much attention in order to understand the humor. TV Guide called this "the most stupid reason a network ever gave for ending a series".

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* Among the reasons that ''Series/PoliceSquad'' only lasted was one season was that ABC thought it was guilty of this trope. According to ABC, the show required the viewer to pay too much attention in order to understand the humor. TV Guide called this "the most stupid reason a network ever gave for ending a series".
21st Feb '18 10:05:02 AM Scorpion451
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* Quite a bit of ''Series/{{Lost}}'''s reputation as an incomprehensible tangle is the result of people not catching on when an FreezeFrameBonus in Season 2 combines with an obscure science reference in season 3 and an unrelated conversation in season 4 to explain an event that happened in season 1. Given that this happens several times an episode, the result is a show revered by fans of complex storytelling that leaves the average viewer scratching their heads.
22nd Jan '18 12:21:51 PM eroock
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-->--'''Lt. Colonel Cameron Mitchell,''' ''Series/StargateSG1''

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-->--'''Lt.-->-- '''Lt. Colonel Cameron Mitchell,''' ''Series/StargateSG1''
3rd Jan '18 7:26:11 PM Caps-luna
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* ''WebComic/PolandBall'' requires a thorough knowledge of vexillogy to even know who is suppose to be who. The jokes are based around the international relations of rather obscure countries as they are the more famous ones.
20th Nov '17 8:28:28 PM mlsmithca
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* Kit Williams' ''[[Literature/KitWilliamsMasquerade Masquerade]]'' was ostensibly a children's book in which the illustrations provided clues to the burial location of the jewelled golden hare featured in the story. Williams claimed that a child with a primary school-level understanding of mathematics and astronomy would be just as able to solve the puzzle as an {{Oxbridge}} don. The puzzle remained unsolved for nearly three years, and the two people who finally cracked it were physics teachers.[[note]] Not that this was enough for them to win the contest; the actual contest winner had done so not by solving the puzzle, but by exploiting a chain of personal connections between Williams and himself.[[/note]] Even now that the method behind the solution has been thoroughly documented and published, it still leaves many readers scratching their heads, wondering "How was ''anyone'' supposed to solve this??"

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* Kit Williams' ''[[Literature/KitWilliamsMasquerade Masquerade]]'' was ostensibly a children's book in which the illustrations provided clues to the burial location of the jewelled golden hare featured in the story. Williams claimed that a child of ten with a primary school-level good understanding of mathematics language, mathematics, and astronomy would be just as able likely to solve the puzzle as an {{Oxbridge}} don. The puzzle remained unsolved for nearly three years, and the two people who finally cracked it were physics teachers.[[note]] Not that this was enough for them to win the contest; the actual contest winner had done so not by solving the puzzle, but by exploiting a chain of personal connections between Williams and himself.[[/note]] Even now that the method behind the solution has been thoroughly documented and published, it still leaves many readers scratching their heads, wondering "How was ''anyone'' supposed to solve this??"



* ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' and ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' were unafraid to have obscure references and gags because the producers knew that the joke was that the erudite characters (Diane and Frasier in the former, Frasier and Niles in the latter) were confusing the hell out of the down-to-earth characters - and people who got the reference would get more mileage, but those who didn't would laugh at the contrast.
** ''Frasier'' gets a special mention for being one of the shows that pulled it off well while still getting high ratings. Frasier, Niles, and some of their highbrow friends frequently make reference to all manner of obscure, highbrow things, often within the subcultural worlds of opera, wine appreciation, and psychology. They're particularly fun of clever puns or sassy insults that show off their knowledge, though these can be difficult to follow for the un-elite.

to:

* ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' and ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' were unafraid to have obscure references and gags because the producers knew that the joke was that the erudite characters (Diane and Frasier in the former, Frasier and Niles in the latter) were confusing the hell out of the down-to-earth characters - and people who got the reference would get more mileage, but those who didn't would laugh at the contrast.
**
contrast. ''Frasier'' gets a special mention for being one of the shows that pulled it off well while still getting high ratings. Frasier, Niles, and some of their highbrow friends frequently make reference to all manner of obscure, highbrow things, often within the subcultural worlds of opera, wine appreciation, and psychology. They're particularly fun of clever puns or sassy insults that show off their knowledge, though these can be difficult to follow for the un-elite.
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