History Main / VideogameLives

5th Jun '18 5:36:57 PM WillKeaton
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* ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'': The [[NintendoHard Challenge/Oni mode]] is a rare RhythmGame example: you start with four lives, and every time you get a Good, Boo[[note]]Almost in US versions[[/note]], Miss[[note]]Boo in US versions[[/note]], or NG, you lose one life, and losing all of your lives will, of course, trigger a GameOver. (And unlike other modes, in which you can keep playing if the other player is still alive, the game stops ''completely'' on your side if you die, showing "Game Over" on your side of the screen.) If you're lucky, the song you're on may give you a life back once completed. The Extra Stage system in ''Dance Dance Revolution [=SuperNOVA=]'' onwards, also uses lives, and One More Extra Stages give you a mere [[OneHitPointWonder one life]].

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* ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'': The [[NintendoHard Challenge/Oni mode]] is a rare RhythmGame example: you start with four lives, and every time you get a Good, Boo[[note]]Almost Boo,[[note]]Almost in US versions[[/note]], Miss[[note]]Boo versions[[/note]] Miss,[[note]]Boo in US versions[[/note]], versions[[/note]] or NG, you lose one life, and losing all of your lives will, of course, trigger a GameOver. (And unlike other modes, in which you can keep playing if the other player is still alive, the game stops ''completely'' on your side if you die, showing "Game Over" on your side of the screen.) If you're lucky, the song you're on may give you a life back once completed. The Extra Stage system in ''Dance Dance Revolution [=SuperNOVA=]'' onwards, also uses lives, and One More Extra Stages give you a mere [[OneHitPointWonder one life]].
24th Apr '18 7:53:16 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/CarriesOrderUp'' uses a "miss" system similar to ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch''; it's three strikes and you're out, but [[LawOf100 you can erase a miss by collecting enough coins]]. You can't, however, earn more lives than the cap of three.

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* ''VideoGame/CarriesOrderUp'' uses a "miss" system similar to ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch''; ''UsefulNotes/GameAndWatch''; it's three strikes and you're out, but [[LawOf100 you can erase a miss by collecting enough coins]]. You can't, however, earn more lives than the cap of three.
20th Apr '18 9:02:48 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoClassic'' and ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'' used lives, the total expiration of which led to a GameOver. These would be the only games in the series to use lives: starting with ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIII'', players would simply respawn after dying while free-roaming, or start back at a checkpoint during missions.
* In the online multiplayer of ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'', players share a pool of lives during jobs. When one player dies, the party's "Team Lives" are depleted: if someone dies when there are no more Team Lives, the job will fail and the party will need to start over at the last checkpoint.



* ''VideoGame/MakaiToshiSaga'' (''The VideoGame/FinalFantasy Legend'', in North America) is another rare example of an RPG using lives. Each party member has three hearts. If they run out of HP, they can be revived at a House of Life, but doing so requires a heart in addition to a fee for the revive. If a party member has no hearts when they die, [[FinalDeath they cannot be revived]] (unless you purchase another heart for them, which are prohibitively expensive) and will have to be "retired" at a guild outpost to make room for a new party member.

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* ''VideoGame/MakaiToshiSaga'' (''The VideoGame/FinalFantasy Legend'', in North America) is another rare example of an RPG using lives. Each party member has three hearts. If they run out of HP, they can be revived at a House of Life, but doing so requires a heart in addition to a fee for the revive. fee. If a party member has no hearts when they die, [[FinalDeath they cannot be revived]] (unless you purchase another heart for them, [[ContinuingIsPainful which are prohibitively expensive) expensive]]) and will have to be "retired" at a guild outpost to make room for a new party member.
2nd Apr '18 9:25:06 PM Vilui
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Modern video games generally do not have lives counters. They instead us a "one-and-done" health bar system (that can sometimes be increased), with infinite retries (it's the way that aspect is done that varies among games).

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Modern video games generally do not have lives counters. They instead us use a "one-and-done" health bar system (that can sometimes be increased), with infinite retries (it's the way that aspect is done that varies among games).
1st Apr '18 11:33:28 PM Lemia
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/JumanjiWelcomeToTheJungle'', the characters who get sucked into the video game get three lives each that are marked on their left wrists. Every time they die, they respawn and one of the marks on their wrist disappears.
22nd Mar '18 4:34:32 AM ClatoLawa
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The video game adaptation actually explains the presence of lives; the Professor builds a "reanimator" that resurrects you when you die.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': ''VideoGame/{{Futurama}}'': The video game adaptation actually explains the presence of lives; the Professor builds a "reanimator" that resurrects you when you die.
21st Mar '18 11:21:16 PM DragonQuestZ
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This is based on carvinal games, where you you got a certain number of tries before you had to pay to play again. This was then carried over to {{Pinball}} games, and continued in arcade games. When games were released on home consoles, the need for lives was largely removed (with the exception of games where the goal is to get the highest score and not to beat the game), but they were initially kept in as TheArtifact and the punishment for running out of lives was changed from entering a new coin to starting the game over. Eventually a continue system also became more widespread so players didn't have to start from the beginning of the game when their lives ran out.

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This is based on carvinal carnival games, where you you got a certain number of tries before you had to pay to play again. This was then carried over to {{Pinball}} games, and continued in arcade games. When games were released on home consoles, the need for lives was largely removed (with the exception of games where the goal is to get the highest score and not to beat the game), but they were initially kept in as TheArtifact and the punishment for running out of lives was changed from entering a new coin to starting the game over. Eventually a continue system also became more widespread so players didn't have to start from the beginning of the game when their lives ran out.
21st Mar '18 11:20:58 PM DragonQuestZ
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This actually started out with {{Pinball}} games, where you had a limited number of plays until you had to put in more money. This continued in arcade games. When games were released on home consoles, the need for lives was largely removed (with the exception of games where the goal is to get the highest score and not to beat the game), but they were initially kept in as TheArtifact and the punishment for running out of lives was changed from entering a new coin to starting the game over. Eventually a continue system also became more widespread so players didn't have to start from the beginning of the game when their lives ran out.

to:

This actually started out with is based on carvinal games, where you you got a certain number of tries before you had to pay to play again. This was then carried over to {{Pinball}} games, where you had a limited number of plays until you had to put in more money. This and continued in arcade games. When games were released on home consoles, the need for lives was largely removed (with the exception of games where the goal is to get the highest score and not to beat the game), but they were initially kept in as TheArtifact and the punishment for running out of lives was changed from entering a new coin to starting the game over. Eventually a continue system also became more widespread so players didn't have to start from the beginning of the game when their lives ran out.
21st Mar '18 11:18:55 PM DragonQuestZ
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[[caption-width-right:256:You only live thrice.]]

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[[caption-width-right:256:You only live thrice.have three. [[TryNotToDie Don't waste them]].]]
21st Mar '18 10:38:37 PM Galaxithea
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[[caption-width-right:256:You have three. [[TryNotToDie Don't waste them]].]]

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[[caption-width-right:256:You have three. [[TryNotToDie Don't waste them]].only live thrice.]]
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