History Main / VerySpecialEpisode

6th Sep '17 1:55:50 AM jormis29
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* Creator/JacquelineWilson has written several books based around an issue that readers might face: ''The Story of Tracy Beaker'' (living in care), ''The Suitcase Kid'' (divorced parents), ''Vicky Angel'' (bereavement), ''Love Lessons'' (TeacherStudentRomance), ''Lily Alone'' (ParentalNeglect), ''Clean Break'' (what happens when a parent walks out on the family), ''Bad Girls'' (the effects of bullying), ''The Bed and Breakfast Star'' (the stress of living in temporary housing), ''Falling Apart'' (suicide), ''Girls Under Pressure'' (eating disorders) and more.

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* Creator/JacquelineWilson has written several books based around an issue that readers might face: ''The Story of Tracy Beaker'' ''Literature/TheStoryOfTracyBeaker'' (living in care), ''The Suitcase Kid'' (divorced parents), ''Vicky Angel'' (bereavement), ''Love Lessons'' (TeacherStudentRomance), ''Lily Alone'' (ParentalNeglect), ''Clean Break'' (what happens when a parent walks out on the family), ''Bad Girls'' (the effects of bullying), ''The Bed and Breakfast Star'' (the stress of living in temporary housing), ''Falling Apart'' (suicide), ''Girls Under Pressure'' (eating disorders) and more.
27th Aug '17 8:34:55 PM CosmicCat
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* Music/BoardsOfCanada have their song "One Final Very Important Thought", about freedom of speech. It's actually far less [[{{Narm}} Narmy]] than it sounds

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* Music/BoardsOfCanada have their song "One Final Very Important Thought", about freedom of speech. It's actually far less [[{{Narm}} Narmy]] than it sounds
23rd Aug '17 8:24:20 AM Thesedaysthosedays
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The tone will typically be much, ''[[CerebusSyndrome much]]'' more serious than other installments of the series, although with sitcoms, there may still be a [[{{Bathos}} comedic subplot]] or occasional moments where the LaughTrack is needed.

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The tone will typically be much, ''[[CerebusSyndrome much]]'' more serious than other installments of the series, although with sitcoms, there may still be a [[{{Bathos}} comedic subplot]] or occasional moments where the LaughTrack is needed.
needed. If StatusQuoIsGod is in effect, there is only a small chance of breaking with this practice, but that's the reason for the common tactic of introducing [[LongLostUncleAesop a new guest character]] who isn't protected by this consideration, and can therefore have anything bad or good happen to him without chaning the status quo
20th Aug '17 4:12:59 PM eroock
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->''These excursions into rougher areas were all the more jarring because of the setting, where viewers used to cackling audiences wooing over the appearances of the wacky neighbor suddenly found themselves faced with sexual abuse, teenage pregnancy, and death by drunk-driving, all played out in front of a live studio hush. Characters who'd barely had to emote further than shrugs of exasperation were suddenly left upset or afraid, leaving you trapped in the terrible no-man's land of feelings, with no laugh track to cling onto. It was like having your wacky uncle interrupt an armpit fart to tell you about the time he saw a dead body and that's why he drinks.''
-->--'''Stuart Millard''', ''So Excited, So Scared: The Series/SavedByTheBell Retrospective''

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->''These ->''"These excursions into rougher areas were all the more jarring because of the setting, where viewers used to cackling audiences wooing over the appearances of the wacky neighbor suddenly found themselves faced with sexual abuse, teenage pregnancy, and death by drunk-driving, all played out in front of a live studio hush. Characters who'd barely had to emote further than shrugs of exasperation were suddenly left upset or afraid, leaving you trapped in the terrible no-man's land of feelings, with no laugh track to cling onto. It was like having your wacky uncle interrupt an armpit fart to tell you about the time he saw a dead body and that's why he drinks.''
-->--'''Stuart
"''
-->-- '''Stuart
Millard''', ''So Excited, So Scared: The Series/SavedByTheBell Retrospective''
31st Jul '17 7:00:29 PM NWolfman
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These episodes were far more common in the 1980s, fueled by then-United States president UsefulNotes/RonaldRegen's [[JustForPun crack]]down on drug use in America. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.

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These episodes were far more common in the 1980s, fueled by then-United States president UsefulNotes/RonaldRegen's UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan's [[JustForPun crack]]down on drug use in America. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.
31st Jul '17 7:00:02 PM NWolfman
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These episodes were far more common in the 1980s, fueled by then-United States president UsefulNotes/RonaldRegan's [[JustForPun crack]]down on drug use in America. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.

to:

These episodes were far more common in the 1980s, fueled by then-United States president UsefulNotes/RonaldRegan's UsefulNotes/RonaldRegen's [[JustForPun crack]]down on drug use in America. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.
31st Jul '17 6:59:46 PM NWolfman
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These episodes were far more common in the 1980s. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.

to:

These episodes were far more common in the 1980s.1980s, fueled by then-United States president UsefulNotes/RonaldRegan's [[JustForPun crack]]down on drug use in America. They've largely fallen out of favor since then for most shows due in part to the increasing number of shows, particularly dramas, where issues such as [[TheAlcoholic drug/alcohol abuse]], violence, [[SexIsEvil sex]] and [[KilledOffForReal death]] are dealt with on an almost weekly basis, and then you have the {{Dramedy}} genre that regularly mixes comedy with serious issues.
11th Jun '17 4:16:04 PM fruitstripegum
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Compare PublicServiceAnnouncement. TooSmartForStrangers (about the danger of child abduction) and DrugsAreBad (about Just Saying No to them) are two specific kinds of Very Special Episodes that reached their zenith in [[TheEighties the 1980s]]. DescentIntoAddiction is a special case of the latter trope, in which the episode is all about a character's gradual slide into addictive behaviour. See CompressedVice for when a character is saddled with an issue for just long enough to illustrate the aesop, and LongLostUncleAesop for when a new character is introduced ''solely'' for this purpose and never seen again. An AuthorTract is when the ''entire'' work is used as an excuse to preach about a particular real world issue.

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Compare PublicServiceAnnouncement. TooSmartForStrangers (about the danger of child abduction) and DrugsAreBad (about Just Saying No to them) are two specific kinds of Very Special Episodes that reached their zenith in [[TheEighties the 1980s]]. DescentIntoAddiction is a special case of the latter trope, in which the episode is all about a character's gradual slide into addictive behaviour. See CompressedVice for when a character is saddled with an issue for just long enough to illustrate the aesop, and LongLostUncleAesop for when a new character is introduced ''solely'' for this purpose and never seen again. An AuthorTract is when the ''entire'' work is used as an excuse to preach about a particular real world issue.
issue. GreenAesop is when the story focuses on environmental issues, but these aren't as common.
4th Jun '17 6:29:46 PM merotoker
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* The episode Vomiting Point from ''Anime/PantyAndStockingWithGarterbelt'' was extrordinarily depressing, and a satire on the pitiful, everyday lives of people living in a monotonous world, minus the main characters. The animation style is much more realistic in contrast to the show's normal ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]''-esque style, and the titular characters (who ''are'' animated in the normal style) only show up at the end for about a minute. The rest of the episode follows a very put-upon office worker as he attempts to simply do his mundane job and get his daughter a present for her birthday. The ending is at least somewhat positive, as Panty and Stocking do give him an autograph to give to her.

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* The episode Vomiting Point from ''Anime/PantyAndStockingWithGarterbelt'' was extrordinarily extraordinarily depressing, and a satire on the pitiful, everyday lives of people living in a monotonous world, minus the main characters. The animation style is much more realistic in contrast to the show's normal ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]''-esque style, and the titular characters (who ''are'' animated in the normal style) only show up at the end for about a minute. The rest of the episode follows a very put-upon office worker as he attempts to simply do his mundane job and get his daughter a present for her birthday. The ending is at least somewhat positive, as Panty and Stocking do give him an autograph to give to her.



* {{The Modern Age|OfComicBooks}} Speedy, Mia Dearden, got her own Very Special Issue where it was discovered that she was HIV Positive.
** This issue was written by Creator/JuddWinick, who seems to have a thing for Very Special moments involving AIDS and gay characters, given how a close friend of his who was gay died from complications relating to HIV.

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* {{The UsefulNotes/{{The Modern Age|OfComicBooks}} Speedy, Mia Dearden, got her own Very Special Issue where it was discovered that she was HIV Positive.
**
Positive.This issue was written by Creator/JuddWinick, who seems to have a thing for Very Special moments involving AIDS and gay characters, given how a close friend of his who was gay died from complications relating to HIV.



** Saving a stoner from jumping off a building. [[http://wolkin.com/2010/04/152/why-am-i-doing-this-fastlane-commentary-part-1/ This mess]] was actually paid for with tax dollars, mind you.

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** Saving a stoner from jumping off a building. [[http://wolkin.com/2010/04/152/why-am-i-doing-this-fastlane-commentary-part-1/ This mess]] mess was actually paid for with tax dollars, mind you.



** Creator/JMichaelStraczynski's [[ComicBook/JMSSpiderMan run]] had quite a few of those, through a lot of time the serious issues like bullying or school shooting were organic parts of the plot. Some of the straighter exampels would be an issue in which Peter tries to help one of his studends who has junkie brother [[spoiler: and turns out they're both homeless]] (and in subversion to general rule this issue opens longer story arc and the girl is one of the central characters of it). The straightest example however would be an issue about 9/11 and it's still considered one of the better written comics about that tragedy.
* ''ComicBook/NewMutants'' issue #45 was all about a new kid named Larry who was secretly a mutant. His classmates started teasing him about it (not knowing he really ''was'' a mutant) and stuck a flyer under his door that said "X-Factor [the mutant hunting team] is coming for you!" That freaked him out so badly that he ended up committing suicide. And the whole thing ends with a [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot We Could Have Avoided This]] speech from Kitty Pryde about name-calling. Fortunately, it's so well-written that it's not really that {{Narm}}y. [[TearJerker No, indeed.]]

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** Creator/JMichaelStraczynski's [[ComicBook/JMSSpiderMan run]] had quite a few of those, through a lot of time the serious issues like bullying or school shooting were organic parts of the plot. Some of the straighter exampels examples would be an issue in which Peter tries to help one of his studends students who has junkie brother [[spoiler: and turns out they're both homeless]] (and in subversion to general rule this issue opens longer story arc and the girl is one of the central characters of it). The straightest example however would be an issue about 9/11 and it's still considered one of the better written comics about that tragedy.
* ''ComicBook/NewMutants'' [[http://www.supermegamonkey.net/chronocomic/entries/new_mutants_45.shtml issue #45 #45]] was all about a new kid named Larry who was secretly a mutant. His classmates started teasing him about it (not knowing he really ''was'' a mutant) and stuck a flyer under his door that said "X-Factor [the mutant hunting team] is coming for you!" That freaked him out so badly that he ended up committing suicide. And the whole thing ends with a [[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot We Could Have Avoided This]] speech from Kitty Pryde about name-calling. Fortunately, it's so well-written that it's not really that {{Narm}}y. [[TearJerker No, indeed.]]



* ''[[Comicbook/TheSandman Death talks about life]]'' was a giveaway special produced by Vertigo at the height of the AIDS epidemic. It features Death [[BreakingTheFourthWall directly addressing the reader]] about AIDS and sex related issues, and is probably the single most {{Anvilicious}} comic not written by [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]]. It's also probably the best {{Anvilicious}} comic of all time, as it makes up for its {{anvilicious}}ness by featuring a scene in which [[Comicbook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny holds a banana while Death rolls a condom onto it.]]
** The AIDS epidemic was also a bit of a running motif in ''Comicbook/TheSandman'' itself, although never to the extent of having entire issues based around it.

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* ''[[Comicbook/TheSandman Death talks about life]]'' was a giveaway special produced by Vertigo at the height of the AIDS epidemic. It [[http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/295605.html#cutid1 It]] features Death [[BreakingTheFourthWall directly addressing the reader]] about AIDS and sex related issues, and is probably the single most {{Anvilicious}} comic not written by [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]]. It's also probably the best {{Anvilicious}} comic of all time, as it makes up for its {{anvilicious}}ness by featuring a scene in which [[Comicbook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny holds a banana while Death rolls a condom onto it.]]
**
]] The AIDS epidemic was also a bit of a running motif in ''Comicbook/TheSandman'' itself, although never to the extent of having entire issues based around it.



* ''Heroes for Hope'', published in 1985, was a special one-shot starring the Comicbook/{{X-Men}} and written and drawn by dozens of notable comic book and genre fiction creators (conceived as sort of a comic book version of ''We Are the World''), in which [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel's]] mutant heroes confront famine in Africa (and an ancient demon that feeds on the despair it causes). Proceeds from the book were donated to famine relief.
* DC got it on it at about the same time, producing ''Heroes Against Hunger'' where Comicbook/{{Superman}} discovers his powers are useless against famine.
* ''Comicbook/{{Shazam}}: The Power of Hope'' is the comic book equivalent of a Very Special Episode. Penned by Paul Dini and drawn by Alex Ross, it mostly deals with Captain Marvel being sent on an errand to find a ''hopeless boy'' and bring him hope. Captain Marvel spends his free time in a child ward of the local hospital, dealing with terminally ill kids and various other ''hopeless cases''. Only after helping the seemingly most hopeless kid of the bunch, in a TwistEnding moment, [[spoiler: Captain Marvel is made aware that the ''hopeless boy'' was none other than Billy Batson, his alter ego, feeling doubts about his capacity to bring hope and needing to be confronted with the tragedies of human life and innocence of other kids.]]

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* ''Heroes for Hope'', published in 1985, was a special one-shot starring the Comicbook/{{X-Men}} Comicbook/XMen and written and drawn by dozens of notable comic book and genre fiction creators (conceived as sort of a comic book version of ''We Are the World''), in which [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel's]] mutant heroes confront famine in Africa (and an ancient demon that feeds on the despair it causes). Proceeds from the book were donated to famine relief.
* DC got it on it at about the same time, producing ''Heroes Against Hunger'' where Comicbook/{{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} discovers his powers are useless against famine.
* ''Comicbook/{{Shazam}}: The Power of Hope'' is the comic book equivalent of a Very Special Episode. Penned by Paul Dini and drawn by Alex Ross, it mostly deals with Captain Marvel being sent on an errand to find a ''hopeless boy'' and bring him hope. Captain Marvel spends his free time in a child ward of the local hospital, dealing with terminally ill kids and various other ''hopeless cases''. Only after helping the seemingly most hopeless kid of the bunch, in a TwistEnding moment, [[spoiler: Captain Marvel is made aware that the ''hopeless boy'' was none other than Billy Batson, his alter ego, feeling doubts about his capacity to bring hope and needing to be confronted with the tragedies of human life and innocence of other kids.]]kids]].



* ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}'' had a 2-part story about domestic abuse in the early 90's called "Crisis at Hand," deconstructing the days when Supes was a WifeBasherBasher from the early Golden Age comics, showing that early in his career when he once attempted to scare a man from beating his wife, only to later learn it failed and the man later ''killed'' her the next time he got violent; in the present day when he learns that one of his neighbors is the victim of abuse, Clark tries to find a way to help her without setting her husband off worse. Considered one of the better cases of a "very special issue" and was actually brought up a few times afterward in the Superman books.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}'' ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' had a 2-part story about domestic abuse in the early 90's called "Crisis at Hand," deconstructing the days when Supes was a WifeBasherBasher from the early Golden Age comics, showing that early in his career when he once attempted to scare a man from beating his wife, only to later learn it failed and the man later ''killed'' her the next time he got violent; in the present day when he learns that one of his neighbors is the victim of abuse, Clark tries to find a way to help her without setting her husband off worse. Considered one of the better cases of a "very special issue" and was actually brought up a few times afterward in the Superman books.



* Christopher Reeve only agreed to do another ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' film if it contained a clear anti-nuclear message. And, so ''Film/SupermanIVTheQuestForPeace'' and its ridiculously hamfisted villain Nuclear Man were born.

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* Christopher Reeve Creator/ChristopherReeve only agreed to do another ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' film if it contained a clear anti-nuclear message. And, so ''Film/SupermanIVTheQuestForPeace'' and its ridiculously hamfisted villain Nuclear Man were born.



* ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'' series had Very Special Books dealing with different topics. Most involved characters that had [[LongLostUncleAesop never been mentioned before]] and some ended with information about related support groups, such as Students Against Drunk Driving. Topics included drunk driving, dealing with death, anorexia, scoliosis, parental abuse, racism, and homelessness.

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* ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'' ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'' series had Very Special Books dealing with different topics. Most involved characters that had [[LongLostUncleAesop never been mentioned before]] and some ended with information about related support groups, such as Students Against Drunk Driving. Topics included drunk driving, dealing with death, anorexia, scoliosis, parental abuse, racism, and homelessness.



* Literature/JacquelineWilson= has written several books based around an issue that readers might face: ''The Story of Tracy Beaker'' (living in care), ''The Suitcase Kid'' (divorced parents), ''Vicky Angel'' (bereavement), ''Love Lessons'' (TeacherStudentRomance), ''Lily Alone'' (ParentalNeglect), ''Clean Break'' (what happens when a parent walks out on the family), ''Bad Girls'' (the effects of bullying), ''The Bed and Breakfast Star'' (the stress of living in temporary housing), ''Falling Apart'' (suicide), ''Girls Under Pressure'' (eating disorders) and more.

to:

* Literature/JacquelineWilson= Creator/JacquelineWilson has written several books based around an issue that readers might face: ''The Story of Tracy Beaker'' (living in care), ''The Suitcase Kid'' (divorced parents), ''Vicky Angel'' (bereavement), ''Love Lessons'' (TeacherStudentRomance), ''Lily Alone'' (ParentalNeglect), ''Clean Break'' (what happens when a parent walks out on the family), ''Bad Girls'' (the effects of bullying), ''The Bed and Breakfast Star'' (the stress of living in temporary housing), ''Falling Apart'' (suicide), ''Girls Under Pressure'' (eating disorders) and more.



* Soul Asylum's MusicVideo for "Runaway Train" was interspersed with photos of missing children and ended with a phone number to call if the viewer had seen any of them. [[ShaggyDogStory In unfortunate twists]], it was eventually revealed that some of the now-adults shown in the video didn't ''want'' to be found, and at least one of them was a victim of abuse by the same AbusiveParents who sent the photo. Worse, a little girl shown in the original video had been [[OffingTheOffspring murdered by her mother]] and buried in her backyard as the corollary of her parents's bitter divorce.

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* Soul Asylum's MusicVideo {{Music Video|Tropes}} for "Runaway Train" was interspersed with photos of missing children and ended with a phone number to call if the viewer had seen any of them. [[ShaggyDogStory In unfortunate twists]], it was eventually revealed that some of the now-adults shown in the video didn't ''want'' to be found, and at least one of them was a victim of abuse by the same AbusiveParents who sent the photo. Worse, a little girl shown in the original video had been [[OffingTheOffspring murdered by her mother]] and buried in her backyard as the corollary of her parents's bitter divorce.



* Although by its very nature professional wrestling does not have "very special problem" plots in the vein of most sitcoms and such, Wrestling/{{WWE}} has aired very different types of "Very Special Episodes," most notably after the death of a prominent current member of its roster or after a notably tragic event. Current storylines will be dropped, and wrestlers will be invited to do [[RealLife "out-of-character"]] tributes to their fallen comrade.
** The most famous "death" examples were tribute shows aired for Wrestling/OwenHart (who was killed after a stunt gone horribly wrong), Wrestling/EddieGuerrero, and Wrestling/ChrisBenoit (aired live, before the details of his murders of his wife and son, and his suicide became definitively known). WWE also aired a show six days after the September 11, 2001, attacks in New York and Washington, as a salute to victims killed in the terrorist attacks.
* Once on ''Monday Night Raw'', WWE superstars wore pink to raise awareness on the battle against breast cancer and to promote their partnership with the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

to:

* Although by its very nature professional wrestling does not have "very special problem" plots in the vein of most sitcoms and such, Wrestling/{{WWE}} has aired very different types of "Very Special Episodes," most notably after the death of a prominent current member of its roster or after a notably tragic event. Current storylines will be dropped, and wrestlers will be invited to do [[RealLife "out-of-character"]] tributes to their fallen comrade.
**
comrade. The most famous "death" examples were tribute shows aired for Wrestling/OwenHart (who was killed after a stunt gone horribly wrong), Wrestling/EddieGuerrero, and Wrestling/ChrisBenoit (aired live, before the details of his murders of his wife and son, and his suicide became definitively known). WWE also aired a show six days after the September 11, 2001, attacks in New York and Washington, as a salute to victims killed in the terrorist attacks.
* Once on ''Monday Night Raw'', In October, WWE superstars wore wear pink to raise awareness on the battle against breast cancer and to promote their partnership with the Susan G. Komen Foundation.



* ''Series/SesameStreet'''s Very Special Episode dealing with the death of Mr. Harold Hooper, which was entirely {{justified|Trope}} as [[RealLifeWritesThePlot the man who played him had actually died.]] Not a shred of {{Narm}} this time, this Very Special Episode headed straight into TearJerker territory. A similar scenario, in which Elmo deals with the death of his uncle Jack, was produced in TheNewTens.

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* ''Series/SesameStreet'''s ''Series/SesameStreet''
** A very famous
Very Special Episode dealing dealt with the death of Mr. Harold Hooper, which was entirely {{justified|Trope}} as [[RealLifeWritesThePlot the man who played him had actually died.]] Not a shred of {{Narm}} this time, this Very Special Episode headed straight into TearJerker territory. A similar scenario, in which Elmo deals with the death of his uncle Jack, was produced in TheNewTens.



** There was an episode which centered around Big Bird's nest,which had been destroyed by a hurricane.

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** There was an episode which centered around Big Bird's nest,which nest, which had been destroyed by a hurricane.



** At least in context, it isn't that Dorian's parents think being gay is wrong. It's that he won't play by the Imperium rules and agree to an ArrangedMarriage SuperBreedingProgram. His parents would probably be fine if he engaged in extramarital homosexual relations so long as it's behind closed doors so long as he marries the proper girl and produces an heir first. WordOfGod is Dorian's parents hate each other and as a result only had one child which is why they can't turn to another kid to continue the family line. This gives credible in-universe justifications for their actions, but doesn't work as a RealWorld allegory for parental homophobia as the basis for Dorian's fictional discrimination is vastly different to what people face in real life.

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** At least in context, it isn't that Dorian's parents think being gay is wrong. It's that he won't play by the Imperium rules and agree to an ArrangedMarriage SuperBreedingProgram. His parents would probably be fine if he engaged in extramarital homosexual relations so long as it's behind closed doors so long as he marries the proper girl and produces an heir first. WordOfGod is Dorian's parents hate each other and as a result only had one child which is why they can't turn to another kid to continue the family line. This gives credible in-universe justifications for their actions, but doesn't work as a RealWorld RealLife allegory for parental homophobia as the basis for Dorian's fictional discrimination is vastly different to what people face in the real life.world.



* ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDel''. One word: [[http://www.cad-comic.com/cad/20080602 Miscarriage.]] This set off a slew of mockery and debate, including biting parody from [[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/zero-punctuation/108-Webcomics Zero Punctuation]] and [[http://www.vgcats.com/cadaprilfools/ VG Cats.]]For context, CAD up to that point had been a fairly humorous webcomic, but since it was a humor comic first and foremost, the jarring switch to drama with Lilah's miscarriage combined with how infamous CAD already sort of was at that point resulted in the above internet meme mocking how poorly handled the subject matter was.

to:

* ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDel''. One word: [[http://www.cad-comic.com/cad/20080602 Miscarriage.]] This set off a slew of mockery and debate, including biting parody from [[http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/zero-punctuation/108-Webcomics Zero Punctuation]] and [[http://www.vgcats.com/cadaprilfools/ VG Cats.]]For context, CAD up to that point had been a fairly humorous webcomic, but since it was a humor comic first and foremost, the jarring switch to drama with Lilah's miscarriage combined with how infamous CAD already sort of was at that point resulted in the above internet Internet meme mocking how poorly handled the subject matter was.



* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSchiqWIB6g Alternate History Hub's video on the Armenian Genocide]] certainly counts. Instead of exploring alternate history what ifs, the video is dedicated to a summary of the genocide and raises awareness of its denial by numerous nations, including the perpetrator. [[TheNarrator Cody's]] voice is pretty somber and serious, and no light hearted snark, comedic elements or background music (even during the outro) are present.

to:

* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSchiqWIB6g Alternate History Hub's video on the Armenian Genocide]] certainly counts. Instead of exploring alternate history what ifs, the video is dedicated to a summary of the genocide and raises awareness of its denial by numerous nations, including the perpetrator. [[TheNarrator [[{{Narrator}} Cody's]] voice is pretty somber and serious, and no light hearted lighthearted snark, comedic elements or background music (even during the outro) are present.



* The ''WebVideo/BrowsHeldHigh'' review of ''Theatre/AngelsInAmerica'' for World AIDS Day in part of the Red Ribbon Reviewers project was mostly a PSA about HIV and AIDS, and praise for the play and TV miniseries.
** His review of {{Melancholia}}. The movie deals with themes of severe depression, and when it starts as a fun MilestoneCelebration, it quickly grinds down and becomes less funny until FilmBrain calls him out for focusing on easily mocked but ultimately irrelevant aspects of the movie instead of facing the ElephantInTheRoom. At this point, Kyle stops the review to talk for a moment about real-life depression and his battles with such.

to:

* ''WebVideo/BrowsHeldHigh''
**
The ''WebVideo/BrowsHeldHigh'' review of ''Theatre/AngelsInAmerica'' for World AIDS Day in part of the Red Ribbon Reviewers project was mostly a PSA about HIV and AIDS, and praise for the play and TV miniseries.
** His review of {{Melancholia}}.''Film/{{Melancholia}}''. The movie deals with themes of severe depression, and when it starts as a fun MilestoneCelebration, it quickly grinds down and becomes less funny until FilmBrain calls him out for focusing on easily mocked but ultimately irrelevant aspects of the movie instead of facing the ElephantInTheRoom. At this point, Kyle stops the review to talk for a moment about real-life depression and his battles with such.



* Parodied and deconstructed in the fifth ''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared'' video. A gang of talking foods sing a common children's cartoon {{aesop}} about eating healthy. It soon becomes obvious they're very factually incorrect and spouting nonsense. Things such as how "plain foods" such as "bread, cream, white sauce, and aspic" are good for you while "fancy foods" like "cooked meats, fruit salad, soil foods, and yolk" are bad for you. The AnthropomorphicFood characters are also FauxAffablyEvil and condensending towards Duck Guy and his friends.

to:

* Parodied and deconstructed in the fifth ''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared'' video. A gang of talking foods sing a common children's cartoon {{aesop}} [[AnAesop aesop]] about eating healthy. It soon becomes obvious they're very factually incorrect and spouting nonsense. Things such as how "plain foods" such as "bread, cream, white sauce, and aspic" are good for you while "fancy foods" like "cooked meats, fruit salad, soil foods, and yolk" are bad for you. The AnthropomorphicFood characters are also FauxAffablyEvil and condensending towards Duck Guy and his friends.
8th May '17 1:43:51 PM Sakubara
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* The hour-long [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4_U3Da_mwA 50th episode]] of [[WebVideo/ACoupleofCuntsintheCountryside A Couple of Cunts in the Countryside]], which featured interviews with past guest stars, a [[TopTenList countdown]] of the ten best episodes and previously unseen footage. It also served as the show's GrandFinale.
* From ''Machinima/YogscastMinecraftSeries'', the "very special episode" in this case was an episode of the ''Voltz'' mod, titled "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2ohslGivm8 The Bomb]]". In this episode, LetsPlay/{{Sjin}} and LetsPlay/{{Sips}} spawn in a series of red matter explosives... [[TooDumbToLive all so they can mine copper]]. [[MikeNelsonDestroyerOfWorlds The server is nearly destroyed]]. In this case, the humour was still very much there, but had a slightly darker tone than normal.
This list shows the last 10 events of 154. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VerySpecialEpisode