History Main / VariableMix

16th Mar '17 9:17:38 PM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Shadow of the Colossus}}'', the music transitions smoothly to a more upbeat theme once you have discovered how to get onto the colossus.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Shadow of the Colossus}}'', ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheColossus'', the music transitions smoothly to a more upbeat theme once you have discovered how to get onto the colossus.



** Also done in ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay''.
** Basically, Creator/{{Rare}} (David Wise, Grant Kirkhope, Eveline Fischer, ect.) loved this trope and used it at every opportunity.



* ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'' does this with the theme heard in the areas within and around Windy.



* ''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' has a variation on this trope: with each world completed, an additional line of instrumentation is added to the map screen music, until it becomes fully orchestrated on the last world's map.
** ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' reuses the tune for LavaLava Island, and each area of the map has a different mix of the tune. In fact, lots of areas in the game are like that, but the most dynamic has to be Toad Town, where the different parts of the tune actually fade in or out as you approach various areas.
*** Toad Town has its own theme song, and certain parts of it have their own themes, which are in the same key as and in sync with the Toad Town theme. When you are near one of these parts, you can hear the special music just a little bit, and when you are ''in'' said part, the special music is all there. The main theme can still be heard faintly, as if it were coming from outside.

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* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'':
** The
''VideoGame/YoshisIsland'' has games have a variation on this trope: with each world completed, an additional line of instrumentation is added to the map screen music, until it becomes fully orchestrated on the last world's map.
** ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' reuses the tune for LavaLava Island, and each area of the map has a different mix of the tune. In fact, lots of areas in the game are like that, but the most dynamic has to be Toad Town, where the different parts of the tune actually fade in or out as you approach various areas.
*** Toad Town has its own theme song, and certain parts of it have their own themes, which are in the same key as and in sync with the Toad Town theme. When you are near one of these parts, you can hear the special music just a little bit, and when you are ''in'' said part, the special music is all there. The main theme can still be heard faintly, as if it were coming from outside.
map.



* ''VideoGame/{{Ristar}}'' has a [[BandLand music-themed level]] in which the objective was to deliver metronomes to birds found throughout the level. For each metronome returned, a portion of the level's background music was replaced with a choral melody.
** The final boss theme isn't a layered track like Planet Sonata, but it aims for this effect in spirit. It's timed so that the slow part lasts almost exactly as long as it takes to wear Kaiser's first phase down, the accelerando takes place during his first black hole attack, and the fast, frantic part goes into full swing when he TurnsRed.

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** ''VideoGame/PaperMario'':
*** The game reuses the tune for LavaLava Island, and each area of the map has a different mix of the tune. In fact, lots of areas in the game are like that, but the most dynamic has to be Toad Town, where the different parts of the tune actually fade in or out as you approach various areas.
*** Toad Town has its own theme song, and certain parts of it have their own themes, which are in the same key as and in sync with the Toad Town theme. When you are near one of these parts, you can hear the special music just a little bit, and when you are ''in'' said part, the special music is all there. The main theme can still be heard faintly, as if it were coming from outside.
* ''VideoGame/{{Ristar}}'' has a [[BandLand music-themed level]] in which the objective was to deliver metronomes to birds found throughout the level. For each metronome returned, a portion of the level's background music was replaced with a choral melody.
**
melody. The final boss theme isn't a layered track like Planet Sonata, but it aims for this effect in spirit. It's timed so that the slow part lasts almost exactly as long as it takes to wear Kaiser's first phase down, the accelerando takes place during his first black hole attack, and the fast, frantic part goes into full swing when he TurnsRed.



* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}'' game, this trope was used two different ways in the same place: the between-level transition screens. Each time you visited it, each level you'd completed would play a section of a tune; completing every level would complete the tune, [[spoiler:the Song of Rebirth]]. In addition, each level had six characters to rescue, who formed members of the band that played the tune; if you didn't collect all six characters in a level, their portion of the tune would have correspondingly fewer instruments.
** Also, the music playing on the level changes slightly depending on where you are (outer and inner areas) and what is going on (particularly easy to notice in [[spoiler:Temple of the Sun, due to constantly triggering magic-induced twilight in the outer areas]]).

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* In the original ''VideoGame/{{Klonoa}}'' game, this trope was used two different ways in the same place: the between-level transition screens. Each time you visited it, each level you'd completed would play a section of a tune; completing every level would complete the tune, [[spoiler:the Song of Rebirth]]. In addition, each level had six characters to rescue, who formed members of the band that played the tune; if you didn't collect all six characters in a level, their portion of the tune would have correspondingly fewer instruments.
**
instruments. Also, the music playing on the level changes slightly depending on where you are (outer and inner areas) and what is going on (particularly easy to notice in [[spoiler:Temple of the Sun, due to constantly triggering magic-induced twilight in the outer areas]]).



* In the pre-''[[VideoGame/SonicAdventure Adventure]] Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games, the BGM currently playing would speed up if you got the super shoes (only ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehogCD Sonic CD]]'' and the Saturn version of ''VideoGame/Sonic3DFlickiesIsland'' didn't do this presumably technical limitations since they were playing direct from audio CD).
** ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' gives us Mystic Mansion with its segmented level theme; different segments play and loop depending on where in the level you are, transitioning at noticeable "checkpoints". You can hear them all in sequence in the SoundTest. The preceding level (Hang Castle) toys with this as well, albeit differently. Its two themes are interchanged virtually seamlessly as you go from normal castle to upside-down castle and back again.
** In ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'', the music would gain a more fast-paced drum beat when boosting in Modern Sonic's Green Hill and Sky Sanctuary stages. (In all other stages, boosting simply adds a filter to the music).
*** This originated in ''VideoGame/SonicColors'', where, upon boosting, the prominent instruments in the BGM would be drowned out a bit, allowing the drum & bass to come center stage. Diving underwater with Sonic in Aquarium Park also creates subtle changes in the music.
*** Reversed in ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' where the drum & bass would be drowned out, sometimes completely, when boosting.

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* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':
**
In the pre-''[[VideoGame/SonicAdventure Adventure]] Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' Adventure]]'' games, the BGM currently playing would speed up if you got the super shoes (only ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehogCD Sonic CD]]'' and the Saturn version of ''VideoGame/Sonic3DFlickiesIsland'' didn't do this presumably technical limitations since they were playing direct from audio CD).
** ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' gives us has Mystic Mansion with its segmented level theme; different segments play and loop depending on where in the level you are, transitioning at noticeable "checkpoints". You can hear them all in sequence in the SoundTest. The preceding level (Hang Castle) toys with this as well, albeit differently. Its two themes are interchanged virtually seamlessly as you go from normal castle to upside-down castle and back again.
** In ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'', the music would gain a more fast-paced drum beat when boosting in Modern Sonic's Green Hill and Sky Sanctuary stages. (In In all other stages, boosting simply adds a filter to the music).
***
music. This originated in ''VideoGame/SonicColors'', where, upon boosting, the prominent instruments in the BGM would be drowned out a bit, allowing the drum & bass to come center stage. Diving underwater with Sonic in Aquarium Park also creates subtle changes in the music.
*** ** Reversed in ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' where the drum & bass would be drowned out, sometimes completely, when boosting.
16th Mar '17 8:41:40 PM Abodos
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Added DiffLines:

** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'', the bosses at the end of the four main dungeons have the same song, but with a different instrument playing the melody. Also, while going through Hyrule Castle, a bass line is added when you fight enemies.
28th Feb '17 1:51:18 AM Korodzik
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A hard cut to a different piece is one possible solution for a game, and it's not so jarring when disguised by a sound effect. But some titles make better use of their technology: in a variable mix, the background music changes subtly and smoothly depending on what is going on in the game. The running background music could have, for example, parallel parts that fade in and out with the rising and falling action level, seamlessly transitioning from a bare-bone ambient haunting theme to a hard-rocking drum-backed metal anthem during combat, and back again after the last enemy has fallen. A clever bit of composing that has a very subtle but real influence on player immersion. Variable mix is almost always made possible by MIDI (musical instrument digital interface).

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A hard cut to a different piece is one possible solution for a game, and it's not so jarring when disguised by a sound effect. But some titles make better use of their technology: in a variable mix, the background music changes subtly and smoothly depending on what is going on in the game. The running background music could have, for example, parallel parts that fade in and out with the rising and falling action level, seamlessly transitioning from a bare-bone ambient haunting theme to a hard-rocking drum-backed metal anthem during combat, and back again after the last enemy has fallen. A clever bit of composing that has a very subtle but real influence on player immersion. Variable mix The UsefulNotes/MIDI musical interface, in which music pieces are not saved as pre-recorded audio but rather as musical notation that is almost always made possible interpreted on-the-fly by MIDI (musical instrument digital interface).
the sound hardware, is well suited for this sort of thing.
25th Jan '17 3:49:36 AM OldBen
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* In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', the game normally has a large map where you can control your units, and attacking an enemy (or healing an ally) zooms the camera in, changing the characters from sprites to 3D models to show off the scene. When this happens, the music nicely changes to a livelier version of the theme while the scene plays. The same happens when enemy units attack your characters as well, except it plays a different theme. The exception is boss battles, but they too are a separate example: during the pre-fight conversation, a subdued, ominous theme plays, which transitions smoothly into the boss music proper once the fighting starts.

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* In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', the game normally has a large map where you can control your units, and attacking an enemy (or healing an ally) zooms the camera in, changing the characters from sprites to 3D models to show off the scene. When this happens, the music nicely changes to a livelier version of the theme while the scene plays. The same happens when enemy units attack your characters as well, except it plays a different theme. The exception is boss battles, but they too are a separate example: during the pre-fight conversation, a subdued, ominous theme plays, which transitions smoothly into the boss music proper once the fighting starts. This carries over to ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', except both player and enemy turns now use the same theme.


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* Combat themes in ''VideoGame/XCOM2'' transition seamlessly from dramatic and orchestral during XCOM's turn, to menacing and electronic during the alien's turn.
3rd Jan '17 5:31:16 PM Wyldchyld
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* This is the point of the soundtrack for ''VideoGame/FableII'': in fights, the music becomes more intense as you do cooler things; be a big enough BadAss and you'll hear a symphony, more or less. Oh, and [[RuleOfCool the cooler you fight, the more experience you get.]]

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* This is the point of the soundtrack for ''VideoGame/FableII'': in fights, the music becomes more intense as you do cooler things; be a big enough BadAss badass and you'll hear a symphony, more or less. Oh, and [[RuleOfCool the cooler you fight, the more experience you get.]]
30th Dec '16 8:53:08 AM OldBen
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* Keeping with the series' tradition, in ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', music regularly gains and loses instruments and tempo depending on events within the game. Boss themes in particular often shift to different parts of the song to go along with the actions of the battle, usually ending in a full vocal performance.
28th Dec '16 7:53:41 PM TheGreatKomodo
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** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'' works the same way with mission-specific music, which builds up track by track the further along in the mission you get.

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** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'' works the same way with mission-specific music, which builds up track by track the further along in the mission you get. Background music also plays when the player gets a 3 star wanted level in free roam, which progressively intensifies as the chase drags on and the player gets more stars.
29th Nov '16 6:21:43 PM mariofan12ify
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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'', when riding a chocobo, the music changes depending on how fast you go. For example, when you walk slowly, the music starts off by playing a relaxing flute and acoustic guitar and when you start dashing/running, the music changes to an upbeat version of the same song.
28th Nov '16 6:27:11 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast'' and ''VideoGame/VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'' near-seamlessly mixes and matches Music/JohnWilliams's music from ''Franchise/StarWars'', with calm pieces playing when exploring, seguing into dramatic and fast-paced when spotted by enemies, and cooling back down after the encounter.

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* ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast'' and ''VideoGame/VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'' ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'' near-seamlessly mixes and matches Music/JohnWilliams's music from ''Franchise/StarWars'', with calm pieces playing when exploring, seguing into dramatic and fast-paced when spotted by enemies, and cooling back down after the encounter.
31st Oct '16 10:06:26 AM KamenRiderOokalf
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* Used a lot in the ''VideoGame/SilentHill'' series; sometimes there's a variation of a music piece that only plays when entering or exiting a room (like the scary music when you return to the clock room for the last time in the second game, and the ScareChord when you jump across the alleyway), or different variations are used for different types and numbers of enemies (e.g. the music quiets down when there's only one or two left), as well as different rooms (the alternate mall in the third game is a major example).

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* Used a lot in the ''VideoGame/SilentHill'' ''Franchise/SilentHill'' series; sometimes there's a variation of a music piece that only plays when entering or exiting a room (like the scary music when you return to the clock room for the last time in the second game, and the ScareChord when you jump across the alleyway), or different variations are used for different types and numbers of enemies (e.g. the music quiets down when there's only one or two left), as well as different rooms (the alternate mall in the third game is a major example).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VariableMix