History Main / VariableMix

28th Jun '16 3:31:37 AM Diask
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''{{Okami}}'', going into important and/or busier areas of some maps would add an extra layer of music.

to:

* In ''{{Okami}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'', going into important and/or busier areas of some maps would add an extra layer of music.



* ''VideoGame/{{NieR}}'' uses this to great effect in its soundtrack, adding drums and percussion in several areas when in battle, and sometimes adding and subtracting instruments when you transition into new areas.
* ''Videogame/{{Drakengard 3}}'' adds percussion and a OneWomanWail whenever Zero enters Intoner Mode.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{NieR}}'' ''VideoGame/NieR'' uses this to great effect in its soundtrack, adding drums and percussion in several areas when in battle, and sometimes adding and subtracting instruments when you transition into new areas.
* ''Videogame/{{Drakengard 3}}'' ''Videogame/Drakengard3'' adds percussion and a OneWomanWail whenever Zero enters Intoner Mode.



** ''VideoGame/XWing'' and ''VideoGame/{{TIE Fighter}}'' use this too, as does the ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' series. Needless to say, when used in conjunction with elements of the ''Star Wars'' score, plus new music that blended with it, the effect is extremely enjoyable and atmospheric.

to:

** ''VideoGame/XWing'' and ''VideoGame/{{TIE Fighter}}'' ''VideoGame/TIEFighter'' use this too, as does the ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' series. Needless to say, when used in conjunction with elements of the ''Star Wars'' score, plus new music that blended with it, the effect is extremely enjoyable and atmospheric.



* In ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest IV'', the Galaxy Galleria theme is normally elevator/lobby music, but when you enter the Skate-O-Rama, it adds drums. It also mixes in the various shop music themes as you pass by.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest IV'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIV'', the Galaxy Galleria theme is normally elevator/lobby music, but when you enter the Skate-O-Rama, it adds drums. It also mixes in the various shop music themes as you pass by.



* The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' games, particularly the [[VideoGame/{{Halo2}} second]] and [[VideoGame/{{Halo3}} third]], use what the composer calls "quantum music". A piece may have an intro, followed by a looping middle section that may have different variations depending on the player's actions, and an outtro, again triggered by the gameplay. The music fades out after a certain time if no dynamic triggers are activated. "Glue" musics consisting of short loops (typically drone ambient) are used to transition between larger pieces.

to:

* The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' games, particularly the [[VideoGame/{{Halo2}} [[VideoGame/Halo2 second]] and [[VideoGame/{{Halo3}} [[VideoGame/Halo3 third]], use what the composer calls "quantum music". A piece may have an intro, followed by a looping middle section that may have different variations depending on the player's actions, and an outtro, again triggered by the gameplay. The music fades out after a certain time if no dynamic triggers are activated. "Glue" musics consisting of short loops (typically drone ambient) are used to transition between larger pieces.



* ''VideoGame/{{Payday2}}'' uses this for police assaults. Each track is timed so a "quiet" version plays between waves, and when an assault triggers there is almost always a brief lull (for aBain to comment) before the heavy drop.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Payday2}}'' ''VideoGame/Payday2'' uses this for police assaults. Each track is timed so a "quiet" version plays between waves, and when an assault triggers there is almost always a brief lull (for aBain to comment) before the heavy drop.



* ''VideoGame/{{Action52}}'' has this unintentionally in level 3 in ''Lollipops''. While belonging to glitch chiptune subgenre, it changes with every action like walking, jumping and attacking. This is apparently due to the system attempting to read game data as music (like playing the data track of a CD-ROM in a CD player).

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Action52}}'' ''VideoGame/Action52'' has this unintentionally in level 3 in ''Lollipops''. While belonging to glitch chiptune subgenre, it changes with every action like walking, jumping and attacking. This is apparently due to the system attempting to read game data as music (like playing the data track of a CD-ROM in a CD player).



* An unusual example comes from ''VideoGame/{{WarioWare}}: Smooth Moves'' on Dribble and Spitz's stage. The vocal song "Tomorrow Hill" plays throughout the level. When you mess up, the song distorts. You might think it's just an effect placed over the original song, but it's actually a variable mix--the distorted parts of the song are ''actually sung differently'', sometimes even [[{{Mondegreen}} with nonsensical words in place of the normal ones]] ("Already said my goodbyes" becomes "Already ate my french fry", for example). This alternate version of the song, "Falling Off Tomorrow Hill", can even be heard in the SoundTest.

to:

* An unusual example comes from ''VideoGame/{{WarioWare}}: ''VideoGame/WarioWare: Smooth Moves'' on Dribble and Spitz's stage. The vocal song "Tomorrow Hill" plays throughout the level. When you mess up, the song distorts. You might think it's just an effect placed over the original song, but it's actually a variable mix--the distorted parts of the song are ''actually sung differently'', sometimes even [[{{Mondegreen}} with nonsensical words in place of the normal ones]] ("Already said my goodbyes" becomes "Already ate my french fry", for example). This alternate version of the song, "Falling Off Tomorrow Hill", can even be heard in the SoundTest.



* The two town themes in ''VideoGame/ShovelKnight'' change instrumentation depending on where you are in the town. There's also the final level theme which begins with only one instrument and gains more as the player gets closer and closer to the final boss.



* Cipher Prime games ''Auditorium'' and ''[[FractalMakeBloomsNotWar Fractal]]'' do this. In the former, each level starts in silence. Every "bucket" you fill with the correct type of flowing particle adds a layer to the music. In the latter, creating more blooms adds these layers. Each level starts with the stereotypical "howling wasteland" sound.
* In some levels with ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', the background music gets instruments or changes when various puzzle elements are used. For an example, music becomes muffled inside excursion funnel or gets a line of instruments when running on propulsion gel.

to:

* Cipher Prime games ''Auditorium'' and ''[[FractalMakeBloomsNotWar Fractal]]'' ''VideoGame/{{Fractal|MakeBloomsNotWar}}'' do this. In the former, each level starts in silence. Every "bucket" you fill with the correct type of flowing particle adds a layer to the music. In the latter, creating more blooms adds these layers. Each level starts with the stereotypical "howling wasteland" sound.
* In some levels with ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'', ''VideoGame/Portal2'', the background music gets instruments or changes when various puzzle elements are used. For an example, music becomes muffled inside excursion funnel or gets a line of instruments when running on propulsion gel.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Age of Mythology}}'', the normal game music would change to battle music during a large battle, often triggered by an attack on a Town Center, then afterward it would often change to the original music or a "mellow mix" (their own words).

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Age of Mythology}}'', ''VideoGame/AgeOfMythology'', the normal game music would change to battle music during a large battle, often triggered by an attack on a Town Center, then afterward it would often change to the original music or a "mellow mix" (their own words).



** The cave/dungeon music in ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' also gets lower in pitch as you go further down. It becomes NightmareFuel when you reach the lowest level of the Dragonlord's Castle.

to:

** * The cave/dungeon music in ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' also ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' gets lower in pitch as you go further down. It becomes NightmareFuel when you reach the lowest level of the Dragonlord's Castle.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' have this, with non-radio ingame music changing depending on various things, such as the player arriving at certain locations (or parts thereof) or being discovered by a passing enemy. In the latter, the music also changes between day and night, and with your KarmaMeter and faction allignment, especially during the final battle [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon at Hoover Dam]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' have this, with non-radio ingame music changing depending on various things, such as the player arriving at certain locations (or parts thereof) or being discovered by a passing enemy. In the latter, the music also changes between day and night, and with your KarmaMeter and faction allignment, especially during the final battle [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon at Hoover Dam]].



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has the Tartarus theme, which starts out minimalistic at the bottom, but gradually builds as the player ventures into higher blocks until it's more dramatic and triumphant.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' ''VideoGame/Persona3'' has the Tartarus theme, which starts out minimalistic at the bottom, but gradually builds as the player ventures into higher blocks until it's more dramatic and triumphant.



* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] in ''VideoGame/BeatHazard'' where the game changes depending on the music.

to:

* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] Inverted in ''VideoGame/BeatHazard'' where the game changes depending on the music.



* ''VideoGame/{{X-COM}}: Interceptor's'' take on this was to use 5-second snippets of music played randomly and in succession during space battles. When something good or bad happened in the battle, like destroying an enemy or taking a friendly casualty, it would interject a "happy" or "sad" snippet of music into the stream. When the battle was over, the fast-paced battle music would change to something a little more spacey and ambient.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{X-COM}}: ''VideoGame/XCom: Interceptor's'' take on this was to use 5-second snippets of music played randomly and in succession during space battles. When something good or bad happened in the battle, like destroying an enemy or taking a friendly casualty, it would interject a "happy" or "sad" snippet of music into the stream. When the battle was over, the fast-paced battle music would change to something a little more spacey and ambient.



** A particularly scary example occurs when you make the final LeapOfFaith from the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgRPiUi4Rys prison morgue]] to the Labyrinth in ''SilentHill2''. First there's the regular droning ambience, then it adds a groaning noise similar to a steam valve, then a horrible high-pitched siren-like sound (so bad you have to cover your ears, worse than the "radio squeal" in the first game).

to:

** A particularly scary example occurs when you make the final LeapOfFaith from the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgRPiUi4Rys prison morgue]] to the Labyrinth in ''SilentHill2''.''VideoGame/SilentHill2''. First there's the regular droning ambience, then it adds a groaning noise similar to a steam valve, then a horrible high-pitched siren-like sound (so bad you have to cover your ears, worse than the "radio squeal" in the first game).
15th Jun '16 5:05:19 PM Dallenson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed III: Hot Pursuit'' did this in spades, and did it ''very'' well. There were a limited number of courses in the game (the total being nine) and all courses except [[spoiler:Empire City]] shared music with another course. Still, each course had two music tracks: a rock and a techno track, meaning ten pieces of music (outside the menu themes). However, each of these tracks was composed of three second segments that when placed together usually totaled well over 10 minutes of music (and in fact, many of these segments never made it into the official soundtrack). The music flowed absolutely seamlessly, which is a good thing, as the music would change depending on three main factors: Your location on the course (where you were), your rank (in the race) and your speed, as well as how many laps had passed in the race, especially noticeable in timed races where you're the only one on the track. There was even a special bit that played when you crashed (and sometimes that varied depending on location) as well as one when being chased (even that varied, the music was more intense the closer a cop was to you). Given the fluidity and constant changing circumstances of a vehicular racing game, you can imagine the challenge this must have been for the composers.

to:

* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed III: Hot Pursuit'' did this in spades, and did it ''very'' well. There were a limited number of courses in the game (the total being nine) and all courses except [[spoiler:Empire City]] shared music with another course. Still, each course had two music tracks: a rock and a techno track, meaning ten pieces of music (outside the menu themes). However, each of these tracks was composed of three three-to-ten second segments that when placed together usually totaled well over 10 minutes of music (and in fact, many of these segments never made it into the official soundtrack). The music flowed absolutely seamlessly, which is a good thing, as the music would change depending on three main factors: Your location on the course (where you were), your rank (in the race) and your speed, as well as how many laps had passed in the race, especially noticeable in timed races where you're the only one on the track. There was even a special bit that played when you crashed (and sometimes that varied depending on location) as well as one when being chased (even that varied, the music was more intense the closer a cop was to you). Given the fluidity and constant changing circumstances of a vehicular racing game, you can imagine the challenge this must have been for the composers.



** This kind of music returns in ''Need for Speed Rivals'' when chasing or being chased, notably the music would calm down when you or your suspect is escaping or would become incredibly intense when more cops were close to you. This variable mix is overwritten when using custom playlists on console versions of the game.

to:

** This kind of music returns in ''Need for Speed Rivals'' when chasing or being chased, notably the music would calm down when you or your suspect is escaping or would become incredibly intense when more cops were close to you.depending on the state of you and/or your target. This variable mix is overwritten when using custom playlists on console versions of the game.



* Both VideoGame/NitronicRush and VideoGame/Distance have the music adapt depending on what the car is doing, with boosting, jumping, flying and overheating adding to the instruments used.

to:

* Both VideoGame/NitronicRush ''VideoGame/NitronicRush'' and VideoGame/Distance ''VideoGame/{{Distance}}'' have the music adapt depending on what the car is doing, with boosting, jumping, flying and overheating adding to the instruments used.



* ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast'' near-seamlessly mixes and matches Music/JohnWilliams's music from ''Franchise/StarWars'', with calm pieces playing when walking around, seguing into dramatic and fast-paced when spotted by enemies, and cooling back down after the encounter.

to:

* ''VideoGame/JediKnightIIJediOutcast'' and ''VideoGame/VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'' near-seamlessly mixes and matches Music/JohnWilliams's music from ''Franchise/StarWars'', with calm pieces playing when walking around, exploring, seguing into dramatic and fast-paced when spotted by enemies, and cooling back down after the encounter.



* ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight'' has two versions of each of its themes, a mellow one for when you're flying through space enjoying the sights, and a more bass-heavy version for when you're fighting a hostile ship. It smoothly fades between the two when you enter or leave combat.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FTLFasterThanLight'' has two versions of each of its themes, a mellow one for when you're flying through space enjoying the sights, and a more bass-heavy version for when you're fighting a hostile ship. It smoothly fades between the two when you enter or leave combat. The Cosmos and Civil tracks sound more unique from each other depending if you're in combat or not compared to the rest of the soundtrack, points for Ben on that part.
12th Jun '16 12:08:13 PM wolftickets1969
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[VideoGame/TheAngryVideoGameNerdAdventures The Angry Video Game Nerd II: ASSimilation]] filters the music when the Nerd is underwater. Unfortunately, the "Croc Conundrum" stage is exclusively underwater, [[WastedSong making it impossible to hear the unfiltered version of its music in-game]].
9th Jun '16 6:18:22 AM Dallenson
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed III: Hot Pursuit'' did this in spades, and did it ''very'' well. There were a limited number of courses in the game (the total being nine) and all courses except [[spoiler:Empire City]] shared music with another course. Still, each course had two music tracks: a rock and a techno track, meaning ten pieces of music (outside the menu themes). However, each of these tracks was composed of three second segments that when placed together usually totaled well over 10 minutes of music (and in fact, many of these segments never made it into the official soundtrack). The music flowed absolutely seamlessly, which is a good thing, as the music would change depending on three main factors: Your location on the course (where you were), your rank (in the race) and your speed, as well as how many laps had passed in the race, especially noticeable in timed races where you're the only one on the track. There was even a special bit that played when you crashed, as well as one when being chased (even that varied, the music was more intense the closer a cop was to you). Given the fluidity and constant changing circumstances of a vehicular racing game, you can imagine the challenge this must have been for the composers.
** This also applied to some tracks in ''NFS II'' but [[CaptainObvious didn't have the chase segments]]. Examples could include "Gore" (for the track in the U.S), "Corroboree" (for the track in the {{Land Down Under}}), "Sanquoa" (for the track in Canada), and some others while some tracks didn't share this variable mix, such as "Halling Ass" and "Headless Horse" for Norway's Proving Grounds (since it was a simple oval track so a variable mix would've been quite unnecessary).

to:

* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed III: Hot Pursuit'' did this in spades, and did it ''very'' well. There were a limited number of courses in the game (the total being nine) and all courses except [[spoiler:Empire City]] shared music with another course. Still, each course had two music tracks: a rock and a techno track, meaning ten pieces of music (outside the menu themes). However, each of these tracks was composed of three second segments that when placed together usually totaled well over 10 minutes of music (and in fact, many of these segments never made it into the official soundtrack). The music flowed absolutely seamlessly, which is a good thing, as the music would change depending on three main factors: Your location on the course (where you were), your rank (in the race) and your speed, as well as how many laps had passed in the race, especially noticeable in timed races where you're the only one on the track. There was even a special bit that played when you crashed, crashed (and sometimes that varied depending on location) as well as one when being chased (even that varied, the music was more intense the closer a cop was to you). Given the fluidity and constant changing circumstances of a vehicular racing game, you can imagine the challenge this must have been for the composers.
** This also applied to some tracks in ''NFS II'' ''Need for Speed II: Special Edition'' but [[CaptainObvious didn't have the chase segments]]. Examples could include "Gore" (for the track in the U.S), "Corroboree" (for the track in the {{Land Down Under}}), "Sanquoa" (for the track in Canada), and some others while some Some tracks didn't share this variable mix, such as "Halling Ass" and "Headless Horse" for Norway's Proving Grounds (since it was a simple oval track so a variable mix would've been quite unnecessary).
7th Jun '16 11:22:04 AM wille179
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While still in development, the stage music for ''VideoGame/ThemsFightinHerds'' is done in multiple styles, and the style used depends on which character has the upper…erm, hoof. Read more and see examples of this [[http://www.mane6.com/2015/09/fighting-game-music-and-you-2/ here]].

to:

* While still in development, the stage music for ''VideoGame/ThemsFightinHerds'' is done in multiple styles, and the style used depends on which character has the upper…erm, hoof. Read more and see examples of this [[http://www.mane6.com/2015/09/fighting-game-music-and-you-2/ com/?p=466 here]].
6th Jun '16 4:48:43 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'' has a more relaxing, atmospheric mix of level themes playing when you go underwater, somewhat similar to both ''Donkey Kong Country 3'' and former fellow Creator/{{Rare}} franchise ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' ([[MusicalNod some levels will even have the song's melody replaced with the melody of "Aquatic Ambience" from the original game]]). Also, like most ''Mario'' games, the music of [[PowerupMount Rambi]] levels gets an added drum beat when you're riding him.

to:

** ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'' has a more relaxing, atmospheric mix of level themes playing when you go underwater, somewhat similar to both ''Donkey Kong Country 3'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry3DixieKongsDoubleTrouble'' and former fellow Creator/{{Rare}} franchise ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' ([[MusicalNod some levels will even have the song's melody replaced with the melody of "Aquatic Ambience" from the original game]]). Also, like most ''Mario'' games, the music of [[PowerupMount Rambi]] levels gets an added drum beat when you're riding him.
31st May '16 6:53:10 PM ThePocket
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The Main Street Electrical Parade is a mobile example; radio controllers in the floats communicate with the park's audio system to cue themes from their respective films when they reach key locations along the route.
25th May '16 2:14:33 AM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''{{Burnout}}'' does things things differently. The foreground music plays during unboosted periods and then fades into a sharp violin track when the boost is triggered. The sequel normally has a repetitive drum beat and electro soundtrack with a secondary backing track that is muted unless the boost is triggered, which pulls it back into the mix and gives the music more of a surfer-tune.
* The levels in ''VideoGame/TwistedMetal 1, 2'', and ''Black'' can have up to three dynamic music variations: the ambient music (eg "Cyburb Hunt" in Cyburbia), the battle music (eg "Cyburb Slide"), and the "final opponent" music (''Black'', and maybe ''Head On'').

to:

* ''{{Burnout}}'' The first ''VideoGame/{{Burnout}}'' game does things things differently. The foreground music plays during unboosted periods and then fades into a sharp violin track when the boost is triggered. The sequel ''[[VideoGame/Burnout2PointOfImpact Point of Impact]]'' normally has a repetitive drum beat and electro soundtrack with a secondary backing track that is muted unless the boost is triggered, which pulls it back into the mix and gives the music more of a surfer-tune.
* The levels in ''VideoGame/TwistedMetal 1, 2'', and ''Black'' ''[[VideoGame/TwistedMetalBlack Black]]'' can have up to three dynamic music variations: the ambient music (eg "Cyburb Hunt" in Cyburbia), the battle music (eg "Cyburb Slide"), and the "final opponent" music (''Black'', and maybe ''Head On'').



* In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', the main tracks of the stages Summit and Yoshi's Island constantly change in tone and tempo to match the current state of stage (Though the Summit music is a single audio track that's merely ''timed'' to match up with the stage's various events; if you're playing in Slow Brawl, for instance, you'll hear the audio desynch from the onscreen events).

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros''
**
In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosBrawl'', the main tracks of the stages Summit and Yoshi's Island constantly change in tone and tempo to match the current state of stage (Though the Summit music is a single audio track that's merely ''timed'' to match up with the stage's various events; if you're playing in Slow Brawl, for instance, you'll hear the audio desynch from the onscreen events).




21st May '16 6:40:14 PM Exusia
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Caligula}}'' has an instrumental soundtrack for when the party is roaming around, but most songs have vocals that fade into the instrumentals once an encounter begins.
24th Feb '16 12:55:03 AM aquagon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{ArtonelicoQoga}}'' also has this in the form of its RAH (Realtime Active Hymmnetics) system, in which the in-battle music changes depending on the situation of the player's party, the ways they have customized the song magic of their Reyvateils (casters) and the events that happen during the battle. Subverted, however, during battles where a storyline-important song is playing, as in these cases the music won't change at all.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{ArtonelicoQoga}}'' ''[[VideoGame/ArtonelicoQoga Ar tonelico Qoga: Knell of Ar Ciel]]'' also has this in the form of its RAH (Realtime Active Hymmnetics) system, in which the in-battle music changes depending on the situation of the player's party, the ways they have customized the song magic of their Reyvateils (casters) and the events that happen during the battle. Subverted, however, during battles where a storyline-important song is playing, as in these cases the music won't change at all.
This list shows the last 10 events of 171. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VariableMix