History Main / VanillaEdition

21st Jan '18 2:51:53 PM nombretomado
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** MakingFiends got considerably got the WORST treatment yet, only featuring the 18 7-minute segments, adding up to around 2 hours of entertainment.

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** MakingFiends ''WesternAnimation/MakingFiends'' got considerably got the WORST treatment yet, only featuring the 18 7-minute segments, adding up to around 2 hours of entertainment.
15th Jan '18 1:43:21 AM Cryoclaste
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* The Lionsgate DVD of ''[[WesternAnimation/TheMagicAdventuresofMumfie Mumfie's Quest]]'' has no bonus features but previews for [=DVDs=] of LeapFrog and {{Toys/Lalaloopsy}}, while the previous release from 2012 contains early storyboards and a deleted scene.

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* The Lionsgate DVD of ''[[WesternAnimation/TheMagicAdventuresofMumfie Mumfie's Quest]]'' has no bonus features but previews for [=DVDs=] of LeapFrog ''WesternAnimation/LeapFrog'' and {{Toys/Lalaloopsy}}, ''{{Toys/Lalaloopsy}}'', while the previous release from 2012 contains early storyboards and a deleted scene.
3rd Jan '18 7:10:47 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Put the single disc release of ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' (2007) in your PC. It's actually NAMED "Transformers_Vanilla"

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* Put the single disc single-disc release of ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' (2007) in your PC. It's actually NAMED "Transformers_Vanilla""Transformers_Vanilla".



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' launched a new era of home entertainment for Creator/{{Pixar}}. Each of the preceding movies got 2-Disc Collector's Edition [=DVDs=] with hours of bonus features. By contrast, ''Cars'' got a DVD containing nothing more than three shorts, some deleted scenes, and a short interview with the director as bonus features. Nearly every Pixar movie onward received similarly lightweight platters on DVD. Fans would have to buy the Blu-ray discs for more comprehensive extras. Eventually, ''Cars 2'' became Pixar's first movie to come to 3-D Blu-ray. As a result, both the DVD ''and'' the Blu-ray received paltry selections of bonus features, with consumers having to buy the 3-D version to get all the extras! Fortunately, ''WesternAnimation/{{Brave}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo'' each have 2-D and 3-D Blu-rays with identical or nearly-identical amounts of extras, giving this trend a quick death.
* The rental-only release of Pixar's ''WesternAnimation/{{Up}}'' takes this to new extremes: even the most bare-bones retail DVD of the movie has interactive menus and subtitles, but the rental disc doesn't even have ''that'' because Disney considered them bonus features. [-(Clearly, deaf people and non-native speakers aren't supposed to rent movies…)-] Have fun when the used copies start floating around, since the cases are otherwise indistinguishable (and the rental version's case flat-out lies about the disc's features!).

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' launched a new era of home entertainment for Creator/{{Pixar}}. Each of the preceding movies got 2-Disc 2-disc Collector's Edition [=DVDs=] with hours of bonus features. By contrast, ''Cars'' got a DVD containing nothing more than three shorts, some deleted scenes, and a short interview with the director as bonus features. Nearly every Pixar movie onward received similarly lightweight platters on DVD. Fans would have to buy the Blu-ray discs for more comprehensive extras. Eventually, ''Cars 2'' became Pixar's first movie to come to 3-D Blu-ray. As a result, both the DVD ''and'' the Blu-ray received paltry selections of bonus features, with consumers having to buy the 3-D version to get all the extras! Fortunately, ''WesternAnimation/{{Brave}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo'' each have 2-D and 3-D Blu-rays with identical or nearly-identical amounts of extras, giving this trend a quick death.
* The rental-only release of Pixar's ''WesternAnimation/{{Up}}'' takes this to new extremes: even the most bare-bones retail DVD of the movie has interactive menus and subtitles, but the rental disc doesn't even have ''that'' because Disney considered them bonus features. [-(Clearly, features.
(Clearly,
deaf people and non-native speakers aren't supposed to rent movies…)-] movies...) Have fun when the used copies start floating around, since the cases are otherwise indistinguishable (and the rental version's case flat-out lies about the disc's features!).



* ''Film/TheManFromEarth'' is of the 'likely won't sell well' variety, as it features little action to speak of and is very cerebral. The DVD is also generally only available online and features four brief featurettes and two commentaries.
** The Blu-ray release is worse. No extras at all.

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* ''Film/TheManFromEarth'' is of the 'likely won't sell well' variety, as it features little action to speak of and is very cerebral. The DVD is also generally only available online and features four brief featurettes and two commentaries.
**
commentaries. The Blu-ray release is worse. No worse; no extras at all.all!



* The Blockbuster rental copy of Film/CopOut just has "play movie" and "language selection".
** Warner Bros. and Fox (among other companies) have been doing this on all of their releases lately. The only way you can tell them apart is if the cover says Rental or Rental Exclusive.

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* The Warner Bros. and Fox, among other companies, are known for releasing alternate "rental" editions of their movies which lack bonus features and come with [[UserOperationProhibitFlag long previews you can't skip]]. For one example, the Blockbuster rental copy of Film/CopOut ''Film/CopOut'' just has "play movie" and "language selection".
** Warner Bros. and Fox (among other companies) have been doing this on all of their releases lately.
selection" The only way you can tell them apart is if the cover says Rental "Rental" or Rental Exclusive."Rental Exclusive".



* The "Superbit" [=DVDs=] released by Columbia/[=TriStar=] reportedly have above-average picture and sound quality. To minimize compression, they didn't include any bonus features. They did usually include a second disc with all the relevant bonus features. Similarly, Sony has their line of "Mastered in 4K" Blu-ray releases that feature better video quality, but no bonus features.

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* The "Superbit" [=DVDs=] released by Columbia/[=TriStar=] reportedly have above-average picture and sound quality. To minimize compression, they didn't include any bonus features. They Sony did usually include later release deluxe editions of Superbit titles, which included a second disc with all the relevant bonus features. Similarly, Sony has their line of "Mastered in 4K" Blu-ray releases that feature better video quality, but no bonus features.



* The DVD releases of the ''Film/ErnestPWorrell'' films have no special features, probably because by the time they were released Jim Varney had passed away.

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* The DVD releases of the ''Film/ErnestPWorrell'' Film/ErnestPWorrell films have no special features, probably because by the time they were released Jim Varney had passed away.



* Zig-zagged with ''Disney/AGoofyMovie''. The US 2000 release was full-screen and some bonus features (including a Goof Troop episode without its opening sequence, a trivia game, a storybook, an episode of Disneyland anthology series from 1955 focusing on Goofy, the fullscreen trailer and the Disney's Mambo No. 5 music video), while the 1999 European release despite not having any bonus features (like many Disney movies released by Warner Home Video at the time) features the movie in its original widescreen ratio and seven additional language tracks besides the original English (depending on country those were German, Spanish (Spain), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish and Portuguese (European) or French, Italian, Dutch, Polish, Czech, Hungarian and Hebrew).

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* Zig-zagged with ''Disney/AGoofyMovie''. The US 2000 release was full-screen and some bonus features (including a Goof Troop ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'' episode without its opening sequence, a trivia game, a storybook, an episode of Disneyland anthology series from 1955 focusing on Goofy, the fullscreen trailer and the Disney's "Disney's Mambo No. 5 5" music video), while the 1999 European release despite not having any bonus features (like many Disney movies released by Warner Home Video at the time) features the movie in its original widescreen ratio and seven additional language tracks besides the original English (depending on country those were German, Spanish (Spain), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish and Portuguese (European) or French, Italian, Dutch, Polish, Czech, Hungarian and Hebrew).
1st Jan '18 6:33:21 PM KaisertheGreat
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** The ''Franchise/{{Rocky}}'' series falls victim to the MGM curse as well. The [[Film/{{Rocky}} first movie]] has a nice two-disc DVD set and the [[Film/RockyBalboa last movie]] at least has a commentary and a few deleted scenes, but ''Film/RockyII'', ''[[Film/RockyIII III]]'', [[Film/RockyIV IV]]'' and ''[[Film/RockyV V]]'' have ''nothing''.

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** The ''Franchise/{{Rocky}}'' series falls victim to the MGM curse as well. The [[Film/{{Rocky}} first movie]] has a nice two-disc DVD set and the [[Film/RockyBalboa last movie]] at least has a commentary and a few deleted scenes, but ''Film/RockyII'', ''[[Film/RockyIII III]]'', [[Film/RockyIV ''[[Film/RockyIV IV]]'' and ''[[Film/RockyV V]]'' have ''nothing''.nothing.



* Every edition of ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000: TheMovie'' until Creator/ShoutFactory's Blu-ray / DVD release (which included a fair amount of bonus features) was a vanilla edition, containing the movie and nothing else, really.

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* Every edition of ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000: TheMovie'' until Creator/ShoutFactory's Blu-ray / DVD Blu-ray/DVD release (which included a fair amount of bonus features) was a vanilla edition, containing the movie and nothing else, really.



* Creator/{{Paramount}} originally released ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' in 2000 as 40 single [=DVD=] volumes with 2 episodes per disc and no bonus features (except for both the color and black-and white versions of "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]" on volume 40), which was similar to their previous releases of the series on [=VHS=]/Beta[[note]]80 tapes with one episode each (except for one tape with [[Recap/StarTrekS1E11TheMenageriePartI both]] [[Recap/StarTrekS1E12TheMenageriePartII parts]] of "The Menagerie"), with two tapes for each version of "The Cage"[[/note]] and Laserdisc[[note]]42 discs with 2 episodes per disc, with "The Cage" getting two separate discs and "[[Recap/StarTrekS3E24TurnaboutIntruder Turnabout Intruder" getting a disc to itself[[/note]]. The volumes were seen by the public as an inefficient and outmoded way to buy TV series, and box sets came four years later.

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* Creator/{{Paramount}} originally released ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' in 2000 as 40 single [=DVD=] volumes with 2 episodes per disc and no bonus features (except for both the color and black-and white versions of "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]" on volume 40), which was similar to their previous releases of the series on [=VHS=]/Beta[[note]]80 tapes with one episode each (except for one tape with [[Recap/StarTrekS1E11TheMenageriePartI both]] [[Recap/StarTrekS1E12TheMenageriePartII parts]] of "The Menagerie"), with two tapes for each version of "The Cage"[[/note]] and Laserdisc[[note]]42 discs with 2 episodes per disc, with "The Cage" getting two separate discs and "[[Recap/StarTrekS3E24TurnaboutIntruder Turnabout Intruder" Intruder]]" getting a disc to itself[[/note]]. The volumes were seen by the public as an inefficient and outmoded way to buy TV series, and box sets came four years later.



* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' is notorious for this. First is the barest Japanese release, then the American release, which has a few more bits, and the European one, usually has a few more changes too. Then the ''[[LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Final Mix]]'' goes out in Japan, [[NoExportForYou and ONLY in Japan]]. This one can be explained by Sony of America's policy on not rereleasing games for the same console unless there's a minimum percentage of new content (one wonders what low, spooky voodoo is used to determine that percentage). When the first 2 games got HD remasters on PS3, America finally got the final mix versions.

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* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' is notorious for this. First is the barest Japanese release, then the American release, which has a few more bits, and the European one, usually has a few more changes too. Then the ''[[LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Final Mix]]'' goes out in Japan, [[NoExportForYou and ONLY in Japan]]. This one can be explained by Sony of America's policy on not rereleasing games for the same console unless there's a minimum percentage of new content (one wonders what low, spooky voodoo is used to determine that percentage). When the first 2 games got HD remasters on PS3, [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]], America finally got the final mix versions.



** When [[WesternAnmiation/SpiderMan1967 the 1960s]] ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' animated series was released on DVD in the United States (around the time ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was released to theaters), it only got all 52 episodes and an introduction by Creator/StanLee. No commentaries, no commercials, no behind-the-scenes featurettes, nothing. Still, the fact that it got any bonus features at all feels like more than one could say for Buena Vista's barren ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' [=DVDs=], and the fact that it contained every episode feels like more than one could say for their single-disc releases of [[WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries the 1990s]] ''Spider-Man'' animated series.

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** When [[WesternAnmiation/SpiderMan1967 [[WesternAnimation/SpiderMan1967 the 1960s]] ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'' animated series was released on DVD in the United States (around the time ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was released to theaters), it only got all 52 episodes and an introduction by Creator/StanLee. No commentaries, no commercials, no behind-the-scenes featurettes, nothing. Still, the fact that it got any bonus features at all feels like more than one could say for Buena Vista's barren ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' [=DVDs=], and the fact that it contained every episode feels like more than one could say for their single-disc releases of [[WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries the 1990s]] ''Spider-Man'' animated series.



* This is so far true with many of the releases of the Creator/CartoonCartoons. While the first two seasons of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'', all six seasons of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'', and the first season of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' were released with special features, Creator/WarnerBrothers released a line as the, "Cartoon Network Hall of Fame," which was the first seasons of ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'', ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'', and ''WesternAnimation/CourageTheCowardlyDog''. Surprisingly, despite the popularity of these series (especially considering ''Dexter'' was Cartoon Network's first big hit), only the ''Johnny Bravo'' set got a special feature, and ''only'' because of Creator/SethMacFarlane (he was a writer on ''Johnny Bravo'' before moving on to ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', and other shows of his). Adding insult to injury, the ''Dexter'' set lacks one of the ''Dial M For Monkey'' segments.

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* This is so far true with many of the releases of the Creator/CartoonCartoons. While the first two seasons of ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'', all six seasons of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'', and the first season of ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' were released with special features, Creator/WarnerBrothers released a line as the, the "Cartoon Network Hall of Fame," which was the first seasons of ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'', ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyBravo'', and ''WesternAnimation/CourageTheCowardlyDog''. Surprisingly, despite the popularity of these series (especially considering ''Dexter'' was Cartoon Network's first big hit), only the ''Johnny Bravo'' set got a special feature, and ''only'' because of Creator/SethMacFarlane (he was a writer on ''Johnny Bravo'' before moving on to ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', and other shows of his). Adding insult to injury, the ''Dexter'' set lacks one of the ''Dial M For Monkey'' segments.
23rd Dec '17 11:12:43 AM nombretomado
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* When individual seasons of ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' were first released, they were all bare-bones, with no special features, other than an option to turn off the LaughTrack (as the producers originally wanted to bypass a laugh track all along). At first, this was justifiable, as the series was from a time period where home video releases were not common, and as such, special features really wouldn't have been available. Then, around the same time the final season was released, TwentiethCenturyFox released a complete series set that not only had special features (a blooper reel, the 20th and 30th anniversary reunion specials, a ''Series/{{Biography}}'' special, interviews with the cast, behind-the-scenes footage, among other things), but also included the [[Film/{{Mash}} original 1970 movie as well]]; because of this, many angry fans that had already spent time, effort, and money collecting the individual season sets complained to Fox, and they responded by temporarily removing the complete series set from shelves, and releasing instead a set with the GrandFinale as the main feature, but with all of the bonuses from the complete series set included (except the movie).

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* When individual seasons of ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' were first released, they were all bare-bones, with no special features, other than an option to turn off the LaughTrack (as the producers originally wanted to bypass a laugh track all along). At first, this was justifiable, as the series was from a time period where home video releases were not common, and as such, special features really wouldn't have been available. Then, around the same time the final season was released, TwentiethCenturyFox Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox released a complete series set that not only had special features (a blooper reel, the 20th and 30th anniversary reunion specials, a ''Series/{{Biography}}'' special, interviews with the cast, behind-the-scenes footage, among other things), but also included the [[Film/{{Mash}} original 1970 movie as well]]; because of this, many angry fans that had already spent time, effort, and money collecting the individual season sets complained to Fox, and they responded by temporarily removing the complete series set from shelves, and releasing instead a set with the GrandFinale as the main feature, but with all of the bonuses from the complete series set included (except the movie).
17th Dec '17 12:44:05 PM dsneybuf
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* When the fan clamoring for a non-special edition of ''Franchise/StarWars'' reached crisis levels, Creator/GeorgeLucas did in fact release the Original Trilogy without the additions of the various special editions… such as bonus features, remastered sound and video (they were simply transferred from the 1993 non-anamorphic UsefulNotes/LaserDisc release), resulting in a general sense that Lucas was saying "Well, [[LiteralGenie you wanted them]] ''[[ExactWords just]]'' like they were the first time around…"

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* When the fan clamoring for a non-special edition of ''Franchise/StarWars'' reached crisis levels, Creator/GeorgeLucas did in fact release the Original Trilogy without the additions of the various special editions… such as bonus features, features and remastered sound and video (they were simply transferred from the 1993 non-anamorphic UsefulNotes/LaserDisc release), resulting in a general sense that Lucas was saying "Well, [[LiteralGenie you wanted them]] ''[[ExactWords just]]'' like they were the first time around…"release).
13th Dec '17 4:56:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' was so terribly stripped down that Geneon didn't even bother to double check whether the selection arrows on the the main screen lined up with the menu items. The Funimation releases of the latter half of the series [[{{DRM}} had even more problems]].

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* ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' was so terribly stripped down that Geneon didn't even bother to double check whether the selection arrows on the the main screen lined up with the menu items. The Funimation releases of the latter half of the series [[{{DRM}} [[UsefulNotes/DigitalRightsManagement had even more problems]].
4th Dec '17 6:06:10 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/WesAnderson movies often receive this when they're first released to home video. The studios have an exclusivity window to issue such a release, but Anderson himself prefers to work with TheCriterionCollection, and they release a much improved and expanded set once that window expires. Most of his fans tend to skip the initial DVD or Blu-ray release of one of his films, because they know a Criterion will eventually be coming out in a few years.

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* Creator/WesAnderson movies often receive this when they're first released to home video. The studios have an exclusivity window to issue such a release, but Anderson himself prefers to work with TheCriterionCollection, Creator/TheCriterionCollection, and they release a much improved and expanded set once that window expires. Most of his fans tend to skip the initial DVD or Blu-ray release of one of his films, because they know a Criterion will eventually be coming out in a few years.
24th Oct '17 5:35:11 AM Sapphirea2
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* Some films released by Creator/TheCriterionCollection (previously known for its fantastic extras) have been barebones releases, such as the remastered edition of the film ''Film/{{Brazil}}''. The company also runs a separate entity called Eclipse, which releases film-only themed collections of mostly-obscure films that have artistic and/or historic merit but won't attract big sales. Finally, Criterion has the Essential Art House line: movie-only editions of Janus Films titles that have received a proper Criterion release, the closest thing the company has to a budget line.

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* Some films released by Creator/TheCriterionCollection (previously known for its fantastic extras) usually has the most packed discs anywhere, but there have been a few barebones releases, releases in the main line, such as the remastered edition of the film ''Film/{{Brazil}}''. The company also runs a separate entity called Eclipse, which releases film-only themed collections of mostly-obscure films that have artistic and/or historic merit but won't attract big sales. Finally, Criterion has the And Criterion's Essential Art House line: budget line consists of movie-only editions of Janus Films titles that have already received a proper Criterion release, the closest thing the company has to a budget line.release.


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** Warner Bros. was notorious for treating most of its catalog titles this way for the first few years of the format. While some of them were revisited later with more elaborate editions, others never have been. A good example of this is 1981's ''Film/{{Arthur}}'', which never received a widescreen DVD release...even though the poorly-regarded sequel did. While the 2011 Blu-Ray disc finally offers up the film in its proper aspect ratio, it's still vanilla otherwise, sharing disc space with said sequel.
21st Oct '17 11:55:02 PM C2
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* Creator/{{Paramount}} originally released ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' in 2000 as 40 single [=DVD=] volumes with 2 episodes per disc and no bonus features (except for both the color and black-and white versions of "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]" on volume 40), which was similar to their previous releases of the series on [=VHS=]/Beta[[note]]80 tapes with one episode each (except for one tape with [[Recap/StarTrekS1E11TheMenageriePartI both]] [[Recap/StarTrekS1E12TheMenageriePartII parts]] of "The Menagerie"), with two tapes for each version of "The Cage"[[/note]] and Laserdisc[[note]]42 discs with 2 episodes per disc, with "The Cage" getting two separate discs and "[[RecapStarTrekS3E24TurnaboutIntruder Turnabout Intruder" getting a disc to itself[[/note]]. The volumes were seen by the public as an inefficient and outmoded way to buy TV series, and box sets came four years later.

to:

* Creator/{{Paramount}} originally released ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' in 2000 as 40 single [=DVD=] volumes with 2 episodes per disc and no bonus features (except for both the color and black-and white versions of "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]" on volume 40), which was similar to their previous releases of the series on [=VHS=]/Beta[[note]]80 tapes with one episode each (except for one tape with [[Recap/StarTrekS1E11TheMenageriePartI both]] [[Recap/StarTrekS1E12TheMenageriePartII parts]] of "The Menagerie"), with two tapes for each version of "The Cage"[[/note]] and Laserdisc[[note]]42 discs with 2 episodes per disc, with "The Cage" getting two separate discs and "[[RecapStarTrekS3E24TurnaboutIntruder "[[Recap/StarTrekS3E24TurnaboutIntruder Turnabout Intruder" getting a disc to itself[[/note]]. The volumes were seen by the public as an inefficient and outmoded way to buy TV series, and box sets came four years later.
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