History Main / UnstableEquilibrium

7th Mar '17 3:53:54 PM ZombieAladdin
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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite the disadvantage. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.

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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite The more the disadvantage.difference in remaining Pokémon grows, the more at a disadvantage the player with fewer Pokémon becomes. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.


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* An unusual example with ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'', but Splatfests in the American continents and in Japan wound up like this as time went on: You commit to a side when you begin (such as Cats vs. Dogs, Delicious vs. Disgusting referring to pineapples on pizza, or naughty vs. Nice regarding Christmas). When it's over, you're rewarded with Super Sea Snails, but you win more if the side you chose won more battles.[[note]]It's actually more complicated than that, and the actual winner is whichever has the higher value for (percentage of participants who chose that side) + (percentage of matches where that side won multiplied by any integer between 1 and 6 depending on the Splatfest), but most of the time, whoever won more battles was the winner of the Splatfest.[[/note]] American players and Japanese players soon noticed a correlation in whoever won more battles with that side's popularity, with the more popular team winning in Japan and the less popular team winning in the Americas. This pattern allowed people who didn't care which side they were on to accurately predict who would win the Splatfest, and it became a SelfFulfillingProphecy as the pattern became easier and easier to notice and it snowballed out of control. It was most pronounced in the American PiratesVersusNinjas Splatfest, where only 28% of the players chose the Pirates side but were responsible for 59% of the wins. Shortly afterward, ''Splatoon'' got an [[ObviousRulePatch update introducing the "Splatfest Power" mechanic]] to make it less predictable which side would come out on top.
7th Mar '17 3:38:30 PM ZombieAladdin
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* ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic & SEGA-All-Stars Racing]]'' wound up like this, despite scaling the items' power like with Mario Kart. This is because of the unintentional advantage given to the driver in 1st place: Whereas drivers in 2nd and lower have a certain number of opportunities per race to get items to attack and defend, the driver in 1st gets the same amount and only has to defend. Sometimes, they didn't even need to defend: Long range items that followed the track would often instead collide into an obstacle or hazard, or fall down a pit, and never even reach its target. In addition, there were items that, if dropped behind the vehicle, will attack whoever is the next racer to come across, which wound up strengthening the lead. It was not unusual for online races where whoever's in 1st place would finish half a lap or more ahead of the player in 2nd.


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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite the disadvantage. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.
25th Feb '17 6:54:11 AM Kalaong
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** Actually, the Praxis system in general. The major experience bonuses are only available with specific augs activated - the Traveller bonuses usually need high jump and/or Icarus Descent, combat requires the Reflex Booster, hacking requires an array of hacking augs - and better defenses don't trigger bonuses. Choose utility early on, and you can afford defenses later. Choose defenses, and you'll never get enough Praxis to gain utility.

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** Actually, the Praxis system in general. The major experience bonuses are only available with specific augs activated - the Traveller bonuses usually need high jump and/or Icarus Descent, combat requires the Reflex Booster, hacking requires an array of hacking augs - and better aim and defenses don't trigger bonuses. Choose utility early on, and you can afford aiming and defenses later. Choose defenses, and you'll never get enough Praxis to gain utility.
11th Feb '17 11:04:35 AM Morgenthaler
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** This is why many game with such a system also have some system where a player can obtain additional [[AndYourRewardIsClothes (entirely cosmetic)]] rewards by resetting their level to the minimum and clawing their way up again. The rewards for doing this may only be cosmetic, but they are still reflect well upon others' perception of a player's skill (or determination). Examples include Prestige Mode in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, and Prime Mode in High Moon's [[TransformersWarForCybertron Transformers]] [[TransformersFallOfCybertron shooters]].

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** This is why many game with such a system also have some system where a player can obtain additional [[AndYourRewardIsClothes (entirely cosmetic)]] rewards by resetting their level to the minimum and clawing their way up again. The rewards for doing this may only be cosmetic, but they are still reflect well upon others' perception of a player's skill (or determination). Examples include Prestige Mode in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, and Prime Mode in High Moon's [[TransformersWarForCybertron [[VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron Transformers]] [[TransformersFallOfCybertron [[VideoGame/TransformersFallOfCybertron shooters]].
28th Jan '17 7:48:35 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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[[folder:SurvivalHorror]]
* ''VideoGame/SweetHome'' combines SurvivalHorror resource management and permanent character deaths with RPG-style RandomEncounters, i.e. infinite enemies. The game becomes an utter cakewalk if you can level up enough, because your party is always given first chance to attack, but [[EarlyGameHell it is a very big "IF."]]
[[/folder]]
23rd Jan '17 10:11:29 PM ZombieAladdin
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* This was the biggest reason why ''Pinball/JamesBond007'' flopped: It had a mechanic in which you'd begin with a set amount of time, and achieving certain things would add time. What resulted was that beginners got destroyed and could barely play before the game decided they were done, while experienced players who got to learn the rules could play and play until they got bored. In other words, this mechanic annoyed both beginners and experts alike, to where operators returned the machines and demanded refunds.

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* This was the biggest reason why ''Pinball/JamesBond007'' flopped: It had a mechanic in which you'd begin with a set amount of time, and achieving certain things would add time. What resulted was that beginners got destroyed and could barely play before the game decided they were done, while experienced players who got to learn the rules could play and play until they got bored. In other words, this mechanic annoyed both beginners and experts alike, to where operators returned the machines and demanded refunds. This mechanic, in which players begin with a limited time and could extend it, was revisited by different companies with ''Pinball/FlipperFootball'' and ''Pinball/SafeCracker'', both of which also flopped (though ''Safe Cracker'' would later be VindicatedByHistory).
23rd Jan '17 10:06:28 PM ZombieAladdin
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[[folder:Pinball]]
* This was the biggest reason why ''Pinball/JamesBond007'' flopped: It had a mechanic in which you'd begin with a set amount of time, and achieving certain things would add time. What resulted was that beginners got destroyed and could barely play before the game decided they were done, while experienced players who got to learn the rules could play and play until they got bored. In other words, this mechanic annoyed both beginners and experts alike, to where operators returned the machines and demanded refunds.
[[/folder]]
5th Dec '16 4:35:37 PM Gosicrystal
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[[folder:RacingGame]]
* In ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' grand prix, winning a race means you start the next race slightly ahead of everyone else; the players start in the order they finished the previous race. This is countered with the re-introduction of coins as of ''7''; racers start off with coins based on how far down the grid they are.
* ''R4: VideoGame/RidgeRacer Type 4''[='=]s GP Mode gives you a new car after the first heat, after the second heat, and before the final race. Your performance in previous races determines the quality of your new car. Get first place in every race and you'll get the best new car, allowing you to complete the next few races with ease. Place just high enough to qualify in each race and you'll get crappy new cars that will require perfect runs to even qualify in the upcoming races. This is on top of your team [[WhatTheHellPlayer berating you for]] [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers not finishing in first]].
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Sports Games]]
* In ''VideoGame/MarioSuperSluggers'', the better you play in a given baseball game, the more stars you will get. The more stars, the more star swings/pitches, and the more good plays that will net you more stars. So if you're doing poorly, it'll be hard to come back. Especially if your opponent has a ton of stars.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:RacingGame]]
* In ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' grand prix, winning a race means you start the next race slightly ahead of everyone else; the players start in the order they finished the previous race. This is countered with the re-introduction of coins as of ''7''; racers start off with coins based on how far down the grid they are.
* ''R4: VideoGame/RidgeRacer Type 4''[='=]s GP Mode gives you a new car after the first heat, after the second heat, and before the final race. Your performance in previous races determines the quality of your new car. Get first place in every race and you'll get the best new car, allowing you to complete the next few races with ease. Place just high enough to qualify in each race and you'll get crappy new cars that will require perfect runs to even qualify in the upcoming races. This is on top of your team [[WhatTheHellPlayer berating you for]] [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers not finishing in first]].
[[/folder]]
24th Nov '16 1:02:35 PM Necrodomo
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* Preventing this sort of thing and returning everyone to an equal starting point is a major reason why the ''[[NexusWar Nexus Clash]]'' universe hits the ResetButton on the universe from time to time. There are still some things that get carried over from universe to universe though, and enough of them can add up to an advantage.
23rd Nov '16 5:52:27 PM Dreadjaws
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* ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'' gives you stars as you win battles and complete missions, and takes them away as you die. These stars give a boost to your stats, improving your healing abilities, the damage you do, etc. That means that doing well in battle makes your character more powerful, while doing bad takes your power away, making you weaker and hencefort more likely to die even more. You can buy star refill boosts in the in-game store at any time but, of course, this takes real money. If you've been doing certain missions you can get Questionite, which you can then exchange for store money at exhorbitant rates, but you'll likely find that there are many more useful things you could be doing with either of those currencies. If you're a free player, your better choice are vendors that will refill your stars for in-game gold but, of course, those can only be found in hub areas, and not inside dungeons, where you're more likely to need them.
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