History Main / UnstableEquilibrium

17th Jun '17 6:37:04 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/ChoRenSha68K'' awards bonuses at the end of each stage: 20,000 points per bomb (up to 5 bombs for 100,000 points total), 50,000 points if you have a shield up, and 50,000 points for each life in stock. Staying alive and racking up points means you'll earn those [[EveryTenThousandPoints every-1,000,000-points lives]] much faster than if you keep fumbling, and those extra lives in turn will earn you more points. Additionally, dying resets your shot power back to minimum, meaning that a single life lost can begin a cascade of drawn-out boss battles, more mistakes, and a much lower score by the end of your credit.
4th Jun '17 6:56:28 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/StarSoldier'' (the WiiWare one, probably other ones) rubs Unstable Equilibrium in the face of gamers everywhere with an (admittedly generous) twist on the "die and lose all your weapons" concept. Your weapon strength is ''tied'' to your health, so each time you're hit, your weapons get weaker and weaker until you die. The short "score attack" nature of the WiiWare game makes this a bit easier to swallow.

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* ''VideoGame/StarSoldier'' (the WiiWare UsefulNotes/WiiWare one, probably other ones) rubs Unstable Equilibrium in the face of gamers everywhere with an (admittedly generous) twist on the "die and lose all your weapons" concept. Your weapon strength is ''tied'' to your health, so each time you're hit, your weapons get weaker and weaker until you die. The short "score attack" nature of the WiiWare [=WiiWare=] game makes this a bit easier to swallow.
15th May '17 8:06:53 PM Raijinken
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'''s large-scale PvP mode, Frontline, gives players on a killing spree the "Battle High" and "Battle Fever" buffs (high for four kills, fever for eight), which increase damage dealt and result in your Limit Break filling faster. Given how a melee DPS job can very nearly kill squishier jobs (e.g. healers) with the Limit Break alone, this can lead to a juggernaut ripping through your team if they have their own healers focusing on them. The tradeoff is that a broken spree rewards the enemy team with more points.
14th May '17 1:55:27 AM Dark_Lord_
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* Invoking this trope is the goal of the "Rush" strategy in Real Time Strategy games. If executed properly, you severely hinder the economy of your opponent while your economy has a great chance to thrive. This allows you to quickly build more or better combat units, while your opponent is still trying to recover from your initial attack, allowing you more time to expand your territory. In the end, the difference in power between you and your opponent is so glaring, that the game turns into a CurbStompBattle. However, this can also backfire heavily when the initial rush fails. Since the rusher temporarily cripples his own economy to build combat units instead of workers, failing the rush could lead to the rushee having a much more stable economy, leading to more powerful units, which are used to expand their territory, essentially turning this trope to their own favor.
17th Apr '17 1:40:29 AM Killerikala
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* The early (1&2, I believe) ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank'' games didn't return any ammo to the player if they died, making progressing through already difficult missions even harder if there were no vendors in sight.
* The same goes with ''VideoGame/JakIIRenegade''; especially painful due to the game's NintendoHard nature worsened even more by CheckpointStarvation. Emptied 85% of your weaponry on that final wave and died? Now do the same without ammo.
17th Apr '17 1:40:29 AM Killerikala
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7th Mar '17 3:53:54 PM ZombieAladdin
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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite the disadvantage. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.

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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite The more the disadvantage.difference in remaining Pokémon grows, the more at a disadvantage the player with fewer Pokémon becomes. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.


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* An unusual example with ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'', but Splatfests in the American continents and in Japan wound up like this as time went on: You commit to a side when you begin (such as Cats vs. Dogs, Delicious vs. Disgusting referring to pineapples on pizza, or naughty vs. Nice regarding Christmas). When it's over, you're rewarded with Super Sea Snails, but you win more if the side you chose won more battles.[[note]]It's actually more complicated than that, and the actual winner is whichever has the higher value for (percentage of participants who chose that side) + (percentage of matches where that side won multiplied by any integer between 1 and 6 depending on the Splatfest), but most of the time, whoever won more battles was the winner of the Splatfest.[[/note]] American players and Japanese players soon noticed a correlation in whoever won more battles with that side's popularity, with the more popular team winning in Japan and the less popular team winning in the Americas. This pattern allowed people who didn't care which side they were on to accurately predict who would win the Splatfest, and it became a SelfFulfillingProphecy as the pattern became easier and easier to notice and it snowballed out of control. It was most pronounced in the American PiratesVersusNinjas Splatfest, where only 28% of the players chose the Pirates side but were responsible for 59% of the wins. Shortly afterward, ''Splatoon'' got an [[ObviousRulePatch update introducing the "Splatfest Power" mechanic]] to make it less predictable which side would come out on top.
7th Mar '17 3:38:30 PM ZombieAladdin
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* ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic & SEGA-All-Stars Racing]]'' wound up like this, despite scaling the items' power like with Mario Kart. This is because of the unintentional advantage given to the driver in 1st place: Whereas drivers in 2nd and lower have a certain number of opportunities per race to get items to attack and defend, the driver in 1st gets the same amount and only has to defend. Sometimes, they didn't even need to defend: Long range items that followed the track would often instead collide into an obstacle or hazard, or fall down a pit, and never even reach its target. In addition, there were items that, if dropped behind the vehicle, will attack whoever is the next racer to come across, which wound up strengthening the lead. It was not unusual for online races where whoever's in 1st place would finish half a lap or more ahead of the player in 2nd.


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* Head-to-head battling in a Franchise/{{Pokemon}} game, assuming no other factors, is like this: As soon as the first Pokémon faints, that player has one fewer Pokémon to use, and it also means fewer options to switch to. Since a good competitive team has each of its six members fulfill a different but crucial role, being down such a role when you need it most can put you at quite the disadvantage. There are also some Pokémon that are very effective were it not for some crippling weaknesses or one or two bad stats, such as Arcanine, Donphan, Shedinja, Tangrowth, Serperior, Tyrantrum, Alolan Sandslash, and Vikavolt, who are sitting ducks early on but become a lot more useful when the opponent has run out of Pokémon that can safely deal with them. In addition, there are Abilities that create bigger advantages the more the user is ahead, like Moxie or Beast Boost. In practice, however, Pokémon battling is a game of withheld information, meaning surprises and wild cards that cause huge comebacks can pop up at any moment--you can never tell if that Mimikyu will use [[DeathOrGloryAttack Z-Splash]] and suddenly gain the Attack boost needed to one-hit KO all of your Pokémon, for instance.
25th Feb '17 6:54:11 AM Kalaong
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** Actually, the Praxis system in general. The major experience bonuses are only available with specific augs activated - the Traveller bonuses usually need high jump and/or Icarus Descent, combat requires the Reflex Booster, hacking requires an array of hacking augs - and better defenses don't trigger bonuses. Choose utility early on, and you can afford defenses later. Choose defenses, and you'll never get enough Praxis to gain utility.

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** Actually, the Praxis system in general. The major experience bonuses are only available with specific augs activated - the Traveller bonuses usually need high jump and/or Icarus Descent, combat requires the Reflex Booster, hacking requires an array of hacking augs - and better aim and defenses don't trigger bonuses. Choose utility early on, and you can afford aiming and defenses later. Choose defenses, and you'll never get enough Praxis to gain utility.
11th Feb '17 11:04:35 AM Morgenthaler
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** This is why many game with such a system also have some system where a player can obtain additional [[AndYourRewardIsClothes (entirely cosmetic)]] rewards by resetting their level to the minimum and clawing their way up again. The rewards for doing this may only be cosmetic, but they are still reflect well upon others' perception of a player's skill (or determination). Examples include Prestige Mode in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, and Prime Mode in High Moon's [[TransformersWarForCybertron Transformers]] [[TransformersFallOfCybertron shooters]].

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** This is why many game with such a system also have some system where a player can obtain additional [[AndYourRewardIsClothes (entirely cosmetic)]] rewards by resetting their level to the minimum and clawing their way up again. The rewards for doing this may only be cosmetic, but they are still reflect well upon others' perception of a player's skill (or determination). Examples include Prestige Mode in the various ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' games, and Prime Mode in High Moon's [[TransformersWarForCybertron [[VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron Transformers]] [[TransformersFallOfCybertron [[VideoGame/TransformersFallOfCybertron shooters]].
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