History Main / UnreliableVoiceover

24th May '18 4:12:59 PM AmuckCricetine
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* Used extensively in the new ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Unicorn and The Wasp", when the suspects are giving their alibis. A GenreSavvy viewer can spot that [[spoiler:the culprit is the one person who ''isn't'' shown doing something shady in flashback.]]
** Also used in the ''Doctor Who'' episode "The Runaway Bride", when the titular bride is describing how she and her fiance met and fell in love.

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\n* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
**
Used extensively in the new ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E7TheUnicornAndTheWasp The Unicorn and The Wasp", the Wasp]]", when the suspects are giving their alibis. A GenreSavvy viewer can spot that [[spoiler:the culprit is the one person who ''isn't'' shown doing something shady in flashback.]]
** Also used in the ''Doctor Who'' episode "The "[[Recap/DoctorWho2006CSTheRunawayBride The Runaway Bride", Bride]]", when the titular bride is describing how she and her fiance met and fell in love.
21st Mar '18 6:22:21 AM LinTaylor
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* On ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', Lucky is telling the guys about buried treasure in a forest, and how his grandfather left it there in his youth. He talks about how his grandfather, a pastor found the treasure while on a church trip and "went on to be with the Lord" before he could recover it. The flashbacks show that his grandfather was a criminal who found the treasure while fleeing from WorkingOnTheChainGang and was executed in the electric chair. Unlike many examples, the implication isn't that Lucky is lying but that this is the version of the story he was told himself.

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* On In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', Lucky is telling the guys tells Hank and co. about buried treasure in a forest, and how his grandfather left it there in found "the perfect walnut stump". He says that his youth. He talks about how his grandfather, grandfather was a pastor found the treasure stump while on a church trip picnic and "went on to be with the Lord" before he could recover it. The it, but the flashbacks show that his grandfather was actually a criminal who found stumbled across the treasure stump while fleeing escaping from WorkingOnTheChainGang and was executed in the electric chair. chair. Unlike many examples, the implication is that Lucky isn't that Lucky is lying consciously lying, but that this is the version of the story he was told himself.
2nd Mar '18 2:01:46 PM RedScharlach
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* In ''[[Manga/FullmetalAlchemist Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood]]'', when [[ButtMonkey Yoki]] encounters the Elrics again, he gives this whole account of how things have went downhill for him ever since he met them, and it's all presented in silent movie style. While he tells of being a good leader who was unjustifiably tricked, and tells of his investments failing, we see him abusing his power and his "investments" are more along the lines of him conning people and gambling away the rest of his money. The funniest part is his narration about "borrowing money" from a noble family- it's actually a scene of him burglarizing the Armstrong home, and in a MythologyGag referencing a manga omake, he gets a piano dropped on him by the {{moe}} and harmless-looking [[CuteBruiser Katherine Armstrong]].

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* In ''[[Manga/FullmetalAlchemist Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood]]'', when [[ButtMonkey Yoki]] encounters the Elrics again, he gives this whole account of how things have went downhill for him ever since he met them, and it's all presented in silent movie style. While he tells of being a good leader who was unjustifiably tricked, and tells of his investments failing, we see him abusing his power and his "investments" are more along the lines of him conning people and gambling away the rest of his money. The funniest part is his narration about "borrowing money" from a noble family- family -- it's actually a scene of him burglarizing burgling the Armstrong home, and in a MythologyGag referencing a manga omake, he gets a piano dropped on him by the {{moe}} and harmless-looking [[CuteBruiser Katherine Armstrong]].



* This happens multiple times throughout [[Creator/BradNeely Brad Neely's]] ''AudioPlay/WizardPeopleDearReader'' -- an audio accompaniment to the first ''Literature/HarryPotter'' movie, which is intended to be run while the film itself is muted. These include such things as the eleven year-old protagonists drinking cognac and floating jack-o'-lanterns falling on people's heads... But probably the most memorable example is that of "Harmony's" intense death and resurrection by Harry while Hermione is obviously perfectly fine on-screen.

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* This happens multiple times throughout [[Creator/BradNeely Brad Neely's]] ''AudioPlay/WizardPeopleDearReader'' -- an audio accompaniment to the first ''Literature/HarryPotter'' movie, which is intended to be run while the film itself is muted. These include such things as the eleven year-old eleven-year-old protagonists drinking cognac and floating jack-o'-lanterns falling on people's heads... But probably the most memorable example is that of "Harmony's" intense death and resurrection by Harry while Hermione is obviously perfectly fine on-screen.



* In ''Film/{{Superbad}}'', this is used when one of the lead characters describes their previous evening to their love interest. While they describe going to a elegant club, the audience sees them trying to gain admission to a seedy strip club. Similarly, their account of celebrating with a drink is matched by them vomiting violently from cheap booze.

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* In ''Film/{{Superbad}}'', this is used when one of the lead characters describes their previous evening to their love interest. While they describe going to a an elegant club, the audience sees them trying to gain admission to a seedy strip club. Similarly, their account of celebrating with a drink is matched by them vomiting violently from cheap booze.



** In the case of the short story the [[AdaptationExpansion film was based on,]] the trope applies, as the majority of it was from Ennis' point of view. A reoccurring theme for Ennis is what his dad made him witness when he was young, and something in Lureen's voice makes him think "So it was the tire iron."

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** In the case of the short story the [[AdaptationExpansion film was based on,]] the trope applies, as the majority of it was from Ennis' point of view. A reoccurring recurring theme for Ennis is what his dad made him witness when he was young, and something in Lureen's voice makes him think "So it was the tire iron."



* Used extensively in the new ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Unicorn and The Wasp", when the suspects are giving their alibis. A GenreSavvy viewer can spot that [[spoiler: the culprit is the one person who ''isn't'' shown doing something shady in flashback.]]

to:

* Used extensively in the new ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Unicorn and The Wasp", when the suspects are giving their alibis. A GenreSavvy viewer can spot that [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the culprit is the one person who ''isn't'' shown doing something shady in flashback.]]



* ''Series/TheLastDetective'' uses this on ocassion, as suspects will give accounts of happenings to Dangerous and co. In one episode, dealing with a murder at a college reunion, one character describes the interaction between the chief suspect and the eventual victim as heated but not really violent, but the audience sees a very vindictive interaction on the brink of coming to blows.

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* ''Series/TheLastDetective'' uses this on ocassion, occasion, as suspects will give accounts of happenings to Dangerous and co. In one episode, dealing with a murder at a college reunion, one character describes the interaction between the chief suspect and the eventual victim as heated but not really violent, but the audience sees a very vindictive interaction on the brink of coming to blows.



** Before that, when on trial, he lied about his reaction to a tell-all book about him also containing various things about Dr. Girlfriend, claiming he reacted calmly, forgave the henchman that wrote it, and amicably broke up with Dr. Girlfriend. He really was in inconsolable rage, killed the one blamed for writing the book [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill in an incredibly over the top manner]] ("Lower the giant hair dryer!"), and kicked Dr. Girlfiend out loudly right before crying into his pillow.

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** Before that, when on trial, he lied about his reaction to a tell-all book about him also containing various things about Dr. Girlfriend, claiming he reacted calmly, forgave the henchman that wrote it, and amicably broke up with Dr. Girlfriend. He really was in inconsolable rage, killed the one blamed for writing the book [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill in an incredibly over the top manner]] ("Lower the giant hair dryer!"), and kicked Dr. Girlfiend Girlfriend out loudly right before crying into his pillow.
12th Feb '18 4:13:13 PM eroock
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Related to RashomonStyle, except that instead of someone else's version of events clashing, it's the cold, unvarnished truth. Unlike UnreliableNarrator, we're led to believe that the visuals tell us what really happened. Unless there's a MindScrew going on.

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Compare ContrastMontage. Related to RashomonStyle, except that instead of someone else's version of events clashing, it's the cold, unvarnished truth. Unlike UnreliableNarrator, we're led to believe that the visuals tell us what really happened. Unless there's a MindScrew going on.
10th Jun '17 3:31:48 PM nombretomado
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* In ''TheWotch'', Jason [[http://thewotch.com/index.php?epDate=2003-09-10 recounts]] his reaction to the Mythos virus turning him into a satyr girl.

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* In ''TheWotch'', ''Webcomic/TheWotch'', Jason [[http://thewotch.com/index.php?epDate=2003-09-10 recounts]] his reaction to the Mythos virus turning him into a satyr girl.
26th Apr '17 12:16:04 PM Medinoc
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* ''Webcomic/BasicInstructions'' has some (inverted) elements of this: The voiceover is usually sound advice, but the illustrations often show said advice [[ComicallyMissingThePoint misapplied as badly as possible]].
5th Mar '17 7:07:52 PM nombretomado
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* In a {{Marvel}} UK ''[[ComicBook/TheTransformers Transformers Generation 1]]'' story, Octane tells Ratbat about how he bravely stood up to the vast Autobot onslaught only to be pushed back by overwhelming numbers. The images show him running like a coward from just two Autobots.

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* In a {{Marvel}} {{Creator/Marvel}} UK ''[[ComicBook/TheTransformers Transformers Generation 1]]'' story, Octane tells Ratbat about how he bravely stood up to the vast Autobot onslaught only to be pushed back by overwhelming numbers. The images show him running like a coward from just two Autobots.
26th Oct '16 4:33:16 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/{{Beowulf 2007}}'': Beowulf claims a bunch of sea monsters attacked him during the race with Breca. We ''do'' see him fighting said sea monsters, but when he claims another sea monster dragged him down under the water, it's actually a beautiful mermaid that he ends up "plunging his blade into."

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* ''Film/{{Beowulf ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf 2007}}'': Beowulf claims a bunch of sea monsters attacked him during the race with Breca. We ''do'' see him fighting said sea monsters, but when he claims another sea monster dragged him down under the water, it's actually a beautiful mermaid that he ends up "plunging his blade into."
21st Oct '16 11:11:21 AM MarkLungo
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* Season 2 of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' had Adam West tell the story of Miles Musket, the settler who allegedly founded Quahog with the help of a magic talking clam. West states that Musket was thrown overboard for "speaking his mind", while the flashback shows that Musket was an incredibly grating blabbermouth who the other settlers threw overboard just to preserve their own sanity.

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* Season 2 of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' had Adam West Craetor/AdamWest tell the story of Miles Musket, the settler who allegedly founded Quahog with the help of a magic talking clam. West states that Musket was thrown overboard for "speaking his mind", while the flashback shows that Musket was an incredibly grating blabbermouth [[MotorMouth blabbermouth]] who the other settlers threw overboard just to preserve their own sanity.
14th Oct '16 3:24:04 PM nombretomado
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* [[http://exterminatusnow.co.uk/2010-05-09/comic/team-scramble/suddenly-words-thousands-of-them/ Wildfire's letter]] in ''ExterminatusNow''.

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* [[http://exterminatusnow.co.uk/2010-05-09/comic/team-scramble/suddenly-words-thousands-of-them/ Wildfire's letter]] in ''ExterminatusNow''.''Webcomic/ExterminatusNow''.
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