History Main / UnitConfusion

18th Apr '17 5:15:38 PM Amahn
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** Of course the Luminoth could also simply have a different definition of "cycle" than the Space Pirates. Compare Imperial Tons to Metric Tons. Making it an in-universe example of LostInTranslation.
31st Mar '17 4:39:36 PM bombadil211
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** Fortunately, due to [[AcePilot supreme skill of the pilots]] and some good luck they managed to land the powerless plane (that's why it's known as ''Glider'') on the former RCAF Gimli airbase, where one of the pilots was stationed back in his military days, and managed not to hit the drag races held on the runway they landed on, so [[EverybodyLives nobody got hurt]] both on plane and on the ground. Note that in later simulator re-creations of the circumstances with other flight crews, ''every one'' ended with a fatal crash.

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** Fortunately, due to [[AcePilot supreme skill There was an extreme level of the pilots]] and some good luck they managed to land involved in the flight having no fatalities. The captain happened to be a glider pilot (and thus knew about the unique requirements of powerless plane (that's why it's known as ''Glider'') on flight) and the first officer happened to be a former RCAF Gimli airbase, where one of the pilots pilot who was stationed back in his military days, at RCAF Gimli, a nearby (decommissioned) airbase. The base had been converted into a race track and the pilots managed not to hit the drag races held on the runway they landed on, so [[EverybodyLives nobody got hurt]] both on plane and on the ground. Note that in later simulator re-creations of the circumstances with other flight crews, ''every one'' ended with a fatal crash.
30th Mar '17 3:30:22 PM DarkHunter
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* Parodied in ''WebAnimation/StarWreck, where the twist in the maggothole (''sic!'') is stated to be several mega-parsec-seconds in the Finnish original, and googol-fluxoms in English translation. Naturally, neither of those make any sense.

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* Parodied in ''WebAnimation/StarWreck, ''WebAnimation/StarWreck'', where the twist in the maggothole (''sic!'') (''sic'') is stated to be several mega-parsec-seconds in the Finnish original, and googol-fluxoms in English translation. Naturally, neither of those make any sense.
16th Mar '17 6:49:14 AM morane
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* The shoe sizes [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoe_size are a complete quagmire]]. Not only do the shoe sizes depend of the country and culture, but also whether they are based on the foot size or last size (a last is the male "mould" upon which the shoe is made). The most common units are Mondopoint (foot length and beam in millimetres), used on ski boots and by US armed forces, the EU sizing (1.5 times the length of the last in centimeters), US male shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 24), US female shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 22.5) and UK shoe size (approx 3 times the heel to toe length in inches minus 23). The UK sizes are one barleycorn apart each other.

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* The shoe sizes [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoe_size are a complete quagmire]]. Not only do the shoe sizes depend of the country and culture, but also whether they are based on the foot size or last size (a last is the male "mould" upon which the shoe is made). The most common units are Mondopoint (foot ((foot length and beam in millimetres), used on ski boots and by US armed forces, forces), the EU sizing (1.5 times the length of the last in centimeters), US male shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 24), US female shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 22.5) and UK shoe size (approx 3 times the heel to toe length in inches minus 23). The UK sizes are one barleycorn (1/3 in or 8.47 mm) apart each other.other, while the EU sizes are 2/3 cm (6.6667 mm or 0.262 in). Mondopoint shoes are sized 5 mm apart, and they also take account the beam of the foot: 275/100 shoe is, while of same length (275 mm), 10 mm narrower than 275/110.
16th Mar '17 6:39:57 AM morane
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Added DiffLines:

* The shoe sizes [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoe_size are a complete quagmire]]. Not only do the shoe sizes depend of the country and culture, but also whether they are based on the foot size or last size (a last is the male "mould" upon which the shoe is made). The most common units are Mondopoint (foot length and beam in millimetres), used on ski boots and by US armed forces, the EU sizing (1.5 times the length of the last in centimeters), US male shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 24), US female shoe size (3 times the last length in inches minus 22.5) and UK shoe size (approx 3 times the heel to toe length in inches minus 23). The UK sizes are one barleycorn apart each other.
15th Mar '17 4:23:07 PM StatuesqueChinchilline
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*** That bit Steve Jackson at least gets correct. The abbreviation for metres prer second is m/s or ms[[ssuperscript:-1]].

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*** That bit Steve Jackson at least gets correct. The abbreviation for metres prer second is m/s or ms[[ssuperscript:-1]].
ms[[superscript:-1]].
15th Mar '17 4:22:18 PM StatuesqueChinchilline
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*** That bit Steve Jackson at least gets correct. The abbreviation for meters per second is m/s and nothing else.

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*** That bit Steve Jackson at least gets correct. The abbreviation for meters per metres prer second is m/s and nothing else.or ms[[ssuperscript:-1]].
3rd Mar '17 10:59:58 PM Micah
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* In the folk song "The Frozen Logger", the title character freezes to death when the temperature reaches "a thousand degrees below zero"; though no units of temperature are specified, there are no commonly used units that go that low. As the song is a Myth/PaulBunyan-esque tall tale, this is entirely appropriate to its tone.
1st Mar '17 1:48:22 PM BTD6_maker
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* A fatal example of this trope occurred with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Air_Cargo_Flight_6316 Korean Air Cargo Flight 6316]]. As the plane was climbing, ATC cleared the flight to 1,500 meters (4,900 feet). The flight crew misinterpreted this order as 1,500 ''feet'', leading them to believe they were too high. The captain attempted to descend, but pushed the control column too hard, causing the plane to nosedive into a neighborhood, killing all three crew members and five people on the ground.

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* A fatal example of this trope occurred with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Air_Cargo_Flight_6316 Korean Air Cargo Flight 6316]]. As the plane was climbing, ATC cleared the flight to 1,500 meters metres (4,900 feet). The flight crew misinterpreted this order as 1,500 ''feet'', leading them to believe they were too high. The captain attempted to descend, but pushed the control column too hard, causing the plane to nosedive into a neighborhood, killing all three crew members and five people on the ground.



** The units of ''energy'' (distance multiplied by force) and ''torque'' (distance multiplied by force), but they are different products. Energy is ''scalar product'' while torque is ''cross product'' (matrix product). Thus while the unit of both are newtonmeter in SI system, the unit of energy has its own name, joule (J): 1 J = 1 Nm. The unit of torque is newtonmeter, but cross-product (N x m). When you lift a weight of one newton up one meter, it is energy of one joule; when you pivot a lever, length of one meter, by force of one newton, it is torque of one newtonmeter).

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** The units of ''energy'' (distance multiplied by force) and ''torque'' (distance multiplied by force), but they are different products. Energy is ''scalar product'' while torque is ''cross product'' (matrix (vector product). Thus while the unit of both are newtonmeter newtonmetre in SI system, the unit of energy has its own name, joule (J): 1 J = 1 Nm. The unit of torque is newtonmeter, newtonmetre, but cross-product (N x m). When you lift a weight of one newton up one meter, metre, it is energy of one joule; when you pivot a lever, length of one meter, metre, by force of one newton, it is torque of one newtonmeter).newtonmetre). Note that the unit of length is always spelled "metre" while a measuring instrument is always spelled "meter"; a newtonmetre is the unit of torque, but a newtonmeter is an instrument for measuring force.
14th Jan '17 10:01:17 PM Prfnoff
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* A more down-to-Earth example (no pun intended) was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimli_Glider Gimli Glider.]] The Boeing 767 C-GAUN was the first Air Canada jet with metric instrumentation. There already had to be a measurement conversion because the refueling people on the ground measured kerosene in volume (gallons), while the aircraft measured fuel in weight (pounds or kilograms). The ground crew used the wrong conversion factor in calculating how many gallons to pump on the plane, leading the crew to think the plane had 22,000 kilograms of fuel on board, the amount needed for the flight, when it only had 22,000 pounds (9979 kg). The exact mass of fuel used is very important to aircraft and thus the gauge could not be replaced with a car style unitless gauge.
** And in a supreme GuideDangIt (for the pilots/groundcrew)/WhatAnIdiot (for Air Canada) moment: ''nobody on the groundcrew or in the cockpit had been trained to do the proper conversion''.
*** This was primarily due to the fact that this kind of thing used to be the job of the flight engineer. Unfortunately, computerized jets like the Boeing 767 have eliminated the need for that position, and apparently no one at Air Canada had stopped to consider who should take over the FE's duties.

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* A more down-to-Earth example (no pun intended) was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimli_Glider Gimli Glider.]] The Boeing 767 C-GAUN was the first Air Canada jet with metric instrumentation. There already had to be a measurement conversion because the refueling people on the ground measured kerosene in volume (gallons), while the aircraft measured fuel in weight (pounds or kilograms). The ground crew used the wrong conversion factor in calculating how many gallons to pump on the plane, leading the crew to think the plane had 22,000 kilograms of fuel on board, the amount needed for the flight, when it only had 22,000 pounds (9979 kg). The exact mass of fuel used is very important to aircraft and thus the gauge could not be replaced with a car style unitless gauge.
** And in a supreme GuideDangIt (for the pilots/groundcrew)/WhatAnIdiot (for Air Canada) moment: ''nobody
gauge. Nobody on the groundcrew or in the cockpit had been trained to do the proper conversion''.
*** This was primarily due to the fact that
conversion; this kind of thing used to be the job of the flight engineer. Unfortunately, engineer, but computerized jets like the Boeing 767 have eliminated the need for that position, and apparently no one at Air Canada had stopped to consider who should take over the FE's duties.
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