History Main / UnintentionalPeriodPiece

21st Feb '18 5:36:23 PM KoopaKid17
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* The 1961 song "Sad Movies (Make me Cry)" references newsreels and color cartoons being shown in theaters, a practice that stopped by the end of that decade.
13th Feb '18 2:11:17 AM C2
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* As noted in the page quote, ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle''. Ironically, ''Rocky and Bullwinkle'' has had a much longer life in reruns -- appearing in syndication through the 1960s, '70s and '80s, on {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} in the early 1990s, and occasionally elsewhere since then -- than the show poking fun at it in the page quote (''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' hadn't been seen much on TV since the late 1990s until The Hub brought it back in 2013). It helps that there are over 100 episodes and the rights aren't owned by any of the big networks [[note]]Owned by a joint partnership of [[Creator/DreamWorksAnimation DreamWorks Classics]] and the Jay Ward estate, syndication rights are owned by General Mills via The Program Exchange[[/note]] (so it's easier to negotiate syndication rights from area to area), whereas ''Tiny Toons'' has only 98 and is owned by Warner Bros., which is co-owned with the Turner networks.

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* As noted in the page quote, ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle''. Ironically, ''Rocky and Bullwinkle'' has had a much longer life in reruns -- appearing in syndication through the 1960s, '70s and '80s, on {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} in the early 1990s, and occasionally elsewhere since then -- than the show poking fun at it in the page quote (''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' hadn't been seen much on TV since the late 1990s until The Hub brought it back in 2013). It helps that there are over 100 episodes and the rights (in the US) aren't owned by any of the big networks [[note]]Owned by a joint partnership of [[Creator/DreamWorksAnimation DreamWorks Classics]] and the Jay Ward estate, US syndication rights are owned by General Mills via The the moribund Program Exchange[[/note]] (so it's easier to negotiate syndication rights from area to area), whereas ''Tiny Toons'' has only 98 and is owned by Warner Bros., which is co-owned with the Turner networks.
11th Feb '18 3:48:32 AM ZanderSchubert
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** The montage in the first episode of Season Three features Abby wearing a white and gold dress at the same time as Ilana wearing a blue and black dress, referencing the meme from 2015.
** In a Season One episode, Lincoln tells a gay character "I'm not getting married until everyone can get married", dating it to before 2015.


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* One of the questions on ''Series/{{QI}}'' was "what has twenty legs, five heads, and can't reach its own nuts?" Jeremy Clarkson answers "Music/{{Westlife}}", a reference outdated enough not to get the klaxon; Jimmy Carr's answer, Music/OneDirection, does. In time, both answers will be equally outdated.
17th Jan '18 1:54:37 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Series/{{Portlandia}}'', as explained in [[https://www.avclub.com/portlandia-was-the-perfect-obama-era-comedy-series-and-1822160135 this article]] by William Hughes of ''The Website/AVClub'', was firmly rooted in a period of Obama-era liberal optimism, and in an AffectionateParody of the {{hipster}} culture of the time. Notably, the last couple of seasons wound up dealing with the growing cynicism and reactionary politics that eventually gave way to the Trump era.
11th Jan '18 7:58:06 AM ClintEastwood
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* ''Film/AnchorsAweigh''

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* ''Film/AnchorsAweigh''''Film/AnchorsAweigh'' was released as a moral booster for the US Navy. While WWII was clearly coming to an end in Europe, it was still raging in the Pacific where the Navy was actively engaged against the Japanese. The opening sequence of the film is clearly designed to make the nation feel good about its naval forces.



* "Confessions of a Nazi Spy," filmed in 1939 and released in 1940, portrayed a United States when it was feasible enough for German immigrants and German-Americans to have enough of a dual loyalty to the United States and Germany that they could be seduced into spying on the former for the latter. Several of the spies in the film are members of the German-American Bund, an organization that was already under Congressional investigation by 1938, and was actually outlawed by 1942, when the US was at war with Nazi Germany.

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* "Confessions of a Nazi Spy," ''Film/ConfessionsOfANaziSpy'', filmed in 1939 and released in 1940, portrayed a United States when it was feasible enough for German immigrants and German-Americans to have enough of a dual loyalty to the United States and Germany that they could be seduced into spying on the former for the latter. Several of the spies in the film are members of the German-American Bund, an organization that was already under Congressional investigation by 1938, and was actually outlawed by 1942, when the US was at war with Nazi Germany.



* ''Film/MissionToMoscow'' . ''The North Star'' and ''Song Of Russia'' are the three primary examples of American pro-Soviet films. Their blind optimism about the nobility of UsefulNotes/JosefStalin and advocacy for the US and USSR to remain steadfast allies stands in stark contrast to nearly every American film made during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, in which the Soviet Union was at worst a tyrannical empire, or at best simply the lesser evil compared to Nazi Germany. Then there's all the millions of executions and war crimes committed by Stalin that have been uncovered over the years. Needless to say, all of the films were products of the Hollywood war effort.

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* ''Film/MissionToMoscow'' .''Film/MissionToMoscow''. ''The North Star'' and ''Song Of Russia'' are the three primary examples of American pro-Soviet films. Their blind optimism about the nobility of UsefulNotes/JosefStalin and advocacy for the US and USSR to remain steadfast allies stands in stark contrast to nearly every American film made during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, in which the Soviet Union was at worst a tyrannical empire, or at best simply the lesser evil compared to Nazi Germany. Then there's all the millions of executions and war crimes committed by Stalin that have been uncovered over the years. Needless to say, all of the films were products of the Hollywood war effort.
24th Dec '17 1:33:58 PM nombretomado
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However - also remember that while older references zing over the heads of younger consumers - newer references zing over the heads of older consumers, too. So references from modern times can ''sometimes'' be accurate, and [[ExamplesAreNotRecent TV Tropes does not know time]].

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However - also remember that while older references zing over the heads of younger consumers - newer references zing over the heads of older consumers, too. So references from modern times can ''sometimes'' be accurate, and [[ExamplesAreNotRecent [[Administrivia/ExamplesAreNotRecent TV Tropes does not know time]].
23rd Dec '17 3:33:37 AM Arivne
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* The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "A Scauze for Applause" ends with Jesus leading the townspeople in a "Free Pussy Riot" rally, which becomes this after the members of Pussy Riot were freed in 2013.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''
**
The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "A Scauze for Applause" ends with Jesus leading the townspeople in a "Free Pussy Riot" rally, which becomes this after the members of Pussy Riot were freed in 2013.
21st Dec '17 9:33:07 AM nlpnt
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* The original version of "Santa Baby" as sung by Eartha Kitt refers to a "[19]'54 convertible", changed in some covers to "''outer space'' convertible." Though it can be subverted, as 1950s cars are highly sought after nowadays. Maybe if you heard this song in the 1960s or 1970s, it'd be closer to this trope.

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* The original version of "Santa Baby" as sung by Eartha Kitt refers to a "[19]'54 convertible", changed in some covers to "I want a new.." or even "''outer space'' convertible." Though it can be subverted, as 1950s cars are highly sought after nowadays. Maybe if you heard this song in In the 1960s or 1970s, it'd be closer to this trope.trope, but 1954 isn't a particularly sought-after year for any mainstream American car since styling tended to be at an awkward stage between the flowing Art Deco of the first postwar generation and the long, low finniness of the late '50s, and wheezy old flathead engines and flaky first-generation automatic transmissions proliferated.
5th Dec '17 5:05:52 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* The 2011 slasher parody ''Film/{{Detention}}'', which is crammed with jokes about TorturePorn films, fad diets, contemporary pop and indie rock, text-speak, and the wave of '90s nostalgia that was rising at the time. The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLVUlb7fpF8 opening scene]] is almost as much a MisterSandmanSequence for 2011 as what we see later in the film for 1992, with the line "your lack of faith in the durability of Music/{{Kesha}} is disturbing" ringing HilariousInHindsight given how quickly she vanished from pop culture (or a FunnyAneurysmMoment, given [[RapeAsDrama precisely how and why]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Hook_Elementary_School_shooting she vanished]]). One of the film's subplots also involves a millennial teenage girl and her Generation X mother undergoing a FreakyFridayFlip, with the resulting generation gap being PlayedForLaughs; one scene has the mother (in her daughter's body) remarking about how her generation never had any great crises or struggles, to which the teenagers around her (thinking that she's still her daughter) respond by bringing up [[TheWarOnTerror 9/11, the war in Afghanistan]], Hurricane Katrina, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and the death of]] Creator/HeathLedger -- all historic touchstones of the millennial generation.

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* The 2011 slasher parody ''Film/{{Detention}}'', which is crammed with jokes about TorturePorn films, fad diets, contemporary pop and indie rock, text-speak, and the wave of '90s nostalgia that was rising at the time. The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLVUlb7fpF8 opening scene]] is almost as much a MisterSandmanSequence for 2011 as what we see later in the film for 1992, with the line "your lack of faith in the durability of Music/{{Kesha}} is disturbing" ringing HilariousInHindsight given how quickly she vanished from pop culture (or a FunnyAneurysmMoment, given [[RapeAsDrama precisely how and why]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Hook_Elementary_School_shooting she vanished]]). One of the film's subplots also involves a millennial teenage girl and her Generation X mother undergoing a FreakyFridayFlip, with the resulting generation gap being PlayedForLaughs; one scene has the mother (in her daughter's body) remarking about how her generation never had any great crises or struggles, to which the teenagers around her (thinking that she's still her daughter) respond by bringing up [[TheWarOnTerror 9/11, the war in Afghanistan]], Hurricane Katrina, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and the death of]] Creator/HeathLedger -- all historic touchstones of for those who grew up during the millennial generation.2000s.


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* ''Film/PopstarNeverStopNeverStopping'', a feature-length parody of Music/JustinBieber and early-mid 2010s pop culture in general. Many of its protagonist Connor's tribulations are exaggerated versions of real things that Bieber did during that time that helped make him a tabloid punchline. There are also jabs at smart devices, hoverboards, Music/{{Macklemore}}'s "Same Love", and Apple's heavy-handed promotion of Music/{{U2}}'s album ''Songs of Innocence'', while Connor's girlfriend Ashley Wednesday is the star of a film franchise adapted from a series of {{dystopia}}n [[YoungAdultLiterature YA]] novels.
27th Nov '17 4:40:02 PM Ocsaleb
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* It's technically a film from the '40s (1941), but Disney's ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' has a very opaque '30s reference in its very first song, "Look Out for Mr. Stork." The singers casually mention "those quintuplets," which at the time would not have been necessary to explain because it is clearly a reference to the Dionne Quintuplets, five identical French-Canadian girls who became enormous celebrities during the Depression years simply by virtue of being quintuplets (and even that is dated, as quintuplets would hardly impress anyone today because ''octuplets'' have since been born). The North American media obsessively covered the Dionne story for years (partly because it gave them an excuse to avoid any controversial economic or political topics that might have offended people in what was at the time a fairly heated social climate), with the result that the girls' entire childhood and adolescence became world news. You probably only remember the Dionne Quintuplets today if you're a Thirties buff, or a student of old newsreels, or maybe if you saw that ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode that subtly parodied the phenomenon with a big fuss in the town over five identical Romanian girls. Also, during the song "When I See an Elephant Fly", one of the crows makes a reference to then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "fireside chats".

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* It's technically a film from the '40s (1941), but Disney's ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' has a very opaque '30s reference in its very first song, "Look Out for Mr. Stork." The singers casually mention "those quintuplets," which at the time would not have been necessary to explain because it is clearly a reference to the Dionne Quintuplets, five identical French-Canadian girls who became enormous celebrities during the Depression years simply by virtue of being quintuplets (and even that is dated, as quintuplets would hardly impress anyone today because ''octuplets'' ''nonuplets'' have since been born). The North American media obsessively covered the Dionne story for years (partly because it gave them an excuse to avoid any controversial economic or political topics that might have offended people in what was at the time a fairly heated social climate), with the result that the girls' entire childhood and adolescence became world news. You probably only remember the Dionne Quintuplets today if you're a Thirties buff, or a student of old newsreels, or maybe if you saw that ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode that subtly parodied the phenomenon with a big fuss in the town over five identical Romanian girls. Also, during the song "When I See an Elephant Fly", one of the crows makes a reference to then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "fireside chats".
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