History Main / UnintentionalPeriodPiece

22nd Sep '17 7:31:05 AM nanakiro
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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' tends to fall into this trope since the story was essentially a long conversation with its author and the audience. Earlier {{Call Back}}s and gags came from Hussie's writings in the early 2000s, but a good chunk of the story was written in the 2010s. Whenever kids talk about {{Discredited Meme}}s, they usually mention that the joke fell out of favor a few years before the start of the comic (2009). Music acts like the Music/InsaneClownPosse are major characters or inspirations for how they act. A character based on the mid-2010s perception of Website/{{Tumblr}}, a segment where dialog is done in the style of Website/{{Twitter}} posts with once popular feed Horse_Ebooks immortalized as a steady stream of nonsense before its creator revealed it to be part of an AlternateRealityGame, a major villain based on Blingee, and the credits told in Website/{{Snapchat}} photos all point to the 2010-2016 era of internet shenanigans.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' tends to fall into this trope since the story was essentially a long conversation with its author and the audience. Earlier {{Call Back}}s and gags came from Hussie's writings in the early 2000s, but a good chunk of the story was written in the 2010s. Whenever kids talk about {{Discredited Meme}}s, they usually mention that the joke fell out of favor a few years before the start of the comic (2009). Music acts like the Music/InsaneClownPosse are major characters or serve as inspirations for how they other characters act. A character based on the mid-2010s perception of Website/{{Tumblr}}, a segment where dialog is done in the style of Website/{{Twitter}} posts with once popular feed Horse_Ebooks immortalized as a steady stream of nonsense before its creator revealed it to be part of an AlternateRealityGame, a major villain based on Blingee, mid-2010s urban culture (and somehow manages to use Blingee on real life objects), and the credits told in Website/{{Snapchat}} Snapchat photos all point to the 2010-2016 era of internet shenanigans.shenanigans. The extremely interactive meta narrative of the story can also point to this era, as a lot of contemporary media at this time had some sort of self-aware, {{Troperiffic}} angle to it.
22nd Sep '17 1:16:30 AM nanakiro
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' tends to fall into this trope since the story was essentially a long conversation with its author and the audience. Earlier {{Call Back}}s and gags came from Hussie's writings in the early 2000s, but a good chunk of the story was written in the 2010s. Whenever kids talk about {{Discredited Meme}}s, they usually mention that the joke fell out of favor a few years before the start of the comic (2009). Music acts like the Music/InsaneClownPosse are major characters or inspirations for how they act. A character based on the mid-2010s perception of Website/{{Tumblr}}, a segment where dialog is done in the style of Website/{{Twitter}} posts with once popular feed Horse_Ebooks immortalized as a steady stream of nonsense before its creator revealed it to be part of an AlternateRealityGame, a major villain based on Blingee, and the credits told in Website/{{Snapchat}} photos all point to the 2010-2016 era of internet shenanigans.
19th Sep '17 2:27:45 PM WaterBlap
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Subtropes include FashionDissonance (when this is caused by clothing and hairstyles alone) and {{Zeerust}} (when it's just the technology that's outdated). Look for examples of {{Technology|MarchesOn}} and [[SocietyMarchesOn Society Marching On]], AluminumChristmasTrees, and scenes that would resemble {{Mister Sandman Sequence}}s if they occurred in an ''actual'' period piece. Compare with TwoDecadesBehind, which is when something inadvertently feels like a period piece despite having been made a good time after the period it seems to be based on, and WereStillRelevantDammit, for when long-running series make blatant (and sometimes forced) references to modern culture in an attempt to seem up-to-date or to look more "hip", often resulting in one of these. Sometimes, especially when the viewer has spent too long on ThisVeryWiki, [[DiscreditedTrope the very tropes in use]] may be recognisably of an era -- such as the NinetiesAntiHero.

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Subtropes include FashionDissonance (when this is caused by clothing and hairstyles alone) and {{Zeerust}} (when it's just the depiction of future technology that's outdated). Look for examples of {{Technology|MarchesOn}} and [[SocietyMarchesOn Society Marching On]], AluminumChristmasTrees, and scenes that would resemble {{Mister Sandman Sequence}}s if they occurred in an ''actual'' period piece. Compare with TwoDecadesBehind, which is when something inadvertently feels like a period piece despite having been made a good time after the period it seems to be based on, and WereStillRelevantDammit, for when long-running series make blatant (and sometimes forced) references to modern culture in an attempt to seem up-to-date or to look more "hip", often resulting in one of these. Sometimes, especially when the viewer has spent too long on ThisVeryWiki, [[DiscreditedTrope the very tropes in use]] may be recognisably of an era -- such as the NinetiesAntiHero.
18th Sep '17 9:43:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* Similarly, ''Film/{{Zoolander}} 2'' became regarded as this for ''the previous decade'' when it was released in 2016, with its merciless mocking of the fashion world seen as not only mean-spirited, but fairly dated at a time when the "supermodel culture" was experiencing a huge comeback.

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* Similarly, ''Film/{{Zoolander}} 2'' ''Film/{{Zoolander 2}}'' became regarded as this for ''the previous decade'' when it was released in 2016, with its merciless mocking of the fashion world seen as not only mean-spirited, but fairly dated at a time when the "supermodel culture" was experiencing a huge comeback.
17th Sep '17 11:33:18 AM nombretomado
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* ''Literature/RallyRoundTheFlagBoys'' has suburban housewives organizing committees to welcome a new [[SuperiorFirepowerSurfaceToAirMissiles Nike installation]], which leads to a fight between soldiers and GreaserDelinquents. Throwaway references include a HenpeckedHusband comparing trying to make a date with his wife with "like trying to get tickets to ''Theatre/MyFairLady''."

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* ''Literature/RallyRoundTheFlagBoys'' has suburban housewives organizing committees to welcome a new [[SuperiorFirepowerSurfaceToAirMissiles [[UsefulNotes/SuperiorFirepowerSurfaceToAirMissiles Nike installation]], which leads to a fight between soldiers and GreaserDelinquents. Throwaway references include a HenpeckedHusband comparing trying to make a date with his wife with "like trying to get tickets to ''Theatre/MyFairLady''."
12th Sep '17 4:26:47 PM Vilui
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* In some ways, ''Film/TheGreatDictator'' is actually quite ahead of its time in its satirical depiction of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, since it openly mocked the Nazis when the United States was still neutral. In other ways, though, it's clearly an early-1940's film, and its depiction of Nazi Germany can seem rather jarring to modern audiences. For one thing, Creator/CharlieChaplin hadn't known the full scale of the Holocaust at the time the film was made (years later, he said if he had known, ''he wouldn't have made the movie at all''), so he portrays the Nazis' domestic policies as ''much'' more mild than they really were, i.e. the Nazi stand-ins are shown bullying and harassing the Jews, but nothing much worse than that. For another thing, he focuses much of the plot on the rivalry between Hitler and Mussolini (er...[[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed "Hynkel" and "Benzino"]]) over the occupation of Austria, and portrays Mussolini as a seriously intimidating rival to Hitler; the dispute over the occupation of Austria was big news in 1940, but it's only remembered as a minor historical footnote today, and Fascist Italy is only remembered as an ineffectual ally of Nazi Germany.

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* In some ways, ''Film/TheGreatDictator'' is actually quite ahead of its time in its satirical depiction of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, since it openly mocked the Nazis when the United States was still neutral. In other ways, though, it's clearly an early-1940's early-1940s film, and its depiction of Nazi Germany can seem rather jarring to modern audiences. For one thing, Creator/CharlieChaplin hadn't known the full scale of the Holocaust at the time the film was made (years later, he said if he had known, ''he wouldn't have made the movie at all''), so he portrays the Nazis' domestic policies as ''much'' more mild than they really were, i.e. the Nazi stand-ins are shown bullying and harassing the Jews, but nothing much worse than that. For another thing, he focuses much of the plot on the rivalry between Hitler and Mussolini (er...[[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed "Hynkel" and "Benzino"]]) over the occupation of Austria, and portrays Mussolini as a seriously intimidating rival to Hitler; the dispute over the occupation of Austria was big news in 1940, but it's only remembered as a minor historical footnote today, and Fascist Italy is only remembered as an ineffectual ally of Nazi Germany.



* 1959's Merrie Melodies cartoon "The Mouse that Jack Built" is chock-full of late 50's references, but one that would go over the head of people who don't know one World War from the other[[note]]increasingly likely, as both those wars are from the early 20th Century and fade into history[[/note]] is when Jack is speaking to Ed, the vault guard, who has evidently been in there a long time by the 1959 date that is assumed. Jack assumes Ed means UsefulNotes/WorldWarII (which had been over for 14 years by this time), but then Ed drops a reference from UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

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* 1959's Merrie Melodies cartoon "The Mouse that Jack Built" is chock-full of late 50's 50s references, but one that would go over the head of people who don't know one World War from the other[[note]]increasingly likely, as both those wars are from the early 20th Century and fade into history[[/note]] is when Jack is speaking to Ed, the vault guard, who has evidently been in there a long time by the 1959 date that is assumed. Jack assumes Ed means UsefulNotes/WorldWarII (which had been over for 14 years by this time), but then Ed drops a reference from UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.



* ''[[ComicBook/AchilleTalon Walter Melon]]'' was written in the '60s and finished in the '90s. The comic was mainly a gag-a-day strip with a main character that had an unclear mind and encyclopedic knowledge. Pretty much 90% of the jokes in those comics would barely even work well (unless you can still laugh with jokes about people that mock old cars that have cars themselves that scream the 1960's). The dialogue is also unbelievably dated, not helped by the fact that the comic used a complex vocabulary for its time (the Spanish translator of the comic had to come up with a new joke at one point because the original joke didn't translate well into Spanish) and a lot of neologisms that don't catch on with modern viewers.

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* ''[[ComicBook/AchilleTalon Walter Melon]]'' was written in the '60s and finished in the '90s. The comic was mainly a gag-a-day strip with a main character that had an unclear mind and encyclopedic knowledge. Pretty much 90% of the jokes in those comics would barely even work well (unless you can still laugh with jokes about people that mock old cars that have cars themselves that scream the 1960's).1960s). The dialogue is also unbelievably dated, not helped by the fact that the comic used a complex vocabulary for its time (the Spanish translator of the comic had to come up with a new joke at one point because the original joke didn't translate well into Spanish) and a lot of neologisms that don't catch on with modern viewers.



* The 1967 ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short ''Daffy's Diner'' has Daffy using DDT to give the rubber mice he cooks a more authentic flavor. DDT would be banned in the early-1970's.

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* The 1967 ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' short ''Daffy's Diner'' has Daffy using DDT to give the rubber mice he cooks a more authentic flavor. DDT would be banned in the early-1970's.early-1970s.



* ''[[https://www.buzzfeed.com/etgarkeret/arctic-lizard The Arctic Lizard]]'', an online short story by Israeli author Etgar Keret, unfortunately falls into this. The story on its own is well written, but the massive amount of references to concerns in 2016 immediately date it to that year. The story takes place in a dystopian future, during UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's third term as US president, where after a war with Mexico (which leads to WorldWarIII), the government has set up a military unit comprised exclusively of [[ChildSoldier teenagers]]. While Trump did get elected and fears of war were widespread, these mostly had to do with North Korea and Russia, as after Trump's election, Mexico made it clear that they do not take him seriously at all, meaning that a war would be unnecessary. As the story progresses, it is revealed that to get children to join the army, the government set up "Destromons Go", a thinly-veiled parody of ''VideoGame/PokemonGo'' (which was extremely popular for a brief period in 2016, but was forgotten after that) and spawned extremely rare and powerful monsters at specific battle sites (with the titular Arctic Lizard being one that the protagonist has). As many were exasperated with the game's fanbase during its run, leading to a stereotype of the game's players being TooDumbToLive people caring only about Pokémon, the story also contains multiple [[TakeThat jabs towards the game]], especially at the climax, where the protagonist manages to successfully finish off the second-in-command of Al Qaeda, but is quickly forgotten after his unit learns that one of the other soldiers found a rare monster at the same site.

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* ''[[https://www.buzzfeed.com/etgarkeret/arctic-lizard The Arctic Lizard]]'', an online short story by Israeli author Etgar Keret, unfortunately falls into this. The story on its own is well written, but the massive amount of references to concerns in 2016 immediately date it to that year. The story takes place in a dystopian future, during UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's third term as US president, where after a war with Mexico (which leads to WorldWarIII), the government has set up a military unit comprised composed exclusively of [[ChildSoldier teenagers]]. While Trump did get elected and fears of war were widespread, these mostly had to do with North Korea and Russia, as after Trump's election, Mexico made it clear that they do not take him seriously at all, meaning that a war would be unnecessary. As the story progresses, it is revealed that to get children to join the army, the government set up "Destromons Go", a thinly-veiled parody of ''VideoGame/PokemonGo'' (which was extremely popular for a brief period in 2016, but was forgotten after that) and spawned extremely rare and powerful monsters at specific battle sites (with the titular Arctic Lizard being one that the protagonist has). As many were exasperated with the game's fanbase during its run, leading to a stereotype of the game's players being TooDumbToLive people caring only about Pokémon, the story also contains multiple [[TakeThat jabs towards the game]], especially at the climax, where the protagonist manages to successfully finish off the second-in-command of Al Qaeda, but is quickly forgotten after his unit learns that one of the other soldiers found a rare monster at the same site.
11th Sep '17 10:39:37 AM pvsage
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* In ''Series/Warehouse13'', practically [[ProductPlacement everybody's cellphone is a Blackberry]], and there's a noticeable shift from using the ones with tactile switch keypads to touchscreen phones between seasons 3 and 4, firmly rooting the series in the early 2010s when Blackberry began to abandon its flagship product. There are more intentional references to the time period, like the "Got Your Six" lapel pins, Pete and Claudia's fondness of internet memes, and of course newspaper dates, but the transition from cellphones to smartphones was something the writers couldn't have planned for.
5th Sep '17 5:48:54 AM Abberline1888
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* Classic Universal horror movies like ''Dracula'' or ''The Wolf Man'' play their supernatural menaces with a straight-faced sobriety that would never have survived an audience jaded by WWII.

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* Classic Universal horror movies like ''Dracula'' or ''The Wolf Man'' play their supernatural menaces with a straight-faced sobriety that would never have survived an audience jaded by WWII.
4th Sep '17 1:30:53 PM jamespolk
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* ''Film/{{Bullitt}}'': The police department watches in dramatic, stony silence as game-changing evidence in the case is printed by the Xerox Magnafax Telecopier, a then-revolutionary fax machine that nevertheless took minutes to send a document. You would also not find an airport even two decades later with security as lax as in the film's climax, where a character is able to carry a gun in and out of an airplane and through an airport without anyone noticing.



* ''Film/{{Revolution 1968}}'' captures the feeling of the 1960s, even though the topics in the {{documentary}} might seem old-fashioned nowadays.

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* ''Film/{{Revolution 1968}}'' ''Film/{{Revolution|1968}}'' captures the feeling of the 1960s, even though the topics in the {{documentary}} might seem old-fashioned nowadays.



* ''Film/{{Bullitt}}'': The police department watches in dramatic, stony silence as game-changing evidence in the case is printed by the Xerox Magnafax Telecopier, a then-revolutionary fax machine that nevertheless took minutes to send a document. You would also not find an airport even two decades later with security as lax as in the film's climax, where a character is able to carry a gun in and out of an airplane and through an airport without anyone noticing.

to:

* ''Film/{{Bullitt}}'': The police department watches in dramatic, stony silence as game-changing evidence in Most of the case is printed by plot of 1966 film ''Film/WalkDontRun'' (actually a remake of 1943 movie ''The More the Xerox Magnafax Telecopier, Merrier'') turns on how shocking and scandalous it is for an unmarried woman to sub-let a then-revolutionary fax machine room in her apartment out to a man. When a newspaper reporter hears the tale of how Steve wound up renting a room from Catherine, he says he's going to write a juicy story about it. Then Catherine's fiancée Julius, a low-ranking diplomat, decides that nevertheless took minutes Steve and Catherine ''have to send a document. You would also not find an airport get married'' in order to avoid scandal and social embarrassment and damage to Julius's career. All because Steve rented out Catherine's guest bed. It's impossible to imagine the movie made even two decades a few years later with security as lax as in when the film's climax, where a character is able to carry a gun in and out of an airplane and through an airport without anyone noticing.swinging 1970s were underway.
1st Sep '17 9:04:13 PM KizunaTallis
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* The 2017 film ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming'' has a SettingUpdate, where Spidey's fame is built by Website/{{Youtube}} videos rather than print news, there is a RaceLift of many characters to better represent current demographics of New York youths, Flash Thompson turned into an arrogant rich kid rather than a JerkJock and Aunt May into a "cool aunt" with a lesser generation gap with Peter instead of the "grandma" image of previous incarnations, EDM and dubstep music in a high school student house party, a reference to the "F, Marry, Kill" game, reference to TEDTalk which is very popular for millennial students in 2010s and changing Aunt May and Peter's residence from spacious house into an apartment in Queens to better represent 2010s economic condition. In short, it's a master class in 2010s realism deeply rooted in the decade--fittingly, as it's a tribute to the very rooted-in-the-80s oeuvre of Creator/JohnHughes.

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* The 2017 film ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming'' has a SettingUpdate, where Spidey's fame is built by Website/{{Youtube}} videos rather than print news, there is a RaceLift of many characters to better represent current demographics of New York youths, Flash Thompson turned into an arrogant rich kid rather than a JerkJock and Aunt May into a "cool aunt" with a lesser generation gap with Peter instead of the "grandma" image of previous incarnations, EDM and dubstep music in a high school student house party, a reference to the "F, Marry, Kill" game, reference to TEDTalk which is very popular for millennial students in 2010s and changing Aunt May and Peter's residence from spacious house into an apartment in Queens to better represent 2010s economic condition.conditions. In short, it's a master class in 2010s realism deeply rooted in the decade--fittingly, as it's a tribute to the very rooted-in-the-80s oeuvre of Creator/JohnHughes.



* "Gun Fight" by Music/SickPuppies references the American presidents President Bush and President Obama, which pins the song firmly from the late 2000s to late 2010s.

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* "Gun Fight" by Music/SickPuppies references the American presidents President Bush and President Obama, which pins the song firmly from the late 2000s to late early 2010s.
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