History Main / UncannyValley

24th Jan '16 10:51:10 AM Thecommander236
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Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.

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Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.VideoGame/UncannyValley.
24th Jan '16 10:50:38 AM Thecommander236
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Added DiffLines:

Not to be confused with the game, Uncanny Valley.
13th Jan '16 4:05:11 PM R1ck
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For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.



The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.



This should not be confused with [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley the 5th anniversary]] of Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses, which was named after this phenomenom, but had little to do with it.
21st Sep '15 7:09:31 PM justanid
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Thus, things that look somewhat human, but are clearly not -- such as C-3PO (in ''Franchise/StarWars'') or a {{Golem}} -- produce an accepting reaction, while things that are very nearly human, but just a little strange -- such as a [[CreepyDoll child's doll]], a [[DemonicDummy ventriloquist's dummy]], or [[MonsterClown a clown]] -- produce a negative response. For some people, the resonance is stronger with a ''moving'' object, which is why a corpse is creepy but a moving corpse is creepier still. In fact, some people that don't have a problem with things like [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] and consider them merely another monster may still be creeped out by things like [[MarionetteMotion unnatural movement]].

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Thus, things that look somewhat human, but are clearly not -- such as C-3PO (in ''Franchise/StarWars'') or a {{Golem}} -- produce an accepting reaction, while things that are very nearly human, but just a little strange -- such as a [[CreepyDoll child's doll]], a [[DemonicDummy ventriloquist's dummy]], or [[MonsterClown [[ClownTropes a clown]] -- produce a negative response. For some people, the resonance is stronger with a ''moving'' object, which is why a corpse is creepy but a moving corpse is creepier still. In fact, some people that don't have a problem with things like [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] and consider them merely another monster may still be creeped out by things like [[MarionetteMotion unnatural movement]].
movement]].



This idea has recently been applied to CG effects. While it's become very easy for programs to simulate textures and skin tones, convincing movement and facial expressions aren't always as simple. This can produce an effect where the character comes off as a zombie, if a production company is going for a purely realistic human look.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily rotoscoped characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

This also happens in video games, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements'' within the game world. A more stylized game or a 2D game can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation cycles are extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when they must be applied to multiple [=NPCs=] and still look natural for every single person. For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.

to:

This idea In recent decades this trope has recently been applied to CG effects. While it's become very easy for programs to simulate textures film [[ComputerGeneratedImages CGI]] and skin tones, convincing movement and facial expressions aren't always as simple. This can produce an effect where the character comes off as a zombie, if a production company is going for a purely realistic human look.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily rotoscoped characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

This also happens in video games,
video-game graphics, as technology has developed over time to allow for more photorealistic graphics, but not necessarily realistic ''movements'' within the game world. A more ''movements''. It's become very easy for computers to simulate textures and skin tones, but convincing movement and facial expressions aren't so simple, often requiring MotionCapture to look realistic. More stylized game 3D models or a 2D game art can generally get away with odd animations or expressions, but the more realistic the graphics shoot for, the more noticeable it is when something isn't lining up with reality. This is normally a cost issue, as detailed animation cycles are can be extremely time-consuming to craft and even more so when they must be applied to one set of animations is used for multiple [=NPCs=] characters and still needs look natural for every single person. all of them. Not putting in enough effort can produce the effect where a character can come across as a something less than human, like a zombie.

For one notable example, the critically acclaimed ''VideoGame/LANoire'' received special recognition for its high-quality facial motion capture, allowing for the gameplay to focus heavily on reading the expressions of witnesses and suspects for the purposes of interrogation. However, because the engine only provided this level of detail in faces while human bodies were unnaturally stiff and jerky, many critics also cited being unnerved by the obvious dissonance between the active and alive faces and the rod-still bodies.

Many cartoons nowadays prefer a simultaneously stylized yet simplified character design, versus the realistic look amongst some older cartoons. In the latter, it's more obvious the budget just didn't allow characters to move much. Heavily {{rotoscop|ing}}ed characters also often seem less real than more stylized animated characters, especially when they're in the same production. See the Fleischer Studios version of ''Gulliver's Travels'' for an example.

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure, which triggers a "threat" response.
response.



See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.


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See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.


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17th Sep '15 2:49:27 PM brianify
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The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure.

to:

The psychological reasons behind the Uncanny Valley reaction are unknown, but seem to be rooted in human evolution. Under one theory, a thing that appears human, but moves unnaturally or herky-jerkily, is interpreted by the viewer's brain as a terribly damaged human and is thus unfit for mating. Hence the natural instinctive response is revulsion (compare to the reaction of seeing a person with a missing limb or feature). Another theory holds that the response is a vestigial reaction to what is perceived by the brain to be a predator's disguise or lure.lure, which triggers a "threat" response.
3rd Jul '15 9:09:07 AM Quirderph
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This should not be confused with [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley the 5th anniversary]] of Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses.

to:

This should not be confused with [[WebVideo/TheUncannyValley the 5th anniversary]] of Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses.Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses, which was named after this phenomenom, but had little to do with it.
17th Jun '15 9:40:56 PM Kid
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In 1970 Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori proposed in [[http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/the-uncanny-valley The Uncanny Valley]] that the more human a robot acted or looked, the more endearing it would be to a human being. For example, most lovable {{Robot Budd|y}}ies look humanoid, but keep quirky and artistically mechanical affectations. However, at some point, the likeness seems ''too'' strong and yet somehow, fundamentally ''different''- and it just comes across as a very strange human being. At this point, the acceptance drops suddenly, changing to a powerful negative reaction. The Uncanny Valley doesn't necessarily have to invoke fear though; for some people, the reaction is more similar to {{Narm}} or unintentional comedy. Either way, you don't feel the same about that character as you would a human, or even something less realistic.

to:

In 1970 Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori proposed in [[http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/the-uncanny-valley The Uncanny Valley]] that the more human a robot acted or looked, the more endearing it would be to a human being. For example, most lovable {{Robot Budd|y}}ies look humanoid, but keep quirky and artistically mechanical affectations. However, at some point, the likeness seems ''too'' strong and yet somehow, fundamentally ''different''- and ''different''--and it just comes across as a very strange human being. At this point, the acceptance drops suddenly, changing to a powerful negative reaction. The Uncanny Valley doesn't necessarily have to invoke fear though; for some people, the reaction is more similar to {{Narm}} or unintentional comedy. Either way, you don't feel the same about that character as you would a human, or even something less realistic.
19th May '15 8:45:14 AM Underveil
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[[caption-width-right:320:That's why clowns are scary.]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:That's why clowns zombies are scary.]]
28th Mar '15 5:11:14 PM kansas_hurricane
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[[caption-width-right:320:That's why zombies are scary.]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:320:That's why zombies clowns are scary.]]
10th Jan '15 9:27:56 AM Saber15
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See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination).

to:

See also RealityIsUnrealistic, where the poor impression comes less from being "creepy" as from breaking [[TheCoconutEffect existing conventions which audiences had come to expect]]. In addition, there's OffModel, [[BishonenLine Bishonen Line]], NoFlowInCGI, and UglyCute. And while you're at it, see WhatMeasureIsANonCute, as the scientific study of that trope gave birth to this one. An opposite is EldritchAbomination, where the unsettling effect is caused by being way too unfamiliar rather than being way too human, yet still produces the same abominable effect (although the two can overlap as a HumanoidAbomination).
HumanoidAbomination). FurriesAreEasierToDraw is a way artists get around the Uncanny Valley phenomenon; it's easy for drawn humans to to dip into the valley, but a cartoony talking animal doesn't evoke the same response.
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