History Main / URExample

17th Jan '17 12:23:41 PM Nargrakhan
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** The ''Cairo Annals Stone'' from the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt contains the oldest surviving transcript of battlefield tactics and strategy.

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** The ''Cairo Annals Stone'' from the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt contains the oldest surviving transcript of battlefield tactics and strategy. They are collectively considered to be an almanac and instructional material for the ruling class, as it contains a wealth of information ranging from construction to census and the aforementioned warfare.
17th Jan '17 12:18:52 PM Nargrakhan
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Added DiffLines:

** The ''Cairo Annals Stone'' from the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt contains the oldest surviving transcript of battlefield tactics and strategy.
27th Dec '16 11:28:13 AM morana01
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This doesn't just apply to tropes, many times an idea is created by different people simultaneously or discovered and forgotten only to be rediscovered later. For example, who invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell, you might say. Wrong. Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray both independently invented the telephone, but Bell got to the patent office first. Thomas Edison had the idea of wireless transmission of voice and signals but considered it unimportant, and it was forgotten until Marconi independently invented radio years later. And if this is the situation with something as concret as an invention, imagine how easy it is with something as intangible as an idea for a concept in fiction.

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This doesn't just apply to tropes, many times an idea is created by different people simultaneously or discovered and forgotten only to be rediscovered later. For example, who invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell, you might say. Wrong. Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray both independently invented the telephone, but Bell got to the patent office first. Thomas Edison had the idea of wireless transmission of voice and signals but considered it unimportant, and it was forgotten until Marconi independently invented radio years later. And if this is the situation with something as concret concrete as an invention, imagine how easy it is with something as intangible as an idea for a concept in fiction.
18th Dec '16 12:12:49 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Josie Wahlford is the first pro wrestler recognized as a "World Champion" on record. The exploits of Wrestling/GeorgeHackenschmidt are far better documented and were the model for Wrestling/LouThesz and the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance, making Hackenshmidt the TropeMaker and Thesz the TropeCodifier.[[/folder]]

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* Josie Wahlford is the first pro wrestler recognized as a "World Champion" on record. The exploits of Wrestling/GeorgeHackenschmidt are far better documented and were the model for Wrestling/LouThesz and the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance, making Hackenshmidt the TropeMaker and Thesz the TropeCodifier.TropeCodifier.
* Arena Coliseo was the first arena built exclusively for lucha libre, it's construction funded by [[Wrestling/{{CMLL}} EMLL]], although it has long since been used for boxing events as well. Arena Mexico, which EMLL built later when Lutteroth won the lottery, is what became known as [[FanNickname the citadel of lucha libre]].
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16th Dec '16 12:41:00 PM thelivingtoad
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* The Ur-Example of the shopping mall could be anything, depending on whom you ask some argue that the overall concept dates back to markets in ancient Rome, and many towns had "shopping arcades" in the 19th century, which consisted of enclosed walkways lined with stores. Another early example is Lake View Store in Morgan Park, Minnesota, which had the overall idea of "stores on an enclosed walkway" in 1915. But the first mall that really resembled a modern one, in terms of having an enclosed walkway ending in an anchor store, was Valley Fair in Appleton, Wisconsin in 1955. Many early suburban shopping centers also claim to be the "first mall" (such as Northland Center in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, or Bellevue Square in Bellevue, Washington), but they were open-air and did not become enclosed until later. The first suburban mega-mall that ''was'' enclosed from the get-go was Southdale Center in Edina, Minnesota in 1956.

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* The Ur-Example of the shopping mall could be anything, depending on whom you ask some argue that the overall concept dates back to markets in ancient Rome, and many towns had "shopping arcades" in the 19th century, which consisted of enclosed walkways lined with stores. The one that usually gets the credit as "America's oldest enclosed shopping mall" is the Westminster Arcade in Providence, Rhode Island, which opened in 1828 and is still operational as a mall today (albeit one that's far more modest than the huge Providence Place Mall a half-mile away). Much of its structure is taken up by trendy lofts, but there's still several stores and restaurants on the first floor.
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Another early example is Lake View Store in Morgan Park, Minnesota, which had the overall idea of "stores on an enclosed walkway" in 1915. But the first mall that really resembled a modern one, in terms of having an enclosed walkway ending in an anchor store, was Valley Fair in Appleton, Wisconsin in 1955. Many early suburban shopping centers also claim to be the "first mall" (such as Northland Center in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, or Bellevue Square in Bellevue, Washington), but they were open-air and did not become enclosed until later. The first suburban mega-mall that ''was'' enclosed from the get-go was Southdale Center in Edina, Minnesota in 1956.
15th Dec '16 3:57:47 PM Madrugada
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They all have one. The Ur-Example is the oldest known example of any given trope. "Ur-" is a German prefix meaning "proto-, primitive, or original".

Typically, an Ur-Example doubles as the TropeMaker - but not always, and far less often with [[TheOldestOnesInTheBook ancient tropes]], which often evolved over a long period of time rather than suddenly bursting forth from someone's head, fully formed. When they're distinct, a Trope Maker differs from an Ur-Example in that the latter becomes an example of that trope only in retrospect.

For instance, one of the pivotal Trope Makers of the DetectiveStory is Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's collection of Literature/CAugusteDupin stories; before Dupin, there is no story ''genre'' of fictional detectives going about the business of solving crimes. Nevertheless, while you may or may not know Poe's Dupin stories, you've [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples probably encountered]] a certain Danish Prince named Theater/{{Hamlet}}, who not only sets about to ensnare his uncle [[VillainWithGoodPublicity King Claudius]], but even incorporates into his plans a [[MetaFiction play-within-a-play]] he dubs "[[Creator/AgathaChristie The Mousetrap]]." And half a millennium earlier still, "The Tale of the Three Apples" is a proto-DetectiveStory from [[Literature/ArabianNights The Book of One Thousand and One Nights]] - which makes "The Tale of the Three Apples" the Ur-Example of the DetectiveStory, or at least a possible candidate. However, Theatre/OedipusRex, first performed in 429 B.C., depicts Oedipus investigating the cause of the plague that has struck his realm.

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They all have one.one, but we often don't know what work they're from. The Ur-Example is the oldest known example of any given trope. "Ur-" is a German prefix meaning "proto-, primitive, or original".

Typically, Often, an Ur-Example doubles as the TropeMaker - but not always, and far less often with [[TheOldestOnesInTheBook ancient tropes]], which often evolved over a long period of time rather than suddenly bursting forth from someone's head, fully formed. When they're distinct, a Trope Maker differs from an Ur-Example in that the latter becomes an example of that trope only in retrospect.

For instance, one of the pivotal Trope Makers of the DetectiveStory is Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's collection of Literature/CAugusteDupin stories; before Dupin, there is no story ''genre'' of fictional detectives going about the business of solving crimes. Nevertheless, while you may or may not know Poe's Dupin stories, you've [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples probably encountered]] a certain Danish Prince named Theater/{{Hamlet}}, who not only sets about to ensnare his uncle [[VillainWithGoodPublicity King Claudius]], but even incorporates into his plans a [[MetaFiction play-within-a-play]] he dubs "[[Creator/AgathaChristie The Mousetrap]]." "The Mousetrap". And half a millennium earlier still, "The Tale of the Three Apples" is a proto-DetectiveStory from [[Literature/ArabianNights The Book of One Thousand and One Nights]] - which makes "The Tale of the Three Apples" the Ur-Example of the DetectiveStory, or at least a possible candidate. However, Theatre/OedipusRex, first performed in 429 B.C., depicts Oedipus investigating the cause of the plague that has struck his realm.



This doesn't just apply to tropes, many times an idea is created by different people simultaneously or discovered and forgotten only to be rediscovered later. For example, who invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell, you might say. Wrong. Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray both independently invented the telephone, but Bell got to the patent office first. Thomas Edison had the idea of wireless transmission of voice and signals but considered it unimportant, and it was forgotten until Marconi independently invented radio years later. And if this is the situation with something as complex as an invention, imagine how easy it is with something as simple as an idea for a concept in fiction.

to:

This doesn't just apply to tropes, many times an idea is created by different people simultaneously or discovered and forgotten only to be rediscovered later. For example, who invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell, you might say. Wrong. Alexander Graham Bell and Elisha Gray both independently invented the telephone, but Bell got to the patent office first. Thomas Edison had the idea of wireless transmission of voice and signals but considered it unimportant, and it was forgotten until Marconi independently invented radio years later. And if this is the situation with something as complex concret as an invention, imagine how easy it is with something as simple intangible as an idea for a concept in fiction.



* ''Theatre/TheFrogs'' by the Greek playwright Creator/{{Aristophanes}} may be the Ur-example of the recognition of the existence of {{Dead Horse Trope}}s. The opening scene involves two characters, one telling the other essentially "Go ahead and do whatever bits you want, but please, not [list of things that he considers overdone]".



** Speaking of ''Anime/AstroBoy'', it is generally considered the first true anime.

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** Speaking of ''Anime/AstroBoy'', it * ''Anime/AstroBoy'' is also generally considered the first true anime.
15th Dec '16 3:49:17 PM Madrugada
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9th Dec '16 7:22:32 PM karstovich2
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*** Creator/{{Aristotle}} gave some thoughts to economics in his ''Politics'', too.

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*** Creator/{{Aristotle}} gave some thoughts to economics in his ''Politics'', too.too, but it is much less systematic than the ''Muqaddimah'', and does not quite take the same kind of skeptical approach that characterizes both the ''Muqaddimah'' and modern social science.
9th Dec '16 7:20:15 PM karstovich2
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*** Edward Gibbon's ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_History_of_the_Decline_and_Fall_of_the_Roman_Empire History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire]]'', published in 1776, is the first ''modern'' historical work, and [[TropeCodifier largely codified]] the principles of historical research - most notably, the use of primary sources.

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*** Edward Gibbon's ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_History_of_the_Decline_and_Fall_of_the_Roman_Empire History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire]]'', published in 1776, is the first ''modern'' historical work, and [[TropeCodifier largely codified]] the principles of historical research - most notably, the use of reliance on and preference for primary sources.sources, combined with the rigor of Thucydides' logical methodology.
3rd Dec '16 1:34:53 PM TSims
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* The ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' Series gave us power armor and space marines.

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* The ''Literature/{{Lensman}}'' Series gave us power armor and space marines. Basically the first MilitaryScienceFiction.
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