History Main / TwoPartTrilogy

24th Sep '17 6:04:45 PM nombretomado
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* The ''CompleteWorldKnowledge'' trilogy. Only the first two volumes are out so far, but it looks like all three will share an equal degree of cohesion.

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* The ''CompleteWorldKnowledge'' ''Literature/CompleteWorldKnowledge'' trilogy. Only the first two volumes are out so far, but it looks like all three will share an equal degree of cohesion.
21st Sep '17 4:25:31 AM CombativeBoil
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* The ''Franchise/MuvLuv'' series of visual novels. The first installment, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvExtra'' is a self-contained romance visual novel that differs sharply from its sequels in both tone and plot, even though it serves as an important OriginsEpisode for the major characters of the trilogy. ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvUnlimited'' is the visual novel that actually introduces the post-apocalyptic alien invasion arc the series is best known for, and it deliberately ends on a bleak note so that the key plot threads and motivations of the finale, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'', are properly set up. This also applies in a meta sense; while ''Extra'' and ''Unlimited'' were released as a combined title simply called ''Muv-Luv'', ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'' was released and sold separately due to production issues.

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* The ''Franchise/MuvLuv'' series of visual novels. The first installment, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvExtra'' is a self-contained romance visual novel that differs sharply from its sequels in both tone and plot, even though it serves as an important OriginsEpisode for the major characters of the trilogy. ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvUnlimited'' is the visual novel that actually introduces the post-apocalyptic "post-apocalyptic alien invasion in a parallel universe" arc the series is best known for, and it deliberately ends on a bleak note so that the key plot threads and motivations of the finale, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'', are properly set up. This also applies in a meta sense; while ''Extra'' and ''Unlimited'' were released as a combined title simply called ''Muv-Luv'', ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'' was released and sold separately due to production issues.
19th Sep '17 4:28:28 PM CombativeBoil
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''Franchise/MuvLuv'' series of visual novels. The first installment, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvExtra'' is a self-contained romance visual novel that differs sharply from its sequels in both tone and plot, even though it serves as an important OriginsEpisode for the major characters of the trilogy. ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvUnlimited'' is the visual novel that actually introduces the post-apocalyptic alien invasion arc the series is best known for, and it deliberately ends on a bleak note so that the key plot threads and motivations of the finale, ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'', are properly set up. This also applies in a meta sense; while ''Extra'' and ''Unlimited'' were released as a combined title simply called ''Muv-Luv'', ''VisualNovel/MuvLuvAlternative'' was released and sold separately due to production issues.
6th Sep '17 7:31:46 PM case
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'', while having a rather confusing plot, was for all intent and purposes a standalone game, and ended with a pretty neat closure. The game's fast sale and exceedingly positive review prompted Creator/SquareEnix to launch ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'', which ended with [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the world approaching apocalypse]], and a ToBeContinued announcement. The game was followed up by ''VideoGame/LightningReturnsFinalFantasyXIII'', which finally ends the story.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'', while having a rather confusing plot, was for all intent intents and purposes a standalone game, and ended with a pretty neat closure. The game's fast sale and exceedingly positive review reviews and commercial success prompted Creator/SquareEnix to launch ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII2'', which ended with [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the world approaching apocalypse]], and a ToBeContinued announcement. The game was followed up by ''VideoGame/LightningReturnsFinalFantasyXIII'', which finally ends the story.
28th Aug '17 11:29:41 AM OriCat
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* In ''The Literature/WindOnFire'' trilogy, the first book is self-contained and deals with the recovery of the voice, while the second two are more closely tied and deal with the exodus from Aramanth and search for the Homeland.
18th Aug '17 6:27:19 AM nighttrainfm
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* In ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'' series, the [[Film/SawI first movie]] works pretty well as a stand-alone film, but the next two were pretty obviously made to be tied together. Of course, the [[Film/SawIII third movie]] was supposed to wrap everything up. The seventh film, ''Film/Saw3D'', was released in 2010 and finally concluded the series.

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* In ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'' series, the [[Film/SawI first movie]] works pretty well as a stand-alone film, but the next two were pretty obviously made to be tied together. Of course, the [[Film/SawIII third movie]] was supposed to wrap everything up. The seventh film, ''Film/Saw3D'', was released in 2010 and finally concluded the series.series...until 2017, [[Film/{{Jigsaw}}, anyway.]]
29th Jul '17 12:54:21 PM Drgonzo
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* The ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' film trilogy. ''None'' of the three films really stand alone at all; they were all approached with the assurance that all three would be successful, and all were filmed within the same time period. In other words, all three films had the characteristics of the "second part" of a Two-Part Trilogy. It was a big gamble, especially for such expensive films, which of course is why this trope happens more often than not. It helps that the movies were based on a single {{doorstopper}} novel split into three volumes at publishing time; the trilogy was pre-existent, so it was easier to tailor the movies around a three-part structure. Tolkien was ''not'' happy that the publishers made him [[DividedForPublication divide it for publication]]. In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir.

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* The ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' film trilogy. ''None'' of the three films really stand alone at all; they were all approached with the assurance that all three would be successful, and all were filmed within the same time period. In other words, all three films had the characteristics of the "second part" of a Two-Part Trilogy. It was a big gamble, especially for such expensive films, which of course is why this trope happens more often than not. It helps that the movies were based on a single {{doorstopper}} novel split into three volumes at publishing time; the trilogy was pre-existent, so it was easier to tailor the movies around a three-part structure. Tolkien was ''not'' happy that the publishers made him [[DividedForPublication divide it for publication]]. In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir. Now, ''here's where the story gets interesting:'' When the films were orignally pitched, Peter Jackson was only asking for a TWO picture deal, [[ExecutiveMeddling but it was the studio executive]] who gave the greenlight who required the films be a trilogy. And the rest is history.
18th Jun '17 8:49:32 PM StarryEyed
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* ''The False Prince'', the first book of The''Literature/AscendanceTrilogy'' is basically a stand-alone story with a SequelHook tagged on to the very end. While there is some foreshadowing of future conflicts, and a few things are left uncertain, almost all of the conflicts and questions are resolved to a degree that if a few paragraphs were taken out of the last five pages, readers might not even expect a sequel. ''The Runaway King'' introduces a looming war with another country, several characters, and establishes new relationship dynamics between several characters, which all continue on into ''The Shadow Throne.'' ''The Runaway King'' also ends with a massive cliffhanger which directly plays into the beginning of ''The Shadow Throne,'' although several months lapse between them.
30th May '17 9:21:34 AM MyFinalEdits
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* An interesting comparison between the kinds of trilogy is the ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogies; in the original trilogy, ''Film/ANewHope'' is clearly made as a movie that can stand by itself (although the narrative is open to the possibilities of later movies), whereas ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' and ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' - greenlit after the success of the first - are more closely linked together and separated by a sequel hook (in fact in the original theatrical release of ''A New Hope'', neither the subtitle "A New Hope" nor the "Episode IV" designation were a part of the opening crawl, they were only added to later releases following the next two episodes). In the prequel trilogy, it was obvious to all that all three movies were going to be made, so all are incorporated together more tightly as a trilogy, but even still, ''[[Film/ThePhantomMenace Episode I]]'' could be a stand-alone movie, ending on a happy note, while ''[[Film/AttackOfTheClones Episode II]]'' and ''[[Film/RevengeOfTheSith III]]'' are more tightly linked through a cliffhanger ending in ''II'' (the Clone Wars begin).

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* An interesting comparison between the kinds of trilogy is the ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogies; in the original trilogy, ''Film/ANewHope'' is clearly made as a movie that can stand by itself (although the narrative is open to the possibilities of later movies), whereas ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' and ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' - greenlit after the success of the first - are more closely linked together and separated by a sequel hook (in fact in the original theatrical release of ''A New Hope'', neither the subtitle "A New Hope" nor the "Episode IV" designation were a part of the opening crawl, they were only added to later releases following the next two episodes). In the prequel trilogy, it was obvious to all that all three movies were going to be made, so all are incorporated together more tightly as a trilogy, but even still, ''[[Film/ThePhantomMenace Episode I]]'' could be a stand-alone movie, ending on a happy note, note and also being chronologically much older than all other movies (Anakin Skywalker is a child), while ''[[Film/AttackOfTheClones Episode II]]'' and ''[[Film/RevengeOfTheSith III]]'' are more tightly linked through a cliffhanger ending in ''II'' (the Clone Wars begin).
30th May '17 7:37:22 AM Sapphirea2
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** Series 4 does something similar with its final three episodes -- "Turn Left" has a standalone plot and is a separate story officially, but leads directly into "The Stolen Earth" which is a two-part story with "Journey's End". The series of specials that follows this also does such -- after two standalone stories with no real connection to the MythArc (barring some ArcWords), "The Waters of Mars" functions as a standalone story that sets up the two-part GrandFinale of the Tenth Doctor's run, titled "The End of Time".
** Series 9: "Face the Raven" was written as a standalone story -- and is often listed as such -- but it becomes the opening salvo of a three-part finale in the final 10 minutes, which see the Doctor captured and handed over to a mysterious enemy and Clara, his beloved companion, [[spoiler: Killed Off for Real]]. "Heaven Sent" and "Hell Bent" follow the Doctor's resultant ProtagonistJourneyToVillain as he is DrivenToMadness, escapes the prison, [[spoiler: returns to Gallifrey]], punishes his enemy, and [[spoiler: tries to bring Clara back from the grave]], ending with his return to the side of right. The ChristmasEpisode that follows, "The Husbands of River Song", aired less than three weeks later and serves as a coda to the finale, as its denouement hinges on the personal growth the Doctor experiences in "Hell Bent".
** Series 10: The mid-season "Monks Trilogy" starts with "Extremis", a TwoLinesNoWaiting / MeanwhileInTheFuture episode. One plot is set in the past, as the nature of the mysterious Vault the Doctor has been guarding is revealed, and the second in ThePresentDay as he learns of an impending AlienInvasion of Earth via [[spoiler: his equivalent in a computer simulation said aliens have set up]]. It can work as a standalone story: An exploration of what exactly makes the Doctor the Doctor via his actions in two very different circumstances. But it also introduces him and the audience to the villains of "The Pyramid at the End of the World" and "The Lie of the Land", which chronicle their invasion and its undoing and are connected by a conventional {{Cliffhanger}}.

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** Series 4 does something similar with its final three episodes -- "Turn Left" has a standalone plot and is a separate story officially, officially but leads directly into "The Stolen Earth" Earth", which is a two-part story with "Journey's End". End".
**
The series of specials that follows followed this also does such -- after two standalone stories with no real connection to the MythArc (barring some ArcWords), "The Waters of Mars" functions as a standalone story that sets up the two-part GrandFinale of the Tenth Doctor's run, titled "The End of Time".
** Series 9: "Face the Raven" was written as a standalone story -- and is often listed as such -- but it becomes the opening salvo of a three-part finale in the final 10 minutes, which see the Doctor captured and handed over to a mysterious enemy and Clara, his beloved companion, [[spoiler: Killed Off for Real]]. "Heaven Sent" and "Hell Bent" follow the Doctor's resultant ProtagonistJourneyToVillain as he is DrivenToMadness, escapes the prison, [[spoiler: returns to Gallifrey]], punishes his enemy, and [[spoiler: tries to bring Clara back from the grave]], ending with his return to the side of right. The ChristmasEpisode that follows, "The Husbands of River Song", aired less than three weeks later and serves as a coda to the finale, as its denouement hinges on the personal growth the Doctor experiences in "Hell Bent".
** Series 10: The mid-season "Monks Trilogy" starts with "Extremis", a TwoLinesNoWaiting / MeanwhileInTheFuture episode. One plot is set in the past, as the nature of the mysterious Vault the Doctor has been guarding is revealed, and the second in ThePresentDay as he learns of an impending AlienInvasion of Earth via [[spoiler: his equivalent in a computer simulation said aliens have set up]]. It can work as a standalone story: An exploration of story that explores what exactly makes the Doctor the Doctor via his actions in two very different circumstances. Doctor. But it also introduces him and the audience to the villains of leads directly into "The Pyramid at the End of the World" and "The Lie of the Land", which chronicle their said invasion and its undoing and are connected by a conventional {{Cliffhanger}}.
This list shows the last 10 events of 450. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwoPartTrilogy