History Main / TwoPartTrilogy

14th Jan '18 4:11:33 AM RedScharlach
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* ''Literature/TheSagaOfDarrenShan'' is a twelve-part saga divided into four trilogies which form their own story-arcs. ''Vampire Blood'' is about Darren becoming a half-vampire, coming to terms with his transformation and encountering a member of the vampire offshoot, the vampaneze. ''Vampire Rites'' is about Darren traveling to the home of the vampire clan and trying to gain acceptance by them, while uncovering a conspiracy to destroy the clan. ''Vampire War'' is the hunt for the Vampaneze Lord, whose death can end the war between the two clans. ''Vampire Destiny'' is about Darren learning disturbing revelations about the implications of the war, while it comes to its conclusion. Strangely, ''Vampire War'' and ''Vampire Destiny'' form their ''own'' Two-Part Trilogy, as the last two books of each form a complete storyline in contrast to the first, which are more establishing the change in the story after the TimeSkip from the halfway point (in the case of ''War'') and briding the Grand Finale with the WhamEpisode that ended ''War'' (in the case of ''Destiny'').

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* ''Literature/TheSagaOfDarrenShan'' is a twelve-part saga divided into four trilogies which form their own story-arcs. ''Vampire Blood'' is about Darren becoming a half-vampire, coming to terms with his transformation and encountering a member of the vampire offshoot, the vampaneze. ''Vampire Rites'' is about Darren traveling to the home of the vampire clan and trying to gain acceptance by them, while uncovering a conspiracy to destroy the clan. ''Vampire War'' is the hunt for the Vampaneze Lord, whose death can end the war between the two clans. ''Vampire Destiny'' is about Darren learning disturbing revelations about the implications of the war, while it comes to its conclusion. Strangely, ''Vampire War'' and ''Vampire Destiny'' form their ''own'' Two-Part Trilogy, as the last two books of each form a complete storyline in contrast to the first, which are more establishing the change in the story after the TimeSkip from the halfway point (in the case of ''War'') and briding building to the Grand Finale with the WhamEpisode that ended ''War'' (in the case of ''Destiny'').



* The ''Land of Elyon'' series is two examples in one. The first book can stand on its own, and the first three can stand on their own, but not the first two or first four, making the first three a two-part trilogy and the whole series a three-part pentology.

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* The ''Land of Elyon'' series is two examples in one. The first book can stand on its own, and the first three can stand on their own, but not the first two or first four, making the first three a two-part trilogy and the whole series a three-part pentology.pentalogy.



* The first book of the ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' series was written as a standalone story without much of a SequelHook, but it became so popular that ''ten sequels'' (and counting) were produced. The sequels are literally intertwined: most contain several different story arcs [[AnachronicOrder occuring some random amount of time]] after the events of the first book, which has become more like a giant prologue and character introduction than an actual installment. The fourth book lampshades its own giant prologue, probably partly as a reference to the first book's transformation.

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* The first book of the ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' series was written as a standalone story without much of a SequelHook, but it became so popular that ''ten sequels'' (and counting) were produced. The sequels are literally intertwined: most contain several different story arcs [[AnachronicOrder occuring occurring some random amount of time]] after the events of the first book, which has become more like a giant prologue and character introduction than an actual installment. The fourth book lampshades its own giant prologue, probably partly as a reference to the first book's transformation.



* The ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' series is an interesting variation on this trope, in which the standalone piece comes ''last'' rather than first. The first ''Golden Sun'' and its sequel, ''Golden Sun: The Lost Age'', were originally intended to be one game, but [[OneGameForThePriceOfTwo had to be seperated due to the space limitations]] on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance. The Two-Part Trilogy is rounded out with ''VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn'' (for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS). This was not however the intended plan - ''Dark Dawn'' sets up its own plot rather than being part of a trilogy with the first two games (the final scene ended on a cliffhanger), but a continuation has yet been announced.

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* The ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' series is an interesting variation on this trope, in which the standalone piece comes ''last'' rather than first. The first ''Golden Sun'' and its sequel, ''Golden Sun: The Lost Age'', were originally intended to be one game, but [[OneGameForThePriceOfTwo had to be seperated separated due to the space limitations]] on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance. The Two-Part Trilogy is rounded out with ''VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn'' (for the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS). This was not however the intended plan - ''Dark Dawn'' sets up its own plot rather than being part of a trilogy with the first two games (the final scene ended on a cliffhanger), but a continuation has yet been announced.



* The classic [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Genesis]] [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]] trilogy is probably the earliest video game example. While [[Videogame/SonicTheHedgehog1 Sonic 1]] is pretty much self-contained, [[Videogame/SonicTheHedgehog2 Sonic 2]] and Videogame/Sonic3AndKnuckles are directly linked to each other, with the latter being a direct sequel that chronicles the immediate consequences of the events that took place in the former, to the point that the two entries are collectively referred to as "the Death Egg saga" by fans. What makes this an especially interesting case is the fact that Sonic 3 & Knuckles was actually split into two games due to time constraints, yet it's possible to combine them into one thanks the second part's unique feature that allows it to become an expansion pack. So you could also call it a two-part tetralogy, or even ''a three-part tetralogy''.

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* The classic [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Genesis]] [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]] trilogy is probably the earliest video game example. While [[Videogame/SonicTheHedgehog1 Sonic 1]] is pretty much self-contained, [[Videogame/SonicTheHedgehog2 Sonic 2]] and Videogame/Sonic3AndKnuckles are directly linked to each other, with the latter being a direct sequel that chronicles the immediate consequences of the events that took place in the former, to the point that the two entries are collectively referred to as "the Death Egg saga" by fans. What makes this an especially interesting case is the fact that Sonic 3 & Knuckles was actually split into two games due to time constraints, yet it's possible to combine them into one one, thanks to the second part's unique feature that allows it to become an expansion pack. So you could also call it a two-part tetralogy, or even ''a three-part tetralogy''.
13th Jan '18 8:09:41 PM thunderchild120
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** The Sequel Trilogy, in contrast, appears to either avert or invert this, as ''Film/TheLastJedi'' picks up almost immediately where ''Film/TheForceAwakens'' left off. It remains to be seen how tightly connected Episode IX will be, meaning this trope could either be Averted (all three entries tightly linked) or Inverted (third entry separate from the first two).
13th Jan '18 8:09:16 PM thunderchild120
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Added DiffLines:

** The Sequel Trilogy, in contrast, appears to either avert or invert this, as ''Film/TheLastJedi'' picks up almost immediately where ''Film/TheForceAwakens'' left off. It remains to be seen how tightly connected Episode IX will be, meaning this trope could either be Averted (all three entries tightly linked) or Inverted (third entry separate from the first two).
4th Jan '18 4:19:54 PM WaxingName
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* Zig-Zagged and justified with ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''. The only real "trilogy" in the series; but it wasn't even ''intended'' as one - What's referred to as "Fire Emblem 2" is in fact ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'', a GaidenGame.

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* Zig-Zagged and justified with ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''. ''VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight'' and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem Mystery of the Emblem]]''. The only real "trilogy" in the series; but it wasn't even ''intended'' as one - What's referred to as "Fire Emblem 2" is in fact ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'', a GaidenGame.GaidenGame which features only a smattering of characters from the former two.
27th Dec '17 4:09:35 PM nighttrainfm
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** In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir. Now, ''here's where the story gets interesting:'' When the films were orignally pitched, Peter Jackson was only asking for a TWO picture deal, [[ExecutiveMeddling but it was the studio executive]] who gave the greenlight who required the films be a trilogy. And the rest is history.

to:

** In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir. Faramir.
**
Now, ''here's where the story gets interesting:'' When the films were orignally pitched, Peter Jackson was only asking for a TWO picture deal, [[ExecutiveMeddling but it was the studio executive]] who gave the greenlight who required the films be a trilogy. And the rest is history.
27th Dec '17 4:09:10 PM nighttrainfm
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* The ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' film trilogy. ''None'' of the three films really stand alone at all; they were all approached with the assurance that all three would be successful, and all were filmed within the same time period. In other words, all three films had the characteristics of the "second part" of a Two-Part Trilogy. It was a big gamble, especially for such expensive films, which of course is why this trope happens more often than not. It helps that the movies were based on a single {{doorstopper}} novel split into three volumes at publishing time; the trilogy was pre-existent, so it was easier to tailor the movies around a three-part structure. Tolkien was ''not'' happy that the publishers made him [[DividedForPublication divide it for publication]]. In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir. Now, ''here's where the story gets interesting:'' When the films were orignally pitched, Peter Jackson was only asking for a TWO picture deal, [[ExecutiveMeddling but it was the studio executive]] who gave the greenlight who required the films be a trilogy. And the rest is history.

to:

* The ''Film/LordOfTheRings'' film trilogy. trilogy:
**
''None'' of the three films really stand alone at all; they were all approached with the assurance that all three would be successful, and all were filmed within the same time period. In other words, all three films had the characteristics of the "second part" of a Two-Part Trilogy. It was a big gamble, especially for such expensive films, which of course is why this trope happens more often than not. It helps that the movies were based on a single {{doorstopper}} novel split into three volumes at publishing time; the trilogy was pre-existent, so it was easier to tailor the movies around a three-part structure. Tolkien was ''not'' happy that the publishers made him [[DividedForPublication divide it for publication]]. publication]].
**
In adapting the story to film, both part one and part two end in different spots in the story than their respective books, as the films were designed from the beginning as a story in three parts and needed more appropriate spots to end the first two parts. ''The Fellowship of the Ring'' ends only about a chapter later than the book ([[spoiler:Boromir's death]] is the first chapter of the second book). ''The Two Towers'' has a bigger gap in the endings, for a combination of two reasons. First, rather than split the tale into Frodo and Sam/Everyone Else portions like the book, the movies show everything chronologically, and the ending of the second book (Shelob and [[spoiler:Frodo's capture]]) doesn't happen until the siege of Minas Tirith has begun. Second, after Helm's Deep, anything else was going to be an anticlimax. Instead, Frodo and Sam spend an extended amount of time with Faramir. Now, ''here's where the story gets interesting:'' When the films were orignally pitched, Peter Jackson was only asking for a TWO picture deal, [[ExecutiveMeddling but it was the studio executive]] who gave the greenlight who required the films be a trilogy. And the rest is history.
18th Dec '17 4:15:38 PM Isaac_Heller
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' has a mostly self-contained plot in Book 1, which was originally going to be the entirety of the series, but Books 2, 3 and 4 form a two-part trilogy, with the events of Book 2 being more standalone but creating the situation for the more inter-linked Books 3 and 4, which focus on the conflict against the Red Lotus Society in a changing world.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' has a mostly self-contained plot in Book 1, which was originally going to be the entirety of the series, but Books 2, 3 and 4 form a two-part trilogy, with the events of Book 2 being more standalone but creating the situation for the more inter-linked Books 3 and 4, which focus on the conflict against the Red Lotus Society and the fascist regime they inadvertently cause, set in a changing world.world that possibly may not need the Avatar anymore.
23rd Oct '17 5:55:54 PM DPsycho
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* ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' and ''VideoGame/Dishonored2'' has an unusual example. The first game's central arc of Corvo Attano's loss of his good name, his quest to clear his name and rescue Emily Kaldwin from conspirators is a fairly self-contained story. However the 2-Part DLC for the first Dishonored game and the sequel ''Dishonored 2'' introduces in detail the new arc: the Rise of Delilah Copperspoon as a would-be EvilOverlord who seeks to claim the throne of Dunwall and usurp Emily Kaldwin, she was thwarted in the DLC but the entirety of the sequel deals with her return, her origins and elevates her to big bad.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' and ''VideoGame/Dishonored2'' has an unusual example. The first game's central arc of Corvo Attano's loss of his good name, his quest to clear his name and rescue Emily Kaldwin from conspirators is a fairly self-contained story. However the 2-Part DLC for the first Dishonored game and the sequel ''Dishonored 2'' introduces in detail the new arc: the Rise of Delilah Copperspoon as a would-be EvilOverlord who seeks to claim the throne of Dunwall and usurp Emily Kaldwin, she was thwarted in the DLC but the entirety of the sequel deals with her return, return and her origins origins, and it elevates her to big bad.
23rd Oct '17 5:50:23 PM DPsycho
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* The ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' series was developed with each installment standing on its own. You are introduced to the basic premise via a voice-over (which is basically a long-standing war between two factions) and then the characters show up and introduce themselves. The first game is about a critical mission that puts you directly in the middle of the conflict with a SequelHook at the end. The second game builds upon things that were brought up in the first game but otherwise tells it's own self-contained story. The third game wanted to avoid locking people out of the story so it will also be self-contained, focusing on telling a story rather than simply resolving questions.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' series was developed with each installment standing on its own. You are introduced to the basic premise via a voice-over (which is basically a long-standing war between two factions) and then the characters show up and introduce themselves. The first game is about a critical mission that puts you directly in the middle of the conflict with a SequelHook at the end. The second game builds upon things that were brought up in the first game but otherwise tells it's its own self-contained story. The third game wanted to avoid locking people out of the story so it will also be self-contained, focusing on telling a story rather than simply resolving questions.
23rd Oct '17 11:20:03 AM DPsycho
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* ''Literature/TheGoblinWood'' as a result of [[TrilogyCreep having only meant to be one book]] has a bit of this going on. The first story is about a game or cat and mouse of sorts between Makenna and Tobin, with an underlying message that no one is wholly evil, and that empathy for the opposition can help you reach a solution that benefits everyone. When a few lose ends were picked up to make the story into a trilogy, it gained a plot about overthrowing a conspiracy ''while'' defeating an army, and the message vanished.

to:

* ''Literature/TheGoblinWood'' as a result of [[TrilogyCreep having only meant to be one book]] has a bit of this going on. The first story is about a game or of cat and mouse of sorts between Makenna and Tobin, with an underlying message that no one is wholly evil, and that empathy for the opposition can help you reach a solution that benefits everyone. When a few lose ends were picked up to make the story into a trilogy, it gained a plot about overthrowing a conspiracy ''while'' defeating an army, and the message vanished.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwoPartTrilogy