History Main / TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture

8th Sep '17 2:53:57 PM TheNicestGuy
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** With the ''Deep Space Nine'' example, the two-parter "Past Tense", the staff were creeped out to find that they'd actually foreseen a situation that hit reality much earlier than they predicted. In the show, San Francisco in 2024 has concentrated its homeless population into walled "Sanctuary Districts". In real life, the mayor of Los Angeles proposed something eerily similar to clean up the downtown area. The proposal was announced ''while the episode was filming''.
5th Sep '17 5:23:36 PM Peteman
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* ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon'' (released in 2013) parodies this trope hard. "The year is 2007. It is the future."

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* ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon'' (released in 2013) parodies this trope hard.trope. "The year is 2007. It is the future."
31st Aug '17 11:58:36 AM HalcyonDayz
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* The English dub to the 1960s anime ''Anime/{{Gigantor}}'' has it set in the year 2000. The original Japanese version is set shortly after World War 2. This was probably made to justify the giant robot, however the fashion and technology levels (such as the TVs) makes it look like a RetroUniverse. The 2004 remake keeps it set in its original time period.

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* The English dub to the 1960s anime ''Anime/{{Gigantor}}'' has it set in the year 2000. The original Japanese version is set shortly after World War 2. This was probably made to justify the giant robot, however the fashion and technology levels (such as the TVs) [=TVs=]) makes it look like a RetroUniverse. The 2004 remake keeps it set in its original time period.
17th Aug '17 12:03:22 PM RedScharlach
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TheFuture, but not so far into it that you'd notice except for the abundance of AppliedPhlebotinum. This is often a linear extrapolation of national malaise or existing crises, so American works of the 1970s have endlessly skyrocketing crime and inner urban decay [[note]] true enough in places like Detroit, Michigan [[/note]] whereas the 1980s brought the notion that {{Mega Corp}}s and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan]] (especially [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Japanese megacorps]]) would rule the world (yes on the first count, no on the second). When the 1990s came around, the US economy recovered while the Japanese economy tanked; TheGreatPoliticsMessUp and subsequent collapse of many authoritarian communist regimes drastically changed the political picture of both the present and the future. Instead of criminal anarchy or corporate governance, there's a lot more focus on how technology has come to permeate everyday life and challenge long-held conceptions of the individual and society as a whole. And, of course, works in the '90s naturally assumed that from that point on the only murderous enemies Americans would have to worry about would be right-wing militia fanatics, [[TeensAreMonsters homicidal teenagers]], and maybe the occasional petty dictator - [[HarsherInHindsight but no one else]]. With the Turn of the Milennium and the New Tens, the issue seems to have become extreme Right-Wing dystopias and/or endless American Interventionalism in the Middle East and Central Asia, occasionally spreading into South America, Africa, or Southeast Asia.

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TheFuture, but not so far into it that you'd notice except for the abundance of AppliedPhlebotinum. This is often a linear extrapolation of national malaise or existing crises, so American works of the 1970s have endlessly skyrocketing crime and inner urban decay [[note]] true enough in places like Detroit, Michigan [[/note]] whereas the 1980s brought the notion that {{Mega Corp}}s and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan]] (especially [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Japanese megacorps]]) would rule the world (yes on the first count, no on the second). When the 1990s came around, the US economy recovered while the Japanese economy tanked; TheGreatPoliticsMessUp and subsequent collapse of many authoritarian communist regimes drastically changed the political picture of both the present and the future. Instead of criminal anarchy or corporate governance, there's a lot more focus on how technology has come to permeate everyday life and challenge long-held conceptions of the individual and society as a whole. And, of course, works in the '90s naturally assumed that from that point on the only murderous enemies Americans would have to worry about would be right-wing militia fanatics, [[TeensAreMonsters homicidal teenagers]], and maybe the occasional petty dictator - [[HarsherInHindsight but no one else]]. With the Turn of the Milennium Millennium and the New Tens, the issue seems to have become extreme Right-Wing dystopias and/or endless American Interventionalism in the Middle East and Central Asia, occasionally spreading into South America, Africa, or Southeast Asia.



* The now famous "1984" ad from Apple to promote their new Macintosh during the SuperBowl of, you guessed it, 1984. The ad depicts what would happen to the world had the Macintosh not be made in time and then IBM being displayed as a Big Brother expy on a giant television screen.

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* The now famous "1984" ad from Apple to promote their new Macintosh during the SuperBowl of, you guessed it, 1984. The ad depicts what would happen to the world had the Macintosh not be been made in time and then IBM being displayed as a Big Brother expy on a giant television screen.



** The original series, first aired on Japanese television in 1995-96, is explicitly set in the year 2015, with a BackStory involving an apocalyptic cataclysm in the year 2000. Despite having artificially intelligent computers, giant biomechs, and the ability to sequence a genome stored in particle wave matter in seconds, the Japanese governments' nuclear-powered giant robot runs MS-DOS, and the wifi-enabled laptops in schools (despite doing wireframe 3D modeling) [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture can only draw dialogue boxes using ASCII art]]. Shinji uses an "SDAT" personal stereo, a fictional product in similar vein to the Digital Compact Cassette (a format that launched straight into obscurity in 1992) -- in other words, a cassette player. Could be explained as the result of Second Impact stalling technological advance in all fields except those relating to the threat at hand.

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** The original series, first aired on Japanese television in 1995-96, is explicitly set in the year 2015, with a BackStory involving an apocalyptic cataclysm in the year 2000. Despite having artificially intelligent computers, giant biomechs, and the ability to sequence a genome stored in particle wave matter in seconds, the Japanese governments' government's nuclear-powered giant robot runs MS-DOS, and the wifi-enabled laptops in schools (despite doing wireframe 3D modeling) [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture can only draw dialogue boxes using ASCII art]]. Shinji uses an "SDAT" personal stereo, a fictional product in similar vein to the Digital Compact Cassette (a format that launched straight into obscurity in 1992) -- in other words, a cassette player. Could be explained as the result of Second Impact stalling technological advance advances in all fields except those relating to the threat at hand.



** In the ending of the manga adaptation (which finished in 2013), [[spoiler:a CosmicRetcon resets the timeline so that said apocalyptic event never occurred. The brief glimpses we see of the ''new'' 2015 are much more in line with present day fashion and technology]].

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** In the ending of the manga adaptation (which finished in 2013), [[spoiler:a CosmicRetcon resets the timeline so that said apocalyptic event never occurred. The brief glimpses we see of the ''new'' 2015 are much more in line with present day present-day fashion and technology]].



* ''Manga/DeadmanWonderland'' is set sometime in the 2020s. Considering that most of the series is set in a prison, we don't get to see too much of the outside world. They do seem to have holographic projectors and some advanced robotics, but that is about it in terms of new technology. Tokyo is seemingly recovering from a massive earthquake that occurred ten years previous, so it is a little {{crap|sackWorld}}py but, from what little we see of the world, it is not too much different from to today.

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* ''Manga/DeadmanWonderland'' is set sometime in the 2020s. Considering that most of the series is set in a prison, we don't get to see too much of the outside world. They do seem to have holographic projectors and some advanced robotics, but that is that's about it in terms of new technology. Tokyo is seemingly recovering from a massive earthquake that occurred ten years previous, earlier, so it is a little {{crap|sackWorld}}py but, from what little we see of the world, it is not too much different from to than today.



* ''Code E'' is set in 2017, although the only immediately recognizable difference from the actual modern day are computerized blackboards in the classrooms and computerized billboards and ads on buses. These both exist, but aren't as widespread as in the series. There are also these big-ass 20 TB memory card they're sellin in the school mensa.

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* ''Code E'' is set in 2017, although the only immediately recognizable difference from the actual modern day are computerized blackboards in the classrooms and computerized billboards and ads on buses. These both exist, but aren't as widespread as in the series. There are also these the big-ass 20 TB memory card cards they're sellin selling in the school mensa.



* The hardly known 1982 anime film ''Anime/FutureWar198X''; The title says it all. At the time this film was made, it was assumed that whatever might happen to ignite a third world war would happen sometime in that decade. Given the political climate at the time, there was excellent reason to believe that the 1980s would be the "make it or break it" decade as far as U.S./Soviet relations were concerned.

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* The hardly known little-known 1982 anime film ''Anime/FutureWar198X''; The title says it all. At the time this film was made, it was assumed that whatever might happen to ignite a third world war would happen sometime in that decade. Given the political climate at the time, there was excellent reason to believe that the 1980s would be the "make it or break it" decade as far as U.S./Soviet relations were concerned.



* The English dub to the 1960s anime ''Anime/{{Gigantor}}'' has it set in the year 2000. The original Japanese version is set shortly after World War 2. This was probably made to justify the giant robot, however the fashion and technology levels (such as the tvs) makes it look like a RetroUniverse. The 2004 remake keeps it set in its original time period.

to:

* The English dub to the 1960s anime ''Anime/{{Gigantor}}'' has it set in the year 2000. The original Japanese version is set shortly after World War 2. This was probably made to justify the giant robot, however the fashion and technology levels (such as the tvs) TVs) makes it look like a RetroUniverse. The 2004 remake keeps it set in its original time period.



* ''Comicbook/KingdomCome'' takes place an indeterminate amount of time in the future of the DC Universe. This is noticeable less through advanced technology (since there was already plenty of that) and more through older characters.

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* ''Comicbook/KingdomCome'' takes place an indeterminate amount of time in the future of the DC Universe. This is noticeable less through advanced technology (since there was already plenty of that) and more through older the aging of characters.



* The ''Comicbook/XMen'' story "ComicBook/DaysOfFuturePast", released in 1981 depicted a dystopian future in 2013.

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* The ''Comicbook/XMen'' story "ComicBook/DaysOfFuturePast", released in 1981 1981, depicted a dystopian future in 2013.



* ''Film/XMen1'' is set in "the not-too-distant future", with its [[Film/X2XMenUnited two]] [[Film/XMenTheLastStand sequels]] following after that. Its prequel, ''[[Film/XMenOriginsWolverine Wolverine]]'', is set about 20 years earlier (since Scott Summers is a teenager), setting it sometime between TheSixties and TheEighties. The climactic scene, set at [[spoiler: Three Mile Island]], would seem to imply it's set in 1979, if [[spoiler:Deadpool slicing one of the cooling towers to pieces with his eye-beams]] is assumed to be analogous to the real-world event that occurred in that year.

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* ''Film/XMen1'' is set in "the not-too-distant future", with its [[Film/X2XMenUnited two]] [[Film/XMenTheLastStand sequels]] following after that. Its prequel, ''[[Film/XMenOriginsWolverine Wolverine]]'', is set about 20 years earlier (since Scott Summers is a teenager), setting placing it sometime between TheSixties and TheEighties. The climactic scene, set at [[spoiler: Three Mile Island]], would seem to imply it's set in 1979, if [[spoiler:Deadpool slicing one of the cooling towers to pieces with his eye-beams]] is assumed to be analogous to the real-world event that occurred in that year.



* ''Film/GIJoeTheRiseOfCobra'' is set roughly ten years in the future, and while styles in clothing and automobiles seem more or less unchanged from the present, exotic (but semi-plausible) technologies like powered armour, energy weapons, active camouflage and metal-eating nanites are out in full force. Since the film is believed to be in a SharedUniverse with the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' series, one can assume that this futuristic technology was reverse engineered from Cybertronian technology. The fact that G.I. Joe is in the "near future" could be taken to mean that the Autobot-Decepticon conflict is already over, or at least no longer set on Earth. It could also be taken to mean that the Autobots have either taken it upon themselves or at least helped to repair the damage done to the pyramids in Giza by Devastator ''Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen'', during the ten years between both movies, as "Revenge of the Fallen" is set in 2009.

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* ''Film/GIJoeTheRiseOfCobra'' is set roughly ten years in the future, and while styles in clothing and automobiles seem more or less unchanged from the present, exotic (but semi-plausible) technologies like powered armour, energy weapons, active camouflage and metal-eating nanites are out in full force. Since the film is believed to be in a SharedUniverse with the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' series, one can assume that this futuristic technology was reverse engineered from Cybertronian technology. The fact that G.I. Joe is in the "near future" could be taken to mean that the Autobot-Decepticon conflict is already over, or at least no longer set on Earth. It could also be taken to mean that the Autobots have either taken it upon themselves repaired or at least helped to repair the damage done to the pyramids in Giza by Devastator in ''Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen'', during the ten years ten-year gap between both movies, as "Revenge of the Fallen" is set in 2009.



* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the only futuristic technology seems to be the technology to enter another person's dreamscape, but that is only used by a small number of people. Used ''constructively'' by a very small number of people. We get a brief glimpse of an "opium cave" where people go to have shared dreams in Mombasa - That pretty strongly implies that unless it's illegal, and if it is, it probably has a fair deal of recreational use in the Western world, as well.
* The 2006 Creator/AdamSandler film ''Film/{{Click}}'' takes place in 2006, 2007, 2017, 2023, and finally an unspecified date most likely in the 2030s [[spoiler: before going back to the present day]]. The world doesn't begin to look too different until the latest two.

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* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the only futuristic technology seems to be the technology to enter another person's dreamscape, but that is only used by a small number of people. Used people, and used ''constructively'' by a very ''very'' small number of people. We get a brief glimpse of an "opium cave" where people go to have shared dreams in Mombasa - That this pretty strongly implies that unless it's illegal, and if it is, it probably has a fair deal of recreational use in the Western world, as well.
* The 2006 Creator/AdamSandler film ''Film/{{Click}}'' takes place in 2006, 2007, 2017, 2023, and finally an unspecified date most likely in the 2030s [[spoiler: before going back to the present day]]. The world doesn't begin to look too different until the latest two.last two timeframes.



* The experimental film ''Film/SweetMovie'' is set in 1984 (ten years after the film's release) and much of the plot is driven by a show where the most pure woman in the world is found. It gets weirder from there.
* ''Film/{{Looper}}'' takes place in the year 2044, in an unnamed city in Kansas that looks very futuristic, but also suffers from massive poverty, rampant drug use, and the entire city is being run by criminals. Incidentally, the film is also being influenced from 2074, twenty minutes into ''their'' future because the crime syndicates of that era use time travel to send people they need killed back into the past where the eponymous Loopers kill them there, thus sidestepping the issue of 2074 nanite technology that makes killing people and disposing of bodies VERY difficult. Also, by 2044, one in ten people have the [[MindOverMatter TK]] gene, allowing them to levitate coins for a few seconds. And while it appears that weapons have gone ''backwards'', as loopers are only issued blunderbusses instead of something more practical, [[ThisLooksLikeAJobForAquaman for what they do the blunderbuss is extremely practical.]] It practically guarantees a kill per trigger pull at the range they're using it at while being almost useless for any other situation. That way the criminals running the scheme aren't arming a bunch of people with weapons that can be used against them.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' live action TV movie ''Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner'' takes place thirteen years after the series, which apparently takes place in TheNewTens [[ComicBookTime nowadays]], setting it somewhere in the 2020s. Nothing really seems out of the ordinary from the early 2010s.

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* The experimental film ''Film/SweetMovie'' is set in 1984 (ten years after the film's release) and much of the plot is driven by a show where contest to find the most pure purest woman in the world is found.world. It gets weirder from there.
* ''Film/{{Looper}}'' takes place in the year 2044, in an unnamed city in Kansas that looks very futuristic, but also suffers from massive poverty, poverty and rampant drug use, and the entire city is being run entirely by criminals. Incidentally, the film is also being influenced from 2074, twenty minutes into ''their'' future because the crime syndicates of that era use time travel to send people they need killed back into the past where the eponymous Loopers kill them there, them, thus sidestepping the issue of 2074 nanite technology that makes killing people and disposing of bodies VERY difficult. Also, by 2044, one in ten people have the [[MindOverMatter TK]] gene, allowing them to levitate coins for a few seconds. And while it appears that weapons have gone ''backwards'', as loopers Loopers are only issued blunderbusses instead of something more practical, [[ThisLooksLikeAJobForAquaman for what they do the blunderbuss is extremely practical.]] It practically guarantees a kill per trigger pull at the range they're using it at while being almost useless for in any other situation. That way the criminals running the scheme aren't arming a bunch of people with weapons that can be used against them.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' live action TV movie ''Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner'' takes place thirteen years after the series, which apparently takes place in TheNewTens [[ComicBookTime nowadays]], setting it somewhere in the 2020s. Nothing really seems out of the ordinary from for the early 2010s.



* ''Film/RobotAndFrank'' features versatile humanoid robots that serve as caretakers for the elderly and voice-activated television sets, but otherwise resembles the 2012 when it was released.

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* ''Film/RobotAndFrank'' features versatile humanoid robots that serve as caretakers for the elderly and voice-activated television sets, but otherwise resembles the 2012 when it was released.



* ''Disney/BigHero6'' provides the page image, and according to a sign detailing the 95th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge takes place sometime around 2032. San Fransokyo is shown being rife with massive turbine kites, highly advanced robotics (of which even Baymax stands out in comparison) to the point where illegal botfighting tournaments are commonplace and even [[spoiler:partially functionable wormhole technology]].

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* ''Disney/BigHero6'' provides the page image, and according to a sign detailing the 95th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge takes place sometime around 2032. San Fransokyo is shown being rife with massive turbine kites, highly advanced robotics (of which even Baymax stands out in comparison) to the point where illegal botfighting tournaments are commonplace and even [[spoiler:partially functionable functioning wormhole technology]].



* ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is set in 2022. However the causes of that particular dystopia, over population, over pollution and intense climate change are issues that are still relevant today, as opposed to its contemporaries fears of a nuclear holocaust.

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* ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is set in 2022. However However, the causes of that particular dystopia, over population, over dystopia--overpopulation, pollution and intense climate change are change--are issues that are still relevant today, as opposed to its contemporaries fears of a nuclear holocaust.today.



** A rather brilliant film adaptation of the novel was actually released in 1984, and it won the Best British Film of the Year award at the Evening Standard British Film Awards.

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** A rather brilliant film adaptation of the novel was actually released in 1984, and it won the Best British Film of the Year award at the Evening Standard British Film Awards.



* ''Literature/HouseOfTheScorpion'' is set sometime at a indeterminate date, where a country run by drug lords exists between Mexico (known as Aztlan in the book's universe) and the United States, cars can fly, human cloning is common place, computer chips are put into horses and people's brains to control them, and illegal immigration on the U.S.-Mexican border flows not just towards the north, but ''towards the south'' too.

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* ''Literature/HouseOfTheScorpion'' is set sometime at a an indeterminate date, where a country run by drug lords exists between Mexico (known as Aztlan in the book's universe) and the United States, cars can fly, human cloning is common place, commonplace, computer chips are put into horses and people's brains to control them, and illegal immigration on the U.S.-Mexican border flows not just towards the north, but ''towards the south'' too.



* Shepherd Mead's ''The Big Ball Of Wax'' (published in 1954) predicted that in 1999, {{Video Phone}}s would be common (though he failed to predict personal computers or the Internet, the things which made this very nearly right), TV sets would be wall-size and stereoscopic (we're still waiting...), videotapes would be widespread (he got that right too, though he thought they would be open-reel and didn't foresee [=DVDs=]), power transmission would be a reality and cars would thus be electric, contraceptive pills would be easily available (yes) and nearly all diseases eradicated (sadly, no), the Soviet Union would have fallen and Leningrad reverted to its old name of St. Petersburg (both yes)... and that XP would take over (he got that [[http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/ right -- sort of, anyway]], though ''his'' XP was E'''XP'''eriential Broadcasting, a way of recording and transmitting full-sensory material). Let's hope that the last one never comes true, or at least not the way Mead depicted it...

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* Shepherd Mead's ''The Big Ball Of Wax'' (published in 1954) predicted that in 1999, {{Video Phone}}s would be common (though he failed to predict personal computers or the Internet, internet, the things which made this very nearly right), TV sets would be wall-size and stereoscopic (we're still waiting...), videotapes would be widespread (he got that right too, though he thought they would be open-reel and didn't foresee [=DVDs=]), power transmission would be a reality and cars would thus be electric, contraceptive pills would be easily available (yes) and nearly all diseases eradicated (sadly, no), the Soviet Union would have fallen and Leningrad reverted to its old name of St. Petersburg (both yes)... and that XP would take over (he got that [[http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/ right -- sort of, anyway]], though ''his'' XP was E'''XP'''eriential Broadcasting, a way of recording and transmitting full-sensory material). Let's hope that the last one never comes true, or at least not the way Mead depicted it...



* John Birmingham's ''Literature/AxisOfTime'' trilogy is an interesting case as it's very difficult to tell if it is meant seriously or is a very deadpan parody of {{techno thriller}}s. The first volume was published in 2004 and it's (initially) set in a 2021 where everything that can go wrong with the "war on terror" has gone wrong, turning it into a full scale war of the west against Islam, and the allies act with as much brutality as the enemy (a sanctioned form of field punishment for the US forces is to put a Muslim enemy into a pig carcass and bury him or her alive). Probably the most ridiculous element is the predictions about technology, which include fusion reactors, artificial intelligence, military medical implants (which, amongst other things, reduce the soldiers' sex drive and dispense pain killers) and the routine use of vat grown replacement organs. This is all at least 20 years early.

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* John Birmingham's ''Literature/AxisOfTime'' trilogy is an interesting case as it's very difficult to tell if it is meant seriously or is a very deadpan parody of {{techno thriller}}s. The first volume was published in 2004 and it's (initially) set in a 2021 where everything that can go wrong with the "war on terror" has gone wrong, turning it into a full scale war of the west against Islam, and with the allies act acting with as much brutality as the enemy (a sanctioned form of field punishment for the US forces is to put a Muslim enemy into a pig carcass and bury him or her alive). Probably the most ridiculous element is the predictions about technology, which include fusion reactors, artificial intelligence, military medical implants (which, amongst other things, reduce the soldiers' sex drive and dispense pain killers) painkillers) and the routine use of vat grown vat-grown replacement organs. This is all at least 20 years early.



* The 2008 novel ''Literature/{{Neuropath}}'' is set at an unmentioned year in the future. 2010 is mentioned as a year gone by, government buildings have fMRI scanners at the entrances, Europe is freezing to death because the Gulf Stream has changed course and Moscow has been reduced to a crumbling wasteland. What the book focuses on is the hunt on a serial killer who {{mind control}}s his victims.

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* The 2008 novel ''Literature/{{Neuropath}}'' is set at in an unmentioned year in the future. 2010 is mentioned as a year gone by, government buildings have fMRI scanners at the entrances, Europe is freezing to death because the Gulf Stream has changed course and Moscow has been reduced to a crumbling wasteland. What the book focuses on is the hunt on a serial killer who {{mind control}}s his victims.



* James P Hogan's ''Giants'' novel series is based in 2030s (it has a character born in 1984 who is 40 something at the time of the events of the novel). The series has mankind going from weaponized to no weapons somewhere around 2020 and having manned missions as far out as Jupiter. [[spoiler:The remains of aliens (or our ancestors anyway)]] are discovered on the Moon, [[spoiler:real aliens]] are found on one of the moons of Jupiter, and [[spoiler:more aliens show up and later suffer from FishOutOfTemporalWater with their own race due to their mode of transportation]].

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* James P Hogan's ''Giants'' novel series is based in 2030s (it has a character born in 1984 who is 40 something 40-something at the time of the events of the novel). The series has mankind going from weaponized to no weapons somewhere around 2020 and having manned missions as far out as Jupiter. [[spoiler:The remains of aliens (or our ancestors anyway)]] are discovered on the Moon, [[spoiler:real aliens]] are found on one of the moons of Jupiter, and [[spoiler:more aliens show up and later suffer from FishOutOfTemporalWater with their own race due to their mode of transportation]].



* Carl Sagan's ''Literature/{{Contact}}'' was written in 1983 and set in the late 1990s. Sagan did not foresee the fall of the Soviet Union at the time of writing and the Soviets had a large role to play in the events. He also did not foresee the cell phone, as characters used pagers still. He did ambitiously have a character who solved the grand superunification theory (something that eludes us even today and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future)... And other human technologies that turned out to be beyond what eventuated in the late '90s, such as orbital space stations serving as retirement homes for those who wished to extend their lifespans and could afford it, and shuttle services to go between earth and station.

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* Carl Sagan's ''Literature/{{Contact}}'' was written in 1983 and set in the late 1990s. Sagan did not foresee the fall of the Soviet Union at the time of writing and the Soviets had a large role to play in the novel's events. He also did not foresee the cell phone, as characters used pagers still. He did ambitiously have a character who solved the grand superunification theory (something that eludes us even today and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future)... And other human technologies that turned out to be beyond what eventuated in had occurred by the late '90s, such as orbital space stations serving as retirement homes for those who wished to extend their lifespans and could afford it, and shuttle services to go between earth and station.



* ''Literature/TimeScout'' implies that it's this, but is functionally the same as NextSundayAD May be {{justified|Trope}} in that The Accident, a Class 0 ApocalypseHow, might have stunted things.

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* ''Literature/TimeScout'' implies that it's this, but is functionally the same as NextSundayAD NextSundayAD. May be {{justified|Trope}} in that The Accident, a Class 0 ApocalypseHow, might have stunted things.



* Creator/VernorVinge's cult-classic novella, "Literature/TrueNames", published in 1981, involved some ''very'' educated guesses about the short-term potentials of the personal computer. If this had been written fifteen years later, it would have been NextSundayAD.

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* Creator/VernorVinge's cult-classic novella, "Literature/TrueNames", published in 1981, involved some ''very'' educated guesses about the short-term potentials potential of the personal computer. If this had been written fifteen years later, it would have been NextSundayAD.



* Keith Nartman's ''Drew Parke'' books, both written in 2009 are set in the mid 2030s.

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* Keith Nartman's ''Drew Parke'' books, both written in 2009 2009, are set in the mid 2030s.



* Creator/NigelKneale's 1979 novelisation of the final ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'' story is set in a dystopian future UK plagued by social breakdown, fuel and food shortages and heavily-armed street gangs. The Soviet Union still exists and it vies with the US to spend billions on useless space projects. No date is given but clues in the text indicate that it is happening in 1990. Ironically, it turned out to be at least partially TruthInTelevision, as the Soviet Union ''did'' still exist in 1990, not having been broken until around 1991 Christmas. And the late Eighties ''were'' the scene of a last spat in UsefulNotes/TheSpaceRace. Social breakdown in the UK not so much.

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* Creator/NigelKneale's 1979 novelisation of the final ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'' story is set in a dystopian future UK plagued by social breakdown, fuel and food shortages and heavily-armed street gangs. The Soviet Union still exists and it vies with the US to spend billions on useless space projects. No date is given but clues in the text indicate that it is happening in 1990. Ironically, it turned out to be at least partially TruthInTelevision, as the Soviet Union ''did'' still exist in 1990, not having been broken up until around 1991 Christmas.Christmas 1991. And the late Eighties ''were'' the scene of a last spat in UsefulNotes/TheSpaceRace. Social breakdown in the UK not so much.



* ''Literature/LeftBehind'' takes place sometime in the present or near future, due to the idea that the Rapture could happen at any minute. The original series is [[{{Zeerust}} somewhat dated]] by the lack of cell-phones and widespread Internet access.
* ''Literature/FuturisticViolenceAndFancySuits'' has commonplace self driving cars, google glasses, and holograms, but otherwise most things seem pretty close to where they are today, technologically. The only stated date is mentioning that a classic car is from the 2020's, so it's set sometime after that.

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* ''Literature/LeftBehind'' takes place sometime in the present or near future, due to the idea that the Rapture could happen at any minute. The original series is [[{{Zeerust}} somewhat dated]] by the lack of cell-phones cellphones and widespread Internet access.
* ''Literature/FuturisticViolenceAndFancySuits'' has commonplace self driving self-driving cars, google glasses, and holograms, but otherwise most things seem pretty close to where they are today, technologically. The only date stated date is mentioning that when a classic car is said to be from the 2020's, so it's set sometime after that.




* ''Creator/JamesBlish'''s "Year 2018" (later incorporated in his ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'') : The Soviet Union still exists; [[UsefulNotes/JosephMcCarthy McCarthyism]] has become permanent and has turned the US into an Orwellian police state. There is a political dynasty that always wins. The US has colonies on Jupiter's moons but one of the characters complains how SLOWLY space exploration is progressing. The only remaining religious group is Evangelicals (not accurate in 2016 but it does fit the way the media tends to cover religion). The fact that a powerful Senator is from Alaska is considered a novelty.

* ''Literature/{{Remnants}},'' first published in 2001 and set in 2011, is on the low end of this. There are self-driving cars, and minors can "drive" alone in some states; kids can apparently legally change their names easily, or else have all just decided to use weird nicknames like "2Face" and "Mo'Steel"; and the ubiquitous use of "links" turned out to be a fairly close prediction of [[PhoneaholicTeenager cell-phone culture]]. Oh, and there's some ''very'' experimental [[HumanPopsicle hibernation technology]], but it's nowhere ''near'' safe enough for humans to use yet. Or wouldn't be, if book #1 didn't end with eighty humans having to blast off in a SleeperStarship to escape the Earth's destruction (thus rendering most of that other technology changes moot). About half wake up 500 years later, while the rest PassedInTheirSleep.

to:

\n* ''Creator/JamesBlish'''s "Year 2018" (later incorporated in his ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'') : The Soviet Union still exists; [[UsefulNotes/JosephMcCarthy McCarthyism]] has become permanent and has turned the US into an Orwellian police state. There is a political dynasty that always wins. The US has colonies on Jupiter's moons but one of the characters complains how SLOWLY space exploration is progressing. The only remaining religious group is Evangelicals (not accurate in 2016 but it does fit the way the media tends to cover religion). The fact that a powerful Senator senator is from Alaska is considered a novelty.

novelty.
* ''Literature/{{Remnants}},'' first published in 2001 and set in 2011, is on the low end of this. There are self-driving cars, and minors can "drive" alone in some states; kids can apparently legally change their names easily, or else have all just decided to use weird nicknames like "2Face" and "Mo'Steel"; and the ubiquitous use of "links" turned out to be a fairly close prediction of [[PhoneaholicTeenager cell-phone cellphone culture]]. Oh, and there's some ''very'' experimental [[HumanPopsicle hibernation technology]], but it's nowhere ''near'' safe enough for humans to use yet. Or wouldn't be, if book #1 didn't end with eighty humans having to blast off in a SleeperStarship to escape the Earth's destruction (thus rendering most of that the other technology technological changes moot). About half wake up 500 years later, while the rest PassedInTheirSleep. \n



* ''Series/BlackMirror'' a British sci-fi anthology show is often set in our world, just with some new technology some 20 minutes into the future. Much like the Twilight Zone, it explores modern anxiety with how technology is taking over our lives.
* ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' is the trope namer. The original TV movie was entitled ''Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future'' and the phrase was reused in the openings of the resultant TV series (which takes place in a different universe and begins with a shortened remake of the movie). The date the series takes place is never explicitly pinned down, but the teenage character Bryce Lynch's birthdate was given in the movie and series pilot as October 7, 1988.
** You can still smoke in public buildings. It's a federal offense to turn your TV off. This being cyberpunk, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-zyRlcMi4&fmt=13#t=320 there is an Internet,]] though it gets called "The System", and the way it's shown to work is [[ItsASmallNetAfterAll pretty thoroughly gonzo]]. There's no reality shows. [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan rules the business world]]. Network news is filmed on camcorders. There is still a Soviet Union, which has colonized part of the Third World.

to:

* ''Series/BlackMirror'' a British sci-fi anthology show is often set in our world, just with some new technology some 20 minutes into the future. Much like the ''The Twilight Zone, Zone'', it explores modern anxiety with how technology is taking over our lives.
* ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' is the trope namer. The original TV movie was entitled ''Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future'' and the phrase was reused in the openings opening sequence of the resultant TV series (which takes place in a different universe and begins with a shortened remake of the movie). The date the series takes place is never explicitly pinned down, but the teenage character Bryce Lynch's birthdate was given in the movie and series pilot as October 7, 1988.
** You can still smoke in public buildings. It's a federal offense to turn your TV off. This being cyberpunk, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-zyRlcMi4&fmt=13#t=320 there is an Internet,]] though it gets called "The System", and the way it's shown to work is [[ItsASmallNetAfterAll pretty thoroughly gonzo]]. There's There are no reality shows. [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan rules the business world]]. Network news is filmed on camcorders. There is still a Soviet Union, which has colonized part of the Third World.



* ''Series/DarkAngel'' made in 2000, takes place in 2019, with a backstory where in 2009 terrorists set off an {{EMP}}, turning the United States into a third world hellhole. Which keeps it from looking too dated, ''Dark Angel'' 2019 looks like regular 2019 except shittier. The only significant technological differences are the {{Transhuman}} people running around, and they were a secret project anyway, and the PoliceState flying drones that look very similar to real world drones.

to:

* ''Series/DarkAngel'' made in 2000, takes place in 2019, with a backstory where in 2009 terrorists set off an {{EMP}}, turning the United States into a third world hellhole. Which keeps it from looking too dated, dated; ''Dark Angel'' 2019 looks like regular 2019 except shittier. The only significant technological differences are the {{Transhuman}} people running around, and they were a secret project anyway, and the PoliceState flying drones that look very similar to real world drones.
16th Aug '17 8:39:32 PM Pastykake
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TheFuture, but not so far into it that you'd notice except for the abundance of AppliedPhlebotinum. This is often a linear extrapolation of national malaise or existing crises, so American works of the 1970s have endlessly skyrocketing crime and inner urban decay [[note]] true enough in places like Detroit, Michigan [[/note]] while the 1980s brought the notion that {{Mega Corp}}s and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan]] (especially [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Japanese megacorps]]) would rule the world (yes on the first count, no on the second). When the 1990s came around, the US economy recovered while the Japanese economy tanked; TheGreatPoliticsMessUp and subsequent collapse of many authoritarian communist regimes drastically changed the political picture of both the present and the future. Instead of criminal anarchy or corporate governance, there's a lot more focus on how technology has come to permeate everyday life and challenge long-held conceptions of the individual and society as a whole. And, of course, works in the '90s naturally assumed that from that point on the only murderous enemies Americans would have to worry about would be right-wing militia fanatics, [[TeensAreMonsters homicidal teenagers]], and maybe the occasional petty dictator - [[HarsherInHindsight but no one else]]. With the Turn of the Milennium and the New Tens, the issue seems to have become extreme Right-Wing dystopias and/or endless American Interventionalism in the Middle East and Central Asia, occasionally spreading into South America, Africa, or Southeast Asia.

Obviously, the setting of most FlashForward stories, though they usually don't make a big deal of it except as a minor joke. Of course, ScienceMarchesOn, so it's fun to watch 10 years later to see how wrong they got it. Television series are especially prone to this, as they tend to make use of various props, costumes, and effects that reflect the sensibilities of their time but [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece become increasingly dated over a long run.]]

to:

TheFuture, but not so far into it that you'd notice except for the abundance of AppliedPhlebotinum. This is often a linear extrapolation of national malaise or existing crises, so American works of the 1970s have endlessly skyrocketing crime and inner urban decay [[note]] true enough in places like Detroit, Michigan [[/note]] while whereas the 1980s brought the notion that {{Mega Corp}}s and [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan]] (especially [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Japanese megacorps]]) would rule the world (yes on the first count, no on the second). When the 1990s came around, the US economy recovered while the Japanese economy tanked; TheGreatPoliticsMessUp and subsequent collapse of many authoritarian communist regimes drastically changed the political picture of both the present and the future. Instead of criminal anarchy or corporate governance, there's a lot more focus on how technology has come to permeate everyday life and challenge long-held conceptions of the individual and society as a whole. And, of course, works in the '90s naturally assumed that from that point on the only murderous enemies Americans would have to worry about would be right-wing militia fanatics, [[TeensAreMonsters homicidal teenagers]], and maybe the occasional petty dictator - [[HarsherInHindsight but no one else]]. With the Turn of the Milennium and the New Tens, the issue seems to have become extreme Right-Wing dystopias and/or endless American Interventionalism in the Middle East and Central Asia, occasionally spreading into South America, Africa, or Southeast Asia.

Obviously, 20 Minutes into the Future is the setting of most FlashForward stories, though they usually don't make a big deal of it except as a minor joke. Of course, ScienceMarchesOn, so it's fun to watch 10 years later to see how wrong they got it. Television series are especially prone to this, as they tend to make use of various props, costumes, and effects that reflect the sensibilities of their time but [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece become increasingly dated over a long run.]]



See also NextSundayAD, which is completely indistinguishable from the present, but claims to be happening in the future anyway. How much AppliedPhlebotinum it takes to flip NextSundayAD into full-scale Twenty Minutes Into The Future is an interesting question, since many stories employing fictional technology are actually set in the ''present''. Can result in IWantMyJetpack if the writers set the work not sufficiently far into the future, and the year the work was set in comes in real life without any of the new technology it featured. Compare to UrbanFantasy as the magical version. Inverted by TwentyMinutesIntoThePast.

A good way to gauge whether or not a show takes place Twenty Minutes Into The Future: would much of the world's population at the time of filming still be alive by then?

to:

See also NextSundayAD, which is completely indistinguishable from the present, but claims to be happening in the future anyway. How much AppliedPhlebotinum it takes to flip NextSundayAD into full-scale Twenty Minutes Into The into the Future is an interesting question, since many stories employing fictional technology are actually set in the ''present''. Can result in IWantMyJetpack if the writers set the work not sufficiently far into the future, and the year the work was set in comes in real life without any of the new technology it featured. Compare to UrbanFantasy as the magical version. Inverted by TwentyMinutesIntoThePast.

A good way to gauge whether or not a show takes place Twenty Minutes Into The into the Future: would much of the world's population at the time of filming still be alive by then?
16th Aug '17 8:33:04 PM Pastykake
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->''"''VideoGame/SmashTV'' takes place in the grim, cold future of 1999, only a few short years after the conquest of Earth by the [[VideoGame/RevolutionX New Order Nation]]."''

to:

->''"''VideoGame/SmashTV'' ->''"''Smash TV'' takes place in the grim, cold future of 1999, only a few short years after the conquest of Earth by the [[VideoGame/RevolutionX New Order Nation]].Nation."''
6th Jul '17 12:03:38 PM bwburke94
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** All episodes set in "present day London" since ''Aliens in London'' take place a year after the airing date.
** WordOfGod, however, is that, since the 2008 Christmas Special was not contemporary (the Christmas stories otherwise being fixed points of reference for the date), the subsequent "present day" stories (''Planet of the Dead'' and ''The End of Time'') are set in the same year they originally aired -- ''The End of Time Part 1'' (Aired Christmas 2009) takes place one year to the day after ''Voyage of the Damned'' (Aired Christmas 2007)
** The first decade of the 21st century in ''Ahistory: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe'' makes interesting reading. The writer takes a deep breath and presents the CyberPunk near future of the 1990s [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse New Adventures novels]] and the PresentDay setting of the current series as happening at the same time, without further explanation.
*** [[TimeyWimeyBall Wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...]]
** Then there's the 2007 episode "Utopia" which takes place in the year 100000000000000 but depicts humans as using almost exclusively 21st century technology.
*** A lot can happen in 100 trillion years. We could have blown ourselves up, rebuilt, evolved, devolved, Ascended To A Higher Plane Of Existence, redone the history of humanity from scratch, etc., countless times.

to:

** All episodes set in "present the present day London" since ''Aliens in London'' from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens of London"]] to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], inclusive, take place a year after the airing date.
** WordOfGod, however,
date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] is that, since a tiny exception to the 2008 Christmas Special rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was not contemporary (the Christmas stories otherwise being fixed points of reference for the date), the subsequent "present day" stories (''Planet of the Dead'' and ''The End of Time'') are set after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the same year they originally it aired -- ''The End of Time Part 1'' (Aired Christmas 2009) takes place one year to but ''finished'' at the day after ''Voyage of the Damned'' (Aired Christmas 2007)
normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]]
** The first decade of the 21st century in ''Ahistory: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe'' makes interesting reading. The writer takes a deep breath and presents the CyberPunk near future of the 1990s [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse New Adventures novels]] and the PresentDay setting of the current series as happening at the same time, without further explanation.
***
explanation. [[TimeyWimeyBall Wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...]]
** Then there's the 2007 episode "Utopia" which takes place in the year 100000000000000 but depicts humans as using almost exclusively 21st century technology.
*** A lot can happen in 100 trillion years. We could have blown ourselves up, rebuilt, evolved, devolved, Ascended To A Higher Plane Of Existence, redone the history of humanity from scratch, etc., countless times.
]]
30th Jun '17 3:20:20 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Played with in the final content of [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft Cataclysm]]. The Hour of Twilight instance and the Dragon Soul raid both take place in modern Azeroth's Dragonblight, with Deathwing and the Old Gods laying siege to Wyrmrest Temple, but are both accessed through the Caverns of Time. Also, for obvious reasons regarding Wrath's content, non-instanced Dragonblight looks exactly the same. To any character it can seem like these two instances are set 20 minutes into Azeroth's future.

to:

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'': Played with in the final content of [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft Cataclysm]].''Cataclysm''. The Hour of Twilight instance and the Dragon Soul raid both take place in modern Azeroth's Dragonblight, with Deathwing and the Old Gods laying siege to Wyrmrest Temple, but are both accessed through the Caverns of Time. Also, for obvious reasons regarding Wrath's content, non-instanced Dragonblight looks exactly the same. To any character it can seem like these two instances are set 20 minutes into Azeroth's future.
30th Jun '17 3:17:47 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Each game in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series (with the exception of prequels) is set nearly a decade after the ones when they were released: the first ''VideoGame/MetalGear'', originally released in 1987, is set in the placeholder date of 199X (later established to be 1995 or '96, depending on the source), ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', released in 1990, is set in 1999; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', released in 1998, is set in 2005; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', released in 2001; is set in 2007 and '09; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', released in 2008, is set in 2014; ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', released in 2013, is set in between 2016 and '18.
** In Kojima's earlier game, ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}},'' the [[AfterTheEnd Catastrophe]] (an event which results in [[DepopulationBomb the deaths of 80% of the Eurasian population]]) occurs on June 6, 1991 in the Japanese versions (the first versions of the game were released for Japanese computers in 1988). Changed to 1996 (convenient due to the presence of a [[FauxSymbolism third 6 in its date]]) in the English Sega CD version released in 1994.
** ''VisualNovel/{{Policenauts}},'' the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Snatcher'' originally released in 1994, states that mankind's first fully functional space colony would be launched in 2010.

to:

* Each game in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' series (with the exception of prequels) is set nearly a decade after the ones when they were released: the first ''VideoGame/MetalGear'', ''VideoGame/MetalGear1'', originally released in 1987, is set in the placeholder date of 199X (later established to be 1995 or '96, depending on the source), ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'', released in 1990, is set in 1999; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', released in 1998, is set in 2005; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', released in 2001; is set in 2007 and '09; ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', released in 2008, is set in 2014; ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'', released in 2013, is set in between 2016 and '18.
** * In Kojima's earlier game, ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}},'' ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'', the [[AfterTheEnd Catastrophe]] (an event which results in [[DepopulationBomb the deaths of 80% of the Eurasian population]]) occurs on June 6, 1991 in the Japanese versions (the first versions of the game were released for Japanese computers in 1988). Changed to 1996 (convenient due to the presence of a [[FauxSymbolism third 6 in its date]]) in the English Sega CD version released in 1994.
** * ''VisualNovel/{{Policenauts}},'' the SpiritualSuccessor to ''Snatcher'' ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'' originally released in 1994, states that mankind's first fully functional space colony would be launched in 2010.



* ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2:'' Parts of the game are set in the year 2025. The major differences from the present day seen in-game include mass proliferation of [[AttackDrone combat drone technology]], weapons that are [[RareGuns prototypes]] today shown in common use, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld China having formed a multinational Strategic Defence Coalition that threatens world peace,]] commercially available VTOL aircraft, and a super-expensive resort city on a mobile, floating island. On the other hand, nightclubs on said island still play Music/{{Skrillex}}.
** The following game ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' is also set in a future time period but not in the same way as ''Black Ops II'' (since the setting of the game is a FallenStatesOfAmerica scenario, where UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates has struggled to remain intact following a devastating KillSat attack) so the technology is more reminiscent of a NextSundayAD. The 2014 ''Call of Duty,'' ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyAdvancedWarfare Advanced Warfare,]]'' embraces the trope even more than ''Black Ops II,'' featuring highly equipped PrivateMilitaryContractors using PoweredArmor exosuits that can scale walls, among other exotic technologies (appropriately set in 2054).
** ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Call of Duty: Black Ops III]]'' jumps forward to roughly the time of ''Advanced Warfare'' (2065) and we find soldiers with robotic augmentations and LeParkour enabling "Cyber Rigs," among other things. In this reality, autonomous defense systems have become so sophisticated that they cause a stalemate so national defense has returned to reliance on traditional foot soldier forces, hence the growth in robotic augmentation.

to:

* ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'':
**
''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2:'' Parts of the game are set in the year 2025. The major differences from the present day seen in-game include mass proliferation of [[AttackDrone combat drone technology]], weapons that are [[RareGuns prototypes]] today shown in common use, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld China having formed a multinational Strategic Defence Coalition that threatens world peace,]] commercially available VTOL aircraft, and a super-expensive resort city on a mobile, floating island. On the other hand, nightclubs on said island still play Music/{{Skrillex}}.
** The following game ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyGhosts'' is also set in a future time period but not in the same way as ''Black Ops II'' (since the setting of the game is a FallenStatesOfAmerica scenario, where UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates has struggled to remain intact following a devastating KillSat attack) so the technology is more reminiscent of a NextSundayAD. The 2014 ''Call of Duty,'' Duty'', ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyAdvancedWarfare Advanced Warfare,]]'' Warfare]]'', embraces the trope even more than ''Black Ops II,'' II'', featuring highly equipped PrivateMilitaryContractors using PoweredArmor exosuits that can scale walls, among other exotic technologies (appropriately set in 2054).
** ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Call of Duty: Black Ops III]]'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3'' jumps forward to roughly the time of ''Advanced Warfare'' (2065) and we find soldiers with robotic augmentations and LeParkour enabling "Cyber Rigs," Rigs", among other things. In this reality, autonomous defense systems have become so sophisticated that they cause a stalemate so national defense has returned to reliance on traditional foot soldier forces, hence the growth in robotic augmentation.
30th Jun '17 3:14:39 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemI'' was released in 1991 and takes place in 1997. Its setting looks somewhat futuristic while also retaining many elements from the late '80s and early '90s.
* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemII'' came out in 1993 and its opening shows a very futuristic city with a caption "NEO-L.A.: THE FUTURE". No year is given directly, but in the story, Duke says he defeated Dr. Proton[[note]]the villain in the original game[[/note]] "last year", which means the events in the game take place in 1998.
* ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' is placed in December 2007. It was released in 1996. It's kinda funny (sad) how [[VaporWare the sequel was promised to be out in 98]]...
** The sequel ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' looks like it could be more or less in the present day...but going by the fact that it's set during the run of the 67th President of the United States, that would set it at least in year 2104 up to year 2196. This is barring any previous Presidents leaving office early. Which [[spoiler: Number 67 does in a very violent way...]]
** Further muddled by the fact that, likely as yet another reference to the extreme time in development, everybody at the beginning of ''Forever'' refers to the events of ''3D'' as having taken place "twelve years ago", which would place ''Forever'' in 2019 or 2020.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DukeNukem'':
**
''VideoGame/DukeNukemI'' was released in 1991 and takes place in 1997. Its setting looks somewhat futuristic while also retaining many elements from the late '80s and early '90s.
* ** ''VideoGame/DukeNukemII'' came out in 1993 and its opening shows a very futuristic city with a caption "NEO-L.A.: THE FUTURE". No year is given directly, but in the story, Duke says he defeated Dr. Proton[[note]]the villain in the original game[[/note]] "last year", which means the events in the game take place in 1998.
* ** ''VideoGame/DukeNukem3D'' is placed in December 2007. It was released in 1996. It's kinda funny (sad) how [[VaporWare the sequel was promised to be out in 98]]...
** The sequel ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'' looks like it could be more or less in the present day...but going by the fact that it's set during the run of the 67th President of the United States, that would set it at least in year 2104 up to year 2196. This is barring any previous Presidents leaving office early. Which [[spoiler: Number 67 does in a very violent way...]]
**
]] Further muddled by the fact that, in what's likely as yet another reference to the extreme time in development, game's extremely long development time, everybody at the beginning of ''Forever'' refers to the events of ''3D'' as having taken place "twelve years ago", which would place ''Forever'' in 2019 or 2020.



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'' took place 'in the near future'. 3 hints to its time were given, yet they all contradict each other. The manual states "3 weeks into the future" while entries on the official website are dated 2013. As if that wasn't enough to throw you off, a DJ on the radio states "The millennium's a' commin'!". There wasn't much future technology to be seen, although a few examples exist - one of the weapons is an [[ShockAndAwe electric arc gun]] and one of the gangs is hinted to use {{Expendable Clone}}s as mooks.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'':
**
''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'' took place 'in the near future'. 3 hints to its time were given, yet they all contradict each other. The manual states "3 weeks into the future" while entries on the official website are dated 2013. As if that wasn't enough to throw you off, a DJ on the radio states "The millennium's a' commin'!". There wasn't much future technology to be seen, although a few examples exist - one of the weapons is an [[ShockAndAwe electric arc gun]] and one of the gangs is hinted to use {{Expendable Clone}}s as mooks.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture