History Main / TravelingAtTheSpeedOfPlot

21st Apr '16 2:09:54 AM Korodzik
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* First two seasons of ''Roleplay/TheMassiveMultiFandomRPG'' take place in a city which keeps randomly shifting its layout when no one is looking. This is highly convenient for the players, as no matter where the characters are, they can immediately arrive anywhere else as quickly or as slowly as desired.
* The ''Roleplay/CityOfLostCharacters'' roleplay, being a SpiritualSuccessor to ''The Massive Multi-Fandom RPG'', also takes place in an ever-shifting city with similar benefits for the players.
20th Apr '16 10:15:36 AM WarriorSparrow
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** The fanfic ''Fanfic/{{Intercom}}'' theorizes this is because the Mind World operates on slight NarniaTime or YearOutsideHourInside, with things in Headquarters happening immediately (and by extension the Islands since they're linked to it_ while everything else moves slower in comparison.
20th Mar '16 4:55:38 AM jboone93
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[[quoteright:247:[[{{WebComic/Comedity}} http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/125.png]]]]

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20th Mar '16 4:55:38 AM jboone93
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19th Mar '16 7:24:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* Happens constantly in all versions of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', driving hard-core fans nuts because the mechanical capabilities of the warp drive, impulse drive, and the shuttles vary violently from episode to episode. When the first ''Star Trek'' role-playing game came out, this characteristic was written into the rules. Unlike most science fiction {{RPG}}s, no maps with star systems, distances, and travel times was provided. The instructions specified that all this information should be made up according to the requirements of whatever adventure was being run.
** Also, turbolifts. Fast enough to throw people around when slowing or changing direction with inertial dampeners off, yet take long enough for a decent-length conversation (although they do typically hold them in the shaft if they are going to have a long one).
*** The record holder must be the TOS episode''The Enterprise Incident'' in which Spock and the Romulan Captain take the turbolift from the Bridge (Deck 1) to Deck 2 and have time for a minute-long conversation.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
**
Happens constantly in all versions of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', versions, driving hard-core fans nuts because the mechanical capabilities of the warp drive, impulse drive, and the shuttles vary violently from episode to episode. When the first ''Star Trek'' role-playing game came out, this characteristic was written into the rules. Unlike most science fiction {{RPG}}s, no maps with star systems, distances, and travel times was provided. The instructions specified that all this information should be made up according to the requirements of whatever adventure was being run.
** Also, turbolifts. Turbolifts. Fast enough to throw people around when slowing or changing direction with inertial dampeners off, yet take long enough for a decent-length conversation (although they do typically hold them in the shaft if they are going to have a long one).
***
one). The record holder must be the TOS episode''The episode "The Enterprise Incident'' Incident" in which Spock and the Romulan Captain take the turbolift from the Bridge (Deck 1) to Deck 2 and have time for a minute-long conversation.



*** In defense of ''Enterprise'', they weren't ''supposed'' to use the same warp speed equation as TNG onward -- the in-universe justification in the manual where the warp speed equation could be found for why the TOS Enterprise went above warp 10 more than once while in TNG warp 10 was ''by definition'' impossible was that the warp speed equation had been recalibrated between TOS and TNG. The problem being that ''even by the retconned pre-TNG scale'' Qo'noS still really shouldn't be as close at Warp 5 as ''Enterprise's'' travel speeds indicated.



* When there's time, it takes days to cross the island on ''Series/{{Lost}}''. In other episodes the Losties seem to be able to get anywhere they need to be in an hour or two. Of course, [[TimeyWimeyBall time]] and [[GeniusLoci geography]] are a little wonky on the island.

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* ''Series/{{Lost}}'':
**
When there's time, it takes days to cross the island on ''Series/{{Lost}}''.island. In other episodes the Losties seem to be able to get anywhere they need to be in an hour or two. Of course, [[TimeyWimeyBall time]] and [[GeniusLoci geography]] are a little wonky on the island.



** The trope was played agonizingly straight in the original ''Galactica'', where the fleet explicitly travelled at a ''maximum'' of "lightspeed" -- and usually slower since not all ships could manage that pace -- and yet they passed through at least three different galaxies in the course of the series. Although that's as much bad research as Speed of Plot.

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** * The trope was played agonizingly straight in the original ''Galactica'', ''Series/BattlestarGalactica1978'', where the fleet explicitly travelled at a ''maximum'' of "lightspeed" -- and usually slower since not all ships could manage that pace -- and yet they passed through at least three different galaxies in the course of the series. Although that's as much bad research as Speed of Plot.



* ''Series/{{Space 1999}}'' was based on the idea that Earth's moon (which was occupied by the 300 occupants of Moonbase Alpha) was blasted out of orbit by a massive explosion and sent hurtling through space. There was never any suggestion that the moon was traveling faster than light but it passed through numerous star systems during the two years of the series. Even more magically; while the moon manages to travel between stars in little time between episodes, it also travels slow enough during episodes to allow Eagles to shuttle people between Moonbase and any nearby planets.
** However, some episodes feature the moon going through space/time warps, which sends the Alphans across a whole lot of light years. Also, the first season features a loose StoryArc where a "cosmic intelligence" is manipulating the moon's departure from Earth and later journey.

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* ''Series/{{Space 1999}}'' was based on the idea that Earth's moon (which was occupied by the 300 occupants of Moonbase Alpha) was blasted out of orbit by a massive explosion and sent hurtling through space. There was never any suggestion that the moon was traveling faster than light but it passed through numerous star systems during the two years of the series. Even more magically; while the moon manages to travel between stars in little time between episodes, it also travels slow enough during episodes to allow Eagles to shuttle people between Moonbase and any nearby planets.
**
planets. However, some episodes feature the moon going through space/time warps, which sends the Alphans across a whole lot of light years. Also, the first season features a loose StoryArc where a "cosmic intelligence" is manipulating the moon's departure from Earth and later journey.



* In the second season of ''Series/GameOfThrones'', Littlefinger was given his own AdaptationExpansion sideplot which consists of him travelling to talk to various people throughout Westeros. His appearances are somewhat sporadic, causing him to travel hundreds of miles in between single episodes. Of course, the show deliberately avoids telling how much time has passed, and it's implied in dialogue that season 2 covered about a year in-universe, so it's entirely reasonable that Littlefinger could travel where he travelled in reasonable time.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
**
In the second season of ''Series/GameOfThrones'', season, Littlefinger was given his own AdaptationExpansion sideplot which consists of him travelling to talk to various people throughout Westeros. His appearances are somewhat sporadic, causing him to travel hundreds of miles in between single episodes. Of course, the show deliberately avoids telling how much time has passed, and it's implied in dialogue that season 2 covered about a year in-universe, so it's entirely reasonable that Littlefinger could travel where he travelled in reasonable time.
3rd Jan '16 1:28:17 AM jormis29
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* Warp travel in ''{{Warhammer 40000}}'' is notoriously [[TimeyWimeyBall prone to messing with the timestream]], meaning that depending on the story, author or requirements a warp-traveller might (assuming that they don't get lost in a [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace roiling hell of pure emotion]]) end up arriving exactly in time, years early, decades late or [[spoiler:before they even set out on a rescue mission and end up [[StableTimeLoop broadcasting the doomed distress call that caused them to attempt the trip in the first place]].]]

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* Warp travel in ''{{Warhammer ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' is notoriously [[TimeyWimeyBall prone to messing with the timestream]], meaning that depending on the story, author or requirements a warp-traveller might (assuming that they don't get lost in a [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace roiling hell of pure emotion]]) end up arriving exactly in time, years early, decades late or [[spoiler:before they even set out on a rescue mission and end up [[StableTimeLoop broadcasting the doomed distress call that caused them to attempt the trip in the first place]].]]
18th Dec '15 11:23:48 PM nombretomado
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* In ''ShadowHeartsCovenant'', it takes you about five or six hours and a couple dungeons to travel from the game's real starting place in the Ardennes Forest to the first major destination, Wales, as the party travels through Paris and then has to find a ship willing to travel to Britain during the height of World War One. From Wales, the party instantly and effortlessly travels to its next destination... Florence, Italy.

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* In ''ShadowHeartsCovenant'', ''VideoGame/ShadowHeartsCovenant'', it takes you about five or six hours and a couple dungeons to travel from the game's real starting place in the Ardennes Forest to the first major destination, Wales, as the party travels through Paris and then has to find a ship willing to travel to Britain during the height of World War One. From Wales, the party instantly and effortlessly travels to its next destination... Florence, Italy.
17th Dec '15 4:42:47 AM Geoduck
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'''Yzma''': I... ''[looks confused]'' How did we, Kronk?\\
'''Kronk''': ''[[[BreakingTheFourthWall pulls down the map from the montage]]]'' You got me. By all accounts it doesn't make sense.\\

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'''Yzma''': I... '''Yzma''': ... ''[looks confused]'' How did ''did'' we, Kronk?\\
'''Kronk''': ''[[[BreakingTheFourthWall pulls down the map from the montage]]]'' You Ya got me. By all accounts it doesn't make sense.\\
14th Dec '15 11:07:31 AM Slave
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* Warp travel in ''{{Warhammer 40000}}'' is notoriously [[TimeyWimeyBall prone to messing with the timestream]], meaning that depending on the story, author or requirements a warp-traveller might (assuming that they don't get lost in a [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace roiling hell of pure emotion]]) end up arriving exactly in time, years early, decades late or [[spoiler:before they even set out on a rescue mission and end up [[StableTimeLoop broadcasting the doomed distress call that caused them to attempt the trip in the first place]].]]
6th Dec '15 4:10:57 PM StFan
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* TheFlash consistently shows the ability to move faster than light and there are only negative effects of high speeds (sonic boom, becoming super massive) when he wants them. In one infamous case, he evacuated the entire population of a city to save them from a nuclear bomb...''after the bomb had detonated'', carrying half a million people to safety 35 miles away ''one at a time'' in the span of ''0.00001 microseconds''. He can also tap into a cosmic force called the Speed Force that allows him to control the physics of movement at will- which [[FridgeLogic begs the question]] of why he has any trouble handling normal-speed foes, though. Or for that matter, how he has any trouble handing ''anything'' short of reality-warpers.
* ''HsuAndChan'' {{lampshaded}} this. The protagonists declare that they're going to go to the park. In the next panel, they're in the park. Hsu says "One Panel! That was fast!" before moving onto other matters.

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* TheFlash consistently shows the ability to move faster than light and there are only negative effects of high speeds (sonic boom, becoming super massive) when he wants them. In one infamous case, he evacuated the entire population of a city to save them from a nuclear bomb...''after the bomb had detonated'', carrying half a million people to safety 35 miles away ''one at a time'' in the span of ''0.00001 microseconds''. He can also tap into a cosmic force called the Speed Force that allows him to control the physics of movement at will- will -- which [[FridgeLogic begs the question]] of why he has any trouble handling normal-speed foes, though. Or for that matter, how he has any trouble handing ''anything'' short of reality-warpers.
* ''HsuAndChan'' {{lampshaded}} this. The protagonists declare that they're going to go to the park. In the next panel, they're in the park. Hsu says "One Panel! That was fast!" before moving onto other matters.
reality-warpers.



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* ''ComicStrip/HsuAndChan'' {{lampshaded}} this. The protagonists declare that they're going to go to the park. In the next panel, they're in the park. Hsu says "One Panel! That was fast!" before moving onto other matters.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]Animation]]



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action TV]]
[[folder:Live-Action TV]]



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